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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 9, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news. our top stories: the united states and the taliban are due to hold their first face—to—face talks since the us withdrawal from afghanistan. cracking down on safe havens — after months of negotiations, more than 130 nations agreed to radically change the international tax system. president biden urges american companies to fire workers who have not been vaccinated against coronavirus, but there is a lot of opposition. the nobel peace prize is awarded to two journalists for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression — maria ressa of the philippines and russia's dmitry muratov. trust is what holds us together to be able to solve the complex problems our world
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is facing today. the us open champion emma raducanu knocked out of the indian wells tournament in straight sets. and we speak to the star of spencer, the new movie about princess diana's relationship with the royal family. the united states and the taliban are to hold their first face to face talks since the withdrawal. the state department said the meeting would take place in doha on saturday.
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nomia iqbaljoined me from washington. the us state department has emphasised this is not about giving the taliban legitimacy by meeting them. i'm sure there will be many critics of the government that will try and argue otherwise. but the state department is very specific in saying this is a continuation of the conversations they have already been having with the taliban, mainly things that serve the us national interest. so this is about trying to get safe passage for the thousands of american citizens that are still in afghanistan as well as the afghan allies, and also making sure that the country does not turn into a hotbed of terrorism. the only time that they do mention the word "government" in the statement is when they say that they will press the taliban to form an inclusive government. the taliban has not recognised women in its leadership at all, so that is something that the us wants to discuss with the taliban. and as i say, the us state department is very, very clear in saying this is not about granting recognition. they say in the statement this is not about conferring legitimacy. the taliban has said that they are not the same group that they were
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when they were in power all of those years ago, that they are now more inclusive, but the us has repeatedly said that they will judge the taliban on its deeds, not its words. also, we've been hearing today about this bombing in kunduz. it's thought about 50 people have been killed, and the taliban when they took over said they would be able to keep so—called islamic state in check, didn't they? they said that safety was a key concern for them. that's right, and that's something that the us will be pressing them on as well. this delegation that's going over, we've not got any confirmation who will be a part of that delegation, but we are expecting it to include members of the state department as well as members of the intelligence community. it's a really politically tricky position for america, because you get two sorts of arguments here in the us. you get those who say that the taliban is a repressive group, that you cannot trust them, that even meeting them is strengthening them. and then on the other hand you have this other political argument that says if america
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wants to have any kind of influence in afghanistan in the region then it would be wise to talk to the taliban, especially considering that a lot of countries that the us considers rivals, such as russia and china, have been eyeing up the taliban as their new friends. the announcement of the talks comes after as many as 50 people may have been killed in a suicide bombing in northern afghanistan. a mosque used by the minority sheer community was targeted. the group calling itself islamic state says they were behind the attack. ——shia. it happened during friday prayers when the mosque would have been packed with worshippers. officials say many dozens of people were also injured. fear and panic once again in afghanistan.
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injured victims of the blast are rushed to hospital. translation: there were so many people who were injured. _ hardly anyone was unhurt. most of those who were sitting there were killed. it's terrible. the local branch of the islamic state group, is—k, said it had targeted members of the shia minority. is—k is much less powerful than their rivals, the taliban, but has a history of devastating attacks in afghanistan. in august, more than 150 people were killed at a bombing outside kabul airport. in recent weeks, is has also launched dozens of smaller attacks targeting taliban fighters in eastern afghanistan. this latest bombing in the north of the country, apparently carried out by a member of the uighur ethnic group, suggests is�*s influence is expanding. translation: they are i the enemies of our nation. people were just beginning to experience peace, and now this has happened.
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all our security forces are working on the investigation. we will find the culprits and then they will be dealt with according to sharia law. the taliban say they are bringing stability, but is is a growing concern for afghans and the wider region. secunder kermani, bbc news. it is the most significant overhaul of the international tax system in a generation. 136 countries back to the accord under which the largest multinationals will pay a minimum tax rate of 15%. it is estimated it will result in additional tax revenues of around a per year.- around a per year. this agreement _ around a per year. this agreement at - around a per year. this agreement at the - around a per year. this agreement at the levelj around a per year. this i agreement at the level of around a per year. this - agreement at the level of the oecd is clearly a tax
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revolution. a tax revolution which will lead to less unfairness, to morejustice, to more efficiency. to unfairness, to more 'ustice, to more efficiency. to eliminate tax havens — more efficiency. to eliminate tax havens and _ more efficiency. to eliminate tax havens and rake - more efficiency. to eliminate tax havens and rake in - more efficiency. to eliminate tax havens and rake in more | tax havens and rake in more from multinationals, hundred and 36 nations agreed to a new global minimum tax rate of 15% on a firm's income to stop them paying less elsewhere and for a large chunk of the profits paid to where they actually do business, ratherthan to where they actually do business, rather than where they are based. it will affect digital giants like facebook and amazon, with global sales in the billions of dollars, and healthy profit margins. the oecd expects it will bring around a in new revenues per year, and taxes on $125 billion of profits shifted to countries where big multinationals and their income. so who will profit most? to their income. so who will profit most?— their income. so who will profit most? their income. so who will rofit most? ., . profit most? to the extent that it does generate _ profit most? to the extent that it does generate significant -
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it does generate significant revenues, they are almost all going to go to the us and a few other countries, and that will leave everyone else much where they were. leave everyone else much where they were-— they were. also sceptical of this is the _ they were. also sceptical of this is the charity _ they were. also sceptical of this is the charity oxfam, . they were. also sceptical of i this is the charity oxfam, they said: this seachange has emerged following years of negotiations with differences finally bridged. under pressure from ireland, the mutual corporate tax rate won't visit above 15%. under pressure from hungary, there will be a 10 year transition period for more physical rather than digital businesses like car plants, based on itsjurisdiction. in china has carved out an exemption to protect mystic companies with only small international profits. this could finally end the tension with america over a digital services tax, currently doled out on silicon valley companies by the likes of the uk, india and france. a 2—yearfreeze has
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been agreed on those taxes, which suggests that these new rules could be implemented by october 2023. g20 leaders are expected to sign off on the deal at a expected to sign off on the dealata summit expected to sign off on the deal at a summit in rome in late october, but then crucially, national parliaments must then ratify it to take effect. social media companies have welcomed the proposals. facebook says the tax system needs to command public confidence. amazon said it looks forward to further technical details, and google's parent companies as it hopes the momentum continues. —— company says. several top us officials, including the secretary of state antony blinken and attorney general mitch garland were in mexico today meeting president andres manuel lopez obrador, discussing the creation of a new security deal between the two countries that would address things like the influence of drug cartels of the smuggling of us—made guns into mexico
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and the flow of migrants to the us border. will grant reports. more than 650 people, over half of them children, crammed into trailers, desperate to reach the united states. not that any extra evidence was needed but the tension of so many people underlines the two crisis at the us have mexico border. mexican police say the majority were from guatemala. around 200 were from guatemala. around 200 were unaccompanied minors, children travelling alone through one of the most dangerous drug cartel control parts of latin america. the timing could not have been more apt, with the us secretary of state and the mexican president sitting down for talks. the body language was warm, the
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words cordial as the two sides briefly set aside their differences to focus instead on shared interest, newjoint security framework. the current agreement, was signed in 2008 but the mexican president has long criticised it for pumping billions of dollars to the mexican military were bringing few changes on the ground. translation: the success of this will not be measured by the capture of the kingpin, it will be measured by fewer homicides in mexico and less drug use, that is the difference.— drug use, that is the difference. �*, ., ., difference. it's time for a comprehensive _ difference. it's time for a comprehensive new - difference. it's time for a - comprehensive new approach to our security cooperation, one that— our security cooperation, one that will_ our security cooperation, one that will see us as equal partners in defining our shared priorities _ partners in defining our shared priorities. tackle the root drivers— priorities. tackle the root drivers of these challenges, like in — drivers of these challenges, like in equity, like corruption.- like in equity, like corrution. ., ., , corruption. yet although this was ostensibly _ corruption. yet although this was ostensibly a _ corruption. yet although this was ostensibly a security - was ostensibly a security meeting, such is the scale of the migration issue it couldn't go unmentioned. antony blinken
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again delivered the biden administration's constant refrain about undocumented migrants. it refrain about undocumented migrants-— refrain about undocumented miarants. ,, ~ ., migrants. if they seek to make that journey — migrants. if they seek to make that journey in _ migrants. if they seek to make that journey in an _ migrants. if they seek to make that journey in an irregular - thatjourney in an irregular manner they put themselves at tremendous risk. along the entire route, and they will not be able to enter the us. the reality is _ be able to enter the us. the reality is that _ be able to enter the us. the reality is that often - be able to enter the us. the reality is that often repeated warning carries less weight to those attempting the dangerous journey than the promise of what lies ahead if they are successful. the crises at home, in guatemala, cuba and haiti, are now so acute that thousands more will attempt the perilous trip before the next time the us and mexico hold a summit on security. you're watching bbc news, the headlines: the united states and the taliban are due to hold their first face—to—face talks since the us withdrawal from afghanistan. a widespread international welcome as more than 130 nations agree to crack down
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on safe havens and radically change the international tax system. they're known for their hardhitting investigations which have angered their country's powerful elites and leaders. twojournalists — maria ressa from the philippines and dmitry muratov from russia — have been awarded this year's nobel peace prize, recognising the importance of the right to freedom of expression. the nobel committee commended their work saying that independent and factbased journalism served to protect against the abuse of power and lies. caroline hawley has this profile. for the first time since 1935, the peace prize goes to journalists for their battle to tell the truth at great personal risk. to maria ressa and dmitry muratov, for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace.
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dmitry muratov is a russian journalist who has taken a stand against authoritarian rule. today, he dedicated the award to six colleagues, who, he said, were murdered for their work. speaks russian. naming each one of them, he said the prize belonged to them. their paper, novaya gazeta, has been highly critical of president putin and russia's ruling elite. its investigations have exposed electoral fraud such as the stuffing of ballot boxes as well as official corruption and police violence. translation: | don't know| what effect this nobel award will have on censorship of the media here in russia, with many investigative journalists being accused
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of being foreign agents. maria ressa from the philippines is the other winner, a woman described by the nobel committee as fearless. she's faced criminal charges and death threats. her work has exposed state abuses under the controversial president rodrigo duturte — in particular the extrajudicial killings that have come with his deadly war on drugs. thousands of people, mostly from poor communities, have been murdered. today, maria ressa spoke of the vital importance of telling the truth. when you don't have facts, you don't have a truth, you don't have trust. trust is what holds us together to be able to solve the complex problems our world is facing today. so when you attack the media, often times it is about shooting the messenger. two messengers in the spotlight today as the nobel committee says press freedoms are necessary for both democracy and peace, but are under threat around the world. caroline hawley, bbc news.
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brazil has become just the second country in the world after the us to record 600,000 deaths from covid—19. protesters against how the government has dealt with the pandemic staged this demonstration in rio's copacabana beach, with 600 white handkerchiefs to remember the dead. deaths from coronavirus have been falling in brazil recently. more than 70% of people there have received at least one vaccine dose. president biden is urging companies in the us to fire workers who have not been vaccinated. the latest official figures show only 56% of americans have been fully vaccinated. mr biden says he'll soon bring in rules requiring all healthcare workers to have the jab. he wants individual states to do the same for teachers. but there's been opposition, as a north america correspondent aleem maqbool found in new england. chanting: freedom over fear! freedom over fear! it is, they say, about freedom, an individual�*s right to choose if they get vaccinated, even if they are a nurse.
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one of the new battle grounds over covid in the us is the requirement in some hospitals that all their staff have had the jab. but some, they say, would rather lose theirjob. leah cushman�*s notjust a nurse but a state politician. my beliefs are religious. i believe that my creator endowed me with an immune system that protects me, and if i get sick, that's an act of god. what, you've never been vaccinated against anything? i have before i was saved by the lord, yes. with that logic, you wouldn't take any medicines. that's not true, no. i wouldn't take one that affects the immune system this way. of course, even vaccinated staff have the potential to pass on the virus to patients, but hospital managers say unvaccinated health care workers getting sick also puts more strain on resources and suspect for some there are
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biggerforces at play. it's notjust covid, there are other vaccines that employees are required to have. mmr is an example, hepatitis. so again, this is a highly electrified issue, if you will, and we all recognise that. and politicised. to say it's not political would be disingenuous. chanting: save our teachers! and the controversy swept up another profession too, with school staff being threatened with sacking if they don't get vaccinated, including in new york city. in connecticut, teacher kahseim outlaw refused the vaccine and testing and has already lost his job. i do not use any kind of synthetic ingredients in my life, whether that be for medicinal purposes, supplementation, food and fuel. so the idea of becoming inoculated is something that goes directly against the way that i live my life and have lived for the last decade or more. but what is the harm in getting tested every week?
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so, when we talk about harm, i view it as an unnecessary medical procedure. kahseim had covid so says his natural immunity should suffice. but that's not enough for a government are ramping up pressure on the unvaccinated. aleem maqbool, bbc news. france has threatened to reduce elect city —— electricity supplies to jersey amongst... its europe minister says france had applied for a50 license for its fishermen to access british waters that had only been granted half that number. questions about the row over british fishing licenses on a morning news programme, it was said that reducing electricity to jersey was no vital threat. we're not talking about cutting power to each jersey we're not talking about cutting power to eachjersey resident, power to each jersey resident, he power to eachjersey resident, he said, reducing the delivery
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of electricity to the island is possible. resentment has been piling up on this side of the channel over covid vaccines, post—brexit border checks for northern ireland and a secret british american submarine deal in the pacific. she —— fishing rights have been a source of tension for years but wrecks it has sharpened divisions with european fishermen ask to prove —— brexit. some small boats say they are not equipped to provide that proof. france has accused britain of not living up accused britain of not living up to its own post—brexit agreement. next week, eu ministers will meet in luxembourg to discuss their response as politicians on both sides of the channel point to the waters. that separate britain and france. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. she was one of the best—known figures of the 20th century.
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after the death of diana princess of wales, her story remains a story of intense fascination. a new film has just had its uk premiere at the film festival and our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba spoke to the star of the film, actress kristin stewart. three days, that's it. it's set over christmas 1991, a period where diana felt trapped by the royal family. taking on the role was empowering, says kristen stewart. to play her, even though it was sad and tumultuous, ironically, i felt taller. i felt like somebody who could lead with love and make people feel good, and it's really contagious. it comes right back at you. do you think i got delayed by someone? oh come on, come on. they are circling us. it seems they are circling just me. performers always feel pressure playing real—life figures. it's an even greater sense of responsibility for someone like diana.
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i've felt such love for her and still do and, um... you know, in a way that isn't... without implying like a kind of developed spirituality, i felt her. i wanted to protect her. there is no future. the past in the present are the same thing. she is someone who many feel was exploited throughout her life and now there are still things that are making money from her. do people who think that a film like this is perhaps at best unnecessary and at worst exploitative have a point? we came to this with love. like, we truly... first foot forward is always trying to understand somebody that we love. they know everything. they don't. there is still almost six months to go but kristen stewart is already striding well ahead of her oscar best actress rivals. lizo mzimba, bbc news.
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—— the us open winner emma raducanu has lost her opening match in california. the teenager was defeated in straight sets. last month she made history by becoming the first qualifier to win a grand slam tennis title. let's talk to our news reporter tanya dendrinos now. first march as a grand slam winner. what went wrong? grand slam winner. what went wronu? ., ., , grand slam winner. what went wronu? ., . , ., wrong? unfortunately that ten came wrong? unfortunately that ten game winning _ wrong? unfortunately that ten game winning streak- wrong? unfortunately that ten game winning streak has - wrong? unfortunately that ten | game winning streak has come wrong? unfortunately that ten i game winning streak has come to an end for will —— emma raducanu. she faced the world about hunt —— number 100 four belarus. shejust held her nerve and closed out in straight sets winning 6—2, 6—a, she is capitalised on her chances and kept calm and she will now face simona halep in the third round. she lost her at wimbledon so maybe a chance to redemption with some new found confidence. it to redemption with some new found confidence.— found confidence. it has been such a crazy _
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found confidence. it has been such a crazy few _ found confidence. it has been such a crazy few weeks - found confidence. it has been such a crazy few weeks for . found confidence. it has been - such a crazy few weeks for emma raducanu. she has been catapulted to fame. we have seen her on red carpets, glamorous life. it is not particularly surprising, is it, that she is under a lot of pressure now that may be a little bit distracted and she hasn't even got a permanent coach with her at the moment, does she?— coach with her at the moment, does she? . , , �* does she? she split with andrew richardson _ richardson following that historic us open win and hasn't announced her new coach saying she is waiting for the right candidate to come along so i am sure in due course that will all be playing on her mind and exactly, as you said, her life has changed completely. she came into our hearts and miles at —— mines at wimbledon as a wildcard entry and we thought, could she go all the way? she won the tournament as an 18—year—old which is an achievement for supper comes as achievement for supper comes as a huge amount of pressure. she comes from a smaller tournament, not a major, and all of the fans in all of the media we have is a great deal of attention on her and you sort of almost expect her to win, particularly in the earlier rounds. we have to
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remember this sport. there are winners, there are losers and thatis winners, there are losers and that is part and parcel of the game, even when you think of the three in terms of roger federer, rough nadal, novak djokovic, they all lose games and it is just part of character building. a big part of tennis is your mental battles on court 11 think as such a young player of this will only stand her in good stead as to what she did wrong here, she did focus on her game, potentially with a new coach, potentially really build on that. she unfortunately have to get used to losing as much is winning. irate to get used to losing as much is winning-— to get used to losing as much is winning. we will have to put it down to _ is winning. we will have to put it down to a — is winning. we will have to put it down to a blip. _ is winning. we will have to put it down to a blip. that - is winning. we will have to put it down to a blip. that is - is winning. we will have to put it down to a blip. that is my i it down to a blip. that is my official assessment of things. thank you very much, tanya dendrinos there for us. wringing you these live pictures of the volcano on the spanish island of la palma. —— bringing you. this is the cumbria viejo volcano which has forced the evacuation of thousands of residents. the airport was closed again on friday as an ash cloud affected flights in the area. you can
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see it is still spewing strong amounts of lava there. that is all from me. thank you for watching. get me on twitter if you like at lucy e grey. hello again. friday was another very mild day across the whole of the uk, even those places where it stayed cloudy throughout. however, there were some places where the sunshine popped out. northern england was one of the sunnier places. it was also one of the warmest places in the uk. the day's highest temperature — ryhill in west yorkshire, 22 degrees celsius. that's eight degrees celsius higher than the october average, so it was very, very warm indeed. now looking at this satellite picture, you can see those areas that had the clearest skies. we've seen some clearing skies across east anglia and south—east england behind this cold front because what we're seeing at the moment is cooler and fresher air starting to spread in from the near continent. and that's significant because as humidity levels drop, the clouds will
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increasingly break up, and that's happening right now across east anglia and the south—east. meanwhile, for northern england, wales, south—west england, southern and eastern scotland, still a lot of low cloud around, a few spots of drizzle, bit of mist and fog for some. and then there's this band of rain that's really pepping up at the moment. some heavy rain for northern ireland, western scotland bringing a risk of some localised surface water flooding. now, the rain will tend to turn a little lighter and patchier through saturday, and the weather front will finally, after a couple of days, start to move away into parts of the north of england and the north of wales. midlands, east anglia, southern counties of england should be much more in the way of sunny spells compared with recent days, and temperature still pretty high for october, 18—19 degrees. the second half of the weekend sees that cold front across northern areas pushing southwards. it's a weakening feature, so there won't be much rain left on it by the time it reaches east anglia and south—east england, but there could be an odd patch. for most of the uk on sunday, it's another dry day with plenty of sunshine around.
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however, there will be a fair few blustery showers across the far north and west of scotland. temperatures easing somewhat across northern areas, but still very warm for the south of england and wales. monday, well, it looks like we'll see another band of rain push its way into scotland, turning increasingly heavy, some fairly gusty winds with this as well. temperatures will be coming down further across northern scotland, just around 11—12 degrees for some here. but for northern ireland, england and wales, still above average, but those temperatures are getting a little bit closer to the seasonal norms. 1a degrees, for example, is about right in london. and eventually we should get down there on tuesday. a lot of dry weather for many into next week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the united states and the taliban will hold their first in—person talks since the us withdrawal from afghanistan. the us delegation will meet senior taliban representatives on saturday and sunday in the qatari capital doha. the us has remained in contact with the taliban since they seized kabul in august. the announcement of the talks comes after as many as 50 people are feared to have been killed in a suicide bombing in northern afghanistan at a mosque used by the minority shia community. the group calling itself islamic state says it was behind the attack. the biggest overhaul of the international corporate tax system in decades has received widespread welcome internationally. it is hoped that within two years, the largest multinationals will pay a minimum tax rate of 15%. some of the big technology companies which will be affected, facebook, amazon and google, have spoken positively about the agreement.

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