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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 10, 2021 9:30am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines. britain's tyson fury defends his heavyweight title against american deontay wilder, with an 11th round knockout in las vegas. business secretary kwasi kwarteng defends the government's handling of the energy crisis after suppliers said the system of having a cap on prices was not fit for purpose. pay up to stop illegal migrants, the french government tells the uk to keep to its side of a deal to police the channel. scientists warn that the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into �*ecological meltdown�*. time for a sport update.
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good morning. as we've been hearing, tyson fury has sensationally himself the wbc world heavyweight title by knocking out american deontay wilder in their third fight in las vegas. fury made a strong start putting wilder down in the third round but he came roaring back and put fury down twice. in the seventh, fury looked relentless and wilder exhausted. he lasted a few more rounds, before going down in the tenth and, in the eleventh, it was all over. so, the gypsy king retains the wbc belt, with two wins from three fights against wilder. without sounding too sharp and clever i place myself right on top of the pile. i believe i can beat anyone in history. any man born, i believe i have a good chance of
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beating him. there is always a way of beating tyson fury, you just have to knock me spark out and if you don't do that, i will win. i can say i am the best of my era. to football now, and scotland and england both moved closer to qualifying for the world cup after wins. one was more dramatic than the other as scotland scored in injury time to beat israel, while gareth southgate�*s side eased past andorra 5—0. but northern ireland's hopes of making it to qatar next year seem slim after defeat in switzerland. andy swiss rounds up the action. commentator: hampden park is absolutely bouncing! for scotland and their supporters, an evening of drama, but ultimately delight. they knew victory would put them in sight of a world cup play—off spot, yet it was their opponents israel who lead 2—1 at the break. after it, though, scotland came roaring back. lyndon dykes�* effort was initially ruled out because of a high boot, but after a var check, finally 2—2.
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could scotland find a winner? in the fourth minute of stoppage time, guess what? scott mctominay sending hampden park into pandemonium. a 3—2 win that could be crucial. it'll certainly be unforgettable. for northern ireland, it was a different story. their tricky trip to switzerland soon became even trickier. jamal sent off after a second yellow card for time wasting, and switzerland took advantage, as they eased to a 2—0 victory. northern ireland's hopes of a play—off spot now hanging by a thread. in andorra, meanwhile, a bit of history as kateryna monzul became the first woman to referee an england men's match — and it was one the visitors soon dominated. ben chilwell and bukayo saka put england in control by the break, and afterwards they cruised clear. further goals from tammy abraham and james ward—prowse before jack grealish rounded things off with his first england goal.
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a 5—0 win, and edging ever closer to world cup qualification. andy swiss, bbc news. manchester united missed an opportunity to beat rivals manchester city for the first time in the women's super league yesterday. a dramatic derby ended 2—all at leigh sports village, leaving last year's runners up city 9th in the table with united currently third ahead of today's fixtures. city had georgia stanway sent off in the first half, but still managed to take the lead throuthamaican international khadija shaw. however, they could only hold on for so long as united levelled after the break and then went ahead through alessia russo. but, despite having just 10 on the pitch, city equalised when ellen white tapped in from jess park's shot. i think if it had stayed ii
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i think if it had stayed 11 versus 11 i am confident we would have won. ii i am confident we would have won. we had good chances. made a great block on the line. mary made a great save. even when we went to 10 men, scored the goal and there was a good chance at the back post potentially to go 2— 0 up. it was a roller—coaster today and when you potentially are staring at loss of being too — i down, on top of that, you have to say, reluctantly, it is a fair point. manchester city close the spaces and attack _ manchester city close the spaces and attack. lauren hemp. ellen white was brought— attack. lauren hemp. ellen white was brought on_ attack. lauren hemp. ellen white was brought on to do the same. they are a counterattacking team, too. if you -ive a counterattacking team, too. if you give away _ a counterattacking team, too. if you give away too many half opportunities... it is being patient _ opportunities... it is being patient. the fact we were patient. we have _ patient. the fact we were patient. we have to — patient. the fact we were patient. we have to be more decisive in the box _ we have to be more decisive in the box that _ we have to be more decisive in the box that is — we have to be more decisive in the box. that is what we will continue to work_ box. that is what we will continue
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to work on — st helens got a hat—trick of titles after beating catalan dragons. that seals a hat—trick of titles for saints, but the french side miss out on making history as the first non british winners. stuart pollitt reports. for st helens, this was familiar territory. a third successive grand final. but for their opponents, old trafford is foreign soil, 700 miles from home in the south of france. st helens�* kevin naiqama is soon leaving these shores. this was his farewell appearance, but he took two bodies and the ball over the line for the opening try. catalan had a pre—match message from somebody who knows how to score goals on this ground, eric cantona. it was the boot of james maloney that kept them in touch. 6—4 st helens at halftime. catalan needed a catalyst, and they got one when mike mcmeeken latched onto this high kick to score. the french side in front, time slipping away for saints,
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before naiqama slid in for his second try. lachlan coote�*s conversion would prove crucial, sealing a hat—trick of titles for saints. catalan may have captured the hearts of many neutrals, but the sport's biggest trophy stays in its heartlands. lewis hamilton will need a bit of luck and one of the best drives of his career if he's to keep his formula one championship lead at this afternoon's turkish grand prix. the briton will start the race from eleventh on the grid, despite setting a new track record in qualifying in istanbul. he's been penalised 10 places because mercedes changed the engine on his car. his team mate valtteri bottas will start from pole alongside his title rival max verstappen who's just two points behind him. it was tricky in general, the session, because there are still damp patches. getting temperature in the tyres for the 1st lap was not easy but a greatjob by team. so
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happy with the performance in terms of getting us out at the right time. tomorrow will be difficult but i will it everything. it's not what we want but we tried everything. we need to understand what we _ everything. we need to understand what we could have done better. of course _ what we could have done better. of course now— what we could have done better. of course now we can't change the car any more _ course now we can't change the car any more and we will see tomorrow what _ any more and we will see tomorrow what we _ any more and we will see tomorrow what we can— any more and we will see tomorrow what we can do. updates on that race on the bbc sport website. now time for the papers. hello and welcome to our look at what the sunday papers are covering today. with me are james rampton, features writer at the independent. and laura hughes, political correspondent at the financial times. we can look at the front
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pages. let's start with the observer. ministers are being warned of a mounting nursing crisis as england's hospitals struggle to recruit staff for tens of thousands of vacancies. the sunday telegaph says that the prime minister is preparing for confrontation in courts and parliament over brexit as he demands a new deal with the eu that would free northern ireland from the oversight of europeanjudges. the sunday express leads with the remarks made by energy minister, kwasi kwarteng, that britain is not at risk of running out of gas this winter and that energy prices will remain capped. the independent says that the government is to offer the north a �*bare minimum' of railway upgrades despite the pm's pledge to �*level up�* the country. according to the mail on sunday, civil servants working from home weren�*t able to access vital documents about uk citizens trying to flee afghanistan, slowing down the progress of the evacuations. there�*s also a story about the pm heading on holiday. the sunday times says that scotland yard detectives have spoken to virgina giuffre,
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the woman who claims she was sexually assaulted by the duke of york when she was 17. claims that the prince has always strongly denied. and the sunday mirror says borisjohnson has gone on holiday to marbella — it headlines with a comment referencing the winter of discontent of the 1970s: what costa living crisis? we can speak to laura and james. starting with the mail on sunday, home—working leaving britain is at caliban mercy. the paper said the work from home culture in whitehall left them at the mercy of the taliban in afghanistan. civil servants could not read vital documents to help citizens trying to flee. the unnamed minister said people were left to the caliban who could have been saved and the government last week in the rescue
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mission because of the culture of absenteeism in whitehall. —— taliban. it brings together the ongoing issue of civil servants working from home and ministers do not like it and obviously what happened in afghanistan. yes. not like it and obviously what happened in afghanistan. yes, on the issue of absenteeism, _ happened in afghanistan. yes, on the issue of absenteeism, the _ happened in afghanistan. yes, on the issue of absenteeism, the main - happened in afghanistan. yes, on the issue of absenteeism, the main story| issue of absenteeism, the main story at the time was you hao to the foreign secretary away on holiday. it was notjust foreign secretary away on holiday. it was not just an foreign secretary away on holiday. it was notjust an issue of civil servants not being at their desks, you had the main man in charge away and you also had lots of senior civil servants on holiday. the story reflected all of that. you have the people in charge not present and as you mentioned, we still have a lot of civil servants working from home. and in the foreign office, because of the nature of their work, when it comes to lots of policy issues, there are certain documents that can
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only be read within whitehall. i think this story reflects the fact the mail on sunday are campaigning for people to get back to the office to help businesses as cities grow back after the pandemic, but also the fact there is still a blame game over what went wrong over the fall of kabul and why britain failed to get so many out of the country and the fact fingers are being pointed weeks after shows there is growing concern within the government that maybe there should be some sort of official enquiry that looks into what went wrong. what is your view because it _ went wrong. what is your view because it has _ went wrong. what is your view because it has gone _ went wrong. what is your view because it has gone quiet? - went wrong. what is your view| because it has gone quiet? the erson in because it has gone quiet? the person in this _ because it has gone quiet? the person in this crisis, the foreign secretary— person in this crisis, the foreign secretary then dominic raab, who refused _ secretary then dominic raab, who refused to—
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secretary then dominic raab, who refused to come home from his holiday — refused to come home from his holiday. he said the prime minister sanctioned — holiday. he said the prime minister sanctioned him staying on and he said he _ sanctioned him staying on and he said he was not paddle boarding because — said he was not paddle boarding because the sea was closed, which heaped _ because the sea was closed, which heaped further ridicule upon him. there _ heaped further ridicule upon him. there are — heaped further ridicule upon him. there are also suggestions that months — there are also suggestions that months before he was warned of the severity _ months before he was warned of the severity of _ months before he was warned of the severity of the looming crisis and ignored _ severity of the looming crisis and ignored it — severity of the looming crisis and ignored it. certainly in the weeks leading _ ignored it. certainly in the weeks leading up— ignored it. certainly in the weeks leading up to the absolute catastrophe that befell afghanistan, he was _ catastrophe that befell afghanistan, he was not speaking to regional teaders — he was not speaking to regional leaders in — he was not speaking to regional leaders in the way he might have been _ leaders in the way he might have been to— leaders in the way he might have been to help to alleviate the crisis and the _ been to help to alleviate the crisis and the upshot is that hundreds of very brave — and the upshot is that hundreds of very brave translators and those who helped _ very brave translators and those who helped the _ very brave translators and those who helped the british when we were in afghanistan are stranded there. many of them _ afghanistan are stranded there. many of them are in hiding because they are in— of them are in hiding because they are in fear— of them are in hiding because they are in fearfortheir of them are in hiding because they are in fear for their lives. of them are in hiding because they are in fearfortheir lives. it looks— are in fearfortheir lives. it looks like _ are in fearfortheir lives. it looks like a classic, almost donald trunrb _ looks like a classic, almost donald trunrb tike — looks like a classic, almost donald trump like deflection move. saying it is the _ trump like deflection move. saying it is the fault of lazy civil servants, not the fault of a
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negligent government and the foreign secretary— negligent government and the foreign secretary who apparently lost his 'ob secretary who apparently lost his job because of his negligence. laura, — job because of his negligence. laura, from that holiday by the foreign secretary to the current holiday by the prime minister. the inside pages of the mail on sunday saying boris ignores the barbs and heads for marbs. pointing out he has had a difficult time since his last holiday, almost dying from covid, his mother died, he got divorced, he became a father and remarried and prepared to welcome another child, all while dealing with the gravest crisis since the second world war. how do you see how this holiday will go down? it is how do you see how this holiday will no down? , , how do you see how this holiday will io down? , , ., ., “ go down? it is interesting looking at how different _ go down? it is interesting looking at how different newspapers - go down? it is interesting looking i at how different newspapers covered the story. the mail on sunday has been more sympathetic than say the mirror, who of course pointed to the
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fact we had a fuel crisis shortage, supply chain problems, winter of discontent, the public feeling uneasy about what will come over the next month and the prime minister appears to be going on holiday. but, objectively, the prime minister has a full onjob, very objectively, the prime minister has a full on job, very intense objectively, the prime minister has a full onjob, very intensejob, and has had to deal with a series of big crises over the past years and he has not had a holiday. you had to rush back during the afghan crisis and as you pointed to, a lot has happened since he went away at the beginning of last year. however, the optics do not look good and this is a gift to labour and critics who will seize on this and suggest boris johnson is having a jolly, lying on the beach, while petrol pumps are empty. the beach, while petrol pumps are em . g ., , ., , the beach, while petrol pumps are empty. james, as laura says, different perspectives - empty. james, as laura says, different perspectives in - empty. james, as laura says, - different perspectives in different papers and no doubt it will be the same for people at home reading
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those papers. same for people at home reading those papers-— same for people at home reading those papers. same for people at home reading those --aers. , , g , those papers. absolutely. my view is nobody forced _ those papers. absolutely. my view is nobody forced boris _ those papers. absolutely. my view is nobody forced boris johnson - those papers. absolutely. my view is nobody forced boris johnson to - those papers. absolutely. my view is nobody forced boris johnson to be i nobody forced boris johnson to be prime _ nobody forced boris johnson to be prime minister. when he was 10 years old he _ prime minister. when he was 10 years old he said _ prime minister. when he was 10 years old he said he wanted to be world kin- old he said he wanted to be world king and — old he said he wanted to be world king and manoeuvred for many years in order— king and manoeuvred for many years in order to _ king and manoeuvred for many years in order to become prime minister. shoutd _ in order to become prime minister. should we — in order to become prime minister. should we feel sympathy now he has the job— should we feel sympathy now he has the job he _ should we feel sympathy now he has the job he spent his lifetime angting _ the job he spent his lifetime angling for? i do not think so. i am sadly— angling for? i do not think so. i am sadty otd _ angling for? i do not think so. i am sadly old enough to remember the originat— sadly old enough to remember the original winter of discontent, when james _ original winter of discontent, when james callaghan said something along the tines _ james callaghan said something along the lines of crisis, what crisis? and _ the lines of crisis, what crisis? and it — the lines of crisis, what crisis? and it is — the lines of crisis, what crisis? and it is redolent of that in my eyes — and it is redolent of that in my eyes we — and it is redolent of that in my eyes. we have a looming disaster with the _ eyes. we have a looming disaster with the removal of the uplift of universat— with the removal of the uplift of universal credit, fuel bills going through— universal credit, fuel bills going through the roof, which not only affects _ through the roof, which not only affects poor people but middle—class beobte _ affects poor people but middle—class people. everybody will be hit by that _ people. everybody will be hit by that as — people. everybody will be hit by that. as laura said, empty petrol pumps _ that. as laura said, empty petrol pumps throughout the country. what greater— pumps throughout the country. what greater emblem of the failure of
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this government could you have then a country— this government could you have then a country that cannot move anywhere because _ a country that cannot move anywhere because of— a country that cannot move anywhere because of the idiocy of policies that have — because of the idiocy of policies that have led to huge shortages of staff? _ that have led to huge shortages of staff? , ., ., ., ., ., staff? lets move on to the ongoing issues around _ staff? lets move on to the ongoing issues around the _ staff? lets move on to the ongoing issues around the northern - staff? lets move on to the ongoing issues around the northern ireland | issues around the northern ireland protocol with the sunday telegraph saying the government is facing a fresh brexit clash with judges and says it understands the cabinet office minister will make clear to his eu counterparts removing the european court ofjustice, oversight of the protocol, a red line for britain. it was agreed and has been an issue ever since. the britain. it was agreed and has been an issue ever since.— an issue ever since. the row that has continued _ an issue ever since. the row that has continued to _ an issue ever since. the row that has continued to rumble - an issue ever since. the row that has continued to rumble on - an issue ever since. the row that has continued to rumble on will. an issue ever since. the row that - has continued to rumble on will meet some sort of... come to a head this week because we have lauder frost giving this big speech in lisbon on tuesday where —— lord frost. he will say he wants to remove the oversight
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of the european court ofjustice from the northern ireland protocol, which is the bit of the withdrawal agreement that dictates rules around trade between great britain and northern ireland, which of course has caused a lot of problems over the past months and you see headlines about sausage wars. last week it emerged the eu will make some concessions that allows the movement of sausages for example between ireland and the rest of great britain but lord frost says thatis great britain but lord frost says that is not enough and the eu underestimates the importance of the legal governance issue. basically britain saying we do not like the fact the eu get to decide what is fair and not fact the eu get to decide what is fairand not fair. fact the eu get to decide what is fair and not fair. they feel that is an infringement on british sovereignty and they will fight it. it looks as though if we do not get concessions on both sides, britain may trigger article 16, which would be a big deal, and we would see part
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of the treaty suspended and we could see massive tariffs and a huge row. this is an important week to try to resolve an issue that has caused the government so many problems over the past months and continues to really threaten in the eyes of a lot of people potentially even piece on the island of ireland. so it is a big deal this week. in island of ireland. so it is a big deal this week.— island of ireland. so it is a big deal this week. island of ireland. so it is a big dealthis week. , ., deal this week. in the run-up to the withdrawal. — deal this week. in the run-up to the withdrawal, it _ deal this week. in the run-up to the withdrawal, it was _ deal this week. in the run-up to the withdrawal, it was seen _ deal this week. in the run-up to the withdrawal, it was seen as - deal this week. in the run-up to the i withdrawal, it was seen as something that could not be resolved in that it was so complicated so the fact it got boiled down and is now ending up where it is is not a surprise? it is where it is is not a surprise? it is not and where it is is not a surprise? it is rrot and 1 — where it is is not a surprise? it is rrot and 1 of— where it is is not a surprise? it is not and 1 of the _ where it is is not a surprise? it is not and 1 of the reasons that theresa _ not and 1 of the reasons that theresa may was forced out. she could _ theresa may was forced out. she could not— theresa may was forced out. she could not resolve the issue of northern _ could not resolve the issue of northern ireland. i agree with laura — northern ireland. i agree with laura it— northern ireland. i agree with laura. it goes beyond the slightly jokey_ laura. it goes beyond the slightly jokey yes, — laura. it goes beyond the slightly jokey yes, minister headlines of sausage — jokey yes, minister headlines of sausage wars. it is potentially an issue _
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sausage wars. it is potentially an issue of— sausage wars. it is potentially an issue of peace, on the part of the uk. issue of peace, on the part of the uk there — issue of peace, on the part of the uk. there have been skirmishes with angry— uk. there have been skirmishes with angry unionists protesting about this _ angry unionists protesting about this it _ angry unionists protesting about this. it really depresses me. what part of— this. it really depresses me. what part of binding contract as the uk government not understand? it is typical— government not understand? it is typical of— government not understand? it is typical of boris johnson's have your cake and _ typical of boris johnson's have your cake and eat it philosophy. he signed — cake and eat it philosophy. he signed the treaty and now says he wants _ signed the treaty and now says he wants to _ signed the treaty and now says he wants to cherry pick the bits he likes _ wants to cherry pick the bits he likes. what it is doing to our reputation worldwide does not bear thinking _ reputation worldwide does not bear thinking about. lots of respectable countries _ thinking about. lots of respectable countries will say this is a nation that signed an agreement in good faith and — that signed an agreement in good faith and decided it does not like it sojust — faith and decided it does not like it sojust wants faith and decided it does not like it so just wants to break it. it faith and decided it does not like it sojust wants to break it. it is trashing — it sojust wants to break it. it is trashing our— it sojust wants to break it. it is trashing our reputation and that really— trashing our reputation and that really depresses me. | trashing our reputation and that really depresses me.— trashing our reputation and that really depresses me. i want to bring stories of workforce _ really depresses me. i want to bring stories of workforce shortages - stories of workforce shortages together. in the sunday telegraph, there is a story about a pilot
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shortage potentially looming after the hgv driver shortage. apparently the hgv driver shortage. apparently the number of pilots retired in the pandemic has doubled the usual levels after many were offered redundancy or on furlough and now there are concerns when full flight schedules resume, there may be problems getting pilots to fill the planes. the observer newspaper talks about the nursing crisis, shortage of nurses, which has gone on a long time. they conflate in that when the government has spoken about what to do about the driver shortage, it talks about paying more money to attract more drivers. i guess that might be the issue around pilots potentially. and with nurses, it is a different story. i wonder how you both see those various strands. the airline story — both see those various strands. tie: airline story is both see those various strands. tte: airline story is interesting. both see those various strands. t“t2 airline story is interesting. that is bad news for potential
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holiday—makers, but the point the paper is making, which is slightly different to the nurses crisis, which we have had for wireless that during the pandemic, a lot of pilots were eitherfurloughed during the pandemic, a lot of pilots were either furloughed or offered redundancy, or decided to change career because they were not in the air and they retired. like the hgv drivers, there has been a gap where we have not had time to retrain more pilots. that is why we have a shortage on both fronts. it depends on your perspective. some will argue when it comes to nurses and a driver shortage that of course the pandemic has had an impact on that and the number of people travelling to the uk able to come here, but also brexit has potentially put people off, made it harderfor them to work here and that is why we are seeing this massive gap. the nursing crisis has rumbled on but it is so critical
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now because of the huge backlog we have in the nhs because of all the operations for example that were cancelled in the pandemic. this is a massive issue and will be a huge problem for the prime minister, clearing the backlog and making sure there are enough people to do the vital surgery that has been put off so long. vital surgery that has been put off so lonu. , ., ., vital surgery that has been put off so lon.. , ., ., ., ., so long. james? i agree with laura that the nursing _ so long. james? i agree with laura that the nursing crisis _ so long. james? i agree with laura that the nursing crisis has - so long. james? i agree with laura that the nursing crisis has loomed| that the nursing crisis has loomed for a _ that the nursing crisis has loomed for a while, — that the nursing crisis has loomed for a while, but the figures are catastrophic. in the 5 years since the referendum about leaving the eu, the referendum about leaving the eu, the numbers of nurses from the eu working _ the numbers of nurses from the eu working in— the numbers of nurses from the eu working in this country has dropped by 90%~ _ working in this country has dropped by 90%. gone down from 9500 tojust 810 this _ by 90%. gone down from 9500 tojust 810 this year. that is a cataclysmic shortage — 810 this year. that is a cataclysmic shortage. and we are facing a difficult — shortage. and we are facing a difficult winter. the government this week—
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difficult winter. the government this week warning about a potentially severe flu epidemic, forget _ potentially severe flu epidemic, forget even about covid, that might kill as _ forget even about covid, that might kill as many as 60,000 people. god forbid _ kill as many as 60,000 people. god forbid that _ kill as many as 60,000 people. god forbid that happens but even so, the hospitals _ forbid that happens but even so, the hospitals that were overstretched will be _ hospitals that were overstretched will be under more pressure and will need nurses— will be under more pressure and will need nurses all the more. it plays into the _ need nurses all the more. it plays into the idea of the planning over brexit— into the idea of the planning over brexit has— into the idea of the planning over brexit has been woeful. i saw a heartbreaking footage on bbc news of female _ heartbreaking footage on bbc news of female farmers in tears because they had to— female farmers in tears because they had to put— female farmers in tears because they had to put down perfectly healthy pi-s had to put down perfectly healthy pigs because of the shortage of abattoir— pigs because of the shortage of abattoir workers. they cannot find enough _ abattoir workers. they cannot find enough people. we talked about the fuel crisis. _ enough people. we talked about the fuel crisis, fruit is rotting in the fields— fuel crisis, fruit is rotting in the fields because they do not have enough — fields because they do not have enough farm workers. disasters all round _ enough farm workers. disasters all round and — enough farm workers. disasters all round and still we have bertie booster, _ round and still we have bertie booster, borisjohnson at round and still we have bertie booster, boris johnson at the tory party— booster, boris johnson at the tory party conference saying we are going to the _ party conference saying we are going to the sunny uplands. scarcely mentioned the crisis and just saying isn't everything wonderful in the
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garden? — isn't everything wonderful in the garden? it is not, it is all rotting and it— garden? it is not, it is all rotting and it is— garden? it is not, it is all rotting and it is extremely worrying. we will finish and it is extremely worrying. 2 will finish with tips for long life. the sunday telegraph has a story about a village in the kent downs and it is a place where life expectancy is the highest, for women it is 95 in detling. they have a year old woman who said it is a good busy life, and i have a glass of rose every night before bed. and another resident has said, my motto is if a door opens, go through it, if an opportunity comes up, take it. what are your secrets for long life? a glass of rose before bed is very nice idea — a glass of rose before bed is very nice idea if— a glass of rose before bed is very nice idea. if you can stop at one glass—
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nice idea. if you can stop at one glass that — nice idea. if you can stop at one glass that is probably sensible. i think— glass that is probably sensible. i think there may be something in the at detling _ think there may be something in the at detling. if they could bottle it and export it, maybe it would solve some _ and export it, maybe it would solve some of— and export it, maybe it would solve some of the — and export it, maybe it would solve some of the terrible problems our country— some of the terrible problems our country is — some of the terrible problems our country is facing. export the water and we _ country is facing. export the water and we will— country is facing. export the water and we will all feel better! i country is facing. export the water and we will all feel better!- and we will all feel better! i think the moral of— and we will all feel better! i think the moral of this _ and we will all feel better! i think the moral of this story _ and we will all feel better! i think the moral of this story is - and we will all feel better! i think the moral of this story is to - and we will all feel better! i think the moral of this story is to keep| the moral of this story is to keep busy. i think that is the common theme that runs through the interviewees. they are always doing things. i have aged since having a child, so probably do not have too many children!— child, so probably do not have too man children! , ., , ., , , many children! they age you but they kee ou many children! they age you but they keep you young _ many children! they age you but they keep you young when _ many children! they age you but they keep you young when they _ many children! they age you but they keep you young when they become i keep you young when they become teenagers and you can stay in tune with what younger people are in tune with. great to talk to you. i think i said that was in the sunday telegraph, it was in the sunday times. that is our look at the sunday papers.
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hello, some autumn sunshine to come today. we started with thicker cloud today. we started with thicker cloud to the south as a weather front moved across southern england and east anglia. this afternoon, sunshine will become increasingly widespread. in scotland, strong westerly winds bringing in showers on the west coast and pulling them across the northern isles. gusty along the western coast. a strengthening wind in northern ireland and northern england. light wind in the south and in the sunshine, temperatures up to 20. above average for the time of year. for the start of the new week, switching to a north—westerly air stream that will usher in cooler air to all areas. ist thing on monday, a colder start. temperatures down in single figures. early rain pushing into western scotland. for much of the uk through the week ahead, the
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story will be a dry i. cooler than last week as temperatures move back to more average values for the time of year. high pressure will always be keen to sit to the south of the uk and then we will see various fronts coming into play to the far north. from monday, rain across scotland. the rain moving eastwards through the duration of the day. for northern ireland, much of england and wales, more spells of sunshine. temperatures in the high teens. tuesday, the front pivots and pushes cloud down the north sea coast. here, with the breeze off the north sea, it will feel i think on the chilly side. towards the west, there should be decent spells of sunshine.
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and a high of 17 in cardiff. cooler along the north sea coast and also in aberdeen, a high of ii. along the north sea coast and also in aberdeen, a high of 11. looking further ahead into the week, we pick up further ahead into the week, we pick up a breeze off the land for newcastle and hull. that will warm things up on thursday.
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this is bbc world news, our top stories... britain�*s tyson fury defends his heavyweight title against american deontay wilder, with an 11th round knockout in las vegas. uk business secretary kwasi kwarteng defends the government�*s handling of the energy crisis after suppliers said the system of having a cap on prices was not fit for purpose. i think it is a critical situation. clearly i am speaking to the industry as you said all the time and high gas prices have quadrupled this year and are making an impact and that is why as you say speaking to people, listening and trying to work out a way forward. pay up to stop illegal migrants —
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the french government tells the uk to keep to its side of a deal to police the channel.

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