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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 8, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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has announced a major overhaul of the global tax system. 136 countries have agreed a corporation tax rate of 15%. the nobel peace prize has been awarded to two journalists, maria ressa of the philippines and russia's dmitry muratov. the nobel committee praised their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. as many as 50 people are feared to have been killed in a bomb attack on a mosque in afghanistan. the islamic state group said it carried out the attack in kunduz city, which is used by shia worshippers. steel producers in the uk are calling for urgent government action to protect them from the effects of rising gas prices. unlike domestic consumers, businesses�* energy costs are not capped leaving them exposed to huge price rises over the past few weeks.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are james moore, who is the chief business commentator at the independent, and katy balls, who is the deputy political editor at the spectator. let me bring you up—to—date with the front pages and home. the telegraph reports that senior government ministers believe mass free covid testing must be scaled back because of the costs to the taxpayer. "winter and spring of discontent" — that's the is headline, saying the government fears a year of diruption ahead for food, fuel, gas and labour markets. ministers will, though, push ahead with plans for levies on gas bills to fund low—carbon heating, according to the times, despite soaring energy prices. the express says a former tesco boss, sir david lewis, has been called on by borisjohnson to "save christmas" and end
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the supply chain crisis. the mail claims a new emergency helpline for women walking back on their own could be in operation by christmas. the ft leads on what it calls a "ground—breaking" corporate tax reform aimed at eliminating tax havens, which more than 130 coutnries have signed up to. and the guardian has been investigating how lies and conspiracy theories about covid have been available on tiktok for months and have amassed millions of views. so, let's begin. james, kick off this hour. no pressure, says the express, but it's yourjob pressure, says the express, but it's your job to pressure, says the express, but it's yourjob to save christmas. sir david yourjob to save christmas. s " david lewis is a former boss at tesco. he is also a former senior executive at unilever. going to get somebody to look at the supply chain, this is the guy you are going to get committed to the guy you
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should be getting. he knows his stuff in this area. it's a good thing, i think and within the government is going to call on some external advice and some external advice from somebody who knows the sector. what sir david lewis is going to do about the core problem, which is a lack of lorry drivers, i don't know. is he going to magic them up from somewhere? is he going to do something about the fact that i think hundred and some has signed up i think hundred and some has signed up for these temporary visas the issue because they are still very resistant to bringing lorry drivers and from abroad, which would help the issue. so i don't know what he is going to do on that front, but it is going to do on that front, but it is a smart appointment certainly because sir david lewis does know his onions in this. and if you looked at tesco�*s results, they were very much benefiting from the fact that tesco has a very, very well—developed supply chain. they
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admit a lot of their stuff around via rail with trains coming from spain in all of the place, so sir david lewis if anyone can say christmas, it's him. interesting when he told — christmas, it's him. interesting when he told us _ christmas, it's him. interesting when he told us about - christmas, it's him. interesting when he told us about that - christmas, it's him. interesting when he told us about that in l christmas, it's him. interesting l when he told us about that in the last hour, this work that he has done at tesco and how they have benefited from it because, katy, the interesting thing about the challenge is that it was a few days ago that the premise or was telling us that this was not a problem for government. . us that this was not a problem for government-— us that this was not a problem for government. , yes, we have heard lots of messages _ government. , yes, we have heard lots of messages from _ government. , yes, we have heard lots of messages from the - government. , yes, we have heard - lots of messages from the government on this_ lots of messages from the government on this and _ lots of messages from the government on this and we have heard boris johnson — on this and we have heard boris johnson say christmas did not need to he _ johnson say christmas did not need to be saved. then we had boris johnson — to be saved. then we had boris johnson telling us i promise you this christmas we better than last christmas — this christmas we better than last christmas given that most of us spent _ christmas given that most of us spent that following very strict covenants and guidelines, i don't think_ covenants and guidelines, i don't think it _ covenants and guidelines, i don't think it really is promising you that— think it really is promising you that much. we are seeing the government having to shift now from dismissing _ government having to shift now from dismissing this is a problem for business — dismissing this is a problem for business that is short—term to having — business that is short—term to having to _ business that is short—term to having to work out what they are going _ having to work out what they are going to — having to work out what they are going to do to ultimately make it less had —
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going to do to ultimately make it less bad and also in doing that have less bad and also in doing that have less of— less bad and also in doing that have less of the — less bad and also in doing that have less of the bag for ministers. so for att— less of the bag for ministers. so for all the — less of the bag for ministers. so for all the government fighting this is an issue — for all the government fighting this is an issue for business, i think action— is an issue for business, i think action and _ is an issue for business, i think action and appointments such as this suggest _ action and appointments such as this suggest a _ action and appointments such as this suggest a penny is beginning to drop that they— suggest a penny is beginning to drop that they cannot sit on the sidelines.— that they cannot sit on the sidelines. ,., , ., ~ .., , sidelines. do you think he could be the next lord _ sidelines. do you think he could be the next lord frost _ sidelines. do you think he could be the next lord frost was _ sidelines. do you think he could be the next lord frost was met - sidelines. do you think he could be - the next lord frost was met somebody that come from business and health government at a bit of political hole and manages to turn it into a proper political career? i hole and manages to turn it into a proper political career?— proper political career? i think that's an interesting _ proper political career? i think that's an interesting one. - proper political career? i think that's an interesting one. you | proper political career? i think- that's an interesting one. you also look that's an interesting one. you also took at _ that's an interesting one. you also took at kate — that's an interesting one. you also look at kate bingham who had the vexing _ look at kate bingham who had the vexing task force, who came from the private _ vexing task force, who came from the private sector and is now going back and left _ private sector and is now going back and left the — private sector and is now going back and left the role. but i think this government is keen where it can to make _ government is keen where it can to make that — government is keen where it can to make that move from private sector and having — make that move from private sector and having one profession to more of and having one profession to more of a reguiar— and having one profession to more of a regular route. but as we have seen in the _ a regular route. but as we have seen in the past, — a regular route. but as we have seen in the past, that is something which can lead _ in the past, that is something which can lead to — in the past, that is something which can lead to lots of questions about motivations and interest but i think it is something that... gh,
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motivations and interest but i think it is something that. . ._ it is something that... oh, katy, our it is something that... oh, katy, your from _ it is something that... oh, katy, your frozen. sorry, _ it is something that... oh, katy, your frozen. sorry, you - it is something that... oh, katy, your frozen. sorry, you froze - yourfrozen. sorry, you froze briefly but we are all right. do you want carry on with the i, katy? winter and spring of discontent. yes, and this is pointing out the problems— yes, and this is pointing out the problems we were just talking about, which _ problems we were just talking about, which is _ problems we were just talking about, which is how long the supply chain issue _ which is how long the supply chain issue is— which is how long the supply chain issue is going to last for. and i think— issue is going to last for. and i think we — issue is going to last for. and i think we have heard borisjohnson taiking _ think we have heard borisjohnson talking about short term but lots of eyebrows _ talking about short term but lots of eyebrows being raised at the time because _ eyebrows being raised at the time because we thought it would last all the way— because we thought it would last all the way through the winter. the the i ascendance can go all the way to the iascendance can go all the way to the this— iascendance can go all the way to the this is— i ascendance can go all the way to the this is leaving a really term problem — the this is leaving a really term problem and i think the issue for the government is is on a range of factors _ the government is is on a range of factors not— the government is is on a range of factors. notjust fuels, notjust energv. — factors. notjust fuels, notjust energy, but also food supplies, shortages and then the global markets — shortages and then the global markets potentially with inflation, so even _ markets potentially with inflation, so even if — markets potentially with inflation, so even if you tackle one, there are plenty _ so even if you tackle one, there are plenty of _ so even if you tackle one, there are plenty of the things that are going to really— plenty of the things that are going to really contribute to this
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cost—of—living crisis. it�*s to really contribute to this cost-of-living crisis.- cost-of-living crisis. it's a sobering _ cost-of-living crisis. it's a sobering front _ cost-of-living crisis. it's a sobering front page, - cost-of-living crisis. it's a l sobering front page, james. cost-of-living crisis. it's a . sobering front page, james. i cost-of-living crisis. it's a - sobering front page, james. i think it becomes — sobering front page, james. i think it becomes project _ sobering front page, james. i think it becomes project reality, - sobering front page, james. i think it becomes project reality, i - sobering front page, james. i think it becomes project reality, i think. | it becomes project reality, i think. katy mention inflation and i've been doing some research on that myself talking so my friends in the city, the economists who are forecasting this, and they are very much pushing out how long this is going to last. we were thinking that it would peak and sort of 4% and then come down quite quickly, but what i was finding out when i was researching my column for monday was that really a lot of them are now saying, well, you know, 4.5% probably early next year it will probably last through much of next year. might not sort of come down to the bank of england's 2% target until 2023. so that's a long—term problem. 2% target until 2023. so that's a long-term problem.— 2% target until 2023. so that's a long-term problem. 296 target until 2023. so that's a long-term problem. which could also be an election — long-term problem. which could also be an election year? _ long-term problem. which could also be an election year? exactly. - long-term problem. which could also be an election year? exactly. and - be an election year? exactly. and rocesses
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be an election year? exactly. and processes like _ be an election year? exactly. and processes like that _ be an election year? exactly. and processes like that are _ be an election year? exactly. and processes like that are going - be an election year? exactly. and processes like that are going to i processes like that are going to buy. there is no escaping that. you're going to see this in your shopping bill. you cannot escape them. ,, , , ., ., shopping bill. you cannot escape them. ,, , ., them. suddenly your real income actually falls _ them. suddenly your real income actually falls nessie _ them. suddenly your real income actually falls nessie other - them. suddenly your real income l actually falls nessie other interest in question that comes as we have forgotten what inflation is like in this country. we've not had the sort of inflation you and i would have grown up with in the 1970s and �*80s. it sort of being not really experienced in modern times. in trying to see what the consequences are. do you want to take us onto one of the immediate consequences of the supply chain crisis, james kim and i know you be very upset about this is what is happening and what is not happening with the once it's? what? we are told that _ happening with the once it's? what? we are told that they _ happening with the once it's? what? we are told that they could - happening with the once it's? what? we are told that they could double i we are told that they could double in price and if wotsits are going to double in price than a quaver can be really curly. mil double in price than a quaver can be really curly-— really curly. all those other crisps and snacks _ really curly. all those other crisps and snacks are _ really curly. all those other crisps and snacks are of _ really curly. all those other crisps and snacks are of course - really curly. all those other crispsl and snacks are of course available, like monster munch anything
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advertised by a certain sports presenter or used to be advertised by certain sports presenter, all getting more expensive. katy, in a sense, of course it is. it is that in the blooming obvious in some ways because of all the things we talked about and the i talked about. but we took it home to product people perhaps eat or drink or use regularly, frequently, at least every week, you become much more conscious of it. it stops being a kind of amorphous prices going up by this amount but i cannot quite see it but if you been by the same product like your bag of wotsits here and out maybe since you were in school, you will notice that price rise. , . ~ school, you will notice that price rise. , . ,, ., , school, you will notice that price rise. ,, ., , , rise. yes, and i think that is why it is actually _ rise. yes, and i think that is why it is actually a _ rise. yes, and i think that is why it is actually a difficult _ rise. yes, and i think that is why it is actually a difficult issue - rise. yes, and i think that is why it is actually a difficult issue forl it is actually a difficult issue for boris _ it is actually a difficult issue for borisjohnson. it is really hard to blustar— borisjohnson. it is really hard to biustar or— borisjohnson. it is really hard to blustar or spin your way out of this when _ blustar or spin your way out of this when everyone is seeing and noticing it in parts— when everyone is seeing and noticing it in parts of— when everyone is seeing and noticing it in parts of their life they had changed — it in parts of their life they had changed or become more expensive. in the government has been talking about— the government has been talking about shortages leading to higher
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wages. _ about shortages leading to higher wages, but as we have just been talking _ wages, but as we have just been talking about, if inflation just means— talking about, if inflation just means everything is a lot more expensive, not going to feel like you have — expensive, not going to feel like you have a — expensive, not going to feel like you have a pay rise.— expensive, not going to feel like you have a pay rise. that's a very aood you have a pay rise. that's a very good point- _ you have a pay rise. that's a very good point. let's— you have a pay rise. that's a very good point. let's move _ you have a pay rise. that's a very good point. let's move onto - good point. let's move onto the front of the ft with a i promise we talk about in this paper review because he ran out of time last time. world signs up to biggest tax due in a century. it's a very impressive headline, that. what more do we know? this impressive headline, that. what more do we know?— do we know? this more than 130, 136 nations have — do we know? this more than 130, 136 nations have signed _ do we know? this more than 130, 136 nations have signed up _ do we know? this more than 130, 136 nations have signed up to _ do we know? this more than 130, 136 nations have signed up to a _ nations have signed up to a corporate tax reform which is aimed at iimiting _ corporate tax reform which is aimed at limiting tax havens and there is at limiting tax havens and there is a 50% _ at limiting tax havens and there is a 50% fioor— at limiting tax havens and there is a 50% floor on corporation tax. there _ a 50% floor on corporation tax. there are — a 50% floor on corporation tax. there are some countries that have not signed — there are some countries that have not signed up but ultimately it seems — not signed up but ultimately it seems a — not signed up but ultimately it seems a big step towards where you had i seems a big step towards where you had i think— seems a big step towards where you had i think india signed up at the last minute and ultimately is aimed at trying _ last minute and ultimately is aimed at trying to— last minute and ultimately is aimed at trying to have this dance we will not have _ at trying to have this dance we will not have some countries benefit, take investment away and become tax
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payments _ take investment away and become tax payments. it still needs to go through— payments. it still needs to go through the government of some of these _ through the government of some of these countries and so you will not be home _ these countries and so you will not be home and dryjust yet but it is seen _ be home and dryjust yet but it is seen as— be home and dryjust yet but it is seen as an — be home and dryjust yet but it is seen as an important stepping stone towards _ seen as an important stepping stone towards tackling some of these issues — towards tackling some of these issues. , . , ., , ., ~ towards tackling some of these issues. �* ., , ., , ., ~ ., ., issues. james, i was talking to tax reform campaigners _ issues. james, i was talking to tax reform campaigners during - issues. james, i was talking to tax reform campaigners during the - issues. james, i was talking to tax - reform campaigners during the course of the r11 broadcast in the uk and one journalist saying this really is a case of smoke and mirrors and he does not think this is even as much as they were hoping they would achieve back in the summer when they were looking forward to the meeting being held in october. i were looking forward to the meeting being held in october.— being held in october. i think this deal depends _ being held in october. i think this deal depends on _ being held in october. i think this deal depends on whether - being held in october. i think this deal depends on whether you - being held in october. i think this deal depends on whether you see being held in october. i think this i deal depends on whether you see as being held in october. i think this - deal depends on whether you see as a glass half full or a glass half empty. and i think it's quite remarkable in some respects that they have gotten this far. you always used to hear from multinationals that we don't think government should do anything on their own. it's very important. we think we ought to pay more taxes,
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but it's very important that it's done through the 0ecd. in the you said that because basically the 0ecd would not do anything. and obviously they have gotten this far so that in itself is an achievement. but as your report showed, the devil is always in the detail, and the detail of this is not quite as good as it looks. it's quite beneficial to the united states, a lot less beneficial to developing companies, countries, sorry. because of where the tax will shift if companies try to underpay. so, you know, it's a mixed bag. important if they got somewhere, but they really do need to build on this because frankly governments around the world need revenue, and we have seen a big shift over the past sort of 10-20 seen a big shift over the past sort of 10—20 years from corporate taxation to personal taxation taking up taxation to personal taxation taking up more of the burden. so it is very
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important that these astonishingly wealthy multinationals pay their fair share. �* �* , . wealthy multinationals pay their fair share. . �* , ., , ., wealthy multinationals pay their fair share. . �*, ., , ., ., fair share. and it's a question of whether they — fair share. and it's a question of whether they will _ fair share. and it's a question of whether they will be _ fair share. and it's a question of whether they will be as - fair share. and it's a question of whether they will be as a - fair share. and it's a question of whether they will be as a result | whether they will be as a result of this. two more stores to get them before we leave you tonight. the front page of the times says gas levy gets green light. this front page of the times says gas levy gets green light.— levy gets green light. this is a ureen levy gets green light. this is a green levy _ levy gets green light. this is a green levy on _ levy gets green light. this is a green levy on gas. _ levy gets green light. this is a green levy on gas. and - levy gets green light. this is a green levy on gas. and it - levy gets green light. this is a green levy on gas. and it is i green levy on gas. and it is important that we do this sort of thing. we pay a levy on electricity, and nothing the government's intention with this is to sort of brain gas into line. in the principal is sound on the polluter pays for the problem with this is obviously the timing. it's probably the worst possible time to do this right now with gas prices soaring through the roof. i would not be at all surprised and i know there is a big push on the cop 26 coming on foot of the government wants to do something now and you could make the case that you've got to do it at some point, so when is going to be a good time? but i suspect very much
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that they will backtrack on this and they may well say, ok, we will leave it six months, nine months until this market has calmed down. interesting thought, that. the kind of thing you could slip out a few days after everybody has gone home again after the triumph which you hope for at the meeting. katy, what do you make of equipment i think interesting line in the piece for the government... interesting line in the piece for the government. . ._ interesting line in the piece for the government... says there is a madness and _ the government... says there is a madness and dentistry _ the government... says there is a madness and dentistry is - the government... says there is a madness and dentistry is failing . the government... says there is a | madness and dentistry is failing to appreciate the reality of the problem on gas prices that is coming at the _ problem on gas prices that is coming at the track — problem on gas prices that is coming at the track. i think the risk is by pushing — at the track. i think the risk is by pushing ahead with this now, you could _ pushing ahead with this now, you couid turn— pushing ahead with this now, you could turn off a lot of people in terms — could turn off a lot of people in terms of— could turn off a lot of people in terms of the green agenda. katy... sor , terms of the green agenda. katy... sorry. pick — terms of the green agenda. katy... sorry. pick up _ terms of the green agenda. katy... sorry. pick up your _ terms of the green agenda. katy... sorry, pick up your last _ terms of the green agenda. katy... sorry, pick up your last point - sorry, pick up your last point about... you briefly froze. idistill sorry, pick up your last point about... you briefly froze. will be ne . ative about... you briefly froze. will be negative in _ about... you briefly froze. will be negative in the _ about... you briefly froze. will be negative in the long _ about... you briefly froze. will be negative in the long run _ about. .. you briefly froze. will be negative in the long run if- about... you briefly froze. will be negative in the long run if you - about... you briefly froze. will be | negative in the long run if you turn peopie _
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negative in the long run if you turn people off — negative in the long run if you turn people off the green agenda by having — people off the green agenda by having these bills come in at the worst— having these bills come in at the worst time. so perhaps there is an argument — worst time. so perhaps there is an argument for spacing this out. interesting about the sequencing of these things, which is often so significant. james, katy, thank you both very much, always a pleasure to have you with us. have a lovely rest of your weekend and i hope you have a good weekend at home. that is it. don't forget there will be whether coming up before the midnight news. we will leave you in the capable hands of mark kerr mug with the
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hello, a very warm welcome, it is the film review on bbc news. mark kermode is with me as ever. hello, mark. hi. a number of movies to remind everyone of. there are films other than bond. we have my little sister, an intense swiss drama. we have a fever dream, a very strange movie. how much is real? and everyone's favourite ghoul family are back, the addams family 2. i like the sound of the opening film. i haven't seen it. my little sister was switzerland's entry to the academy awards. a story of lisa and sven. he's a stage actor until he was diagnosed with cancer and he's been treated for cancer. while that's happened, his life has gone on hold. crucially, so has hers because they are bonded, and she has basically dedicated all her time and energy to looking after him. here's a clip.
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so, not a car chase, not an exploding helicopter, but really powerful. i'll tell you why. one of my favourite critic, roger ebert, said that cinema is a machine for creating empathy, and i actually think this is one of the things this film does. you get to know the characters and believe in their situation, you believe in the bond between them. as you saw, its a long take and it doesn't feel like there's a lot of acting going on. it feels like you're watching people living life normally and naturally. going through the kind of crisis people go through. the thing that i really loved about this is i felt that i knew these people. i felt that i understand their circumstances. even though they are different to my circumstances.
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and i was really reminded all the way through of that thing about cinema when it's at its best makes you empathise with other people, and i thought this did this brilliantly, and it's very low—key. it's not a histrionic film. there are really tough emotional things going on. you find out about these characters' back stories not because they tell you, but you look at them and you observe them and get to know them. i thought it was really good. i think you'll like it. it's really good, called my little sister. with a main character with cancer, it's not deliberately weepy, pulling at the heartstrings? no, what it's doing is very difficult subject matter, and doing it in a way that is profoundly humanist in the best sense of the word. it is about empathising with other people. i really liked it. yes, 0k, fever dream. peruvian director, argentine writer, set in argentina.
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chilean—american—argentine co—production. existing somewhere between one world and another. as the title suggests, it's a very heavy concoction. the story is a mother becomes worried about her daughter because herfriend tells her a terrifying story about her son. how much of any of this is true? how much is being dragged into some strange paranoid delusion? the film appears to play out as a monologue, but almost an interior dialogue. there are two voices there. you can either go it's about motherhood. the director said it's about the love and fear surrounding motherhood through a complex women in prison. or you can say it's about poison of the land, or a horror movie about the migration of souls, or you can do what i did, and say you don't really know what it's about. but i love it. i love the way it looks. i love the way it sounds. it's got a fantastic score, and it was a film
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that came out of it saying i was annoyed because i didn't understand it. i came out of this thinking i really like the fact that i'm still not quite sure what it was about. it was very haunting, very tactile. you could feel the environment and the music is absolutely wonderful. don't know what's going on, but i enjoyed it very much. i love that! does the world need another addams family film? well, the animators think so. the story is a convoluted set—up. wednesday becomes convinced that the addamses are not her real family, so they go on a road trip. the real reason they go is it's a sequel, and in sequels, families go on road trips! here's a clip. come on, kids! feast your eyes on the old addams camper! thing's been fixing it up. oh, it's a hybrid — - half car, half eyesore! mother, father, this
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is cruel, even for you. he groans. that's the spirit, lurch! let's go, wednesday. it's time for some family bonding, whether you like it or not. you see, wednesday, this trip will bring the addams family closer than ever before. 0r there will be no survivors. is it funny? look, it's the addams family. of course there are things that are funny, because the whole idea of the family that's a mirror image, it's a funny idea. there is nothing here i don't think we've seen done before or better in the comic strip or the tv series or in the live—action movies, which came out when i was starting out in this job.
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so, there's nothing in it original. there are a couple of things that are funny because the addams family, that kind of topsy—turvy world is kind of funny. there's a star—studded cast, 0scar isaac, charlize theron, but the minute i came out of it, i couldn't remember anything about it at all. it was only four days ago, and i had to read my notes while i was watching it. that's quite telling. it's just some addams family stuff. it's not terrible. it's just remarkably unremarkable. 0k, best out this week, we know what that is. i talked about bond last week and danced around the plot points. you've now seen it. yes, we had a good time. no plot spoilers, but we enjoyed it. the two other members of my party thought it wasn't a vintage villain. that was their observation,
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they are steeped in vintage bond. one thing i think about this is there is an old myth that bond movies are only as good as their villain, and that's not true. it is one of the movies that's actually about bond, not about the villain. in the same way on her majesty's secret service is about him and the dalton movies are i really like it. it has proved quite divisive. some people thinks it breaks bond rules, but i like that about it. did you find yourself swept up? for the most part, yes, and there were a few flashes of humour. i love that. i want my bond to say something a little bit caustic with a glint in his eye. so, you want sean connery, roger moore? yeah, i'm afraid. i know people won't all agree with that. this isn't a roger moore bond. it is a more serious bond. i think daniel craig
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is still my favourite. he's made the role his own, and his films have an arc. that kind of do have... a self—contained bloc of bond movies. connery started it, and i still have a fondness for george lazenby. they are a compact unit, and its long, but i felt it earned it. i thought it got away with the length because i was little nervous. actually, they totally got away with it. if you're going to be longer than 2001, you better have a really good reason. we all enjoyed it. definitely worth seeing. dvd, streaming, what else is around? dvd, so deerskin... how to describe this... a man falls in love with a deerskin jacket which turns him into a serial killer.
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the best way to describe it is it's between man bites and dog peter strickland's movie in fabric, great performances. jean dujardin is actually very wonderful. it's odd, but at the moment, with something as big as a bond movie in cinemas, i like the idea that there are these other things that are totally strange. i'm still not sure with fever dream. i really did enjoy this and i watched it again. thanks very much, mark. see you next week. enjoy your cinema—going. see you next time, bye—bye. hello again. friday was another very mild day across the whole of the uk, even those places where it stayed cloudy throughout. however, there were some places where the sunshine popped out. northern england was one of the sunnier places. it was also one of the warmest places in the uk. the day's highest temperature — ryhill in west yorkshire, 22 degrees celsius.
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that's eight degrees celsius higher than the october average, so it was very, very warm indeed. now looking at this satellite picture, you can see those areas that had the clearest skies. we've seen some clearing skies across east anglia and south east england behind this cold front because what we're seeing at the moment is cooler and fresher air starting to spread in from the near continent. and that's significant because as humidity levels drop, the clouds will increasingly break up, and that's happening right now across east anglia and the south east. meanwhile, for northern england, wales, south west england, southern and eastern scotland, still a lot of low cloud around, a few spots of drizzle, bit of mist and fog for some. and then there's this band of rain that's really pepping up at the moment. some heavy rain for northern ireland, western scotland bringing a risk of some localised surface water flooding. now, the rain will tend to turn a little lighter and patchier through saturday, and the weather front will finally, after a couple of days, start to move away into parts of the north of england and the north of wales. midlands, east anglia, southern counties of england should be much more in the way of sunny
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spells compared with recent days, and temperature still pretty high for october, 18—19 degrees. the second half of the weekend sees that cold front across northern areas pushing southwards. it's a weakening feature, so there won't be much rain left on it by the time it reaches east anglia and south east england, but there could be an odd patch. for most of the uk on sunday, it's another dry day with plenty of sunshine around. however, there will be a fair few blustery showers across the far north and west of scotland. temperatures easing somewhat across northern areas, but still very warm for the south of england and wales. monday, well, it looks like we'll see another band of rain push its way into scotland, turning increasingly heavy, some fairly gusty winds with this as well. temperatures will be coming down further across northern scotland, just around 11—12 degrees for some here. but for northern ireland, england and wales, still above average, but those temperatures are getting a little bit closer to the seasonal norms. 16 degrees, for example, is about right in london. and eventually we should get down there on tuesday. a lot of dry weather
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for many into next week.
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