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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 10, 2021 10:00am-10:31am BST

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this is bbc world news, our top stories... britain's tyson fury defends his heavyweight title against american deontay wilder, with an 11th round knockout in las vegas. uk business secretary kwasi kwarteng defends the government's handling of the energy crisis after suppliers said the system of having a cap on prices was not fit for purpose. i think it is a critical situation. clearly i am speaking to the industry as you said all the time and high gas prices have quadrupled this year and are making an impact and that is why as you say speaking to people, listening and trying to work out a way forward. pay up to stop illegal migrants —
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the french government tells the uk to keep to its side of a deal to police the channel. taiwan's president uses the island's national day to issue a strong response to a speech by china's leader, who warned the two would have to unify. and scientists warn that the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into "ecological meltdown". hello and welcome to bbc news. tyson fury has knocked out deontay wilder to retain his title as wbc heavy weight champion of the world. fury knocked out wilder in the 11th round of the trilogy fight in las vegas. fury has now extended his undefeated professional record to 32 fights. well, our sport correspondent ade adedoyin was watching the fight in las vegas and gave us this assessment. it was a brilliant fight, this will go down as one of the great nights
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in heavyweight boxing history. and the rivalry between deontay wilder and tyson fury will go down as one of the greatest in history as well. there have been some great fights, the likes of muhammad ali and joe fraser, they had three bouts, three good bouts. the second, though, was not anything really to write about, but as far as deontay wilder and tyson fury are concerned, every bout they have had has been better than the previous. there was so much hype in the build up to this fight because of the rivalry between the pair. there is no love lost between them. not particularly respectful of each other, there was a lot of abuse sent either way from both fighters, but the fight more than lived up to expectation and they had five knock—downs in this fight, it was incredible. at one moment, it looked like one fighter was about to win, only for the other to rally back. fury finally won it in the 11th round, as you say, with a knockdown and it ends what is a brilliant trilogy emphatically. i caught up with fury as he was making his way out of the arena and he acknowledged it was one of the greatest nights of his career so far. there were some shaky moments in there but i never lost faith and i continued on and i carried on and persevered and got
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that single punch knockout. as soon as i landed and jumped on the ropes, i knew it was over, he was not getting back up from that. it was a great trilogy. you need a good dance partner for trilogies and wilder has been a good dance partner. but there is no rematch clause. it is actually done. wilder is done, there is no more deontay wilder. a deserved rest for tyson fury now but i think the long—term goal will be to win all the belts in the heavyweight division. oleksandr usyk has the other belt after dethroning anthonyjoshua. they will have a rematch next year. tyson fury�*s promoter, frank warren, said the end goal will be to perhaps challenge the winner of that bout sometime in the autumn next year. they both have to get, as you say, the rematch with usyk and joshua, so that will take place and whoever wins wins and they will have the bout and then maybe we can make the winner of that fight. and as you say, regarding dillian whyte, i don't know what the wbc, which is the belt titleholders, are going to do, but i think dillian whyte is fighting wallin first and that is no easyjob, so that will be interesting.
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so there will be some options and we will look at them, but there is no rush. he needs some time out now and whatever he wants to do is what we will do. in terms of a unification bout, realistically, when do you think that will happen? it could not happen, i don't think, until autumn, maybe this time next year, because obviously i think they are talking about putting that fight sometime in march, so they will need six months after that, so that is when it would happen. it would be an ideal world for anthonyjoshua not to go for the rematch and we could go straight to it. i think the unification bout is one for the future, but for now, i think tyson fury will have a well deserved rest. he put in a really good performance and he said something on stage in the press conference afterwards and he said i always find a way to win. his issues with alcohol and drugs in the past have been well—documented, his battle with mental health and he said i have been down and out but i always find a way to come back
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and in a lot of ways he showed that tonight in this bout against deontay wilder because when he went down in the fourth round, there was a look in his eyes that i thought he will not make it, but he did, he found a way to win. brilliant, brilliant performance by him and as i say, his long—term goal now would be to unify the division and finish his career as the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world. let's talk to former boxing promoter kellie maloney managed lennox lewis to the undisputed heavyweight championship of the world, she was watching the fight. you think you sew potential new undisputed heavyweight champion of the world in action at last night? i certainly saw the best heavyweight there is and due to the politics, thatis there is and due to the politics, that is the only thing that could stop him from becoming the undisputed heavyweight champion, because it is not always about the best in the ring, it is the politics and outside the ring that count as
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well. but we saw what is probably a masterclass performance by tyson fury and 2—macro great warriors are giving everything they had and giving everything they had and giving everything they had and giving everything in the ring and thatis giving everything in the ring and that is heavyweight boxing at its best. ~ ., ., ., best. we were hearing from our correspondent _ best. we were hearing from our correspondent who _ best. we were hearing from our correspondent who said - best. we were hearing from our correspondent who said that. best. we were hearing from our i correspondent who said that after the match, tyson fury said i always find a way to win a. i have been down and out, but i always find a way back and if anyone has been down and out, he really has been through the mill. he was out of boxing for more than two years because of his personal issues. what does it do you think on him at that means he keeps coming back and doing even better? i think it isjust his determination, think it is just his determination, his heart and he does it. he is proud of what he has achieved for his community, he is proud of it being the world champion and he has overcome so much, notjust
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physically but mentally as well and i think that is so important. he must be one of the strongest people i have ever met, mentally and physically, because in the first fight he was beaten, but he came off the canvas and again yesterday, had to come off in that fourth round? and even in the 10th round he got caught and still came back in the 11th round to show that he is the supreme heavyweight out there. the ukrainian may hold all the other belts, but to me tyson fury is the best heavyweight champion at the moment out there. i best heavyweight champion at the moment out there.— best heavyweight champion at the moment out there. i think i saw that ou said moment out there. i think i saw that you said watching _ moment out there. i think i saw that you said watching that _ moment out there. i think i saw that you said watching that match - moment out there. i think i saw that you said watching that match made. you said watching that match made you said watching that match made you fall in love with boxing again, is that true? figs you fall in love with boxing again, is that true?— is that true? as a spectator. i do not want to _ is that true? as a spectator. i do not want to go — is that true? as a spectator. i do not want to go back _ is that true? as a spectator. i do not want to go back to _ is that true? as a spectator. i do | not want to go back to promoting, is that true? as a spectator. i do i not want to go back to promoting, i do not like the politics of boxing, but as a spectator that was one of the fights and if you have not watched it you had to watch it, it was like watching live theatre but with a lot of blood. in was like watching live theatre but with a lot of blood.—
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with a lot of blood. in terms of those next _ with a lot of blood. in terms of those next steps, _ with a lot of blood. in terms of those next steps, and - with a lot of blood. in terms of those next steps, and you - with a lot of blood. in terms of l those next steps, and you talked about the politics are becoming undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the people who are not massive boxing fans and do not understand, that means holding the four belts simultaneously and since there have been four belts to unify it to become undisputed heavyweight champion, there have only been five titleholders of that. what are the obstacles and do you think he can overcome them? there is obviously the rematch clause with anthony joshua the rematch clause with anthony joshua . . ~ the rematch clause with anthony joshua ., ., ~ ., ~ joshua that frank was talking about and with dili _ joshua that frank was talking about and with dili and _ joshua that frank was talking about and with dili and white _ joshua that frank was talking about and with dili and white that - joshua that frank was talking about and with dili and white that frank l and with dili and white that frank was talking about. lennox lewis became undisputed heavyweight champion and i think 1999, but we are stripped of all of the belts within a few months because of they just came on top. —— and with dillian whyte. all they were interested in was the money, they do
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not really respect boxing as a sport, to have won the champion is one of the greatest things for the boxing world and would do boxing good. it boxing world and would do boxing aood. , . boxing world and would do boxing iood, , ., ., boxing world and would do boxing ood. , ., ., ., ~ ., ,., good. it is great to talk to you, thank you _ good. it is great to talk to you, thank you for— good. it is great to talk to you, thank you forjoining _ good. it is great to talk to you, thank you forjoining us. - good. it is great to talk to you, thank you forjoining us. thank| good. it is great to talk to you, - thank you forjoining us. thank you. the uk business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, has defended the government's handling of the energy crisis after several suppliers described the price cap system for regulating household bills as "not fit for purpose". megan paterson reports. the cost of switching on is mounting up. the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, says the government's priority is protecting customers, and describes the price cap as a non—negotiable safety net, shielding people from worrying increases over christmas. it comes after suppliers criticised the price cap system as being not fit for purpose. energy experts say that while it does provide reassurance for customers worried about paying their household bills, the protection won't last forever.
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the price cap actually won't move until the beginning of april. so that period, i think, it is helpful, it gives people peace of mind, and we need to, you know, we need to lock that in. i think then it does create uncertainty going into april. all of the forecasts suggest there will be quite a significant increase to the price cap at that time. so we need to be very mindful of that, and people need to budget accordingly. for businesses, though, there is no price cap, and mr kwarteng gives no indication of how government might seek to ease pressure for those unable to scale back their usage. some already warning higher energy bills will mean increases in the price customers pay for goods. talks with energy—intensive industries are expected to continue this week after calls for urgent government intervention. this comes as strain on supply chains continues to grow. the government has confirmed intensive training courses for hgv drivers will be opened to a further 2,000 people, although those taking part will not qualify until after christmas.
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labour said it was a drop in the ocean compared to what was required. megan paterson, bbc news. 12 energy suppliers have gone bust in the uk so far this year. the big six companies have called for the energy price cap to be lifted. 0ver energy price cap to be lifted. 0ver energy is the third largest company with 4.5 energy is the third largest company with 11.5 million customers. its founder says the government needs to find a fair way to help both suppliers and consumers. when you look at whether _ suppliers and consumers. when you look at whether it _ suppliers and consumers. when you look at whether it is _ suppliers and consumers. when you look at whether it is taxpayers - suppliers and consumers. when you look at whether it is taxpayers or i look at whether it is taxpayers or consumers money, there will need to be a higher price we pay for energy over time. be a higher price we pay for energy overtime. i be a higher price we pay for energy over time. i think probably what is best for consumers is to see that this moved out. it is not that we can magically subsidise or make energy cheaper, but it is a good idea for that to be smoothed out so hassles can prepare for it. if you talk about the consumer is paying, what that really means is everyone is paying the same and what that means is that lower income
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households end up paying a disproportionately higher amount. if we pay through the tax system, which is a progressive system, wealthy people in society and paying more. speaking on the andrew marr programme in the past few minutes, the uk business secretary denied newspaper reports. he said he was working with industry is to find a solution. what he said he was working with industry is to find a solution.— is to find a solution. what we are ”rovidin is to find a solution. what we are providing is _ is to find a solution. what we are providing is a _ is to find a solution. what we are providing is a huge _ is to find a solution. what we are providing is a huge amount - is to find a solution. what we are providing is a huge amount of. providing is a huge amount of support, as we have done over many years with the energy intensive users scheme that we spot in the industry and the other thing i would say about this is that only this summer, we had an issue about extending the steel safeguards and it worked closely with treasury colleagues and the department for international trade colleagues to extend those safeguards and as you know, i am very focused on protecting our industry. the french authorities are calling on the british government to honour its promise to pay them
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more than £50 million to help them try to stop migrants crossing the english channel in small boats. hundreds of people have made the journey in the past two days, leading to tension between france and the uk. simonjones reports. on a visit to calais, the french interior minister meets the officers on the frontline in the battle to stop migrants crossing the channel. some of their work is funded by the british taxpayer. injuly, home secretary priti patel promised an extra £54 million to double the number of patrols on the beaches in northern france and to pay for increased surveillance. but mr darmanin says that cash has yet to come. translation: the british - government has not yet paid us what they promised us. at the moment not a single euro has been handed over by the british, following the deal that i negotiated several months ago with priti patel. the english are an honourable nation, and i'm sure it's just a small delay and they will keep their promise. priti patel recently threatened to withhold the money if the french authorities didn't prevent more crossings.
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france says it's now stopping 65% of those who attempt to set off. but hundreds of migrants have reached the uk on small boats in the past two days, including children and a baby. that brings the total for this year to around 18,000 people. the number arriving by lorry, though, is comparatively small — around 850 people detected between january and august. and overall, asylum claims fell by 4% in the past year. both britain and france agree that the dangerous journeys must be stopped, but there's no consensus on the best way to achieve this. the home office has said it's doing everything it can to support the french response and to target the criminals organising the crossings. simon jones, bbc news. just days after the prime minister said he does not support calls to make misogyny a hate crime, the observer newspaper is reporting the debate about women's safety is causing tension between boris johnson and the home secretary priti patel. policing of crimes against women has come under scrutiny
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since the killings of sarah everard and sabina nessa. i've been speaking to our political correspondent ione wells. that is right, the observer today is reporting there are some tensions over whether or not a new offence would be needed to tackle public sexual harassment and this taps into this wider question, an ongoing live debate about whether any new legislation is needed to tackle male violence against women. firstly, there are calls from mps across the political spectrum to make misogyny a hate crime, which would mean if any harassment or assault was deemed to be due to misogyny, judges could get further sentencing powers and punishment could be more severe as a result. the home office have also said that they are looking at whether there are any gaps in existing laws to tackle violence against women as well. one of the things they are looking at is any kind of need for a specific offence against public sexual harassment, so behaviour making people feel unsafe in public spaces, particularly at night,
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but that comes against this backdrop as we know of the fact that the prime minister days ago told the bbc he is not in favour of any kind of further legislation to tackle male violence against women, saying the current legislation was sufficient and he said adding anything more to what the police needed to do would not tackle the problem in his view. so this is certainly not a debate that is going away. the government is under pressure to try and notjust vocally condemn the terrible scenes we have seen and terrible incidents in the last couple of months of violence against women but actually show they are taking action to counter it. the question though being will they introduce any of these new laws? the public sexual harassment law in particular which the observer has reported on today is something that has been supported by a number of conservative mps in borisjohnson's government, people like the justice minister, also chair of parliament's committee on women and equality.
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tyson fury has knocked out deontay wilder to retain his title as wbc heavy weight champion of the world. 0ur our top stories... the business secretary defends the government's handling of the energy crisis after suppliers are said the system of having a cap on prices was not fit for purpose. and pay up to stop illegal migrants, the french government tells the uk to keep to its side of the deal to police the channel. 15 people have been killed in a plane crash in russia. luminary reports suggest four people survived when the light aircraft came down nearly a thousand metres from moscow to stop the plane is said to have been owned by a local flying club. taiwan's president has issued a strong response to a speech by china's leader xi jinping, who has warned that taiwan would have to unify with mainland china. tensions across the region have been rising in recent weeks, as mark lobel reports.
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taiwan's national day celebrations, a visual show of defiance after rising tensions with china, which views the island as a breakaway province. taiwan disagrees, with a pledge to defend its sovereignty and democracy. taiwan's president, tsai ing—wen, said she was hoping for an easing of relations and would not act rashly, but insisted taiwanese people would not bow to pressure. tensions have been rising after around a record 150 chinese warplanes made incursions into taiwan's air defence zone, includingjets, bombers and spy planes, injust four days. on saturday, china marked the 110th anniversary of a 1911 revolution which saw the last chinese imperial dynasty toppled.
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china's president said reunification with taiwan should be achieved, adding chinese people had a glorious tradition of opposing separatism. translation: national reunification by peaceful means best serves - the interest of the chinese nation as a whole, which includes our compatriots in taiwan. the taiwan question is an internal matter for china. there should be no outside interference. far from an internal matter, this dispute has once again spilled out onto the global stage. beijing seems to think that right now is the moment where it needs to rattle it sabre and threaten taiwan even more. the united states, japan and the united kingdom of course recently completed some naval exercises with four aircraft carriers in waters approximate to taiwan and i think some of what china is doing is trying to show that it too has a capacity to threaten taiwan.
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two competing visions between the inevitability of unification and taiwan's vision that it will not be forced down a path it does not want to take. mark lobel, bbc news. the man regarded as the father of pakistan's nuclear programme, abdul qadeer khan, has died at the age of 85. the atomic scientist was hailed by many pakistanis as a national hero for making his country the first islamic nuclear power in 1998. he was notorious for having smuggled nuclear technology to states such as iran and north korea. he died in islamabad with lung problems after being admitted to hospital in august with covid—19. iraq faces an economic crisis and sectarian division. the president says the poll is an opportunity to
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rebuild a state. the taliban says it will observe a peace agreement negotiated with the united states last year. the announcement which includes a pledge to prevent al-qaeda from operating in afghanistan follows face—to—face talks with the us in the qatari capital, doha. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye is there. from the taliban's point of view, this is part of a series of efforts from the group to try to gain international recognition. they met with uk diplomats a few days ago. now they are meeting us officials and amir khan muttaqi, who is the acting foreign minister of the taliban—appointed government and who is leading the delegation here in doha. he has said they will also be meeting european officials soon and the reason they want to get international recognition is because it is directly linked to the unblocking of foreign funds into afghanistan, which have been frozen since the group seized control of the country. but muttaqi, speaking in doha, also said that they did not want anyone to interfere in the internal affairs of any country.
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they are speaking against the backdrop of girls not being allowed to go to secondary schools in most parts of afghanistan and women not being allowed to go to work. it is unclear whether the us would bring up those issues in these talks. the variety of plant and animal life in the uk is so depleted it could cause an ecological meltdown. scientists at the natural history museum say the uk has only 53% of its biodiversity left, well below the global average of 75%. helen briggs reports. the air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat. all rely on biodiversity, the variety of all plant and animal life on earth. but biodiversity is dwindling fast, because of us, with an estimated 1 million species at risk of extinction. the uk is no exception. it has just 53% of its biodiversity left, well below the global average
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of 75%, according to a new study from the natural history museum. researchers say there is little room for nature in a country where so much of the land has long been built upon or used for intensive agriculture. and they warned the world has lost so much natural biodiversity we risk an ecological meltdown, a future in which we can't rely on nature to provide the energy, food and timber we need. biodiversity is more than something that is beautiful to look at and that we love. it is also what provides us with so many of our basic needs. it is the foundation of our society. we have seen recently how disruptive it can be when supply chains breakdown. nature is at the base of our supply chains. the team from the natural history museum hope their data will help global
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leaders meeting for the un biodiversity conference next week. during a week of virtual talks hosted by china, negotiators will thrash out plans for protecting nature over the next ten years. none of the targets for the previous decade were met, and scientists say this is our last best chance for a sustainable future. helen briggs, bbc news. lebanon's electricity grid has shut down, leaving the entire country without power for the second weekend. officials say it's unlikely that supplies will resume before monday, amid an ongoing economic crisis. from beirut, here's our middle east correspondent anna foster. careful steps in the blackest of nights. for many, this is the reality of life now in lebanon. light and hope are in short supply.
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translation: the collector comes l at the end of each month to take i 300,000 lira from me and where is the electricity? there is no electricity. lebanon's national grid was already weak. when it works, it is only for one or two hours a day. but for the country's poorest, that is a vital lifeline. people here are dealing with crisis after crisis and whilst this blackout was not a surprise, it is just another thing to make an already difficult life even tougher. this is keeping the lights on for 300 flats. those who can pay for expensive private generators, but prices have doubled in the last month and they are getting harder to afford. some people, they text me and they can't, we do not have much money, we are helping them but it is difficult for us too. so without all of this and without you, people are in complete darkness? yes, unfortunately.
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a ship carrying fuel is on its way. it is another short—term solution to an enduring problem. lebanon's politicians are talking about answers, but this struggling country does not have time to waste. you are watching bbc news. hello, some autumn sunshine to come today. we started with thicker cloud to the south as a weather front pulled across southern england and east anglia. this afternoon, sunshine will become increasingly widespread. for scotland, strong westerly winds bringing in showers on the west coast and pulling them across the northern isles. gusty along the western coast. a strengthening wind in northern ireland
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and parts of northern england. light wind in the south and in the sunshine, temperatures up to 19 or 20. above average for the time of year. for the start of the new week, switching to a north—westerly air stream that will usher in cooler air to all areas. first thing on monday, a colder start. temperatures down in single figures. early rain pushing into western scotland. for much of the uk through the week ahead, the story will be a dry one. cooler than last week as temperatures move back to more average values for the time of year. for the week ahead, high pressure will always be keen to sit to the south of the uk and then we will see various fronts coming into play to the far north. from monday, rain across scotland. showers for the northern isles. the rain moving eastwards
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through the duration of the day. for northern ireland, much of england and wales, more spells of sunshine. temperatures in the high teens. gone are those highs of 20 degrees. tuesday, the front pivots and pushes cloud down the north sea coast. here, with the breeze off the north sea, it will feel i think on the chilly side. temperatures scratching around the double figures for the likes of newcastle and hull. towards the west, there should be decent spells of sunshine. and a high of 17 in cardiff. cooler along the north sea coast and also in aberdeen, a high of 11. looking further ahead into the week, we pick up a breeze off the land for newcastle and hull. that will warm things up on thursday. still a lot of fine weather to come through the rest of the week.
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the headlines. britain's tyson fury defends his heavyweight title against american deontay wilder, with an 11th round knockout in las vegas. uk business secretary kwasi kwarteng defends the government's handling of the energy crisis after suppliers said the system of having a cap on prices was not fit for purpose. i think it is a critical situation. i think it is a critical situation. i am speaking to industry is all the time. high gas prices, they have quadrupled, are making an impact. that is why i am speaking to people,
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listening and trying to find out

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