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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 8, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 9pm: the nobel peace prize is awarded to two journalists for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. maria ressa of the philippines and russia's dmitry muratov. this prize belonas russia's dmitry muratov. this prize belon . s to russia's dmitry muratov. this prize belongs to those _ russia's dmitry muratov. this prize belongs to those who _ russia's dmitry muratov. this prize belongs to those who are _ russia's dmitry muratov. this prize belongs to those who are no - russia's dmitry muratov. this prizej belongs to those who are no longer with us and those brilliant young people who are, right now, on the third floor of the newsroom. backing down on safe — third floor of the newsroom. backing down on safe havens _ third floor of the newsroom. backing down on safe havens after _ third floor of the newsroom. backing down on safe havens after months . third floor of the newsroom. backing | down on safe havens after months of negotiations, more than 130 nations agree to radically change the international tax system. the uk's steel industry asks the government to help it cope with the rising price in energy but doesn't get the answer it was hoping for. i
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price in energy but doesn't get the answer it was hoping for.— price in energy but doesn't get the answer it was hoping for. i think we are headed — answer it was hoping for. i think we are headed to _ answer it was hoping for. i think we are headed to a _ answer it was hoping for. i think we are headed to a very _ answer it was hoping for. i think we are headed to a very dark— answer it was hoping for. i think we are headed to a very dark place - answer it was hoping for. i think we are headed to a very dark place if. are headed to a very dark place if the government doesn't step in now. like other countries in the rest of europe, they have already stepped in. ec! europe, they have already stepped in. i: , ., ., europe, they have already stepped in, i: , ., ., in. 50 people are now reported killed in an _ in. 50 people are now reported killed in an attack _ in. 50 people are now reported killed in an attack on _ in. 50 people are now reported killed in an attack on a - in. 50 people are now reported killed in an attack on a mosque in. 50 people are now reported i killed in an attack on a mosque in northern afghanistan. the islamic state group say it was behind the bombing. state group say it was behind the bombinu. ., ., ,, and bombing. your royal highness... and we seak bombing. your royal highness... and we speak to — bombing. your royal highness... and we speak to the _ bombing. your royal highness... and we speak to the start _ bombing. your royal highness. .. and we speak to the start of— bombing. your royal highness... and we speak to the start of the _ bombing. your royal highness... and we speak to the start of the new - we speak to the start of the new movie that chronicles princess diana's strained relationship with the royal family. hello and a warm welcome if you're watching on pbs in the us or around the world. stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe.
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the right to freedom of expression has been recognised by this year's nobel peace prize, which has been awarded to two journalists known for their hard—hitting investigations, which have angered their countries' powerful leaders. maria ressa from the philippines, and dmitry muratov from russia have both faced significant threats. the committee commended their work, saying that independent and fact—based journalism served to protect against the abuse of power and lies. caroline hawley reports. for the first time since 1935, the peace prize goes to journalists for their battle to tell the truth at great personal risk. to maria ressa and dmitry muratov, for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace. dmitry muratov is a russian journalist who has taken a stand against authoritarian rule. today, he dedicated the award to six colleagues, who, he said, were murdered for their work. he speaks russian. the prize, he said,
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belonged to them. their paper, novaya gazeta, has been highly critical of president putin and russia's ruling elite. its investigations have exposed electoral fraud such as the stuffing of ballot boxes as well as official corruption and police violence. translation: | don't know| what effect this nobel award will have on censorship of the media here in russia, with many investigative journalists being accused of being foreign agents. maria ressa from the philippines is the other winner, a woman described by the nobel committee as fearless. she's faced criminal charges and death threats. her work has exposed state abuses under the controversial president rodrigo duturte, in particular the extrajudicial killings that have come with his deadly war on drugs. thousands of people, mostly from poor communities, have been murdered. today, maria ressa spoke
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of the vital importance of telling the truth. when you don't have facts, you don't have a truth, you don't have trust. trust is what holds us together to be able to solve the complex problems our world is facing today, so when you attack the media, oftentimes it is about shooting the messenger. two messengers in the spotlight today as the nobel committee says press freedoms are necessary for both democracy and peace, but are under threat around the world. caroline hawley, bbc news. we will speak to a defence analyst who works closely with one of the nobel peace prize winners. you must be proud, who is dmitry muratov and why do you think he was awarded this? he why do you think he was awarded this? , ., ~ .,
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this? he is a kind of soviet journalist. _ this? he is a kind of soviet journalist, he _ this? he is a kind of soviet journalist, he began - this? he is a kind of soviet - journalist, he beganjournalistic journalist, he began journalistic work journalist, he beganjournalistic work during the soviet union in communist rule. afterwards, with a group of otherjournalists, he moved out of the two found the newspaper as an independent publication and it is the last standing print run newspaper opposition, major opposition in western russian, novaya gazeta. all the rest have been this or that way extinguished. novaya gazeta under his leadership campaigned against the first chechen war, the second chechen war and the russian invasion of georgia, the russian invasion of georgia, the russian campaign in syria, the russian campaign in syria, the russian involvement in the fighting in the dumb
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. protest massive nuclear disarmament. getting the peace prize, it is quite warranted for our newspaper but the main thing is that we are the last independent newspaper left in russia. when you describe that _ newspaper left in russia. when you describe that novaya _ newspaper left in russia. when you describe that novaya gazeta - newspaper left in russia. when you describe that novaya gazeta is - newspaper left in russia. when you describe that novaya gazeta is the l describe that novaya gazeta is the last remaining independent opposition publication inside russia, it seems interesting that the kremlin spokesman congratulated dmitry muratov on his win. how does he manage to walk that very fine line with the kremlin?— line with the kremlin? dmitry muratov does _ line with the kremlin? dmitry muratov does not _ line with the kremlin? dmitry muratov does not really - line with the kremlin? dmitry muratov does not really walk| line with the kremlin? dmitry| muratov does not really walk a line with the kremlin? dmitry - muratov does not really walk a fine line with the kremlin. he does not really interact with the kremlin. they are most likely glad that the nobel prize went to dmitry muratov and not to alexei navalny, the opposition leader who is now incarcerated. it is easier to give
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the nobel peace prize two journalists who are not incarcerated than an opposition figure. but, anyway, the news has not been really much reported. in russia, the official tv coverage and somewhere in the second half of the main today evening news programmes. as something together with the local news. and president putin did not congratulate personally. russia gets a lot of nobel prizes. there's not a lot of public official elation about it. novaya gazeta is not that good with the kremlin but apparently for them, it is better than alexei navalny. them, it is better than alexei navaln . , ., , ., navalny. interesting, many thanks for talkinu navalny. interesting, many thanks for talking to _ navalny. interesting, many thanks for talking to us _ navalny. interesting, many thanks for talking to us on _ navalny. interesting, many thanks for talking to us on the _ navalny. interesting, many thanks for talking to us on the day - navalny. interesting, many thanks for talking to us on the day that i for talking to us on the day that your friend and colleague, for talking to us on the day that yourfriend and colleague, dmitry muratov was honoured with the nobel peace prize. ., ~ , ., muratov was honoured with the nobel peace prize._ on _ muratov was honoured with the nobel peace prize._ on the - muratov was honoured with the nobel
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peace prize._ on the day i peace prize. thank you. on the day that a russian _ peace prize. thank you. on the day that a russian journalist _ peace prize. thank you. on the day| that a russian journalist wednesday nobel peace prize, the russian government has designated a number ofjournalists government has designated a number of journalists as foreign government has designated a number ofjournalists as foreign agents, among them a reporter from the ofjournalists as foreign agents, among them a reporterfrom the bbc, andrei zakharov from the bbc. the bbc says it strongly rejects the decision by russia to designate andrei as a �*foreign agent'. in a statement, it adds... the most significant overhaul of the international tax system in a generation has been announced, after negotiations in paris finally resulted in an agreement. the talks, which involved 140 countries, were led by the organisation for economic cooperation and development, and have now resulted in an agreement of a minimum corporate tax rate of 15%. the aim is for the deal
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to come into force in 2023. the 0ecd says that as a result, countries will collect around one hundred and 50 billion dollars in extra tax revenues each year. gregory daco is the chief us economist at oxford economics usa, and thinks the agreement is a step in the right direction. the level companies will no longer have this ability to choose the jurisdiction in which they decide to be taxed. this should help in terms of global coordination and it should also help reduce potential tensions between different countries when it comes to corporate taxation and avoid a race to the bottom in terms of corporate tax rates. critics have said that people will
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find ways to pay less. 0xfa m 0xfam has described this as a mockery of fairness, what do you say? mockery of fairness, what do you sa ? . ._ , , mockery of fairness, what do you sa? . ., ,, say? there will always be attempts to circumvent _ say? there will always be attempts to circumvent any _ say? there will always be attempts to circumvent any form _ say? there will always be attempts to circumvent any form of - say? there will always be attemptsj to circumvent any form of taxation. but what we have is the foundation with the global taxing system 2.0. the prior one is one that predated a lot of the emergence of the tech companies and in particular, we know that a lot of tech companies were a source of tension between different jurisdictions with the threat or imposition of digital taxes on some of these multinationals that created tensions between us and other trading partners like france or the uk. in this environment, we have the foundation of something likely to last over time and be appropriate in the current environment of a digitised world. this is a step in the right direction. it is digitised world. this is a step in the right direction.— the right direction. it is a step, but is this _
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the right direction. it is a step, but is this really _ the right direction. it is a step, but is this really the _ the right direction. it is a step, but is this really the great - but is this really the great levelling up we are being told it is? ireland, hungary and estonia, all of which have corporate tax rates below 15%. at first, they resisted this but they are now on board. kenya, nigeria, pakistan and sri lanka, they have not yetjoined the agreement, do you think they will? and what could be the repercussions if they don't? it is repercussions if they don't? it is very important _ repercussions if they don't? it 3 very important that we already have 136 countries that are signatories to this potential deal which is over 90% of global gdp. this is a step in the right direction. in particular in an environment where there has been greater fragmentation globally. seeing these large countries all agreeing to this new framework, which has two pillars, more fair distribution of profits and a global minimum to corporate tax, that is a step in the right direction. it will move us towards an environment where there will be less tensions globally on the corporate front and where we
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are going to be able to generate greater profits from some of these... greater tax revenues from some of these large multinationals that generate large amounts of profit. officials in northern afghanistan say as many as 50 people may have been killed in a suicide bombing at a mosque used by the minority she a community. —— shia community. the group calling itself islamic state says it was behind the attack. it happened in the city of kunduz during friday prayers, when the mosque would've been packed with worshippers. officials say many dozens of people were also injured. these pictures give an idea of the devastation caused by the blast, which took place early in the afternoon, inside the mosque. it's the deadliest single attack in afghanistan since us forces left the country. with more, here's our afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani. ..
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this blast took place at 1:30pm in the northern city of conduce as worshipers were gathering for friday prayers, and the most was very busy, we understand there were about 300 people inside the mosque at the time the suicide bomber blew himself up, causing utter devastation. as you say, it's believed that more than 50 people were killed. now in the last hour or so, the local branch of the islamic state group, is—k, have claimed responsibility for the bombing. they've repeatedly launched attacks in the past, as was this one targeting afghanistan's shia minority. now is are also fierce rivals of the taliban in recent weeks, although is is still much less powerful than the taliban, they've launched a campaign of bombing attacks targeting taliban fighters. that's largely in the east of the country at times, as well, in and around kabul. this attack in the north of afghanistan, apparently committed
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by a member of the uighur ethnic group, represents a worrying escalation and suggest their influence is expanding. the local branch of islamic state has claimed responsibility for this attack, what is their strategy? their strategy, given from this target set, they want to hit at least two birds with one stone. one is to exacerbate ethnic and sectarian tensions by targeting shia minority group. they want to be able to rile up the minorities, who are already really concerned about their fate, because of the taliban takeover. that is one. number two is that they want to be able to send a message, the location in kunduz is to rattle notjust iran, which will get involved because, you know, the shia community has been targeted but
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rush and central asian states because kunduz is not far off from the borders with turkmenistan russia and central asian states. and to take a stand. we have seen a war of words between taliban and beach tajikistan a government. that seems to be a big strategy, to prevent the taliban from consolidating power and exploit the chaos. in taliban from consolidating power and exploit the chaos.— exploit the chaos. in which case, what is the _ exploit the chaos. in which case, what is the taliban _ exploit the chaos. in which case, what is the taliban going - exploit the chaos. in which case, what is the taliban going to - exploit the chaos. in which case, what is the taliban going to do i exploit the chaos. in which case, | what is the taliban going to do in response? this is becoming a regular if not weekly occurrence. here response? this is becoming a regular if not weekly occurrence.— if not weekly occurrence. here is where the _ if not weekly occurrence. here is where the taliban _ if not weekly occurrence. here is where the taliban run _ if not weekly occurrence. here is where the taliban run into - if not weekly occurrence. here is where the taliban run into a - if not weekly occurrence. here is i where the taliban run into a major dilemma, as i argued in my wall streetjournal piece from a few weeks ago. the more the taliban tried to become pragmatic and try to govern the country and the further away they get from the ideology, the more they risk losing fighters to isis. it is one thing for the taliban to go suppress minorities and other communities in
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afghanistan. they can'tjust sit by and have isis do these bombings. because they look very weak. and unable to provide for security. they have to go off to the perpetrators. and when they do go after the perpetrators, they will end up going after fellow jihadists and perpetrators, they will end up going after fellowjihadists and it gives isis a stick with which they can beat the taliban and they can point to taliban fighters and the leadership as having given up on the circle because ofjihad is. this strategic dilemma for the taliban. whose interests does this serve? nobody other than isis. at the end of the day, we have seen this play out in iraq and syria where civil unrest, uprisings, violence is fully
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exploited by isis. this is its signature modus operandi, to use conditions of war and conflict and ethnic and sectarian conflict to its advantage. isis is trying to take advantage. isis is trying to take advantage of big strategic vacuum. that will grow in time because i don't see the taliban being able to stabilise the situation. at least not any time soon and that provides for a window of opportunity for isis and other transnationaljihadist and other transnational jihadist actors. and other transnational 'ihadist actors. , ., ., ., , actors. many thanks for 'oining us from washington. _ the social media giant facebook says it is experiencing problems with its services again. the issues seem to be affecting instagram, but not facebook or whatsapp. the company says it is working to get things back to normal as soon as possible. on monday, facebook�*s services suffered a six—hour—long outage, due to what it said were internal technical issues. stay with us on bbc news, still to come...
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diana, they can't change. you have to change. a new film chronicles princess diana's rocky relationship with the royal family. we meet the star who plays the lead role.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines... maria ressa from the philippines and the russian, dmitry muratov. more than 130 countries have signed up to a global deal on corporate tax reform it includes a 15% minimum corporate tax rate. the pressure on supplies of natural gas and the effects that could have on industry across europe were put
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into sharp focus on friday, when the uk steel industry asked for government help to meet the rising costs. the answer, for now at least, was "no" and there are concerns that could start to have wide—ranging effects. here's our business editor, simonjack. it's notjust consumers feeling the heat of the gas crisis. businesses like pilkington glass rely on huge quantities of energy to keep the fires burning, but soaring gas prices recently have shocked veterans of heavy industry. i've been working for pilkington for 30 odd years, never known anything like it at all, and the impact is literally millions of pounds a month. some industries have stopped production, that is not an option here. a glass furnace runs 21w, 365 days a year for 20 years. so we literally can't turn it off. if we turned it off and it went cold, we would lose the whole of the production,
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the whole of the factory. the steel industry has seen production reduced or paused, but the industry warned today that, without government help, temporary shutdowns could become permanently damaging. if we don't see action now in the days to weeks ahead of us, then what we'll see is pauses in production that steelmakers are having to implement now when the price of steel is high, those will become more frequent, will become longer and then, my concern would be that we will then see job losses in the steel sector, which would be very bad news, not only for the uk steel sector, but for the economy as a whole. businesses, unlike consumers, are not protected by an energy price cap, meaning they're bearing the full brunt of a gas price shock. the uk is in a global scramble for energy. this is where we get our gas from currently, less than a half now comes from declining reserves in the north sea. 29% through a pipeline from norway, a little bit, 2%, from mainland europe and over a fifth now comes in the form of liquefied natural gas in tankers
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from places like the us, qatar, russia and there is a bidding war for those tankers, and the voracious appetite of china has seen manufacturs there told, to pay whatever it takes to make those tankers change course for asia. that's pushing prices up here at home where energy concerns of some small businesses are more personal than industrial. it's not as easy as just putting on anotherjumper, or putting another blanket over their knees. these people are very vulnerable. they are very poorly quite often, and they don't move very often. so they don't have the kind of lifestyle that you and i have, where we can just get up and move around a bit. we have to keep them warm, we have to keep them safe, and looking at the energy bills at the moment, it's feeling like a very scary place for us to be at the moment. intensive energy users met with the business secretary this afternoon, but no immediate solutions emerged to a crisis that has brutally exposed uk and international reliance on fossil fuels a month before a major climate summit in glasgow. simon jack, bbc news.
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she was one of the most photographed figures of the late 20th century. today, nearly a quarter of a century after the death of diana, princess of wales, her story remains a source of intense fascination. a new film, spencer, hasjust had its uk premiere at the london film festival. it looks at the strained relationship between the late princess, prince charles, and the royal family. our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, spoke to the star of the film, actor kristen stewart. three days, that's it... it's set over christmas 1991, a period where diana felt trapped by the royal family. taking on the role was empowering, says kristen stewart. to play her, even though it was sad and tumultuous, ironically, i felt taller. i felt like somebody who could lead with love and make people feel good, and it's really contagious.
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it comes right back at you. do you think i got delayed by someone? oh, come on, come on. they are circling us. it seems they are circling just me. performers always feel pressure playing real—life figures. it's an even greater sense of responsibility for someone like diana. i felt such love for her and still do and, um... you know, in a way that isn't... without implying like a kind of developed spirituality, i felt her. i wanted to protect her. there is no future. the past and the present are the same thing. she is someone who many feel was exploited throughout her life and now there are still things that are making money from her. do people who think that a film like this is perhaps at best unnecessary and at worst exploitative have a point? we came to this with love. like, we truly... first foot forward is always trying
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to understand somebody that we love. erm, so i would say that that is... the negotiation between art and commerce is a vast subject. i believe in art. i believe in trying to get closer to other people through it. they know everything. they don't. there's still almost six months to go, but kristen stewart is already striding well ahead of her oscar best actress rivals. lizo mzimba, bbc news. just time to show you some more pictures from the ongoing volcanic eruption on la palma, in spain's canary islands. this drone footage shows how so much lava has flowed down the mountainside, it's now created a second stream. this one has poured down a hillside, threatening farmland and greenhouses. it means any buildings between the two lava streams are effectively cut off, and it could be months, or even years, before they're accessible again.
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don't forget you can get in touch with me and some of the team on twitter. we always love hearing from you. stay with us. hello, again. it was another very mild day on friday with temperatures in the warmest spots reaching the low 20s. and although there was quite a bit of cloud for some, others saw the sunshine come through, for example, in scarborough in north yorkshire. and just down the coastline in bridlington, this was one of the places where we saw temperatures reach 21 celsius. that's 7 degrees above where temperatures should be at this stage of october. so it has been very mild. as i say, there has been some sunshine, northern east wales, northern england, the far north of scotland, otherwise it's been pretty cloudy. notice we're starting to see some breaks in the cloud in kent. that's behind a very weak cold front. this stripe of cloud you can see here, that's important, because behind that, the air turns cooler and fresher. it will tend to kill off
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the cloud across east anglia, across parts of the midlands and central southern england overnight, leaving a few mist and fog patches across southwest england, wales and northern england. outbreaks of rain turning heavier for northern ireland and into western scotland where we could see some areas of localised surface water flooding, particularly in parts of highland. now, through saturday, this weather front that's been with us for ages is starting to pull away from northern ireland and scotland, eventually through the afternoon bringing a bit of rain to the far north of northern england and north wales. most of england having much more in the way of sunshine compared with recent days. and the weather improving certainty across northern ireland and western scotland, as well. so those changes are behind this cold front that's going to be pushing its way southeastward through the weekend. yes, the air will get fresher, but it will be much more in the way of sunshine for many on sunday. so a few showers for scotland across northern and western areas, maybe one or two for the north coasts of northern ireland. here is our cold front, very weak, just bringing a few patches of cloud, maybe an odd spit of rain across east anglia and southern england, but most of the day will be
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dry and bright. plenty of sunshine elsewhere. temperatures about 14—16 celsius quite widely, so still a little above average. now, monday sees a bit more rain move into northern and western scotland. could be quite heavy for a time, as well. temperatures here getting close to average. it will be a bit cooler than it has been. highs of 12 in aberdeen, but otherwise temperatures a little above average, bright or sunny spells, highs between around 15—17 degrees. but in the week ahead, those temperatures will continue to get a bit closer to normal as we get toward the middle part of the week. that's your weather.
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this is bbc world news,
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the headlines... the nobel peace prize has been awarded to two journalists, maria ressa of the philippines, and russia's dmitry muratov. the nobel committee praised their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which it said was vital for democracy and lasting peace. the organisation for economic co—operation and development has announced a major overhaul of the global tax system. 136 countries have agreed a corporation tax rate of 15%. as many as 50 people are feared to have been killed in a bomb attack on a mosque in afghanistan. the islamic state group said it carried out the attack in kunduz city, which is used by shia worshippers. a court in israel has begun hearing arguments in the custody battle for a six—year—old boy, who was the sole survivor of a cable car crash in italy in may. at 10pm, reeta chakrabarti
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will be here with a full round—up of the days news. first, it's time for newscast.

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