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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 8, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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you're watching bbc news for viewers in the uk and around the world. the headlines this hour. cracking down on safe havens after months of negotiation, with 130 countries agreed to radically change the international tax system. the mobile peace prize awarded to do generalist for the first time in more than 80 years for their effort safeguard freedom of expression.- years for their effort safeguard freedom of expression. these belong to those who — freedom of expression. these belong to those who are _ freedom of expression. these belong to those who are no _ freedom of expression. these belong to those who are no longer— freedom of expression. these belong to those who are no longer with - to those who are no longer with us on this brilliant young people who are right now on the third floor of the newsroom. if} are right now on the third floor of the newsroom.— are right now on the third floor of the newsroom. 50 people reported killed on a mosque _ the newsroom. 50 people reported killed on a mosque in _ the newsroom. 50 people reported killed on a mosque in northern - killed on a mosque in northern afghanistan, the group have called
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themselves islamic state claim to be behind it. help it cope with the rising price of energy, it doesn't give the answer was hoping for. i think we're headed towards a very dark place if the government doesn't step in now. like other countries and the rest of europe have already stepped in. and the rest of europe have already ste ed in. , and the rest of europe have already steed in. , g. and the rest of europe have already steed in. , �* stepped in. president joe biden urues stepped in. president joe biden urges companies _ stepped in. president joe biden urges companies to _ stepped in. president joe biden urges companies to fire - stepped in. president joe biden| urges companies to fire workers stepped in. president joe biden - urges companies to fire workers who have not been vaccinated against coronavirus. there is a lot of opposition. the most significant overhaul of the international tax system in the generation was announced friday night after negotiations headed by
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the finally ended in agreement. there will be corporation tax that an agreement, all nations and the planet will be a blast to play. — advise to pay. higher than some examples, ireland's rate which at present is one of the last countries to agree to the deal. under 36 of them have signed up and only kenya, nigeria, pakistan and sri lanka are refusing. they brokered the dealings of the countries will collect and $150,000,000,000 a year extra in tax revenues. here's the french finance minister. fighting with more efficiency against the rising inequalities in the world. these agreements of the
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oecd is the world. these agreements of the 0ecd is what we need to have more justice, more efficiency. let’s justice, more efficiency. let's cross life _ justice, more efficiency. let's cross life to _ justice, more efficiency. let's cross life to the _ justice, more efficiency. let's cross life to the canary - justice, more efficiency. let's| cross life to the canary islands where he can speak to alex. an economist that is the chief executive of the tax justice network. thank you very much. it is clearly an important evening. how significant is it, it depends on the detail. ., . , significant is it, it depends on the detail. ., ., , ., significant is it, it depends on the detail. ., . , . . detail. unfortunately, what we have seen today is _ detail. unfortunately, what we have seen today is almost _ detail. unfortunately, what we have seen today is almost an _ detail. unfortunately, what we have seen today is almost an unravelling | seen today is almost an unravelling of the end of the deal. it is very difficult to take seriously what you see people saying aboutjustice. in july, they had a headline statement very similar to the one they have now. then they claimed by october that would have the technical details. we don't have much more of that. but what we can see is that
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this deal doesn't come anywhere close to the ambition of the original ideas and in fact, it's not going to stop profit shifting to the extent that it does generate some revenues, they're almost all going to go to the united states and a few other countries and that will leave everyone else be much where they were. ., , everyone else be much where they were. . , , . , were. that is the difficulty with this that if _ were. that is the difficulty with this that if you _ were. that is the difficulty with this that if you create - were. that is the difficulty with this that if you create a - were. that is the difficulty with i this that if you create a minimum level, the ideas that no one is undercutting the rivals in other countries and he believes stop this business posting profits muchjust here but in the other country shopping to be based and choose a low tax regime, those kinds of things are designed to be eliminated. quote quite long exemptions. hungary and din um: quite long exemptions. hungary and din .'n. in quite long exemptions. hungary and digging in much _ quite long exemptions. hungary and digging in much more _ quite long exemptions. hungary and digging in much more into _ digging in much more into concessions the fundamental issue
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with the taxes is that if the us multinational is shifting out of brazil in 20 tax bermuda, it won't be brazil the tops of the tax on the profit, it will be the us. brazil will still suffer the same profits but the us will give more revenue. most of the multinationals had in a small group of countries, namely the g7, everyone else will struggle to get much out of this. what we are looking at is not the end of negotiations, it will quickly be another round of negotiations and the question will be will people still have confidence in the 0ecxd to be an honest broker. we may be moving to the united nations. it certainly is the past where it is
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been an impartial organisation, but perhaps it is been diminished. any call withjoe biden said in the united states. for decades, american workers and taxpayers have paid the price for multinational corporations and of course many of them american, shipping jobs overseas. will this reverse that?— shipping jobs overseas. will this reversethat? , , ., reverse that? yes, but not in quite the way that _ reverse that? yes, but not in quite the way that he — reverse that? yes, but not in quite the way that he hopes. _ reverse that? yes, but not in quite the way that he hopes. this - reverse that? yes, but not in quite the way that he hopes. this is - reverse that? yes, but not in quite the way that he hopes. this is a i the way that he hopes. this is a global extension of the minimum tax in their reforms. if you would get a number of the major us multinationals. he did not stop shifting profits out of the rest of the world, theyjust stopped where they were shifting them to do. instead of going to the netherlands, they would string to the us. they still did not pay as much taxes they should and everyone still lost out. the difficulty here is president biden has a real sense of domestic
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taxjustice agenda to be commended. absolutely right to sort out the progressivity and the problems in the us tax system and unfortunately, this deal is really doing that at the expense of the rest of the world, particularly the lower income countries as a share of the current tax revenues from this type of tax abuse. so, this is not going to be sustainable. eva received a love developing countries said this is just not good enough and i think we'lljust seem further negotiations of the next couple of years, maybe we'll get to somewhere better but this isn't the great event to be celebrated that they're trying to present today. celebrated that they're trying to present today-— celebrated that they're trying to resent toda . ., ,, , ., , . present today. thank you very much for bein: present today. thank you very much for being with _ present today. thank you very much for being with us _ present today. thank you very much for being with us on _ present today. thank you very much for being with us on bbc _ present today. thank you very much for being with us on bbc world - present today. thank you very much | for being with us on bbc world news. more on the bbc website. analysis by a business correspondent and just go to the
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to journalists that have campaigned for this and have been jointly awarded the nobel peace prize. they were commended for their work which the committee said supported democracy and peace. it's the first time since 1935 that the piece presses been awarded to journalists. for the first time since 1935, the peace prize goes to journalists for their battle to tell the truth at great personal risk. to maria ressa and dmitry muratov, for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace. dmitry muratov is a russian journalist who has taken a stand
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against authoritarian rule. today, he dedicated the award to six colleagues, who, he said, were murdered for their work. he speaks russian. the prize, he said, belonged to them. their paper, novaya gazeta, has been highly critical of president putin and russia's ruling elite. its investigations have exposed electoral fraud such as the stuffing of ballot boxes as well as official corruption and police violence. translation: | don't know| what effect this nobel award will have on censorship of the media here in russia, with many investigative journalists being accused of being foreign agents. maria ressa from the philippines is the other winner, a woman described by the nobel committee as fearless. she's faced criminal charges and death threats. her work has exposed state abuses under the controversial president rodrigo duturte, in particular
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the extrajudicial killings that have come with his deadly war on drugs. thousands of people, mostly from poor communities, have been murdered. today, maria ressa spoke of the vital importance of telling the truth. when you don't have facts, you don't have a truth, you don't have trust. trust is what holds us together to be able to solve the complex problems our world is facing today, so when you attack the media, oftentimes it is about shooting the messenger. two messengers in the spotlight today as the nobel committee says press freedoms are necessary for both democracy and peace, but are under threat around the world. caroline hawley, bbc news. a russian i , moscow has marked them as foreign
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agents, and it's strongly rejects the decisions to designate him as a foreign agent in a statement, it adds... 0fficials officials in northern afghanistan similes 50 people have been killed in a suicide bombing a mosque used by the minority shear community. islamic states as it's behind the attack and it happened during friday prayers. and officials say many dozens of people were also injured. reporting from neighbouring pakistan, are correspondent. this blast took place at 1:30pm in the northern city of kunduz injured victims of the blaster rushed to hospital. 50 injured victims of the blaster rushed to hospital.— injured victims of the blaster rushed to hospital. so many people were injured- _ rushed to hospital. so many people were injured. hardly _
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rushed to hospital. so many people were injured. hardly anyone - rushed to hospital. so many people were injured. hardly anyone was i were injured. hardly anyone was unharmed. most of those sitting there were killed. it is terrible. the local branch of the islamic state group said it had targeted members of the she a minority. they are much less powerful than their rivals the taliban but has a history of attacks in afghanistan. in august, more than 150 people were killed in a bombing outside of kabul airport. in recent weeks, they have launched several smaller attacks targeting taliban fighters in eastern afghanistan. this latest bombing in the north of the country apparently carried out by a member of the uighur ethnic group. thea;r apparently carried out by a member of the uighur ethnic group. they are the enemies — of the uighur ethnic group. they are the enemies of _ of the uighur ethnic group. they are the enemies of our _ of the uighur ethnic group. they are the enemies of our nation. - the enemies of our nation. people are just _ the enemies of our nation. people are just about to experience peace
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and then_ are just about to experience peace and then this happens. all of our security— and then this happens. all of our security forces are working on the investigation. you'll find the corporis— investigation. you'll find the corporis and then they will be dealt with according to sharia law. the taliban see _ with according to sharia law. iia: taliban see their with according to sharia law. tia: taliban see their bringing stability, but isis k is a growing concern for afghans and the wider region. facebook has said its fixing problems that users were experiencing with instagram and saying that it was primarily the wolves affected into a lesser extent, facebook itself. facebook is that the problems were caused by configuration changed and related to monday's outage or its services suffered a six hour long break due to technical issues. the events are not connected. natural gas and the consequences for industry across europe are put into sharp focus on friday with the ut steel industry experts government to meet the rising costs the answer was no but
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there are concerns of a wide—ranging effects and the business meeting. it's notjust consumers feeling the heat of the gas crisis. businesses like pilkington glass rely on huge quantities of energy to keep the fires burning, but soaring gas prices recently have shocked veterans of heavy industry. i've been working at pilkington for 30 odd years, never known anything like it at all, and the impact is literally millions of pounds a month. some industries have stopped production. that's not an option here. a glass furnace runs 21w, 365 days a year for 20 years. so we literally can't turn it off. if we turned it off and it went cold, we would lose the whole of the production, and whole of the factory. the steel industry has seen production reduced or paused, but the industry warned today that, without government help, temporary shutdowns could become permanently damaging. if we don't see action now in the days to weeks ahead of us, then what we'll see is those pauses
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in production that steelmakers are having to implement now when the price of steel is high, those will become more frequent, will become longer and then, my concern would be that we will then see job losses in the steel sector, which would be very bad news, not only for the uk steel sector, but for the economy as a whole. businesses, unlike consumers, are not protected by an energy price cap, meaning they're bearing the full brunt of a gas price shock. the uk is in a global scramble for energy. this is where we get our gas from currently, less than a half now comes from declining reserves in the north sea. 29% through a pipeline from norway, a little bit, 2%, from mainland europe and over a fifth now comes in the form of liquefied natural gas in tankers from places like the us, qatar, russia and there is a bidding war for those tankers, and the voracious appetite of china has seen manufacturs there told, to pay whatever it takes
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to make those tankers change course for asia. that's pushing prices up here at home where energy concerns of some small businesses are more personal than industrial. it's not as easy as just putting on anotherjumper, or putting another blanket over their knees. these people are very vulnerable. they are very poorly quite often, and they don't move very often. so they don't have the kind of lifestyle that you and i have, where we can just get up and move around a bit. we have to keep them warm, we have to keep them safe, and looking at the energy bills at the moment, it's feeling like a very scary place for us to be at the moment. intensive energy users met with the business secretary this afternoon, but no immediate solutions emerged to a crisis that has brutally exposed uk and international reliance on fossil fuels a month before a major climate summit in glasgow. simon jack, bbc news. is in china struggling to meet its fuel requirements and dozens of coal mines to help cope. country
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struggling to generate enough electricity after a big surge in demand following the pandemic. coal is used for more than half of china's energy uses and it is not aiming to reach its peak of carbon emissions for another nine years. to stay with us on bbc news. still to come. , . . stay with us on bbc news. still to come. , ., ., , . ., ., come. diana, they can change. you have to change. _ come. diana, they can change. you have to change. princess _ come. diana, they can change. you have to change. princess diana's i have to change. princess diana's rocky relationship _ have to change. princess diana's rocky relationship with _ have to change. princess diana's rocky relationship with a - have to change. princess diana's rocky relationship with a real - rocky relationship with a real family. — the royalfamily. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. were relishing theirfreedom. they believed everything was going to be different from now on. they think their country is going to be respected in the world once more before he took power. the dalai lama come the exiled spiritual leader of tibet has won this year's nobel peace prize.
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tibet has won this year's nobel peace prize-— tibet has won this year's nobel peace prize. ., ., , , ., peace prize. two grenades exploded in a a-rou peace prize. two grenades exploded in a group of — peace prize. two grenades exploded in a group of soldiers _ peace prize. two grenades exploded in a group of soldiers trumped - peace prize. two grenades exploded in a group of soldiers trumped from | in a group of soldiers trumped from a military truck and ran towards the president firing automatic rifles. after a47 years, president firing automatic rifles. after 447 years, the skeletal ribs of henry— after 447 years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's tragic worship emerged but even as divers work to pull her— emerged but even as divers work to pull her up. — emerged but even as divers work to pull her up, the mary roseman threw another_ pull her up, the mary roseman threw another stopping drama i want to represent everybody. i believe in the _ drama i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people _ drama i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of— i believe in the people of california. _ the headlines this hour. more than 30 countries have signed up to a global deal to reform corporate taxes and that includes a minimum
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rate. the nobel prizes won by two campaigning journalists maria ressa and dmitry muratov. brazil has become just the second country in the world after the us to record 600,000 deaths from covid—19. protesters against the government has done with the pandemic since this demonstration on the beach, 600 white handkerchiefs to remember the dead. fatalities have been slowing to brazil with more than 70% of people there having received at least one vaccine dose. and another question of vaccination, joe biden is urging countries to fire workers refused to be vaccinated against coronavirus. latest official site 56% of americans are fully vaccinated and he will soon bring in more to have health care workers have the job. the more to have health care workers have thejob. the president more to have health care workers have the job. the president wants others to do the same for teachers but it's been in opposition. as in new england. chanting: freedom over fear! freedom over fear! _
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it is, they say, about freedom, an individual�*s right to choose if they get vaccinated, even if they are a nurse. one of the new battle grounds over covid in the us is the requirement in some hospitals that all their staff have had the jab. but some, they say, would rather lose theirjob. leah cushman's notjust a nurse but a state politician. my beliefs are religious. i believe that my creator endowed me with an immune system that protects me, and if i get sick, that's an act of god. what, you've never been vaccinated against anything? i have before i was saved by the lord, yes. with that logic, you wouldn't take any medicines. that's not true, no. i wouldn't take one that affects the immune system this way. of course, even vaccinated staff have the potential to pass on the virus to patients, but hospital managers say unvaccinated health care workers getting sick also puts more strain on resources and suspect for some
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there are bigger forces at play. it's notjust covid, there are other vaccines that employees are required to have. mmr is an example, hepatitis. so again, this is a highly electrified issue, if you will, and we all recognise that. and politicised. to say it's not political would be disingenuous. save our teachers! and the controversy swept up another profession too, with school staff being threatened with sacking if they don't get vaccinated, including in new york city. in connecticut, teacher kahseim 0utlaw refused the vaccine and testing and has already lost his job. i do not use any kind of synthetic ingredients in my life, _ whether that be for medicinal purposes, supplementation, i food and fuel. so the idea of becoming inoculated is something that goes directly - against the way that i live my life
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and have lived for the _ last decade or more. what is the harm in getting tested every week? so, when we talk about harm, i view it as an unnecessary- medical procedure. kahseim had covid so says his natural immunity should suffice. but that's not enough for a government are ramping up pressure on the unvaccinated. aleem maqbool, bbc news. staying with the question of vaccines and protection against covid—19. the us government has announced the centers for disease control that it will accept the use by international visitors of a covid—19 vaccine authorised by us regulators or the world health organization. this is important 0rganization. this is important because the us at the moment recognises the pfizer vaccine made during the injohnson &johnson vaccines. 0nly during the injohnson &johnson vaccines. only those three are authorised for use in the united states. but others recognised by the
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world health organization this serum from india and their big for vaccines as well. more people from abroad will be able to travel to the united states shortly. let's look at how america's economy is recovering from the huge hit of covid—19 and it seems the upwards momentum has hit a bit of a hitch. 0ne statistic we have been following his employment. 0n have been following his employment. on friday, the latest figures had 194,000 newjobs in september and more than what experts are predicting. 5,000,000 down compared to 2020. just 3% fewer. now, she was one of the most photographed figures of the late 20th century. today, nearly a quarter century after she died in a car accident in paris, the story remains an intense
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fascination. the uk premier was at the london film festival and looks of the strange relationship between the princess, her husband and other members of the royal family. three days, that's it. it's set over christmas 1991, a period where diana felt trapped by the royalfamily. taking on the role was empowering, says kristen stewart. to play her, even though it was sad and tumultuous, ironically, i felt taller. i felt like somebody who could lead with love and make people feel good, and it's really contagious. it comes right back at you. do you think i got delayed by someone? oh come on, come on. they are circling us. it seems they are circling just me. performers always feel pressure playing real—life figures. it is an even greater sense of responsibility for someone like diana.
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i've felt such love for her and still do and, um... you know, in a way that isn't... without implying like a kind of developed spirituality, i felt her. i wanted to protect her. there is no future. the past in the present are the same thing. she is someone who many feel was exploited throughout her life and now there are still things that are making money from her. do people who think that a film like this is perhaps at best unnecessary and at worst exploitative have a point? we came to this with love. like, we truly... first foot forward is always trying to understand somebody that we love. um, so i would say that that is... yeah, like a negotiation between art and commerce. it is a vast subject. i believe in art. i believe in trying to get closer to other people through it. they know everything. they don't. there is still almost six months to go but kristen stewart
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is already striding well ahead of her 0scar best actress rivals. lizo mzimba, bbc news. there are many iterations of her story to be found. you're watching bbc news. hello again. friday was another very mild day across the whole of the uk, even those places where it stayed cloudy throughout. however, there were some places where the sunshine popped out. northern england was one of the sunnier places. it was also one of the warmest places in the uk. the day's highest temperature — ryhill in west yorkshire, 22 degrees celsius. that's eight degrees celsius higher than the october average, so it was very, very warm indeed. now looking at this satellite picture, you can see those areas that had the clearest skies. we've seen some clearing skies across east anglia and south east england behind this cold front because what we're seeing at the moment is cooler and fresher air starting to spread in from the near continent. and that's significant
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because as humidity levels drop, the clouds will increasingly break up, and that's happening right now across east anglia and the south east. meanwhile, for northern england, wales, south west england, southern and eastern scotland, still a lot of low cloud around, a few spots of drizzle, bit of mist and fog for some. and then there's this band of rain that's really pepping up at the moment. some heavy rain for northern ireland, western scotland bringing a risk of some localised surface water flooding. now, the rain will tend to turn a little lighter and patchier through saturday, and the weather front will finally, after a couple of days, start to move away into parts of the north of england and the north of wales. midlands, east anglia, southern counties of england should be much more in the way of sunny spells compared with recent days, and temperature still pretty high for october, 18—19 degrees. the second half of the weekend sees that cold front across northern areas pushing southwards. it's a weakening feature, so there won't be much rain left on it by the time it reaches east anglia and south east england, but there could be an odd patch. for most of the uk on sunday, it's another dry day with plenty of sunshine around. however, there will be a fair few
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blustery showers across the far north and west of scotland. temperatures easing somewhat across northern areas, but still very warm for the south of england and wales. monday, well, it looks like we'll see another band of rain push its way into scotland, turning increasingly heavy, some fairly gusty winds with this as well. temperatures will be coming down further across northern scotland, just around 11—12 degrees for some here. but for northern ireland, england and wales, still above average, but those temperatures are getting a little bit closer to the seasonal norms. 14 degrees, for example, is about right in london. and eventually we should get down there on tuesday. a lot of dry weather for many into next week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines — the organisation for economic cooperation and development has announced a major overhaul of the global tax system. 136 countries have agreed a corporation tax rate of 15%. the nobel peace prize has been awarded to two journalists, maria ressa of the philippines and russia's dmitry muratov. the nobel committee praised their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. as many as 50 people are feared to have been killed in a bomb attack on a mosque in afghanistan. the islamic state group said it carried out the attack in kunduz city, which is used by shia worshippers. steel producers in the uk are calling for urgent government action to protect them from the effects of rising gas prices. unlike domestic consumers, businesses' energy costs are not capped leaving them exposed to huge price rises over the past few weeks.

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