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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 9, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this help support. emma raducanu loses herfirst match, beaten in straight sets by the world number 100. beaten in straight sets by the world number100. environmentalist beaten in straight sets by the world number 100. environmentalist chris packham joins activists at buckingham palace, urging the royal
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family to return their land to its natural state. and studying the effects of long covid in children and young people. specialist centres are due to open across england this week. a number of conservative mps have joined those calling for the government to provide urgent support to businesses struggling with soaring gas prices. the leaders of industries with heavy energy consumption say spiralling costs are threatening their future. ministers insist they're in regular contact with business groups to explore possible solutions. our business correspondent katie prescott reports.
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cement, glass, steel, chemicals. the industries with the heaviest energy consumption in the uk. to keep the furnaces burning, they're crying out for support. absolutely right now. gas prices are at an unprecedented level. and the businesses that manufacture the goods that we need are trying to operate under these unprecedented conditions. they are backed by some conservative mps representing industrial areas. they need government support, either in direct support or a cap on their energy prices to allow them to continue in business, and it would be ludicrous that we would lose these high energy intensive businesses that we need for our economy. but so far that support isn't forthcoming. the government says it is in regular contact with business groups to explore ways to manage the impact
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of rising global prices and that this underscores the importance of building a strong, home—grown renewable energy sector to further reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. businesses don't have the cushion of the energy price cap so they tend to buy their energy a year or so in advance. for those whose contracts are now up for renewal it's a really painful time as they face skyrocketing costs. we've got kids in a nursery. i mean, we can't not turn the heating on for children in the nursery. looking at the prices now, you are looking, at the moment, energy is selling eight times higher than it was when that contract started. eight times higher. that is just crazy. i don't know how people and businesses are actually going to cope. while households might be directly protected by the price cap, rising costs for businesses eventually feed through to all of us. if energy prices won't come down, then this will
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happen to this nursery. katie prescott, bbc news. so, what should residential customers be doing about their energy suppliers? let's speak to stephen murray, head of energy at moneysupermarket.com asa as a customer, first off, what is the first thing you should be doing? i think the watchword in residential energy for many years has been choice. have a look around, shop around, make the choices and save some money. it is unprecedented times at the moment as the previous person mention. at the moment, full residential households the messages stay put. if you've been switching in the market and are on a thick steel the chances are that fixed deal will be considerably cheaper than prices at the moment so stay on that and others in a standard variable tariffs the first time
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since there's gaming is actually appointing a price protection so people should sit on this tariff so the message at the moment is very much to stay put. the message at the moment is very much to stay put-— much to stay put. would it be fair to say that _ much to stay put. would it be fair to say that our — much to stay put. would it be fair to say that our choice _ much to stay put. would it be fair to say that our choice is - much to stay put. would it be fair| to say that our choice is becoming more and more restricted. we have seen so many of those smaller suppliers going bust and perhaps the options of finding better deals just aren't out there anymore. big mac at the moment, you're right. the choice is limited. if you go there six months or a year ago you have 30—40— 50 suppliers with tariffs on energy did deals who were far below the price cap. did deals who were far below the rice ca -. , ,., did deals who were far below the --riceca. , ., price cap. the bison wholesale rices price cap. the bison wholesale prices literally _ price cap. the bison wholesale prices literally over _ price cap. the bison wholesale prices literally over the - price cap. the bison wholesale prices literally over the last. price cap. the bison wholesale | prices literally over the last few months are taken so much of that at the market —— the rise in wholesale packets. we have seen lots of suppliers, notjust the smaller bands but the traditional legacy big six of a move tariffs out of the market because theyjust cannot price energy tariffs in the market
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where they can make any level of profit. they are making huge losses and all of these because they having to offer tariffs at the price cap. the market really is in crisis at the moment with the price cap providing some level of protection for consumers and that comes at a cost and we have seen that who fail suppliers and we are seeing the new supporters talking about beef price cap when it has been reviewed again at the beginning of february and is likely to go buy another three, four, even £500 for consumers and it is going to be a tough winter on energy costs. 50 is going to be a tough winter on energy caste— energy costs. so we talk about consumers _ energy costs. so we talk about consumers that _ energy costs. so we talk about consumers that are _ energy costs. so we talk about consumers that are so - energy costs. so we talk about consumers that are so many, i energy costs. so we talk about i consumers that are so many, and there? we have mentioned that there residential consumers. what about small businesses? what sort of situation and options do they have? the small business market, there is a market there traditionally is well for being able to swap around and be able to fix your deals. traditionally, the last year or so many small businesses and move to tariffs that were fixed for one, two or three years so some small
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businesses could be in a very, lucky as may be the wrong word because they made a conscious choice but if they made a conscious choice but if they switch last year to a three—year deal than they could be sitting here being able to weather that storm but for those who aren't engaging in that market and are having to buy energy from suppliers they are not protected by a price cap on the small businesses are going to be ending up paying significant uplifts, three, four times what we were seeing this time last year. as world economies wake up last year. as world economies wake up and the gas supply is a struggle we are seeing prices just at levels that you wouldn't be able to leave the —— you wouldn't have been able to believe two or three months ago so it is really tough but hopefully we will get the point where when we get gas supply improve over the winter months and if we get gas supply improver the winter months thenit supply improver the winter months then it would have to told us that we might see some light at the end of the terminaljust we might see some light at the end of the terminal just after christmas and get the point where the supplies of 0k was sad to see this prices begin to fall on those deals will be out there in the market for both residential customers and small businesses to be able to looking at prices that are hopefully not as
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frightening as they have at the moment. ~ ., , ., �* frightening as they have at the moment. ~ ., �* ,, , moment. what you're saying, stephen, is that things — moment. what you're saying, stephen, is that things are _ moment. what you're saying, stephen, is that things are going _ moment. what you're saying, stephen, is that things are going to _ moment. what you're saying, stephen, is that things are going to improve - is that things are going to improve because 250% increase since january in the wholesale prices for natural gas, but what you are saying is that potentially in the new year things will change, will get better? yes. we have had _ will change, will get better? yes. we have had a — will change, will get better? yes. we have had a position _ will change, will get better? yes. we have had a position at - will change, will get better? is; we have had a position at the will change, will get better? jazz we have had a position at the moment where two things have been the main factors as to why the prices have spiked quite so much at the moment. world economies have woken up after the pandemic and lockdown and we are seeing particularly gas, the sources and gas supply and storage that we have in the uk is very low. we have also got some geopolitical issues with russia from the new pipeline across to europe which is slowing the supply of gas passed what we want. going into the market makes a difference. but when this gets resolved and we will get resolved and we start to move out of the
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winter and hopefully have a level of it's not too cold winter than yes we will get the point where markets do have a little bit more confidence, see gas prices begin to fall and we will be in a position where prices will be in a position where prices will fall. the problem for residential consumers is that the price cap works on the legacy of six months so that is very little that is going to be able to stop the price cap going up again in february was at that point, as i say, hopefully there will be some deals and that is where we would urge consumers to actually start shopping around. keep an eye on the markets at the moment, stay put when you are but keep an eye because markets can be very fickle and we don't know how quickly those wholesale prices will start to fall and if they do so to fall that we should be back in the time when people can look around and provide that piece of mile of deals that are both fixed and below the price cap. == that are both fixed and below the rice ca -. . .,. that are both fixed and below the --riceca. , ., price cap. -- peace of mind. sound advice there. _ price cap. -- peace of mind. sound advice there. just _ price cap. -- peace of mind. sound advice there. just very _ price cap. -- peace of mind. sound advice there. just very quickly - advice there. just very quickly turning to the call for a price capital is a meeting that was held with the government and industry leaders, some people are saying that this is all coming a little bit too late. it is too little, too late.
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what other government interventions should they be looking at? if there are are there other solutions? it is are are there other solutions? it is a difficult one. _ are are there other solutions? it is a difficult one. the _ are are there other solutions? it 3 a difficult one. the issue affecting us is not, it is not a uk issue. it is a worldwide issue on gas supply and demand just far outstripping supply at the moment so you have got to look at it and say he was going to look at it and say he was going to bear the cost of this. clearly, it is very unpopular and not the right thing to do for consumers to bear that cost and that is what the price cap is opposing on the flip of thatis price cap is opposing on the flip of that is that suppliers are actually bearing the cost with the failures and challenges and we are expecting to be potentially morph failures over the winter. consumers will be ok and we expect to see some level 0k and we expect to see some level of funding, whether that is lent wheel to wheel to provide to some of the energy supplies to get into this winter and make sure that consumers and small businesses and not hit
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with two high arise because none of us need that after the last 18 months or so we had. —— with two hi a rise stephen murray, thank you very much. plans for a phone service aimed at protecting lone women walking home have been announced by bt. the company's chief executive said the firm started to develop the system in the wake of the murders of sarah everard and sabina nessa. bt has set out its plans in a letter to the home secretary. some campaigners argue such a service does not tackle the real problem of male violence. the us open champion emma raducanu, has been knocked out of the indian wells tournament in california, losing herfirst competitive match since her momentous grandslam win last month. the 18 year old brit was beaten in straight sets
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by the world number 100, alexandra sasanovich. mike bushell reports. —— aliaksandra sasnovich. and from great britain, _ please welcome emma raducanu! a new feeling for britain's teenage star, walking out onto the court as a big name, the world superstar. and in terms of the world rankings, the favourite. emma raducanu, the world number 22 now, up against an opponent only just inside the top 100. and early on, raducanu lived up to this billing, an excellent start against aliaksandra sasnovich of belarus. holding to love in the opening game and roared on by a supportive crowd of 4,000 for the night session. but remember the british number one is still only 18. she's also now without a permanent coach after parting ways with long—standing mentor andrew richardson. and there is no substitute for experience. and 27—year—old sasnovich took control, as raducanu was forced into errors and seemed anxious to close out rallies
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quickly on a slower court than she's used to. and after the 6—2, 6—4 straight sets defeat, raducanu said she was glad in a way she had lost, as she could learn from it as she develops in the weeks, months and years ahead. andy murray, though, is still involved in indian wells and was relieved to have his wedding ring tied to his trainers once more, after both were lost and then found — handed in by lost property. andy had a spring in his step as he eased past frenchman adrian mannarino to reach the second round. mike bushell, bbc news. german police say they're investigating several cases of so called �*havana syndrome' at the american embassy in berlin. the illness first came to light in cuba in 2016. dozens of american officials have reported symptoms including nausea, memory lapses and dizziness. police in berlin said they were looking into an "alleged sonic weapon attack"
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are meeting face to face for the first time since american officials and representatives of the taliban are meeting face to face for the first time since the group took control of afghanistan in august. the united states said the talks in the qatari capital, doha did not signal a recognition of taliban rule. yesterday at least 50 people died and more than 100 were injured in a suicide bomb attack on a mosque in the afghan city of kunduz. the islamic state group said it was behind the attack. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye is in doha. yogita, lovely to see you there. so, what is the latest in these talks? in the past hour we have heard from the taliban delegation, the foreign minister they have appointed has said senior taliban leaders met us officials and both sides agreed to uphold what was negotiated in the february 2020 us— taliban deal. he
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said that the us has agreed to help the taliban out and humanitarian aid and delivery of covid—19 vaccines and delivery of covid—19 vaccines and he also warned that no country should interfere in the internal policies. it has been three weeks now since the taliban banned girls from going to secondary schools in the country. women have not yet been allowed to go back to theirjobs so one imagines the they were talking about internal policies that is what he means but these meetings, really, i'm a part of taliban efforts to gain international recognition and recently they also had a meeting with the uk delegation in kabul. he also says they will be meeting european officials soon and international recognition is important because it is directly linked to funding going back to afghanistan. funding from foreign countries as well as international agencies has been frozen at the
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moment forfears agencies has been frozen at the moment for fears that it will fall into taliban hands and could be misused and the taliban very keen for a resumption of theirfunding. yogita, you said that there was an agreement on both sides coming from the talybont foreign minister and they would uphold what was negotiated in february 2020 what was agreed negotiated. aha, negotiated in february 2020 what was agreed negotiated. fix, ken; negotiated in february 2020 what was agreed negotiated.— agreed negotiated. a key part of that was that _ agreed negotiated. a key part of that was that afghanistan - agreed negotiated. a key part of that was that afghanistan and i agreed negotiated. a key part of| that was that afghanistan and its territory should not be used against the us or any of its allies in the security of the us of its allies should not be threatened from afghan territory and that is one of the things we are expecting to be discussed but the top of the us agenda right now is the evacuation of us nationals and others who are still stuck in afghanistan have permits to leave the country and in the past few weeks there have been
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delays and difficulties in the evacuation process particularly by air via doha where i am and they will be hoping to smooth out that process and hold the taliban to its commitment to upholding people with the right documents to leave the country. they report also, a day after dozens of people were killed in a bombing in kunduz city in afghanistan which was claimed by islamic state khorasan province, and a growing state of islamic state militancy is also expected to be something discussed during this two—day meeting. something discussed during this two-day meeting.— something discussed during this two-day meeting. thank you very much. two-day meeting. thank you very much- you _ two-day meeting. thank you very much. you agree _ two-day meeting. thank you very much. you agree to _ two-day meeting. thank you very much. you agree to let _ two-day meeting. thank you very much. you agree to let my - two-day meeting. thank you very much. you agree to let my it - two-day meeting. thank you very much. you agree to let my it with that update. —— yogita limaye with that update. —— yogita limaye with that update. pope francis is launching what some catholics are describing as the most ambitious project of church reform in 60 years. a two year consultation involving every parish begins this weekend. it's the first time catholic voices across the world have been asked for their opinion on all types of issues,
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from women's ordination to blessings for gay couples. 0ur religious affairs reporter harry farley has more details on the project. it's effectively a giant consultation exercise. pope francis is asking every diocese around the world to meet and to discuss solutions to the issues they are facing. and so, in terms of the processes, you say what's going to happen is those local discussions will then be fed through to national bishops who will then filter through those ideas next year before taking their suggestions, those solutions to the problems they face, to rome in 2023. i think there are a couple of reasons why this is significant. first of all, the catholic church is a very hierarchical institution, so cardinals sit above bishops who sit above priests, and so this is a real shift towards consulting lay and ordinary catholics as to the church's future direction. the second reason why this is significant is it opens up the discussion all sorts of thorny issues that the catholic church faces. so, for example, as you mentioned,
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the possibility of women being ordained as deacons, a possibility of blessings for gay couples, it throws all those issues up into the air. mary ring is from the grass roots organisation �*root and branch' which says it is committed to reform of the catholic church. she described why it's important members voices are listened to by the synod. that is completely the question and thatis that is completely the question and that is why the small group of us, we are only small, have taken the step of saying we don't have to wait. if we wait for the bishops to do it it could be a long, long time. catholics can do it for themselves now and we have a responsibility to educate themselves and we also have a responsibility to support those bishops where we can. we just had a very successful synod with over 50
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international speakers in a week and every speech can be heard if you click on a website and it wasn't difficult. there was a lot of work but it wasn't difficult. what people have to remember is that we are the catholics who haven't walked away. we are, actually, the church's get out of jail free we are, actually, the church's get out ofjail free card. we need to care. investigative journalist dmitry muratov has told the bbc he is dedicating the nobel peace prize, which he was awarded jointly with fillipino journalist maria ressa, to russian journalists who have been killed in the line of duty. mr muratov is a co founder of russia's leading independent newspaper novaya gazeta. in the last few months, dozens of russian journalists and media outlets have been harrassed and put on government blacklists as "foreign agents" or "undesirable organisations". he's been speaking to our correspondent richard galpin.
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translation: this price is definitely not for me. i shouldn't be receiving this. it is a price for all the generals who have given their lives for their profession. br; their lives for their profession. by winning the nobel peace prize, you think it will give protection to independentjournalists in russia? independent journalists in russia ? we independentjournalists in russia? we have a very complicated situation with the media now. a lot of media start—ups, especially the ones that do investigations, have been declared foreign agents or undesirable organisations. a lot of journalists are falling victim to censorship and repression so i think we need to give part of this money to —— part of this prize money to independentjournalists. hagar independent “ournalists. how independent journalists. how concerned are _ independent journalists. how concerned are you _ independentjournalists. how concerned are you about increasing the pressure on journalists concerned are you about increasing the pressure onjournalists in russia right now. the pressure on journalists in russia right now.— the pressure on journalists in russia right now. the pressure on journalists in russia riaht now. , ., , , russia right now. many of my friends and colleagues _ russia right now. many of my friends and colleagues have _ russia right now. many of my friends and colleagues have fallen _ russia right now. many of my friends and colleagues have fallen victim - russia right now. many of my friends and colleagues have fallen victim to l and colleagues have fallen victim to the laws that have been passed by the laws that have been passed by the russian parliament. these laws
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aimed at restricting the freedom of the press. i see how difficult and complicated it is to work in the media now. isee complicated it is to work in the media now. i see how many professionaljournalists have left. they have been. leave their country. i think this is a professional tragedy. i am one of those people who look at the situation with independent media in russia very pessimistically. that independent media in russia very pessimistically.— pessimistically. that was dmitry muratov fair _ pessimistically. that was dmitry muratov fair speaking. -- - pessimistically. that was dmitry muratov fair speaking. -- their. muratov fair speaking. —— their speaking. an appeals court in the united states has temporarily reinstated near total ban on abortions in texas. the ruling overturns the decision of a lower court earlier this week, which had blocked the bill. under the law, abortion in texas is prohibited after about six weeks
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of pregnancy and makes no exceptions in cases of rape or incest. the dispute could ultimately end up before the us supreme court. 16 specialist centres looking at the effects of long covid in children and young people will be opening across england from monday. the paediatric hubs will bring together experts on common symptoms like chronic fatigue and respiratory problems. fiona lamdin has been to meet 10 year old taylor, who'll be benefitting from the treatment. ten—year—old taylor in the pool for her weekly hydrotherapy session. since having covid nearly 20 months ago, this is now the only place that she can be without behing in pain. when you wake up, your symptoms will already start to kick in. i wake up with a bad headache, and normally everything aches and i don't want to get out of bed. but when i do, i still feel that pain. it doesn't really go, and then i go to school tired, and ifeel like my hands are going to collapse and not work. and the same with my legs.
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my back can hurt a few times, but it's not the same as my arms and legs. but my head can hurt a lot, and i'll always feel tired, and that goes on for the whole day. and it's notjust the physical pain — her mum also worries about her daughter's mental health. she used to do things like cheerleading and horse riding and enjoy those things, but she wouldn't be able to do it now, and obviously while she's not been at school even with the lockdowns and then not going back last year because of the pain, she's become quite isolated and then that's obviously affected her as well. well, the world's first study into children with long covid suggests that one in seven still suffer symptoms 15 weeks after contracting coronavirus. and so, now, 16 hubs are opening across the country, looking at long covid in children, and one of the pilot's is here in bristol. long covid is essentially a new condition, and there are symptom clusters or groups of symptoms that we don't understand completely and we need
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to develop treatments for. the outcome for children in general is much, much better than the outcome for adults. so what the hub is going to do is to bring the top specialists at bristol children's hospital together and discuss cases. i feel really strongly that what we need to do is to offer treatment quickly, because the kids are sick and they're missing school right now. how does it feel to know you're going to have access to a specialist team of doctors who are hopefully going to get you better? i feel better because they can properly help and not... well, other doctors can help, but these ones are made for long covid. taylor's being seen on monday. after months of pain, she and her family hope she can get the help she finally needs to get better. fiona lamdin, bbc news. the wildlife campaginer chris packham and around 100 children have delivered a petition
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to buckingham palace calling on the royal family to �*rewild' their estates restoring the land they own to its natural state. ecologists believe some of the estates would naturally be home to beavers and wild boar as simonjones explains. campaigners have brought their message direct to buckingham palace. campaigners say the royals must re—wild. they are the biggest landowning family in the country but there are claims their estates an ecological disaster zone with practices like hunting and grouse shooting. because ofthe hunting and grouse shooting. because of the rlobal hunting and grouse shooting. because of the global celebrity _ hunting and grouse shooting. because of the global celebrity in _ hunting and grouse shooting. because of the global celebrity in the _ hunting and grouse shooting. because of the global celebrity in the way - of the global celebrity in the way that they lead and other people follow if they were to do this it would be a fantastic gesture and significantly at a time be a rather tiring of people talking the talk we need them to be walking the walk. we need them to be walking the walk. we need a meaningful positive action. aha, need a meaningful positive action. a petition signed by 100,000 people is delivered to the palace by
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14—year—old simeon while his brother explained the concerns. we 14-year-old simeon while his brother explained the concerns.— explained the concerns. we are still uuite explained the concerns. we are still quite young — explained the concerns. we are still quite young and _ explained the concerns. we are still quite young and have _ explained the concerns. we are still quite young and have a _ explained the concerns. we are still quite young and have a lot - explained the concerns. we are still quite young and have a lot of- explained the concerns. we are still quite young and have a lot of time | quite young and have a lot of time ahead _ quite young and have a lot of time ahead of— quite young and have a lot of time ahead of us— quite young and have a lot of time ahead of us and by the way the world is going _ ahead of us and by the way the world is going that might not be very pleasant — is going that might not be very pleasant because there is going to a lot of— pleasant because there is going to a lot of case _ pleasant because there is going to a lot of case in the future.— lot of case in the future. planting trees at balmoral_ lot of case in the future. planting trees at balmoral the _ lot of case in the future. planting trees at balmoral the queens - trees at balmoral the queens placementjubilee. the boiler states as the queens family has a long—standing commitment to conservation and they are constantly looking for ways to improve commitment to biodiversity. next month, senior members of the royal family are due to attend the glasgow climate conference. campaigners hearsay that will be the perfect opportunity for them to take a stand. they are calling it a polite protest. when they hope will bring about change. simonjones, bbc news. it was certainly looking glorious there, how is the weather looking? this was sheffield about 15 minutes ago because we have got the weather
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fun here and you can see the cloud is quite extensive and quite abundant rain at the moment but as we go to get on in that band of rain will narrow somewhat, become less heavy. there is a shoe show is coming in at the time but the sunshine returned across southern and eastern areas and it is still mild even under that bank cloud. now, the fog has lifted into low cloud emission have as many fog issues overnight because the weather front week as it is will blanket the fog in temperatures. but still some pockets of patchy fog first thing in some milder weather. further north, some milder weather. further north, some clear skies and a brighter start to a sunday and mainly dry as well bar a few showers and in fact most people, places should be even with that weather front, the remains of it in southern and eastern areas can deliver some patchy drizzle and if you can see through the dateless way. for most, muscle sunshine today, more dry weather, patchy fine weather cloud as she was in the north and a brisk wind but it will be fresherfor most north and a brisk wind but it will be fresher for most of us tomorrow.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... pressure grows on the uk government to help businesses facing soaring energy bills, as some of its own mps join industry bosses in asking for support. women in the uk who are travelling home alone, could soon be offered protection from a free mobile phone app. the united states and the taliban will hold face—to—face talks in their first meeting since the group seized control of afghanistan in august. the british teenager, emma raducanu, loses her first match since winning the us open, beaten in straight sets by the world number 100. now on bbc news, emily brown investigates the effect social media companies are having on children's lives, in disclosure — who's watching the kids?

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