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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 9, 2021 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is bbc news. the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. cracking down on safe havens after months of negotiations, more than hundred 30 nations agreed to radically change the international tax system. the nobel peace prize was awarded to two journalists for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. efforts to safeguard freedom of expression-_ efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. this praise belongs to those who — expression. this praise belongs to those who are _ expression. this praise belongs to those who are no _ expression. this praise belongs to those who are no longer- expression. this praise belongsj to those who are no longer with us and the brilliant people who are right now on the third floor of the newsroom. 5c} floor of the newsroom. 50 eo - le floor of the newsroom. 50 peeple are _ floor of the newsroom. 50 people are killed in an attack
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isis claims responsibility. fire workers who have not been vaccinated against coronavirus and there's a lot of opposition. a very warm welcome to you and the most significant overhaul of the international tax system and the generation is been announced after negotiations in paris headed by the 0ecd, there will not be a tax that in theory more companies and virtually all responsible to pat’- virtually all responsible to pay. it will even the playing field for the world. here's how. the minimum rate will be set at 15% lower than the
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global average but higher than ireland's12.5% rate. hundred 36 countries have signed up with only can nigeria and pakistan and sri lanka of refusing. the organisation for economic cooperation in developing, they will collect extra and tax revenues. here the finance minister. it extra and tax revenues. here the finance minister.- the finance minister. it will allow us — the finance minister. it will allow us to _ the finance minister. it will allow us to play _ the finance minister. it will allow us to play with - the finance minister. it will allow us to play with more | allow us to play with more efficiency against the rising inequalities in the world. and with the 0ecd, it is clearly a tax revolution. a tax revolution which we will lead in to lesser unfairness, to more justice, in to lesser unfairness, to morejustice, two more more justice, two more efficiency. more justice, two more efficiency-— efficiency. the chief us economist _ efficiency. the chief us economist is _ efficiency. the chief us
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economist is oxford . efficiency. the chief us - economist is oxford economics economist is 0xford economics and says he thinks the agreement is a step in the right direction. i agreement is a step in the right direction.— right direction. i think this is indeed _ right direction. i think this is indeed something - right direction. i think this is indeed something that l right direction. i think this | is indeed something that is quite — is indeed something that is quite a _ is indeed something that is quite a feat in terms of multilateralism. what we've managed to achieve is a global court _ managed to achieve is a global court whereby the level playing field and jurisdiction will be met— field and jurisdiction will be met and _ field and jurisdiction will be met and by companies will no longer— met and by companies will no longer have this ability to choose _ longer have this ability to choose the jurisdiction in which _ choose the jurisdiction in which they decide to be taxed. this should help in terms of global— this should help in terms of global coordination and help reduce — global coordination and help reduce potential tensions between different countries when — between different countries when it _ between different countries when it comes to corporate taxation _ when it comes to corporate taxation and avoid a race to the — taxation and avoid a race to the bottom in terms of corporate tax rates. critics have said _ corporate tax rates. critics have said the _ corporate tax rates. critics have said the deal - corporate tax rates. critics have said the deal is - corporate tax rates. critics have said the deal is a - corporate tax rates. critics i have said the deal is a white and doesn't go far enough in reality, a big multinational mogul like google will find a way to pay less than 15% and they have described is a mockery of fairness. what do you say to that?—
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mockery of fairness. what do you say to that? they're always auoin to you say to that? they're always going to be _ you say to that? they're always going to be attempts _ you say to that? they're always going to be attempts to - going to be attempts to circumvent any form of taxation and what — circumvent any form of taxation and what we have here is the foundation of tax system 2.0 and one _ foundation of tax system 2.0 and one that predated a lot of the tech — and one that predated a lot of the tech companies in particular, a lot of the tech companies were the source of tension — companies were the source of tension with the threat of digital— tension with the threat of digital taxes on some of these areas — digital taxes on some of these areas the _ digital taxes on some of these areas the created tension between the us and other partners like france, the uk and — partners like france, the uk and indie _ partners like france, the uk and india. in this environment, we have — and india. in this environment, we have the foundation of something that is likely the last something that is likely the tast of— something that is likely the last of her time in the appropriate one and the current environment of the digitised world — environment of the digitised world i_ environment of the digitised world. i think it's a step in the — world. i think it's a step in the right— world. i think it's a step in the right direction. the right to freedom _ the right direction. the right to freedom of _ the right direction. the right to freedom of expression i the right direction. the right| to freedom of expression has been recognised by this year's nobel peace prize which is been
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awarded to two journalists named for their hard—hitting investigations which have angered their countries powerful elites. maria ressa from the philippines and dmitry muratov from russia have both face significant threats. they commended their work saying that independent and fact—based journalism serve to protect against the abuse of power and lies. for the first time since 1935, the peace prize goes to journalists for their battle to tell the truth at great personal risk. to maria ressa and dmitry muratov, for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace. dmitry muratov is a russian journalist who has taken a stand against authoritarian rule.
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today, he dedicated the award to six colleagues, who, he said, were murdered for their work. he speaks russian. the prize, he said, belonged to them. their paper, novaya gazeta, has been highly critical of president putin and russia's ruling elite. its investigations have exposed electoral fraud such as the stuffing of ballot boxes as well as official corruption and police violence. translation: | don't know| what effect this nobel award will have on censorship of the media here in russia, with many investigative journalists being accused of being foreign agents. maria ressa from the philippines is the other winner, a woman described by the nobel committee as fearless. she's faced criminal charges and death threats. her work has exposed state abuses under the controversial
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president rodrigo duturte, in particular the extrajudicial killings that have come with his deadly war on drugs. thousands of people, mostly from poor communities, have been murdered. today, maria ressa spoke of the vital importance of telling the truth. when you don't have facts, you don't have a truth, you don't have trust. trust is what holds us together to be able to solve the complex problems our world is facing today, so when you attack the media, oftentimes it is about shooting the messenger. two messengers in the spotlight today as the nobel committee says press freedoms are necessary for both democracy and peace, but are under threat around the world. caroline hawley, bbc news. we will speak to a defence analyst who works closely with one of the nobel peace prize winners. he is a kind of soviet journalist, he began journalistic work during
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the soviet union in communist rule. afterwards, with a group of other journalists, he moved out of the two found the newspaper as an independent publication and it is the last standing print run newspaper opposition, major opposition in western russian, novaya gazeta. all the rest have been this or that way extinguished. novaya gazeta under his leadership campaigned against the first chechen war, the second chechen war and the russian invasion of georgia, the russian campaign in syria, the russian involvement in the fighting in the dumb.
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protest massive nuclear disarmament. getting the peace prize, it is quite warranted for our newspaper but the main thing is that we are the last independent newspaper left in russia. when you describe that novaya gazeta is the last remaining independent opposition publication inside russia, it seems interesting that the kremlin spokesman congratulated dmitry muratov on his win. how does he manage to walk that very fine line with the kremlin? dmitry muratov does not really walk a fine line with the kremlin. he does not really interact with the kremlin. they are most likely glad that the nobel prize went to dmitry muratov and not to alexei navalny, the opposition leader who is now incarcerated. it is easier to give the nobel peace prize two journalists who are not
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incarcerated than an opposition figure. but, anyway, the news has not been really much reported. in russia, the official tv coverage and somewhere in the second half of the main today evening news programmes. as something together with the local news. and president putin did not congratulate personally. russia gets a lot of nobel prizes. there's not a lot of public official elation about it. novaya gazeta is not that good with the kremlin but apparently for them, it is better than alexei navalny. the russian government has 0n the day that a russian journalist wednesday nobel peace prize, the russian government has designated
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a number ofjournalists as foreign agents, among them a reporterfrom the bbc, andrei zakharov from the bbc. the bbc says it strongly rejects the decision by russia to designate andrei as a �*foreign agent'. in a statement, it adds... officials say as many as 50 people may have been killed in a suicide bombing at a mosque used by the minority community. the group calling itself islamic states as it was behind the attack what happened in the city during friday prayers when it would've been packed with worshipers. officials say many dozens d oze ns of dozens of people were also injured. here in panic once again in afghanistan. injured victims are rushed to hospital.
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there were so many people who were injured. hardly anyone was unharmed. those were sitting there were killed. it is terrible.— there were killed. it is terrible. , ., . there were killed. it is terrible. . ., terrible. the local branch of the islamic _ terrible. the local branch of the islamic state _ terrible. the local branch of the islamic state group - terrible. the local branch of the islamic state group isis terrible. the local branch of. the islamic state group isis k, say it had targeted members of the shia minority. isis k is much less powerful than their rivals, the taliban. it has a history of devastating attacks in afghanistan. in august, more than hundred 50 people were killed at a bombing outside of kabul airport. killed at a bombing outside of kabulairport. in killed at a bombing outside of kabul airport. in recent weeks, isis k has launched dozens of smaller attacks, targeting taliban fighters in eastern afghanistan. this lead is bombing in the north of the country apparently carried out by a member of the league ethnic group suggests isis k's influences expanding. the?t ethnic group suggests isis k's influences expanding. they are the enemies _ influences expanding. they are the enemies of _ influences expanding. they are the enemies of our _ influences expanding. they are
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the enemies of our nation. - the enemies of our nation. people _ the enemies of our nation. people were just beginning to experience peace and now this is happened. all of the security forces are working on the investigation. we will find the investigation. we will find the culprits and they'll be dealt _ the culprits and they'll be dealt with according to sharia law — dealt with according to sharia law. ., dealt with according to sharia law. . , , law. the are saying there bring stability but — law. the are saying there bring stability but isis _ law. the are saying there bring stability but isis k _ law. the are saying there bring stability but isis k is _ law. the are saying there bring stability but isis k is a - stability but isis k is a growing concern for afghans and the wider region. still to come. metropolitan opera performs the first work by a black composer of the companies 138 year history. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. they believe everything is going to be different from now on. they think their country will be
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respected in the world once more as it used to be. the dalai lama. _ more as it used to be. the dalai lama, the _ more as it used to be. the dalai lama, the exiled - dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. ., ., , , ., prize. two grenades exploded. and a grouo — prize. two grenades exploded. and a grouo of— prize. two grenades exploded. and a group of soldiers - prize. two grenades exploded. | and a group of soldiersjumped from _ and a group of soldiersjumped from a — and a group of soldiersjumped from a military truck taking part— from a military truck taking part in— from a military truck taking part in the parade and ran towards _ part in the parade and ran towards the president firing automatic rifles.— automatic rifles. after m7 ears, automatic rifles. after 447 years. the _ automatic rifles. after 447 years, the skeletal - automatic rifles. after 447 years, the skeletal ribs - automatic rifles. after 447 years, the skeletal ribs of| years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's tragic worshipper emerged but even as divers work to pull her up. the mary roseman threw another heart stopping drama. i roseman threw another heart stopping drama.— stopping drama. i want to be the people's _ stopping drama. i want to be the people's governor. - stopping drama. i want to be the people's governor. i- stopping drama. i want to be| the people's governor. i want to represent— the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. - the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i- to represent everybody. i believe _ to represent everybody. i believe in _ to represent everybody. i believe in the _ to represent everybody. i believe in the people - to represent everybody. i believe in the people of. believe in the people of california. _ this is bbc news. than latest
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headlines. more than 130 countries have signed up to a global tax deal or corporate tax reform. it includes a 15% minimum corporate tax rate. this year's nobel peace prize has been awarded to two campaigning journalists. has been awarded to two campaigningjournalists. maria campaigning journalists. maria ressa and campaigningjournalists. maria ressa and dmitry muratov. president biden is urging companies in the us to fire workers who have not been vaccinated against coronavirus. the latest figures show only 52% have been fully vaccinated. the president says he will bring in rules to require all health care workers to have the jab and urged individuals to do the same for teachers. there's been opposition, including in the deeply libertarian region of new england from our north american correspondent reports. chanting: freedom over fear! freedom over fear! it is, they say, about freedom, an individual�*s right to choose
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if they get vaccinated, even if they are a nurse. one of the new battle grounds over covid in the us is the requirement in some hospitals that all their staff have had the jab. but some, they say, would rather lose theirjob. leah cushman's notjust a nurse but a state politician. my beliefs are religious. i believe that my creator endowed me with an immune system that protects me, and if i get sick, that's an act of god. what, you've never been vaccinated against anything? i have before i was saved by the lord, yes. with that logic, you wouldn't take any medicines. that's not true, no. i wouldn't take one that affects the immune system this way. of course, even vaccinated staff have the potential to pass on the virus to patients, but hospital managers say unvaccinated health care workers getting sick also puts more strain on resources and suspect for some there are bigger forces at play.
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it's notjust covid, there are other vaccines that employees are required to have. mmr is an example, hepatitis. so again, this is a highly electrified issue, if you will, and we all recognise that. and politicised. to say it's not political would be disingenuous. save our teachers! and the controversy swept up another profession too, with school staff being threatened with sacking if they don't get vaccinated, including in new york city. in connecticut, teacher kahseim outlaw refused the vaccine and testing and has already lost his job. i do not use any kind i of synthetic ingredients in my life, whether that be for medicinal purposes, i supplementation, food and fuel. so the idea of becoming - inoculated is something that
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goes directly against the way that i live my life _ and have lived for the last decade or more. i what is the harm in getting tested every week? so, when we talk about harm, i view it as an unnecessary- medical procedure. kahseim had covid so says his natural immunity should suffice. but that's not enough for a government are ramping up pressure on the unvaccinated. aleem maqbool, bbc news. a shortage of abattoir workers have left them facing a human disaster according to the national farmers disaster according to the nationalfarmers union. healthy national farmers union. healthy pigs nationalfarmers union. healthy pigs are already having to be destroyed as their meat cannot be processed quickly enough. with the industry blaming brexit and the pandemic. the government says it is keeping the situation under review and working closely with the sector. it's been a busy week who is passionate about the welfare of her animals and the terrified that she will soon have to call
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some of them. she is banging the drum for pig farmers. this morning, she was outside doing a live tv interview while her mom and sisters watched in the kitchen. ., ., , , ., ~ mom and sisters watched in the kitchen. ., ., ,, .,~ ., kitchen. come and speak to me boris kitchen. come and speak to me lboris johnson. _ kitchen. come and speak to me boris johnson, have _ kitchen. come and speak to me boris johnson, have the - kitchen. come and speak to me boris johnson, have the guts i kitchen. come and speak to me boris johnson, have the guts to j borisjohnson, have the guts to come here and talk to us. to make go, girl. come here and talk to us. to make go. girl-— come here and talk to us. to make go, girl. but behind the su ort make go, girl. but behind the suoport of— make go, girl. but behind the support of smiles, _ make go, girl. but behind the support of smiles, there's - make go, girl. but behind the support of smiles, there's a l support of smiles, there's a growing sense of despair all we are asking _ growing sense of despair all we are asking for— growing sense of despair all we are asking for is _ growing sense of despair all we are asking for is some - growing sense of despair all we are asking for is some help. - did she sum up the tension? yeah, well, you can see, you can see. she did, she said exactly what the problem is, - and why it is so heartbreaking! i'm a really optimistic person, but, my god, this past week has really... well, longer than that. we're tired and just, ugh... we're farmers to feed people. it's a job, you know? that's what we do, day in, . day out, and we work bloody hard for it, as well. and i am not killing pigs for no reason. | no way. sniffling.
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so, these pigs are averaging about 100 kilos. if they get to 105 kilos, then basically... their value of them is halved, basically. unlike beef cattle, pigs have a small window of time in which to be sold. leave it too long, and they're too heavy and too big for the retailers. the reality is that we will actually have to pay to get rid of these pigs for them to go into landfill or to be burned. we will pay for them. we will not get anything for these pigs. another key factor is that these pens are full, and there will soon be no more room to put pigs that are coming to the system. and when they run out of space, that's when they will have to start culling healthy animals. the government says it understands the challenges the pig industry is facing and says it's working closely
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with the sector, keeping the situation under review. but its call to make the industry more attractive to uk workers is frustrating here. everybody that works for us is local and british. i am all for borisjohnson's quote of getting british people in britishjobs, i'm for it, but you know what? there won't be a job, there won't be an agricultural industry for these kids to come and work into. the family on this farm says the situation must improve in the next fortnight. danny savage, bbc news. when new york's metropolitan opera reopened after an 18 month shut down, it is slated to make a grand historical gesture. the premier of fire in my bones, the first performance from a black composer and 38 years. (music) the grand opera has returned and it's no longer tethered to
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the past. with the production fire shut up in my bones, a modern—day story in the first work by a black composer is gracing the met stage. how does it feel to make history? it hasn't really hit me yet because i'm still in the mould of wanting to make it better. and i know people say that is a cliche but, i get so nervous when i'm here at the performances.- when i'm here at the performances. when i'm here at the erformances. ., performances. the drive for perfection _ paid off. a universal coming—of—age story that delves into the topic of child abuse, it is tied to the black experience in the deep south. during the first rehearsal, you spoke — during the first rehearsal, you spoke to — during the first rehearsal, you spoke to all the black opera singers _ spoke to all the black opera singers and you told them to
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-et singers and you told them to get back— singers and you told them to get back in touch with themselves.— get back in touch with themselves. �* , themselves. bring everything that ou themselves. bring everything that you grew _ themselves. bring everything that you grew up _ themselves. bring everything that you grew up doing, - themselves. bring everything j that you grew up doing, bring all of your background to this piece, because it needs it. it deserves it. we need everything. we need the sites, the smells, the sounds and the articulations. from the vocalists. angel blew. when she started to sing peculiar grace, there wasn't a dry eye in the room and this was a rehearsal. she did so masterful and beautiful. she did not abandon operatic core, but she paid homage to her religious background. and the combination of the two really created something unique.- of the two really created something unique. used to different art _ something unique. used to different art forms - something unique. used to different art forms at - something unique. used to different art forms at one l different art forms at one point when the main character charles attends a historically
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black college, a step routine pounds the stage.— black college, a step routine pounds the stage. they come up with the sweaters _ pounds the stage. they come up with the sweaters and _ pounds the stage. they come up with the sweaters and they - pounds the stage. they come upj with the sweaters and they know what's about to go down and people recognise that they are seeing their culture onstage at the map. i did my first opera, champion. there was a guy who came up to me was in his mid— �*705 came up to me was in his mid— �*70s he shook my hand after the show. african—american guy and he said if this is opera, i will come.— he said if this is opera, i willcome. �* , ., will come. black composers have submitted work _ will come. black composers have submitted work to _ will come. black composers have submitted work to the _ will come. black composers have submitted work to the past - submitted work to the past unsuccessfully. there were plenty of qualified artists who came before him. he believes the death of george floyd is the death of george floyd is the reason he is standing in this grand opera house. still, he is worried that the country is not making enough progress. everybody runs to the opposite corners and they are staying there, nobody is trying to find middle ground and i'm worried about that. hopefully, we can
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do in the arts is slowly, slowly, slowly open up hearts and minds so people can go oh, maybe i should rethink this. with fire shut up in my bones, the met is reopened with a bold statement. terence blanchard does not believe you will be a token but a turning point to diversity on the stage. — not believe he will be. the organisation for cooperation and development has announced a major overhaul of the tax system. after 36 countries have agreed to the tax rate of 15%. - 136. i agreed to the tax rate of 15%. — 136. i am at agreed to the tax rate of 15%. -136. i am at bbc agreed to the tax rate of 15%. —136. i am at bbc baxter and there is more on all of our stories and our website. do not go anywhere, do stay with us on
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bbc. hello again. friday was another very mild day across the whole of the uk, even those places where it stayed cloudy throughout. however, there were some places where the sunshine popped out. northern england was one of the sunnier places. it was also one of the warmest places in the uk. the day's highest temperature — ryhill in west yorkshire, 22 degrees celsius. that's eight degrees celsius higher than the october average, so it was very, very warm indeed. now looking at this satellite picture, you can see those areas that had the clearest skies. we've seen some clearing skies across east anglia and south east england behind this cold front because what we're seeing at the moment is cooler and fresher air starting to spread in from the near continent. and that's significant because as humidity levels drop, the clouds will increasingly break up, and that's happening right now across east anglia and the south east. meanwhile, for northern
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england, wales, south west england, southern and eastern scotland, still a lot of low cloud around, a few spots of drizzle, bit of mist and fog for some. and then there's this band of rain that's really pepping up at the moment. some heavy rain for northern ireland, western scotland bringing a risk of some localised surface water flooding. now, the rain will tend to turn a little lighter and patchier through saturday, and the weather front will finally, after a couple of days, start to move away into parts of the north of england and the north of wales. midlands, east anglia, southern counties of england should be much more in the way of sunny spells compared with recent days, and temperature still pretty high for october, 18—19 degrees. the second half of the weekend sees that cold front across northern areas pushing southwards. it's a weakening feature, so there won't be much rain left on it by the time it reaches east anglia and south east england, but there could be an odd patch. for most of the uk on sunday, it's another dry day with plenty of sunshine around. however, there will be a fair
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few blustery showers across the far north and west of scotland. temperatures easing somewhat across northern areas, but still very warm for the south of england and wales. monday, well, it looks like we'll see another band of rain push its way into scotland, turning increasingly heavy, some fairly gusty winds with this as well. temperatures will be coming down further across northern scotland, just around 11—12 degrees for some here. but for northern ireland, england and wales, still above average, but those temperatures are getting a little bit closer to the seasonal norms. 11l degrees, for example, is about right in london. and eventually we should get down there on tuesday. a lot of dry weather for many into next week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines — the organisation for economic cooperation and development has announced a major overhaul of the global tax system. 136 countries have agreed a corporation tax rate of 15%. which a corporation tax rate of 15%. in theory all compani which in theory all companies in all nations will be obliged to pay. the nobel peace prize has been awarded to two journalists, maria ressa of the philippines and russia's dmitry muratov. the nobel committee praised their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. which it said was vital for democracy and lasting peace. as many as 50 people are feared to have been killed in a bomb attack on a mosque in afghanistan. the islamic state group said it carried out the attack in kunduz city, which is used by shia worshippers. officials say many dozens of people were also injured.

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