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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 9, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news. our top stories: the united states and the taliban are due to hold theirfirst the taliban are due to hold their first face—to—face talks since the us withdrawal from afghanistan. cracking down on safe havens — after months of negotiations, more than 130 nations agreed to radically change the international tax system. president biden urges american companies to fire workers who have not been vaccinated against coronavirus but there is a lot of opposition. the nobel peace prize is awarded to two journalists for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression — maria ressa of the philippines and russia's dmitry muratov. trust is what holds us together to be able to solve the complex
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problems our world is facing today. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. starting with some breaking news and the united states and taliban at to hold their first face—to—face talks since the militants seized control of afghanistan in august. the state department said the meeting would take place in doha on saturday and sunday. we are joined place in doha on saturday and sunday. we arejoined by nomia iqbal in washington. officials have been talking about what they are going to be pressing they are going to be pressing the taliban for, so talk us through it. the taliban for, so talk us through it— the taliban for, so talk us throu~h it. , ., �*, through it. yes, that's right, the us through it. yes, that's right, the us state _ through it. yes, that's right, the us state department - through it. yes, that's right, | the us state department has emphasised this is not about giving the taliban legitimacy by meeting them. i'm sure there will be many critics of the
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government that will try and argue otherwise. but the state department is very specific in saying this is a continuation of the conversations i have already been having with the taliban, mainly things that serve the us national interest so this is about trying to get safe passage for the thousands of american citizens that are still in afghanistan as well as the afghan allies and also making sure that the country does not turn into a hotbed of terrorism. the only time that they do mention the word government in the statement is when they say that they will press the taliban to form an inclusive government. the taliban has not recognised women in its leadership at all, so that is something the us wants to discuss with the taliban, and as i say, the us state department is very, very clear in saying this is not about granting recognition. they say in the statement this is not about conferring legitimacy. taliban have said they are not the same group that they were when they were in power all of those years ago, that they are now more
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inclusive, but the us has repeatedly said that they will judge the taliban on its deeds, not its words.— not its words. also we've been heafina not its words. also we've been hearing today _ not its words. also we've been hearing today about _ not its words. also we've been hearing today about this - hearing today about this bombing in kunduz and it's got about 50 people have been killed and the taliban when they took over said they would be able to keep so—called islamic state in check, didn't they? they said safety was a key concern for them.- key concern for them. that's ri . ht, key concern for them. that's right. and — key concern for them. that's right, and it's _ key concern for them. that's right, and it's something - key concern for them. that's| right, and it's something that the us will be pressing them on as well. this delegation that's going over, we've not got any confirmation of who will be a part of that delegation but we are expecting it to include members of the state department as well as members of the intelligence community. it's a really politically tricky position for america because you get two sorts of argument here in the us. those who say the taliban is a repressive group, you cannot trust them, but even meeting them is strengthening them. and on the other hand you have this other political argument that says if
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america wants to have any kind of influence in afghanistan in the region then it would be wise to talk to the taliban, especially considering that a lot of countries that the us considers rivals such as russia and china have been eyeing up the taliban as their new friends. the taliban as their new friends-_ the taliban as their new friends. ., ~ , ., , . friends. thank you very much, nomia iqbal— friends. thank you very much, nomia iqbal there _ friends. thank you very much, nomia iqbal there for - friends. thank you very much, nomia iqbal there for us - friends. thank you very much, nomia iqbal there for us in - nomia iqbal there for us in washington. as we were saying, the announcement of the talks comes after around 50 people have been killed in a suicide bombing in northern afghanistan at a mosque used by the minority sheer community. — shia. it happened in the city of kunduz. it happened during prayers when the mosque would have been packed with worshippers. officials say many would have been injured. fear and panic once again in afghanistan. injured victims of the blast are rushed to hospital. translation: there were so many people who were injured. _ hardly anyone was not hurt. most of those who were
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sitting there were killed. it's terrible. the local branch of the islamic state group, is—k, said it had targeted members of the shia minority. is—k is much more powerful than their rivals, the taliban, —— is—k is much less powerful than their rivals, the taliban, but has a history of devastating attacks in afghanistan. in august, more than 150 people were killed at the bombing outside kabul airport. in recent weeks, is has also launched dozens of smaller attacks targeting taliban fighters in eastern afghanistan. this latest bombing, in the north of the country, apparently carried out by a member of the uyghur ethnic group, suggests is's influence is expanding. translation: they are i the enemies of our nation. people were just beginning to experience peace and now this has happened. all our security forces are working on the investigation. we will find the culprits
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and then they will be dealt with according to sharia law. the taliban say they are bringing stability. but is is a growing concern for afghans and the wider region. secunder kermani, bbc news. brazil has become just the second country in the world after the us to record 100,000 deaths from covid—19. protesters against other government has dealt with the pandemic staged this demonstration in rio's copacabana beach with 600 white handkerchiefs remember the dead. deaths from coronavirus have been falling in brazil recently. more than 70% of people there have now received at least one vaccine dose. the most significant overhaul of the international tax system in a generation after negotiations in paris headed by the oecd, an agreement was announced to create a minimum
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rate of corporation tax. president biden says it will even the playing field around the world. here is how it will work. the minimum rate will be set at 15% — lower than the global average but higher than, for example, ireland's12.5% rate. 136 countries have signed up, only kenya and nigeria, pakistan and sri lanka have refused. the organisation for economic co—operation and development, which brokered the deal, says countries will collect around $150 billion a year extra in tax revenues. here is the french finance minister bruno le maire. it will allow us to fight with more efficiency against the rising inequalities in the world. this agreement at the level of the oecd is clearly a tax revolution — a tax revolution which will lead to less unfairness, to more justice, more efficiency.
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i've been speaking to daniel bunn at the tax foundation about the significance of this deal. this is a deal, as you mentioned, for a generation or even multiple generations. it's been about 100 years since this sort of agreement has been met and get there is still a lot of road to run as far as implementing the deal by seeing whether countries actually follow through on their commitments and of course the impact on businesses and the global economy. the concern is, i suppose, that a lot of people have been voicing, that the big companies that are being targeted in this — the googles and the facebooks — they've found ways to get around things in the past and they may well be able to get around this? that's one of the concerns. now, this deal is targeted certainly at the largest companies and in some of the methods that have been used in the past to shift profits. there are some carveouts for payroll and tangible assets
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so where companies are doing real substance, there will not be as much of a new tax burden from this. but generally, the tax — taxes are aimed at the larger companies and those that are more able to shift profits and it will increase the tax burden that they face. i mentioned ireland in the introductionjust there — they have used their 12.5% to bring jobs over to ireland, haven't they? do you think that they will see jobs disappearing as a result of this change to 15%? that's a good question. it depends on the stickiness of the investment. some companies have moved to ireland and built factories or built lots of office spaces and planned to be there for a long time. ireland is going to be complying with this deal by applying the 15% rate to multinationals, but it still wants to be supportive of local irish companies and is going to maintain the 12.5% rate for purely domestic irish companies or companies small enough to be out of scope of the deal. now, ireland will be losing about 2 billion euros from this deal because of a reallocation
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of taxable profits so it is something where they are taking on the cost but bringing into something where they think they can still be attractive to multinational investment. what would you say to the claims that it will be mainly richer companies who will benefit from this and the poorer countries will see their tax incomes decrease? those claims are largely true. a lot of the companies that are in scope are already headquartered in larger, relatively rich countries. so those countries are going to be claiming a larger share of the profits that those companies are earning and developing countries are not going to be claiming claiming as much. a lot of developing countries would have liked to see a large reallocation but apparently, that was not in the cards for this political agreement. daniel bunn from the tax foundation. let's get some of the day's other news. aid workers say at least five people have been shot dead at a migrant detention centre
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in the libyan capital tripoli. the un's migration agency says that overcrowding had led to chaos at the site before the shooting started. in recent days, the libyan authorities have arrested more than 5000 migrants and refugees in raids across the capital. relatives five french sailors who mysteriously drowned of the english coast nearly two decades ago urged france's foreign minister to reveal all he knows about the incident. the sinking of the trawler in 2004 is currently being examined by an inquest at the high court in london. relatives believe that the vote of boat was dragged down by an underwater craft. at least three nato submarines were in the area at the time. donald trump has been accused of trying to hide nearly $4 million of payments from foreign governments at his washington, dc hotel during his years in power. the house of representatives committee on oversight and reform said that hotel records raise troubling questions about potential conflicts of interest. mr trump's lawyers have previously denied that there was any wrongdoing or conflicts of interest.
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france has threatened to reduce electricity supplies to the british crown dependency of jersey amid fresh tensions over post—brexit fishing rights. it's your minister said france had applied for 450 licenses for its fishermen to access british waters but it only been granted half the number. lizzie williamson reports from paris. questions about the row over british fishing licenses on a morning news programme, they said reducing electricity to jersey was no idle threat. translation:— jersey was no idle threat. translation: �* ., ., ~ translation: we're not talking about cutting _ translation: we're not talking about cutting power— translation: we're not talking about cutting power to _ translation: we're not talking about cutting power to each - about cutting power to each resident, he said. but reducing the delivery of electricity to the delivery of electricity to the island is possible. resentment has been piling up on this side of the channel over covid vaccines, post—brexit border tricks for northern ireland and a secret british american submarine deal in the pacific. fishing rights
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have been a source of tension for years but exit has sharpened divisions with european fishermen asked to prove their connections to uk waters. some small french both say they are not equipped to provide that proof. france has accused britain of not living up accused britain of not living up to its own post—brexit agreement. next week, eu ministers will meet in luxembourg to discuss their response. as politicians on both sides of the channel point to the waters. that separate britain and france. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. they are known for their hard—hitting investigations which have angered their country's powerful elites and leaders. twojournalists — maria ressa from the philippines and dmitri muratov from russia — have been recognised for the importance of this freedom of expression. the nobel committee commended their work, saying that independent and fact—based journalism served to protect against the abuse of power and lies. caroline hawley has this
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profile on the winners. maria ressa was prosecuted previously regarding publishing law. dmitry muratov dedicated his work to put —— journalists killed in the line of work. philippine bornjournalist at columbia universityjoins us columbia university joins us live columbia universityjoins us live now. tell us about maria and really what keeps her going under difficult circumstances. truly maria has been under intense pressure over the last five years since duterte has beenin five years since duterte has been in power, she has been trolled, threatened with death and rape, she and rappler have
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had close to a dozen lawsuits. she has tremendous strength of character, she has also largely been locked up in the pandemic, but allowed to travel, just last week the government refused to let her travel to greece, her mother was ill —— to the us, she wanted to visit her mother and she hasn't been allowed. it is a lot of tremendous pressure, she has shown courage, equanimity and grace through all of that. my auestion grace through all of that. my question then is, what keeps her going under such difficult circumstances, do you think? what motivates her? i circumstances, do you think? what motivates her?- circumstances, do you think? what motivates her? i think she is a firm believer _ what motivates her? i think she is a firm believer of _ what motivates her? i think she is a firm believer of the - what motivates her? i think she is a firm believer of the role - is a firm believer of the role of the press as watchdog, the tagline of rappler is hold the line, and is doing, she will hold the line for as long as it takes. she is a firm believer in the right of an independent press and a watchdog of the press. press and a watchdog of the ress. �* ., ., i. press and a watchdog of the ress. �* ., ., , ., ~ press. and what do you think about maybe _ press. and what do you think about maybe the _ press. and what do you think about maybe the concerned i press. and what do you think i about maybe the concerned that something like the nobel peace
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prize being awarded to her might actually endanger her more, might make her more of a target? fist more, might make her more of a taraet? �* , ~' target? at this point i think duterte is _ target? at this point i think duterte is a _ target? at this point i think duterte is a wounded - target? at this point i thinkj duterte is a wounded tiger, target? at this point i think- duterte is a wounded tiger, his polarity is going down, he is still popular but his popularity is going down, his government has been under attack for its very inept response to the covid pandemic, there have been corruption charges against people very close to him as well, and so this actually comes at a good time, when the president is on the defensive, he is weak, he is up for, his term ends next year and the election is going to be coming soon, so i think this helps her, this helps filipino journalists this helps her, this helps filipinojournalists in this helps her, this helps filipino journalists in general and it helps press freedom in the philippines. [30 and it helps press freedom in the philippines.— the philippines. do you think it will a big _ the philippines. do you think it will a big -- _ the philippines. do you think it will a big -- be _ the philippines. do you think it will a big -- be a - the philippines. do you think it will a big -- be a big - the philippines. do you think it will a big -- be a big deal. it will a big —— be a big deal for her, will she be very happy with this? we for her, will she be very happy with this?— with this? we are all very ha - with this? we are all very happy for _ with this? we are all very happy for her. _ with this? we are all very happy for her, i _ with this? we are all very happy for her, i am - with this? we are all very happy for her, i am sure l with this? we are all very i happy for her, i am sure she with this? we are all very - happy for her, i am sure she is thrilled. it happy for her, i am sure she is thrilled. . , happy for her, i am sure she is thrilled. ., , ., , ., happy for her, i am sure she is thrilled. ., , ., ., ~ thrilled. it was lovely to talk to ou, thrilled. it was lovely to talk to you, thank _ thrilled. it was lovely to talk to you, thank you _ thrilled. it was lovely to talk to you, thank you very - thrilled. it was lovely to talkj to you, thank you very much thrilled. it was lovely to talk - to you, thank you very much for joining us. stay with us here
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on bbc news, still to come: we speak to the star of spencer, the new film about princess diana's relationship with the royal family. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. they believe everything's going to be different from now on. they think their country will be respected in the world once more, as it used to be before slobodan milosevic took power. the dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. as the parade was reaching its climax, two grenades i exploded and a group of- soldiersjumped from a military truck taking part in a parade i and ran towards the president, firing from kalashnikov automatic rifles. - after 437 years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's tragic warship emerged. but even as divers worked
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to buoy her up, the mary rose went through another heart—stopping drama. i want to be the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of california. this is bbc news, the headlines: the united states and the taliban are due to hold their first face—to—face talks since the us withdrawal from afghanistan. and widespread international welcome as more than hundred and 30 nations agreed to crack down on safe havens and radically change the international tax system. -- 130 —— 130 nations. nine people in northern ireland are now facing investigations after the death of the journalist leo mckee,
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during writing in 2019. those charges have been linked to the hardline political party. police say it is the critical voice of the new ira which was formed in 2012. they have warned of its attempt to recruit and radicalise young people. our ireland young —— island correspondent reports. this is the public face of what remains of militant dissident republicanism in northern ireland. a march organised by the political party, saoradh, who reject the peace agreement which brought an end to decades of violence and see themselves as the true continuation of a radical struggle to bring about a united ireland. police investigating the death of lyra mckee have recently arrested a number of their members. whilst it's not true to say that everybody who is associated with saoradh is associated with the new ira, there is a crossover in terms of some of that membership. this paramilitary style kind
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of display, you may think looks more like a throwback to northern ireland's past, but for many supporters of saoradh, in their eyes, the conflict continues. they also hope to inspire the next generation to continue the fight. at least a dozen people linked to saoradh are now facing charges for rioting, bomb making and murder. security sources have previously told the bbc the man seen here in the green jacket, tomas ash mallon, is in the new ira's leadership. lyra mckee was shot when a new ira gunman fired towards police during rioting in derry. the dissident group believes the use of violence is justified to resist what it sees as british rule in northern ireland. and continues to try and carry out gun and bomb attacks. some of those charged in connection with the death of lyra mckee have been linked with saoradh's youth wing, known as eistigi. how do you think these groups
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attract young people? in terms of how they continue to attract people to this cause, i think what they do is they give young men in particular a place to belong. and i think that sense of belonging is attractive to young men that have few other opportunities in life, almost to prove themselves. over the past year, the group has held protests in support of new ira prisoners injail and stepped up its efforts to attract young people through recruitment videos on social media — aiming to appeal to a generation born long after northern ireland's darkest days of violence. many of those who joined the old provisional ira during its armed campaign turned away from violence with the good friday agreement in the 1990s. some of these guys that are in the new ira would've been in the provisional ira with you 30—40 years ago. what motivates them to continue? there is no semblance
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of strategic thinking there, but there is a belief in the tradition that any irish person has a right to take up arms against the british while the british are here. it's a very marginal ideological niche, but it exists. how do you feel when you see young people today attracted to that cause that you once supported? i think it's very sad. they are guided by antiquated ideology, which has no relevance in today's world. the people going to jail today will be in for a very long time. saoradh has always denied any involvement with violence. in a statement, the group told us it believes the recent arrests and charges of its members is an attempt to suppress republicanism and that it will not be deterred from pushing forward its ideology. police say those in the new ira continue to pose a serious threat, particularly to their own communities. emma vardy, bbc news.
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she was one of the best—known figures of the late 20th century, and today, nearly 25 years after the death of diana, princess of wales, her story remains a source of intense fascination. the new film spencer has just had its its uk premiere at the london film festival, and our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba spoke to the star of the film, actress kristen stewart. three days, that's it. it's set over christmas 1991, a period where diana felt trapped by the royal family. taking on the role was empowering, says kristen stewart. to play her, even though it was sad and tumultuous, ironically, i felt taller. i felt like somebody who could lead with love and make people feel good, and it's really contagious. it comes right back at you. do you think i got delayed by someone? oh come on, come on.
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they are circling us. it seems they are circling just me. performers always feel pressure playing real—life figures. it is an even greater sense of responsibility for someone like diana. i felt such love for her and still do and, um... you know, in a way that isn't... without implying, like, a kind of developed spirituality, i felt her. i wanted to protect her. there is no future. the past and the present are the same thing. she is someone who many feel was exploited throughout her life and now there are still things that are making money from her. do people who think that a film like this is perhaps at best unnecessary, and at worst exploitative, have a point? we came to this with love. like, we truly... first foot forward is always trying to understand somebody that we love. the negotiation between art and commerce is a vast subject.
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i believe in art. i believe in trying to get closer to other people through it. they know everything. they don't. there is still almost six months to go but kristen stewart is already striding well ahead of her oscar best actress rivals. lizo mzimba, bbc news. before we go, we have an uplifting story from japan. yoshio kinoshita is 81 years old and has recently taken up skateboarding. he saw a board on sale one day in a market near his house and it only cost him about $7, and it made him wonder if he could keep up with the neighbourhood kids he saw cruising around town. every day now he heads to his local skate park in osaka and practices with the other skaters to improve his tricks. you can contact me on twitter, i'm at @lucyegray, and there is plenty more on all of our stories
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on the bbc news website. hello again. friday was another very mild day across the whole of the uk, even those places where it stayed cloudy throughout. however, there were some places where the sunshine popped out. northern england was one of the sunnier places. it was also one of the warmest places in the uk. the day's highest temperature — ryhill in west yorkshire, 22 degrees celsius. that's eight degrees celsius higher than the october average, so it was very, very warm indeed. now looking at this satellite picture, you can see those areas that had the clearest skies. we've seen some clearing skies across east anglia and south—east england behind this cold front because what we're seeing at the moment is cooler and fresher air starting to spread in from the near continent. and that's significant because as humidity levels drop, the clouds will increasingly break up, and that's happening right now across east anglia and the south—east.
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this meanwhile, for northern england, wales, south—west england, southern and eastern scotland, still a lot of low cloud around, a few spots of drizzle, bit of mist and fog for some. and then there's this band of rain that's really pepping up at the moment. some heavy rain for northern ireland, western scotland bringing a risk of some localised surface water flooding. now, the rain will tend to turn a little lighter and patchier through saturday, and the weather front will finally, after a couple of days, start to move away into parts of the north of england and the north of wales. midlands, east anglia, southern counties of england should be much more in the way of sunny spells compared with recent days, and temperature still pretty high for october, 18—19 degrees. the second half of the weekend sees that cold front across northern areas pushing southwards. it's a weakening feature, so there won't be much rain left on it by the time it reaches east anglia and south—east england, but there could be an odd patch. for most of the uk on sunday, it's another dry day with plenty of sunshine around.
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however, there will be a fair few blustery showers across the far north and west of scotland. temperatures easing somewhat across northern areas, but still very warm for the south of england and wales. monday, well, it looks like we'll see another band of rain push its way into scotland, turning increasingly heavy, some fairly gusty winds with this as well. temperatures will be coming down further across northern scotland, just around 11—12 degrees for some here. but for northern ireland, england and wales, still above average, but those temperatures are getting a little bit closer to the seasonal norms. 14 degrees, for example, is about right in london. and eventually we should get down there on tuesday. a lot of dry weather for many into next week.
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this is bbc news. the united states and the taliban are holding their first in—person talks as the us withdrawal from afghanistan. the us delegation will meet senior taliban representatives on saturday and sunday in the qatari capital doha. the us has remained in contact with the taliban since they seized kabul in august as us troops pulled out. the announcement of the talk comes after as many as 50 people are thought to have been killed in a suicide bombing in northern afghanistan in a mosque used by minority shia community. the group calling itself islamic state is behind the attack. the biggest overhaul of the international corporate tax system in decades has received widespread welcome internationally. it is hoped that within two years, the largest multinationals will pay a minimum tax rate of 15%. facebook, amazon and google, have spoken positively about
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the agreement.

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