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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 9, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

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hello, this is bbc news. our top stories cracking down on safe havens, after months of negotiations more than 130 nations agreed to radically change the international tax system. nobel peace prize is awarded to two journalists for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. maria ressa of the philippines and russia's dmitry muratov. translation: this prize belongs to those who are no longer with us and for those brilliant young people who are right now on the third floor of the newsroom. 50 people are reported killed in an attack on a mosque in northern afghanistan. the islamic state group says it was behind the bombing. president biden urges american companies to fire workers who have not been
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vaccinated against coronavirus but there is a lot of opposition.- but there is a lot of opposition. but there is a lot of o- osition. ., ,, opposition. the royal highness. the family _ opposition. the royal highness. the family are _ opposition. the royal highness. the family are all _ opposition. the royal highness. the family are all gathered - opposition. the royal highness. the family are all gathered in i the family are all gathered in the drawing room. find the family are all gathered in the drawing room.— the family are all gathered in the drawing room. and we speak to the star _ the drawing room. and we speak to the star of _ the drawing room. and we speak to the star of spencer, _ the drawing room. and we speak to the star of spencer, the - the drawing room. and we speak to the star of spencer, the new | to the star of spencer, the new movie about princess diana's relationship with the royal family. it is the most significant overhaul of the international tax system in a generation. after negotiations in paris headed by the oecd an agreement was finally announced to provide a minimum rate of corporation tax. president biden says it will even the playing field around the world. here is how it will work. the minimum rate will be set at 15%, lower than the global average but higher than for example ireland's12.5% rate.
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136 countries have signed up, only can you and nigeria, pakistan and sri lanka have refused. the organisation for economic co—operation and development which brokered the deal is countries will collect around $150 billion a year extra in tax revenues. here is the french finance minister. it will allow us to fight with more efficiency against the rising inequalities in the world. this agreement at the level of the oecd is clearly a tax revolution. a tax revolution which will lead to less unfairness, to more justice, more efficiency. more on this now, daniel bunn is at the tax foundation and joins metlife from baltimore. this has been in motion since about 2015 and quite a big deal
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—— joins me now live. it -- joins me now live. it certainly _ —— joins me now live. it certainly is. this is a deal, as you mentioned, for a generation or even multiple generations. it's been about 100 years since this sort of agreement has been met and get there is still a lot of road to run as far as implementing the deal by seeing whether countries actually follow through on their commitments and of course the impact on businesses and the global economy. businesses and the global economy-— businesses and the global econom . . ., . , economy. the concern is, i sunspose. _ economy. the concern is, i suapose. that _ economy. the concern is, i suppose, that a _ economy. the concern is, i suppose, that a lot - economy. the concern is, i suppose, that a lot of - economy. the concern is, i l suppose, that a lot of people have been voicing, the big companies which are being targeted in this, google and facebook, they found ways to get around things in the past and they may well be able to get around this?— and they may well be able to get around this? that's one of the concerns. _ get around this? that's one of the concerns. sdl_ get around this? that's one of the concerns. sdl is _ get around this? that's one of the concerns. sdl is targeted | the concerns. sdl is targeted certainly at the largest companies and in some of the methods that have been used in the past. to shift profits. there are some carveouts for payroll and tangible assets so where companies are doing real substance, it will not be as much of a new tax burden from this generally, taxes are aimed at the larger companies and
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those that are more able to shift profits and it will increase the tax burden that they face. i increase the tax burden that they face-— increase the tax burden that the face. ., ., they face. i mentioned ireland in the introduction _ they face. i mentioned ireland in the introduction just - they face. i mentioned ireland in the introduction just there, | in the introduction just there, they have used the 12.5% to bring jobs over to ireland, haven't they? do you think they will see jobs disappearing as a result of this change to 15%? that's a good question. it depends on the stickiness of the investment. some companies have moved to ireland and built factories or built lots of office spaces and planned to be there for a long time. ireland is going to be complying with this deal by applying the 15% rate multinationals but it still wants to be supportive of local irish companies and is going to maintain 12.5% rate for purely domestic irish companies or companies are small enough to be out of scope of the deal. ireland will be losing about 2 billion euros from this deal because of a reallocation of tax —— taxable profits so it is something where they are taking on the cost by bringing into something
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where they think they can still be attractive to multinational investment.— be attractive to multinational investment. ., ., investment. what would you say to the claims — investment. what would you say to the claims it _ investment. what would you say to the claims it will _ investment. what would you say to the claims it will be _ investment. what would you say to the claims it will be mainly i to the claims it will be mainly richer companies who will benefit from this and the poorer countries will see their tax incomes decrease?- tax incomes decrease? those claims are — tax incomes decrease? those claims are largely _ tax incomes decrease? those claims are largely true, - tax incomes decrease? those claims are largely true, a - tax incomes decrease? those claims are largely true, a lotl claims are largely true, a lot of the companies that are in scope are already headquartered in larger, relatively rich countries. so those countries are going to be claiming a larger share of the profit that those companies are earning and developing countries are not going to be claiming as much, a lot of developing countries would have liked to see a large reallocation but apparently it was not in the cards for this political agreement.- was not in the cards for this political agreement. good to net our political agreement. good to get your thoughts, _ political agreement. good to get your thoughts, thank - political agreement. good to | get your thoughts, thank you very much. daniel bunn from the tax foundation.— they are known for their hard—hitting investigations ha rd—hitting investigations which have hard—hitting investigations which have angered their country's powerful elites and leaders. two journalists maria ressa from the philippines and dmitry muratov from russia have
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been recognised the importance of this freedom of expression. the nobel committee commended their work, saying that independent and fact —based journalism served protect against the abuse of power and lies. carolyn hawley has this profile on the winners. for the first time since 1935, the peace prize goes to journalists for their battle to tell the truth at great personal risk. to maria ressa and dmitry muratov, for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace. dmitry muratov is a russian journalist who has taken a stand against authoritarian rule. today, he dedicated the award to six colleagues, who, he said, were murdered for their work. speaks russian.
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naming each one of them, he said the prize belonged to them. their paper, novaya gazeta, has been highly critical of president putin and russia's ruling elite. its investigations have exposed electoral fraud such as the stuffing of ballot boxes, as well as official corruption and police violence. translation: | don't know| what effect this nobel award will have on censorship of the media here in russia, with many investigative journalists being accused of being foreign agents. maria ressa from the philippines is the other winner — a woman described by the nobel committee as fearless. she's faced criminal charges and death threats. her work has exposed state abuses under the controversial president rodrigo duturte — in particular the extrajudicial killings that have come with his deadly war on drugs. thousands of people, mostly from poor communities, have been murdered. today, maria ressa spoke
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of the vital importance of telling the truth. when you don't have facts, you don't have a truth, you don't have trust. trust is what holds us together to be able to solve the complex problems our world is facing today. so when you attack the media, often times it is about shooting the messenger. two messengers in the spotlight today as the nobel committee says press freedoms are necessary for both democracy and peace, but are under threat around the world. caroline hawley, bbc news. as we were hearing in the piece there on the david that a russian journalist won the nobel peace prize the government in moscow has designated a number of journalists as foreign agents. among them is andre zachary rolfe from the bbc. the corporation said it strongly rejects the decision by russia to identify him as a foreign agent. in a statement, it says:
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officials in northern afghanistan say as many as 50 people may have been killed in a suicide bombing a mosque is ljy a suicide bombing a mosque is by the ts community. grip, calling itself as a next day, says it was behind the attack. it happened in the state of falsity of con dos bring prayers when the mosque would have been packed with worshippers. officials say many would have been injured. fear and panic once again in afghanistan. indian victims of the blast are rushed to hospital. translation: were so many peeple _ hospital. translation: were so many peeple who _ hospital. translation: were so many people who were _ hospital. translation: were so many people who were injured. l many people who were injured. hardly anyone was not heard. those who were sitting there were killed. it's terrible. the local branch _ were killed. it's terrible. the local branch of _ were killed. it's terrible. the local branch of the _ were killed. it's terrible. the local branch of the islamic state group, is k, said it had targeted members of the ts
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minority. —— shia. is k is much more powerful than the taliban, their rivals, but has a history of devastating attacks in afghanistan. in august, more than 150 people were killed at the bombing outside kabul airport. in recent weeks, is has also launched dozens of smaller attacks targeting taliban fighters in eastern afghanistan. this latest bombing, in the north of the country, apparently carried out ljy country, apparently carried out by a member of the uyghur ethnic group, suggests is's influence is expanding. translation: influence is expanding. tuna/mom- influence is expanding. translation: , ., translation: they are the enemies of _ translation: they are the enemies of our _ translation: they are the enemies of our nation. - translation: they are the | enemies of our nation. people who arejust beginning enemies of our nation. people who are just beginning to experience peace and now, this has happened. all our security forces are working on the investigation. we will find the culprit and then they will be dealt with according to sharia law. ., ,_ , dealt with according to sharia law. the taliban say they are brin . in: law. the taliban say they are bringing stability. _
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law. the taliban say they are bringing stability. but - law. the taliban say they are bringing stability. but is - law. the taliban say they are bringing stability. but is is i law. the taliban say they are bringing stability. but is is a | bringing stability. but is is a growing concern for afghans and the wider region. secunder kermani, bbc news. some breaking news to bring you into the united states and the taliban will hold the first in person talk since the us withdrawn from afghanistan. the us delegation will meet on saturday and sunday in the qatari capital doha, senior taliban representatives. us has remained in contact with the taliban since the long—time foes seized kabul in august as us troops pulled out, and the meeting will be the first but face to face. several top us officials, including the secretary of state antony blinken and attorney general met garland were in mexico today meeting president undera is melbourne lopez 0brador discussing the creation of a new security deal between the two countries that would address things like the influence of drug cartels of the smuggling of us — made guns into mexico and the flow of
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migrants to the us border. the talks come at a time in the biden administration is incredibly reliant on mexico to house many of the migrants who have come to the border. it may give the mexican government some leverage in these negotiations. let's talk to our correspondent will grant who joins us from mexico city. they want to tackle drug smuggling, violence and the causes of migration to the us so a lot of talk about. how can we do all this? ~ , , . ., this? well, in essence, what lies at the — this? well, in essence, what lies at the heart _ this? well, in essence, what lies at the heart of— this? well, in essence, what lies at the heart of this - this? well, in essence, what lies at the heart of this is - this? well, in essence, what lies at the heart of this is an | lies at the heart of this is an existing security arrangement called the merida initiative. the president here in mexico has never been a fan of that security plan. he says it is far too militaristic in its basis, but essentially it has pumped over £3 billion, dollars, to the mexican military but not made any difference on the ground. the intention is to completely redraw that and build a new
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security framework altogether. and do you get a sense that they are starting to achieve things? they have been talking warmly about a new stage in relations, haven't they? they have, relations, haven't they? they have. but _ relations, haven't they? they have. but i — relations, haven't they? they have, but i think _ relations, haven't they? they have, but i think they - relations, haven't they? they have, but i think they had - relations, haven't they? they have, but i think they had to | have, but i think they had to park a lot of the differences in order to find enough common ground to reach on this security arrangement. there are huge differences, including for example the president's mistrust of the drug enforcement agency, the fact that the americans want to see a number of agents receive visas so they can do operations in this country, and of course the big elephant in the room between them that continues to between them that continues to be there, which is immigration. what did they talk about, immigration? it was not specifically to talk about immigration but where do you see things going with that? as we were saying in the introduction the us is grateful, isn't it, for what
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happens with the migrants at the border.— happens with the migrants at the border. they are, and in a sense i think _ the border. they are, and in a sense i think critics _ the border. they are, and in a sense i think critics would - sense i think critics would suggest that the mexicans, who have sort have been forced into doing the americans�*s dirty work on immigration, what has been interesting is as the two sides were sitting down for these talks, over 650 immigrants travelling in three refrigerated trucks were detained, all at once, at the us mexico border. not that any more evidence is needed to show the severity of the crisis on the severity of the crisis on the border, but it really underlines just how difficult things are. underlines 'ust how difficult things are.— underlines 'ust how difficult thinusare. ., , . things are. thanks very much, will grant _ things are. thanks very much, will grant in _ things are. thanks very much, will grant in mexico _ things are. thanks very much, will grant in mexico city. - some of the day's other news. aid workers say at least five people have been shot dead at a migrant detention centre in the libyan capital tripoli. the un's migration agencies that overcrowding had led to chaos at the site before the shooting started. in recent days the libyan authorities have arrested more than 5000 migrants and refugees in raids across the capital.
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donald trump has been accused of trying to hide nearly $4 million of payments from foreign governments at his washington, dc hotel during his years in power. house of representatives committee on oversight and reforms that hotel records raise troubling questions about potential conflicts of interest and mr trump's lawyers have previously denied that there was any wrongdoing or conflict of interest. facebook says it is now fixed problems which some users were experiencing with its devices. the issues seem to be affecting instagram but not facebook or whatsapps. hasluck has said it was caused by a configuration change. on monday, facebook services offered up to a six hour long outage after what it said were internal technical issues. the company says the two events are not related. the headlines: more than 130 countries have signed up to a global deal on corporate tax reform, including a 15% minimum corporate tax rate. this year's
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nobel peace prize has been awarded to two campaigning journalists, maria ressa and dmitry muratov. brazil has become just the second country in the world after the us to record 600,000 deaths from covid—19. protesters against how the government has dealt with the pandemic stage this demonstration on rio's copacabana beach where 600 white handkerchiefs were put to remember the dead. deaths from coronavirus have been falling in brazil recently, more than 70% of people they have now received at least one vaccine dose. president biden is urging companies in the us to fire workers who have not been vaccinated. the latest official figures show only 56% of americans have been fully vaccinated, and mr biden says he will soon bring in roles requiring all healthcare workers to have the jab. he wants individual states to do
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the same for teachers. but there has been opposition, as our north america correspondence found in new england. chanting: freedom over fear! freedom over fear! _ it is, they say, about freedom, an individual�*s right to choose if they get vaccinated, even if they are a nurse. one of the new battlegrounds over covid in the us is the requirement in some hospitals that all their staff have had the jab. but some, they say, would rather lose theirjob. leah cushman's not just a nurse, but a state politician. my beliefs are religious. i believe that my creator endowed me with an immune system that protects me, and if i get sick, that's an act of god. what, you've never been vaccinated against anything? i have before i was saved by the lord, yes. with that logic, you wouldn't take any medicines. that's not true, no. i wouldn't take one that affects the immune system this way. of course, even vaccinated
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staff have the potential to pass on the virus to patients, but hospital managers say unvaccinated health care workers getting sick also puts more strain on resources and suspect for some there are biggerforces at play. it's notjust covid, there are other vaccines that employees are required to have. mmr is an example, hepatitis. so again, this is a highly electrified issue, if you will, and we all recognise that. and politicised. to say it's not political would be disingenuous. save our teachers! and the controversy swept up another profession too, with school staff being threatened with sacking if they don't get vaccinated, including in new york city. in connecticut, teacher kahseim outlaw refused the vaccine and testing, and has already lost his job. i do not use any kind of synthetic ingredients in my life, whether that be for medicinal purposes, supplementation, food and fuel.
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so the idea of becoming inoculated is something that goes directly against the way that i live my life and have lived for the last decade or more. what is the harm in getting tested every week? so, when we talk about harm, i view it as an unnecessary medical procedure. kahseim had covid so says his natural immunity should suffice. but that's not enough for a government ramping up pressure on the unvaccinated. aleem maqbool, bbc news. a shortage of abattoir workers had lost pig farmers across the uk facing had lost pig farmers across the ukfacing human had lost pig farmers across the uk facing human disaster, that is according to the national farmers union. healthy pigs are ready having to be destroyed as their meat cannot be processed quickly enough, with the industry blaming brexit in the pandemic. the government says it is keeping the situation under review and working closely with the sector. danny savage reports from east yorkshire.
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it has been a busy week for kate moore who is passionate about the welfare of her animals but threatened —— terrified she will soon have to cull some of them. she is banging the drum for pig farmers. this morning she was outside doing a live tv interview while her mum and sisters watched in the kitchen. come and speak to me, boris johnson, have the guts to stand up johnson, have the guts to stand up and talk to us! {30 johnson, have the guts to stand up and talk to us!— up and talk to us! go girl, go uirl! but up and talk to us! go girl, go girl! but behind _ up and talk to us! go girl, go girl! but behind the - up and talk to us! go girl, go i girl! but behind the supportive smiles there _ girl! but behind the supportive smiles there is _ girl! but behind the supportive smiles there is a _ girl! but behind the supportive smiles there is a growing - girl! but behind the supportive| smiles there is a growing sense of despair. haste smiles there is a growing sense of despair-— of despair. we are struggling so much and _ of despair. we are struggling so much and are _ of despair. we are struggling so much and are we - of despair. we are struggling so much and are we are - of despair. we are struggling i so much and are we are asking for is some help. did so much and are we are asking for is some help.— for is some help. did she sum u . for is some help. did she sum u- the for is some help. did she sum up the tension? _ for is some help. did she sum up the tension? yeah, - for is some help. did she sum up the tension? yeah, you - for is some help. did she sum| up the tension? yeah, you can see. up the tension? yeah, you can see- she _ up the tension? yeah, you can see. she said _ up the tension? yeah, you can see. she said exactly - up the tension? yeah, you can see. she said exactly what - up the tension? yeah, you can see. she said exactly what the j see. she said exactly what the roblem see. she said exactly what the problem is. — see. she said exactly what the problem is, and _ see. she said exactly what the problem is, and why _ see. she said exactly what the problem is, and why it - see. she said exactly what the problem is, and why it is - see. she said exactly what the problem is, and why it is so i problem is, and why it is so heartbreaking. | problem is, and why it is so heartbreaking.— heartbreaking. i am really optimistic _ heartbreaking. i am really optimistic person, - heartbreaking. i am really optimistic person, but - heartbreaking. i am really optimistic person, but myj heartbreaking. i am really - optimistic person, but my god, this past week has... brute optimistic person, but my god, this past week has. . ._ this past week has... we are tired it is _ this past week has... we are tired it is as _ this past week has... we are tired it is as we _ this past week has... we are tired it is as we are - this past week has... we are tired it is as we are farmers, | tired it is as we are farmers, that— tired it is as we are farmers, that is— tired it is as we are farmers, that is what we do, we work
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bloody— that is what we do, we work bloody hard for it.— bloody hard for it. and i am not killing _ bloody hard for it. and i am not killing pigs _ bloody hard for it. and i am not killing pigs for - bloody hard for it. and i am not killing pigs for no - bloody hard for it. and i am i not killing pigs for no reason. no way. cries. these pigs are averaging about 100 kg — these pigs are averaging about 100 in} if— these pigs are averaging about 100 in} if they— these pigs are averaging about 100 kg. ifthey get— these pigs are averaging about 100 kg. if they get 205- these pigs are averaging about 100 kg. if they get 205 kg, - 100 kg. if they get 205 kg, their— 100 kg. if they get 205 kg, their value _ 100 kg. if they get 205 kg, their value is _ 100 kg. if they get 205 kg, their value is halved - their value is halved basically. _ their value is halved basically.— their value is halved basically. their value is halved basicall . ~' , basically. unlike beef cattle, ms basically. unlike beef cattle, pigs have — basically. unlike beef cattle, pigs have a _ basically. unlike beef cattle, pigs have a small _ basically. unlike beef cattle, pigs have a small window . basically. unlike beef cattle, pigs have a small window of| pigs have a small window of time in which to be sold. leave it too long ma are too heavy, and too big for the retailers. the reality is that we will actually have to pay to get rid of these pigs, for them to go into landfill or to be burnt. we will pay for them, we will not get anything for these pigs. not get anything for these is. �* ., ~' , not get anything for these pigs. another key factor is that these _ pigs. another key factor is that these pens _ pigs. another key factor is that these pens are - pigs. another key factor is that these pens are full, i pigs. another key factor is i that these pens are full, and there will soon be no more room to put pigs that are coming through the system. and when they run out of space, that is when they will have to start culling healthy animals. the
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government _ culling healthy animals. the government says _ culling healthy animals. the government says it - culling healthy animals. tia: government says it understands the challenges the pig industry is facing, and says it is working closely with the sector, keeping the situation under review, but it's sector, keeping the situation under review, but its call to make the industry more attractive to uk workers is frustrating here.— attractive to uk workers is frustrating here. everyone who works here _ frustrating here. everyone who works here is _ frustrating here. everyone who works here is local— frustrating here. everyone who works here is local and - frustrating here. everyone who works here is local and british | works here is local and british and i— works here is local and british and i am _ works here is local and british and i am all for boris johnson's quote of getting british— johnson's quote of getting british people in britishjobs, i british people in britishjobs, i am — british people in britishjobs, i am for— british people in britishjobs, i am for it, but there won't be a job. — i am for it, but there won't be a job, they— i am for it, but there won't be a job, they won't be an agricultural industry for these kids to — agricultural industry for these kids to come and work into it. the _ kids to come and work into it. the family— kids to come and work into it. the family on this farms is the situation must improve in the next fortnight. —— farm says. she was one of the best—known figures of the late 20th century. today nearly 25 years after the death of princess diana her story remains a source of intense fascination. the new film spencer has just had its debut at the london film festival, our correspondence spoke to the star of the film, actress
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kristin stewart. three days, that's it. it's set over christmas 1991, a period where diana felt trapped by the royal family. taking on the role was empowering, says kristen stewart. to play her, even though it was sad and tumultuous, ironically, i felt taller. i felt like somebody who could lead with love and make people feel good, and it's really contagious. it comes right back at you. do you think i got delayed by someone? oh come on, come on. they are circling us. it seems they are circling just me. performers always feel pressure playing real—life figures. it is an even greater sense of responsibility for someone like diana. i felt such love for her and still do and, um... you know, in a way that isn't... without implying, like, a kind of developed spirituality, i felt her. i wanted to protect her. there is no future.
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the past in the present are the same thing. she is someone who many feel was exploited throughout her life and now there are still things that are making money from her. do people who think that a film like this is perhaps at best unnecessary, and at worst exploitative, have a point? we came to this with love. like, we truly... first foot forward is always trying to understand somebody that we love. the negotiation between art and commerce is a vast subject. i believe in art. i believe in trying to get closer to other people through it. they know everything. they don't. there is still almost six months to go but kristen stewart is already striding well ahead of her oscar best actress rivals. lizo mzimba, bbc news. before we go, we have an uplifting story from japan.
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this 81—year—old has recently taken up skateboarding. he saw a board on sale one day in a market near his house and it only cost him about $7, and it made him wonder if he could keep up with the neighbourhood kids. every day now he heads to his local skate park in osaka and practices with the other skaters to improve his tricks. good for him. a reminder of our top story. there has been widespread welcome for the biggest reform of international —— the international corporate tax system in decades. it is hoped that within two years the largest multinationals will pay a minimum tax rate of 15%. hundred and 36 countries back to the accord which was brokered by the oecd. —— 136 countries. some of the big technology companies include facebook, amazon and google, have spoken positive about the agreement. you can contact me
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on twitter, there is plenty more on all of our stories on the bbc news website, thanks for watching. hello again. friday was another very mild day across the whole of the uk, even those places where it stayed cloudy throughout. however, there were some places where the sunshine popped out. northern england was one of the sunnier places. it was also one of the warmest places in the uk. the day's highest temperature — ryhill in west yorkshire, 22 degrees celsius. that's eight degrees celsius higher than the october average, so it was very, very warm indeed. now looking at the satellite picture, you can see those areas that had the clearest skies. we've seen some clearing skies across east anglia and south—east england behind this cold front because what we're seeing at the moment is cooler and fresher air starting to spread in from the near continent. and that's significant because as humidity levels drop, the clouds will increasingly break up, and that's happening right
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now across east anglia and the south—east. meanwhile, for northern england, wales, south west england, southern and eastern scotland, still a lot of low cloud around, a few spots of drizzle, bit of mist and fog for some. and then there's this band of rain that's really pepping up at the moment. some heavy rain for northern ireland, western scotland bringing a risk of some localised surface water flooding. now, the rain will tend to turn a little lighter and patchier through saturday, and the weather front will finally, after a couple of days, start to move away into parts of the north of england and the north of wales. midlands, east anglia, southern counties of england should be much more in the way of sunny spells compared with recent days, and temperature still pretty high for october, 18—19 degrees. the second half of the weekend sees that cold front across northern areas pushing southwards. it's a weakening feature, so there won't be much rain left on it by the time it reaches east anglia and south—east england, but there could be an odd patch. for most of the uk on sunday, it's another dry day with plenty of sunshine around. however, there will be a fair few blustery showers across the far north and west of scotland.
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temperatures easing somewhat across northern areas, but still very warm for the south of england and wales. monday, well, it looks like we'll see another band of rain push its way into scotland, turning increasingly heavy, some fairly gusty winds with this as well. temperatures will be coming down further across northern scotland, just around 11—12 degrees for some here. but for northern ireland, england and wales, still above average, but those temperatures are getting a little bit closer to the seasonal norms. 14 degrees, for example, is about right in london. and eventually we should get down there on tuesday. a lot of dry weather for many into next week.
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this is bbc news. the united states and the taliban will hold their first in person talk as the us withdrawal from afghanistan. us delegation will meet senior taliban representatives on and sunday in the qatari capital doha. lie in the qatari capital doha. us has remained in contact with the taliban since they seized kabul in august as us troops pulled out. the biggest overhaul of the international corporate tax system in decades has received widespread welcome internationally. it is hoped that within two years the largest multinationals will pay a minimum tax rate of 15%. some of the big technology companies which will be affected, facebook, and is on to tivoli about the agreement —— amazon and google. maria ressa of the philippines and russia's dmitry muratov were awarded the nobel peace prize for safeguarding freedom of expression. those are your headlines.

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