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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 9, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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taiwanese president tsai ing wuhn has vowed to uphold democracy and freedom at home amid growing tensions with beijing. responding to a speech from president xi jinping saying that reunification with china is inevitable, taiwan's leader was defiant on the occasion of national day. talks have been under way in the qatari capital doha between senior us and taliban officials. it's their first face to face meeting since the militants seized control of afghanistan. chancellor sebastian kurz has announced that he will step down, after he was placed under investigation on suspicion of corruption offences. mr kurz, who denies the accusations, said he would remain leader of his party. the czech election has been won by a coalition of three opposition parties, narrowly edging out the party of the billionaire turned prime minister andrej babis. his campaign was hit with
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accusations of corruption and mismanaging the covid crisis. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejonathan walker, who's political editor of the birmingham post and mail, and the former pensions minister ros altmann. tomorrow's front pages starting with... let's start with the observer ministers are being warned of a mounting nursing crisis as england's hospitals struggle to recruit staff for tens of thousands of vacancies. the telegaph says that the prime minister is preparing for confrontation in courts and parliament over brexit as he demands a new deal with the eu that would free northern ireland from the oversight of europeanjudges. the express leads with the remarks made by energy minister, kwasi kwarteng, that britain is not at risk of running out of gas this winter and that energy prices will remain capped. the independent says that the government is to offer the north a �*bare minimum' of railway upgrades despite the pm's
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pledge to �*level up�* the country. according to the mail on sunday, civil servants working from home weren't able to access vital documents about uk citizens trying to flee afghanistan, slowing down the progress of the evacuations. and the sunday times says that scotland yard detectives have spoken to virgina giuffre, the woman who claims she was sexually assaulted by the duke of york when she was 17. claims that the prince has always strongly denied. let's make a start this time with the sunday times. which says factories are days from closure. which factories and why?- factories are days from closure. which factories and why? well, it is ha enin: which factories and why? well, it is happening here- — which factories and why? well, it is happening here. there _ which factories and why? well, it is happening here. there was - which factories and why? well, it is happening here. there was an - happening here. there was an emergency meeting between some business _ emergency meeting between some business leaders on friday where they basically warned him that with these _ they basically warned him that with these enormous and unexpected rise in the _ these enormous and unexpected rise in the cost _ these enormous and unexpected rise
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in the cost of energy factories are not going — in the cost of energy factories are not going to be able to afford to keep— not going to be able to afford to keep running. and places like the glass— keep running. and places like the glass industry, the ceramics industry. _ glass industry, the ceramics industry, the steel industry spend a hu-e industry, the steel industry spend a huge amount of their budgets on energy— huge amount of their budgets on energy in— huge amount of their budgets on energy in orderto huge amount of their budgets on energy in order to produce the goods that they— energy in order to produce the goods that they make. and with what has happened — that they make. and with what has happened it seems that some companies are saying if we don't get help to _ companies are saying if we don't get help to meet this soaring cost of the energy we can't produce. if we do produce — the energy we can't produce. if we do produce we will be making a loss and potentially risk going out of business — and potentially risk going out of business. this comes on top of what has been _ business. this comes on top of what has been an— business. this comes on top of what has been an extraordinarily difficult _ has been an extraordinarily difficult time for business. for all sorts— difficult time for business. for all sorts of— difficult time for business. for all sorts of reasons. the covid situation, _ sorts of reasons. the covid situation, dislocations in supply chains — situation, dislocations in supply chains after leaving the eu. we have had international dislocations of supply— had international dislocations of supply so— had international dislocations of supply so what we're seeing is almost — supply so what we're seeing is almost one of these perfect storms
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where _ almost one of these perfect storms where the — almost one of these perfect storms where the businesses who have huge parts of _ where the businesses who have huge parts of their input costs formed by energy— parts of their input costs formed by energy are — parts of their input costs formed by energy are saying we can't afford to produce _ energy are saying we can't afford to produce anything. we are going to make _ produce anything. we are going to make a _ produce anything. we are going to make a loss, what's the point of producing? _ make a loss, what's the point of producing? we are asking for government bailouts which is a realty— government bailouts which is a really unusual situation and actually _ really unusual situation and actually the government is probably considering it. gf actually the government is probably considering it.— considering it. of chris rishi sunak had to come _ considering it. of chris rishi sunak had to come to _ considering it. of chris rishi sunak had to come to everyone _ considering it. of chris rishi sunak had to come to everyone product l had to come to everyone product rescue during the pandemic is another version of that. similar story or a related story at least on the sunday express. we will keep you warm during winter, this is trying to reassure people that things are not as powerless as they might seem. the sunday times looking at the impact on business and industry which of course if that story comes it will have a huge impact on households. at the sunday express taking a study different approach to
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in some ways the same story and look at the impact on household budgets. they've at the business secretary issuing a promise saying that the government will act and the people will get some help in the government will get some help in the government will deal with sky—high energy bills and other issues that people are facing. the problem though is this solutions that he gives are quite long—term solutions. in a change in the way that we obtain power. talk to greater reliance on nuclear energy for example, driving of the price of electric cars and so on. those might all be very good things in the long run, might help people in the long run, might help people in the long run, might help people in the long run but i don't think it will do you much to do with the issue immediately in the to christmas. and the logic of the story the study express store in the business to regenerate's comments be a real issue in a real problem and
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concern in government that people are facing this cost—of—living prices. remains to be seen what the government is going to actually be able to do to help people in practice. able to do to help people in ractice. ,, ., , able to do to help people in practice-— able to do to help people in ractice. ,, ., , , ., , ,, ., , practice. summary strands this shows how interconnected _ practice. summary strands this shows how interconnected it _ practice. summary strands this shows how interconnected it always. - practice. summary strands this shows how interconnected it always. pull - how interconnected it always. pull one lever and something goes off somewhere else, very complex. let's look at the mail on sunday. at home working left britons at caliban's mercy. it isjust working left britons at caliban's mercy. it is just tell the mail working left britons at caliban's mercy. it isjust tell the mail on survey civil servants cannot access vital documents in critical days during the afghan exit for which of course the foreign secretary got a lot of criticism. yes and he ended up lot of criticism. yes and he ended up being replaced because he was away at the time. itruiith up being replaced because he was away at the time.— up being replaced because he was away at the time. with this story is about is potentially _ away at the time. with this story is about is potentially four _ away at the time. with this story is about is potentially four in - away at the time. with this story is about is potentially four in five - away at the time. with this story is about is potentially four in five of l about is potentially four in five of the officials needed to assess, the
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brits from — the officials needed to assess, the brits from the british citizens who were _ brits from the british citizens who were in_ brits from the british citizens who were in afghanistan and needed to be emergency— were in afghanistan and needed to be emergency airlifted out, for in five of them _ emergency airlifted out, for in five of them working from home. so they could _ of them working from home. so they could not— of them working from home. so they could not access the files they needed — could not access the files they needed to work out who needed to come _ needed to work out who needed to come home, who was there. look at the paperwork and so on because obviously— the paperwork and so on because obviously very sensitive information. and hundreds of british people _ information. and hundreds of british people it _ information. and hundreds of british people it seems if that is what is suggested here and what they suggest ministers _ suggested here and what they suggest ministers have said were not able to be taken _ ministers have said were not able to be taken out of afghanistan and presumably now at risk or worse. because — presumably now at risk or worse. because they were left behind obviously this happened very quickly _ obviously this happened very quickly. nobody was expecting the sudden _ quickly. nobody was expecting the sudden collapse of afghanistan in the way— sudden collapse of afghanistan in the way it— sudden collapse of afghanistan in the way it happened. and the cobbles of fatt— the way it happened. and the cobbles of fall so— the way it happened. and the cobbles of fall so quickly. what they are
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saying _ of fall so quickly. what they are saying is — of fall so quickly. what they are saying is what we heard of the tory conference — saying is what we heard of the tory conference this week was we need people _ conference this week was we need people to — conference this week was we need people to get back into the office, we need _ people to get back into the office, we need the officials to come back to their— we need the officials to come back to their desks so that they can do their— to their desks so that they can do theiriobs— to their desks so that they can do theirjobs properly. yes to their desks so that they can do theirjobs properly.— to their desks so that they can do theirjobs properly. their “obs properly. yes is the part of theirjobs properly. yes is the part ofthe theirjobs properly. yes is the part of the mail— theirjobs properly. yes is the part of the mail on _ theirjobs properly. yes is the part of the mail on sunday's _ theirjobs properly. yes is the part of the mail on sunday's campaign | theirjobs properly. yes is the part i of the mail on sunday's campaign to get back to the office. and i'm sure nobody has forgotten that the conservative party chairman said that civil servants should get off their palatines, those expensive exercise bikes that people have at home. i exercise bikes that people have at home. ., ., .,, . home. i would imagine most civil service do _ home. i would imagine most civil service do not — home. i would imagine most civil service do not have _ home. i would imagine most civil service do not have one - home. i would imagine most civil service do not have one either. i home. i would imagine most civil. service do not have one either. yes the are service do not have one either. yes they are very _ service do not have one either. jazz they are very expensive in the subscriptions are as well. the story is very important — subscriptions are as well. the story is very important story _ subscriptions are as well. the story is very important story but - subscriptions are as well. the story is very important story but the - is very important story but the chaos in afghanistan and the uk and the us try to get people out of afghanistan and it does tie in with
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the daily mail campaign to get people back to their offices and stop people working at home. i have to say it's a fantastic story in the mail on sunday always gives us good stories but some people will think it's a little bit tenuous possibly. can it really be in the case of the biggest problem the evacuation from afghanistan was too many people work from home? it does look like the campaign is leaving the news agenda on this occasion if people will forgive me saying that. i would actually forgive _ forgive me saying that. i would actually forgive you _ forgive me saying that. i would actually forgive you and - forgive me saying that. i would i actually forgive you and probably agree if i was allowed to. but i'm not so... let's move to the sunday telegraph. fresh face, some are just that we are a bit giddy. you try being in here at this time of night. the sunday telegraph, johnson faces
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fresh, this is what people turn up for. the giddiness. the sunday telegraph, johnson faces fresh brexit clash with judges. this is to do with the european courts still having jurisdiction over northern ireland. because as we know part of the northern ireland protocol northern ireland as part of the single market so there's not a hard to border on the island of ireland. and i hope my colleagues will forgive — and i hope my colleagues will forgive me but this is something i find so _ forgive me but this is something i find so disturbing and upsetting. we 'ust find so disturbing and upsetting. we just signed this protocol. we were told just signed this protocol. we were totd this— just signed this protocol. we were told this was a wonderful deal and britain _ told this was a wonderful deal and britain has — told this was a wonderful deal and britain has reached this fantastic agreement, this oven ready agreement with the _ agreement, this oven ready agreement with the ego. it was always going to be the _ with the ego. it was always going to be the case — with the ego. it was always going to be the case that if northern ireland is part— be the case that if northern ireland is part of— be the case that if northern ireland is part of the island of ireland as
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it obviously factually is, unless you were — it obviously factually is, unless you were going to have some kind of customs _ you were going to have some kind of customs border on the island of iretand — customs border on the island of ireland there has to be a customs border— ireland there has to be a customs border down the irish sea between northern— border down the irish sea between northern ireland and great britain. that is— northern ireland and great britain. that isjust — northern ireland and great britain. that isjust an inevitability northern ireland and great britain. that is just an inevitability unless and until— that is just an inevitability unless and until the alternative arrangements that we were originally told arrangements that we were originally totd coutd _ arrangements that we were originally told could come in such as technology and trusted trade schemes and all— technology and trusted trade schemes and all sorts of things that might otherwise — and all sorts of things that might otherwise be the case, this is not eq otherwise be the case, this is not e0 rigidity— otherwise be the case, this is not eq rigidity in my view. and it worries— eq rigidity in my view. and it worries me that we want to tear up this protocol which should always have been understood but maybe was not properly understood, i don't know _ not properly understood, i don't know but — not properly understood, i don't know. but at the end of the day the eu has— know. but at the end of the day the eu has been trying to accommodate what is _ eu has been trying to accommodate what is in _ eu has been trying to accommodate what is in almost impossible situation _ what is in almost impossible situation. and if we were to agree to stay— situation. and if we were to agree to stay aligned with the regulations
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until the _ to stay aligned with the regulations until the alternative arrangements are in_ until the alternative arrangements are in place this problem would not be rising _ are in place this problem would not be rising i— are in place this problem would not be rising. ithink are in place this problem would not be rising. i think that's what the eu might — be rising. i think that's what the eu might have expected that we would do. ~ , �* , ., eu might have expected that we would do. why then, if it's a sideshow, wh is do. why then, if it's a sideshow, why is iboris _ do. why then, if it's a sideshow, why is boris johnson _ do. why then, if it's a sideshow, why is boris johnson just - do. why then, if it's a sideshow, why is boris johnson just briefly| why is borisjohnson just briefly making a meal of it? itrufeiiii why is boris johnson 'ust briefly making a meal of it?- why is boris johnson 'ust briefly making a meal of it? well we saw after the referendum _ making a meal of it? well we saw after the referendum in _ making a meal of it? well we saw after the referendum in 2016 - making a meal of it? well we saw. after the referendum in 2016 really between that point and 2019 with the general election and arguments within the government and the courts, and government in parliament, and the government really unable to make any decisions or get anything done during that period and of course that was before the borisjohnson became the prime minister as he would be the first to point out himself i suspect. but as doreen suggest to remove going back to that a bit. the whole situation with northern ireland is never really resolved. we have done with a
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hardboard which are northern ireland and ireland, that means for the argument has to stay in the single market and to some extent it evades eu rules and not uk rules. but at the same time brexit is all about sovereignty and taking back control supposedly restoring british sovereignty so that part of the uk not governed entirely by the uk government in parliament, but actually obeying the rules causing its own problems for some people, it's a situation ijust can't accept but there's no easy answer to this, the government seems to think that francis is causing trouble for the sake of it. but i'm not sure that's true. i think there is a genuine problem with the status of northern ireland that we never got through since brexit was first voted for. very quick, from each of you, patel�*s furious pm blocks harassment law. borisjohnson suggesting that
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some of the harassment we get... the rime some of the harassment we get... tie: prime minister is some of the harassment we get... tue: prime minister is not capturing some of the harassment we get... tue prime minister is not capturing the mood from the nation, there's a desire for serious action people to take these issues seriously. which he does not give the impression that he does not give the impression that he is doing. he does not give the impression that he is doinu. ,, w' he does not give the impression that he is doinu. ,, a _, he does not give the impression that he is doinu. ,, :, he is doing. quick comment from you? when i was younger _ he is doing. quick comment from you? when i was younger it was _ he is doing. quick comment from you? when i was younger it was normal - he is doing. quick comment from you? when i was younger it was normal for i when i was younger it was normal for people _ when i was younger it was normal for people to _ when i was younger it was normal for people to wolf whistle and have a lack people to wolf whistle and have a tack of _ people to wolf whistle and have a lack of respect but now my daughters and the _ lack of respect but now my daughters and the public at large expect more respect _ and the public at large expect more respect for— and the public at large expect more respect for women and the idea that it is fine _ respect for women and the idea that it is fine and — respect for women and the idea that it is fine and mere wolf whistling, i it is fine and mere wolf whistling, i don't _ it is fine and mere wolf whistling, i don't think that is really where the idon't think that is really where the public— i don't think that is really where the public is at and we need to make sure that _ the public is at and we need to make sure that women are treated well and respectfully. sure that women are treated well and resectfull . �* . sure that women are treated well and respectfully-— respectfully. let's hope. we will finish then _ respectfully. let's hope. we will finish then with _ respectfully. let's hope. we will finish then with the _ respectfully. let's hope. we will finish then with the sunday - respectfully. let's hope. we will. finish then with the sunday times cartoon a woman walking past a
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billboard with the police warning on it. dark comedy if it is comedy, very sobering note to end our paper review. always nice to see you even if it is virtually. think you were talking through the papers tonight. do buy a paper in the morning, or subscriber. it keeps us in business and them. coming up next, what is it? somebody tell me, it's the film review. the night. hello, a very warm welcome. it is the film review on bbc news and mark kermode is with me as ever. hi, mark. hello. what have you been watching?
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a number of movies to remind everyone that there are

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