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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 8, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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today at 5pm... as the hotels — wholesale cost of gas or is, they hold talks with energy intensive industries like steel and chemical manufacturers about soaring wholesale gas costs. he was in listening mode, and i hope that that dialogue can continue because we cannot wait. more than a0 million people will be offered a jab as part of the biggest flu vaccination programme in the nhs's history, as experts warn of low immunity levls and the risk of covid and flu circulating together. it's because of this significant risk to individuals of co—circulation, so the circulation together of both covid and flu and the likelihood that will cause more serious disease and people are more
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likely to go to hospital. baroness casey has announced of the leading culture and standards for at the police following the murder by serving officer. two journalists are awarded the nobel peace prize for their work in defending freedom of expression in the philippines and russia. the nobel committee recognises the role journalists are going to play, are playing in fixing our broken world. ~ ., ., ., ., world. we are going on a family vacation! let's _ world. we are going on a family vacation! let's roll! _ the addams family are off on roadtrip across america in the addams family 2, out in cinemas this weekend we'll get mark kermode's thoughts on this and the rest of the top releases in the film review.
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good afternoon. people are being warned that they will see significant rises in energy prices next spring. the regulator says the price cap will go up because of the unprecedented increase in wholesale gas prices. this afternoon, the business secretary has been having talks with representatives of industries including chemical manufacturers, paper mills and steel producers are expressing their concerns to the meanwhile, the us has told russia which supplies most of europe's gas that it must not exploit the situation for political gain. our diplomatic correspondent james landale has more. for years, europe has depended on russia for much of its energy supplies. in all, the eu gets 40% of its natural gas from there, and about a quarter of its crude oil. that means the kremlin has a big say in the price of our energy, and one ofjoe biden�*s closest advisers told me that influence could be exploited.
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we have long been concerned about russia using energy as a tool of coercion and a political weapon. we've seen it happen before and we could see it happen again. but do you think that russia are going to try and exploit this? i think it would be a mistake for russia to try to exploit this. i think that would ultimately backfire on them and i believe that they should respond to the market demands for increased energy supplies to europe. the fear is that moscow is not supplying as much gas as it could to put pressure on the eu to start using this, russia's new pipeline called nord stream 2. this would massively increase the amount of gas coming direct from russia, through the baltic sea, to germany, bypassing the other main route through ukraine. some fear this will give russia even more influence. but the country's energy bosses insist they are not deliberately holding back supplies. translation: since the beginning of the year, we have supplied - foreign markets with near—record
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amounts of gas. we increased deliveries to our largest consumer market, germany, by a third compared to the last year. to turkey by two and a half times. to romania by four times. we supplied additional volumes of gas along all routes, including the ukrainian route, as much as we could. eu leaders are less sanguine and hope that greater use of green energy will make europe less reliant on russia. so far, this is very clear that, l with energy in the long—term, it is important to invest in renewables. - that gives us stable prices and more independence, i because gas is imported, l 90% of the gas is imported to the european union. the renewables, we are the masterl of the production of the renewables. the problem is that for europe to go green, it will have to use less coal. and, in the short term, that could mean even greater reliance on russian gas and, potentially, yet more price hikes in the future. james landale, bbc news, brussels.
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as we mentioned, the business secretary has been holding talks this afternoon with leaders from industries that she is a huge amount of power. they've been wanting to discuss their concerns about that soaring cost of gas. producers of steel, paper, glass and ceramics are among those whichjust steel, paper, glass and ceramics are among those which just don't have the protection of a price cap. gareth was in that meeting this afternoon and afterwards spoke to my colleague. irate afternoon and afterwards spoke to my colleauue. ~ ., ., , , colleague. we are really pleased that we could _ colleague. we are really pleased that we could have _ colleague. we are really pleased that we could have that - colleague. we are really pleased that we could have that meeting| colleague. we are really pleased - that we could have that meeting with the secretary of state for business, and there were a number of sectors around the table, energy intensive sectors, and he really listened. he really, i think, sectors, and he really listened. he really, ithink, certainly understands the crisis that we are going through at the moment. but to my worry is where is the action? other countries, other european countries, portugal, for example,
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have already committed to many billions of euros to help those industries in those countries reduce their prices so they can stay competitive. the secretary of state today didn't offer any solutions, but he was listening. he was in listening mode, and i hope that that dialogue can continue because we cannot wait. at the moment we cannot wait for christmas and beyond are even a few weeks. we need action now. it needs to be swift, decisive action to address those wholesale prices and also those prices for carbon, renewables, connexion chargers that we pay more of than our competitors in europe. in the government on the latter ones there, they can do something immediately on that. we've given them all the details and what we want to see is action there. details and what we want to see is action there-— action there. let's be clear, the business secretary _ action there. let's be clear, the business secretary listen - action there. let's be clear, the business secretary listen to - action there. let's be clear, the | business secretary listen to you, you say he understood you but he offered no solutions.—
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you say he understood you but he offered no solutions. there were no immediate solutions _ offered no solutions. there were no immediate solutions or— offered no solutions. there were no immediate solutions or guaranteesl immediate solutions or guarantees that we will see help from government during this energy crisis, and i did one the secretary of state i said, look, we are in an energy crisis at the moment. what i'm fearful is that it might become a steel crisis in the next few weeks if nothing is done. that a steel crisis in the next few weeks if nothing is done.— if nothing is done. that was gareth with the view _ if nothing is done. that was gareth with the view from _ if nothing is done. that was gareth with the view from the _ if nothing is done. that was gareth with the view from the steel - with the view from the steel industry. our business correspondent katie prescott is here. two elements to this, of course. and perhaps the needs and costs of industry sometimes gets forgotten about, and that was loud and clear there, certainly from one representative in terms of the potential impact of these gas prices. i potential impact of these gas rices. ., potential impact of these gas rices. ~ , ., potential impact of these gas rices. ~' , ., ., potential impact of these gas rices. ~ , ., ., ., prices. i think you heard from garrett they're _ prices. i think you heard from garrett they're the _ prices. i think you heard from garrett they're the sort - prices. i think you heard from garrett they're the sort of - prices. i think you heard from - garrett they're the sort of tempered optimism, yes, the government is listening, but what they really want to see is something done about this, because you're talking about industries that use vast amounts of power that is their major cost, and ultimately, when those gas prices go up ultimately, when those gas prices go up as they have been, that really
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affects those businesses. particularly in areas like prince of wales, for example, where these are very highly skilled, highly paid jobs. there was a threat at the end of the peace that we just heard that that this could potentially have an impact on jobs in the long term that this could potentially have an impact onjobs in the long term if perhaps that support isn't there. now, speaking to other businesses today, i don't know if you think about james today, i don't know if you think aboutjames for example, or ice drinks, they are also concerned about the price rises of energy, but actually less concerned than, say, the steel industry, because they can hedge for longer. they don't use, of course, the amounts of energy that they do, so you are talking about two years, maybe a year contract for energy. those will come to an end. i spoke to a care home today that said they are very, very concerned what happens when those contracts do come to an end. he could see price rises up to an end. he could see price rises up potentially, she was telling me, about iio%. up potentially, she was telling me, about 11096-— up potentially, she was telling me, about 11096. , , , about 11096. goodness, huge figures. we will talk more _ about 11096. goodness, huge figures. we will talk more about _ about 11096. goodness, huge figures. we will talk more about this - about 11096. goodness, huge figures. we will talk more about this in - about 11096. goodness, huge figures. we will talk more about this in a - we will talk more about this in a moment, but also in terms of the domestic consumer, another warning
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from offjammed that essentially bills will go up up for all of us next year. bills will go up up for all of us next year-— bills will go up up for all of us next ear. , ., next year. indeed. they were told this meaning _ next year. indeed. they were told this meaning that _ next year. indeed. they were told this meaning that bills _ next year. indeed. they were told this meaning that bills will - next year. indeed. they were told this meaning that bills will go - next year. indeed. they were told this meaning that bills will go upl this meaning that bills will go up significantly and analysts think that could be in the region of hundreds of pounds. we've already seen the price cap rise by 12% to £1277, seen the price cap rise by i2% to £1277, so when that happens again in april, a few hundred pounds more could put bills up very significantly for people. at a difficult time when price rises are coming across the board. to go back to the point that businesses, actually, that, although it might not directly affect us, in the long term will also be due to households as well. , �* term will also be due to households as well. , ~ ., as well. yes. all right, katie, thanks for — as well. yes. all right, katie, thanks for now. _ as well. yes. all right, katie, thanks for now. as _ as well. yes. all right, katie, | thanks for now. as promised, as well. yes. all right, katie, - thanks for now. as promised, let's stay with us. let's speak to the labour mp stephen kinnock, who's aberavon constituency includes the port talbot steelworks. at evening to you. i could — i hope you can hear that part of the interviewee band with the representative of the steel industry who said the business secretary was
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undoubtedly listening, but as he put it, there were no solutions. what is your take? it, there were no solutions. what is our take? ~ , it, there were no solutions. what is your take?— your take? well, it is 'ust not good enou~h, your take? well, it is 'ust not good enough, because _ your take? well, it is 'ust not good enough, because a _ your take? well, it isjust not good enough, because a lot _ your take? well, it isjust not good enough, because a lot of _ your take? well, it isjust not good enough, because a lot of what - your take? well, it isjust not good enough, because a lot of what we | enough, because a lot of what we have been asking for and i work closely with gareth and uk steel and also the community union, the steel workers union, we have been asking forfive or six years workers union, we have been asking for five or six years now for action to be taken on energy costs. we pay 50% more than the german steel industry he pays for its energy, and almost 70% more than the french steel industry does, our network cost, connecting to the national grid is massively more expensive in this country than in continental europe. we've also got much higher wholesale prices, so, of course, the prices — crisis that we are in now is compounding the issue, but frankly, by the government to act as if this is something new or surprising beggars belief, really. the government would say that we
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have provided £2,000,000,000 to help with industry costs over recent years, we have changed just in the last eight days we have changed gas transmission charges to allow discount for large users. the government would say there are certain to measures like that in hand. ~ , ., , , hand. well, they address the symptoms — hand. well, they address the symptoms of _ hand. well, they address the symptoms of the _ hand. well, they address the symptoms of the problem, . hand. well, they address the i symptoms of the problem, but hand. well, they address the - symptoms of the problem, but they are not getting to the cause of it, which is that the network cost and the policy costs and the wholesale costs which make—up the overall energy bill for the steel industry and other energy intensive industries are far, far higher than they are in the competing countries across europe. so, what we need is a regulated wholesale price, like, for example, the model they have in france or italy, and we also need compensation in place to deal with the network costs, which has i said, were so much higher, and renewable
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levies, for example, where we are paying far more than those in europe. so, fundamentally, we have got british deal—makers who make the best steel that money can buy, but they are competing with one hand tied behind their back because we have a government that is failing to work in partnership with the steel industry and supporting the role that the steel industry place as the foundation of british manufacturing. so, it would be such a false economy for the uk government not to intervene and help here because as your correspondent rightly said, there are many, many high—paying jobs, the prime minister said in his speech at the tory party conference, he wants to move to a high productivity, high wage economy. well, you cannot do that without a sustainable and financially viable steel industry. flan sustainable and financially viable steel industry.— steel industry. can i 'ust asking about domestic h steel industry. can ijust asking about domestic bells _ steel industry. can ijust asking about domestic bells as - steel industry. can ijust asking about domestic bells as well, l about domestic bells as well, because he will be aware the head was crystal clear this morning, bills will go up for households
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across the country next year. is there any more that the government can do mitigate that?— can do mitigate that? well, one of the thin . s can do mitigate that? well, one of the things the _ can do mitigate that? well, one of the things the government - can do mitigate that? well, one of the things the government should | the things the government should have done is planned for having more storage. we only have about seven days of gas storage in this country compared to 90 days in countries like germany and france. in abject failure from the part of the government in terms of not planning and storing. that would've helped put some downward pressure on the price of gas in particular. what we need to see now is a really serious discussion about the energy price cap, because this is going to create a really difficult situation where we have already got a cost of living crisis, inflation going up, food prices going up, supply chain disruption, universal credit being cut. the government really needs to understand that they cannot try to bounce this crisis off the poorest
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and most honourable people in our society. they have to find a much fairer way of managing, and in many ways, a crisis that's been caused by theirfailure ways, a crisis that's been caused by their failure to plan for the long—term. their failure to plan for the long-term— their failure to plan for the long-term. their failure to plan for the iona-term. ,, , ., , ., long-term. stephen, many thanks. the labour mp whose _ long-term. stephen, many thanks. the labour mp whose constituency - long-term. stephen, many thanks. the labour mp whose constituency covers l labour mp whose constituency covers the steel racks, of course. and as we were talking the last few moments, a couple more details filtered through. my reaction, really, to that meeting this afternoon. just to try to give you a flavour of it, this is a statement from the energy intensive users group, precisely what we have been talking about, of course, saying, "our message to the secretary of state was very prompt and preventative measures to help avoid recent production contaminants in the fertiliser sector and in the steel sector. we don't want to see that replicated in other areas this winter. we will work with government to avoid threats both to production of essential domestic and industrial
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products as well as supply chains, which are critical to our economy." that's quite a lengthy statement, i want to read the whole thing to you, but that gives you a flavour of that meeting that was held this afternoon with the business secretary. much more to come on that, i'm quite sure. let's change our other major story here this evening. more than a0 million people across the uk are being offered a flu vaccine this year, in the nhs's biggest campaign against the virus. fewer people than usual caught flu last winter, because lockdowns meant we mixed less, and people focused more on hand—washing and hygiene. but medics are worried about the impact of flu and covid i9 circulating together in the coming months. everyone over the age of 50, people with health conditions, pregnant women, health and care workers, and most children are being urged to take up the offer of a vaccine as soon as possible, as our health correspondent naomi grimley reports.
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i've got together some of the country's leading medics to answer your vaccine questions... this is the latest media advert to remind us that it's notjust covid which we will have to worry about this winter. flu could rear its head again, too. a recent survey with 3,000 participants found that nearly a third of those asked were unaware that flu and covid—i9 can circulate together at the same time. that's got health officials worried. it's because of this significant risk to individuals of co—circulation, so the circulation together of both covid and flu and the likelihood that that will cause more serious disease and people are more likely to go to hospital. more than a0 million people across the uk are being offered a flu jab free in the biggest ever roll—out of the vaccine. they include the over—sos, those with certain health conditions, pregnant women, health care workers,
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and most children. lockdowns and extra hygiene measures squashed flu last winter, and that means the level of immunity in the population is likely to be lower this time round. there's also uncertainty about how effective the flu vaccine will be. usually, scientists study what's been circulating in the southern hemisphere to help formulate a flu jab months ahead. but, this year, the guesswork has been hampered by lockdowns disrupting the usual influenza patterns. if we look to australia, for example, we know that influenza a is circulating there right now, it's causing 97% of the flu cases, but we look to china, which is ahead of us in terms of the lockdown measures and their progress through the covid pandemic, they have mainly influenza b, so we're not exactly certain, but the vaccines have a mix of strains in them, so they will offer protection to multiple different types of flu, so we're trying to cover all bases.
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flu normally kills around 11,000 people every winter, but a report published earlier this year from the academy of medical sciences warned respiratory illnesses could hit very high levels, and flu deaths alone could reach 60,000 in a worst—case scenario. naomi grimley, bbc news. isa is a minutes past five pm. he died tonight's headlines... . the business secretary has met direct representatives of energy intensive industries like steel and chemical producers. it follows that dramatic rise in the price of wholesale gas. the biggest flu vaccination programme in nhs history will be getting under way and made concern about covid—i9 and flu spreading at the same time this winter. the cross bench pierre baroness casey is to lead a review of culture and
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standards at the metropolitan police following the murder of sarah everard by a serving officer. let's talk more about that story, because it was announced this afternoon that baroness casey of blackstock is to lead that review of culture and standards at the met police in the wake of the murder of sarah everard. the commissioner of the metro powhatan police announced that appointment this afternoon. — metropolitan police. it will look into the forest internal culture — internal culture and professional standards such as systems, processes, leadership and training. a 67 —year—old man has admitted responsibility for the killing of two women. that was more than three decades ago back in 1987. david feller has accepted that he killed when the mall and caroline
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pierce in tunbridge wells in kent. the admission cons subject to the issue of diminished responsibility. he will stand trial. that trial is due to begin on november the first. it's emerged at the inquest for the four men murdered by the serial killer stephen part ——by the serial killer stephen port that he was identified early on in the police investigation into the killings as a "significant witness". the four young men were murdered by stephen port in 201a and 2015 they were killed by fatal doses of a date rape drug. inquests are now examining whether the police made mistakes our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has been listening to the inquests, and we can speak to him now. explain more about what we learned today. explain more about what we learned toda . . g , explain more about what we learned toda. ._ , explain more about what we learned toda. , ., today. that jerry has been hearing that the first _ today. that jerry has been hearing that the first step _ today. that jerry has been hearing that the first step stephen - today. that jerry has been hearing | that the first step stephen portes's for victims were found dead just after four for victims were found dead just afterfour in for victims were found dead just after four in the morning for victims were found dead just afterfour in the morning on for victims were found dead just after four in the morning on the
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19th ofjune 201a outside the block of flats where port lived. about 200 metres from where these inquests are being held. and very quickly, they identified the anonymous caller to the ambulance service being stephen port and that he lived in that block. in the records that are being shown to the gerry of the police investigation, one of the first officers on the scene is recorded as saying, "we need to find out when he is so we can go and speak to him straight away." he is a significant witness. the london ambulance service had told the metropolitan police after that call that the male caller had sounded unsure and apprehensive. and in and a handwritten note made that morning by that borough commander, the chief superintendent andy ewing, he wrote down "collar, previous sexual assault." and that is because there was a record on the police national computer that a man had made a complaint against stephen port 18 months earlier that he had used a
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drug against ten and had raped him. but stephen port — stephen port was not arrested on suspicion of murder. he was eventuallyjailed for lying to the police because he said that he didn't know anthony well gate even though he'd spent the night with him. but before he was jailed for lying to police, he managed to kill two more men, and after he was released from prison, he managed to kill a fourth man, and it was only after that that he was eventually arrested on suspicion of murder and convicted by a jury. he is now serving a whole life order. convicted by ajury. he is now serving a whole life order. yes, and so exlain serving a whole life order. yes, and so exoiain the _ serving a whole life order. yes, and so explain the purpose _ serving a whole life order. yes, and so explain the purpose of _ serving a whole life order. yes, and so explain the purpose of these - so explain the purpose of these inquest then, danielle. the 'ury have been �* inquest then, danielle. the 'ury have been told i inquest then, danielle. the 'ury have been told that i inquest then, danielle. the 'ury have been told that the i inquest then, danielle. the jury have been told that the idea - inquest then, danielle. the jury - have been told that the idea behind these inquest is to try and establish whether any of the men who died later, their lives could have been saved if a better police investigation had been carried out earlier. so thatjerry, it's been made clear to the jury that their job is to go through what the police
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did at the time of each of the murders and try and establish whether any of these deaths could in fact have been prevented.— fact have been prevented. daniel, thank you. — fact have been prevented. daniel, thank you, that _ fact have been prevented. daniel, thank you, that is _ fact have been prevented. daniel, thank you, that is our _ fact have been prevented. daniel, thank you, that is our home - fact have been prevented. daniel, | thank you, that is our home affairs correspondent daniel sanford. the government in wales says all businesses there are likely to be able to remain open throughout the winter, despite the possibility of a rise in covid 19 cases. the first minister mark drakeford has held a briefing about the welsh government's plans to keep covid 19 under control. he said wales remains at alert level zero but added that there is a "covid urgent" plan if a new variant risks overwhelming the nhs. having closely examined all the indicators and taken the advice of our scientific and medical advisers, the cabinet has decided that wales will remain at alert level zero. this means that there will be no substantial changes to the rules over the next three weeks, beyond those already announced.
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now, that of course includes the covid pass, which will become a legal requirement from monday for certain venues and events. let's look at the latest uk numbers. that's the latest 2a hour period. 127 new debts, that is as ever someone who has died within 20 days of the positive test. in terms of the vaccination programme, 78% of people, people over the age of 12 in fact have had 0kolie vaccine. the government says will lift its advice — the government says it will lift its advice against all but essential travel to a further 51 countries and territories. they include the bahamas,
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jamaica, argentina, chile, cuba, indonesia, mexico, the seychelles, south africa and thailand. it follows the removal of travel advisory notices affecting 32 countries earlier this week. now, let's turn to this year's nobel peace prize. two journalists have been awarded the nobel peace prize, for protecting democracy by defending freedom of expression. maria ressa from the philippines, and dmitry muratov from russia were commended for uncovering abuses of power and protecting freedom of the press. caroline hawley reports. out of 329 nominees, two winners. both have stood up against state power at huge personal risk. the norwegian nobel committee has decided to award the nobel peace prize for 2021 to... maria ressa and dmitry muratov,
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for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace. maria ressa was described as fearless, shedding light on the present of the philippines�* anti—drug campaign, which has been so deadly, the committee said it resembled a war waged against the population. speaking after the announcement, maria ressa said she was in shock. that, without facts, nothing was possible. when you don't have facts, you don't have truth, you don't have trust. trust is what holds us together, to be able to solve the complex problems our world is facing today, so when you attack the media, often times it's about shooting the messenger. another messenger, dmitry muratov. he's editor of russia's most independent newspaper, which has investigated corruption, police violence and electoral fraud.
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the nobel committee said six of its journalists have been killed because of their work. caroline hawley, bbc news. dmitry muratov has been speaking about how he feels after winning i'm joined now by berit reiss andersen who is the chair of the norwegian nobel committee, the 5 member committee that awards the nobel peace prize. thank you so much for your time tonight. a very busy day for you. i think people following this news today will be so struck that the peace prize has gone to journalists, the notion that simply telling the truth is something that contributes to peace. truth is something that contributes to eace. �* ., , ., truth is something that contributes to eace. �* ., , to peace. and that is a very significant _ to peace. and that is a very significant part _ to peace. and that is a very significant part of— to peace. and that is a very significant part of our- to peace. and that is a very - significant part of our reasoning because we are all surrounded by media daily. and we do not perhaps stop to reflect what an important
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part media should really play and our societies. part media should really play and oursocieties. because part media should really play and our societies. because without freedom of expression, you cannot have the truth and you cannot build a true democracy. and it is the peace prize this year is to honour journalists who barely carry the notion and of freedom of expression and freedom of information. that is so important to develop a democratic society, and that is also the best defence, democracy is the best defence, democracy is the best defence against war and conflict. and when we look at the work of these two individuals, one from the philippines, one from russia, i mean, we think of the word bravery. it is sad that people have to be so extraordinarily brave simply, again, to be able to tell the truth. are
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you almost honouring to be able to tell the truth. are you almost honourin- to be able to tell the truth. are you almost honouring there bravely - bravery and — you almost honouring there bravely - bravery and swelling _ you almost honouring there bravely - bravery and swelling highlighting - bravery and swelling highlighting that? i bravery and swelling highlighting that? ., ., ., bravery and swelling highlighting that? . ., ., , ., , that? i am honouring their bravery, and i am honouring _ that? i am honouring their bravery, and i am honouring their— and i am honouring their professionalism as journalists. and i am honouring their professionalism asjournalists. but they are not alone, because actually, russia and the philippines are not examples of nations where freedom of expression is most restricted, but these two individuals are examples of professional standards that are very brave and are in fact on a daily basis challenging power and in that manner, they have contributed to building an awareness of the importance of the freedom of expression. importance of the freedom of exoression-— importance of the freedom of exression. �* , ., , ., expression. and is what they do actually becoming _
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expression. and is what they do actually becoming harder- expression. and is what they do actually becoming harder and i expression. and is what they do - actually becoming harder and harder because of social media? because of the internet as well? notjust because of the political situation within their own country. that because of the political situation within their own country.- within their own country. that is definitely a _ within their own country. that is definitely a plane. _ within their own country. that is definitely a plane. we _ within their own country. that is definitely a plane. we do - within their own country. that is definitely a plane. we do see i within their own country. that is definitely a plane. we do see al definitely a plane. we do see a trade that the repression of the press for political reasons is increasing, both with social media active 20 a7, definitely, manipulation, harassment, disinformation, propaganda is overflowing and qualityjournalism overflowing and quality journalism and overflowing and qualityjournalism and telling the truth is actually the only remedy, efficient remedy, against that. fight! the only remedy, efficient remedy, against that-— against that. and interested what ou think against that. and interested what you think your — against that. and interested what you think your committee's - against that. and interested what i you think your committee's decision this year says to those who would haveit this year says to those who would have it otherwise, oppressive governments, oppressive dictators,
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are you also in some way trying to send a message to them?- are you also in some way trying to send a message to them? well, the messare send a message to them? well, the message is — send a message to them? well, the message is that _ send a message to them? well, the message is that freedom _ send a message to them? well, the message is that freedom of - message is that freedom of expression is a fundamental right. it's not a national issue. it is something that concerns us all as citizens, it concerns democracy and the world is watching the conditions of freedom of expression. so, it is a clear message to leaders who do not respect the importance of this fundamental human right. the world is watching- — fundamental human right. the world is watching. thank _ fundamental human right. the world is watching. thank you _ fundamental human right. the world is watching. thank you so _ fundamental human right. the world is watching. thank you so much. - now it's time for a look at the weather. we will just we willjust pause and take a look at the weather prospects with chris. it's been a very mild day, often
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cloudy with some good breaks in the cloudy with some good breaks in the cloud coming along for some of you. this was the scene earlier this afternoon in scarborough. temperatures into the low 20s. best of the sunshine in northeast wales, northern england and the far north of scotland. overnight tonight, we're going to have further outbreaks of rain for northern ireland and scotland, could be some localised surface water flooding into parts of the highlands. clearer skies for their these words starting to edge across east anglia, but mist and fog around for wales, southwest england and northern england. tomorrow, rain for scotland and northern ireland, finally getting rid of the rain pushing into the far north of england and wales. across the midlands, eastern and southern areas of england, loads more sunshine. temperatures still around 19 or 20 in the warmest spots.
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that's your weather. hello, this is bbc news with me, jane hill. the headlines... as the wholesale cost of gas sores, the business secretary has met from energy industries like steel �*s and chemical manufacturing. the secretary — chemical manufacturing. the secretary of _ chemical manufacturing. the secretary of state _ chemical manufacturing. tue: secretary of state didn't chemical manufacturing. tte: secretary of state didn't offer chemical manufacturing. tt2 secretary of state didn't offer any solutions, but he was listening, and i hope that dialogue will continue because we can't wait.— i hope that dialogue will continue because we can't wait. more than 40 million people _ because we can't wait. more than 40 million people across _ because we can't wait. more than 40 million people across the _ because we can't wait. more than 40 million people across the uk - because we can't wait. more than 40 million people across the uk will. because we can't wait. more than 40 million people across the uk will be | million people across the uk will be offered a flu vaccine and the biggest programme in the nhs's history. warning about the impact of covid—19 and flew circulating at the same time this winter. ben announced that the baroness casey will lead of culture and standards at the metropolitan police following the murder of sarah everard by a serving
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officer. twojournalists murder of sarah everard by a serving officer. two journalists have murder of sarah everard by a serving officer. twojournalists have been awarded the nobel peace prize for their work defending freedom of expression in the philippines and russia. ., , . ., russia. the nobel committee recognised — russia. the nobel committee recognised the _ russia. the nobel committee recognised the role _ russia. the nobel committee | recognised the role journalists russia. the nobel committee - recognised the role journalists will play in _ recognised the role journalists will play in fixing our growth. green we are going _ play in fixing our growth. green we are going on a family vacation! let's _ are going on a family vacation! let's roll! _ are going on a family vacation! let's roll! �* are going on a family vacation! let's roll!— are going on a family vacation! let's roll! �* ~ ., , ., , , let's roll! and the adams family is hittin: the let's roll! and the adams family is hitting the road _ let's roll! and the adams family is hitting the road and _ let's roll! and the adams family is hitting the road and is _ let's roll! and the adams family is hitting the road and is out - let's roll! and the adams family is hitting the road and is out on - hitting the road and is out on the big screen. find out what mark kermode thinks in the film review. before that, it is the latest sports news with catherine. the fa has confirmed their world cup qualifier against england tomorrow will go ahead, despite a fire at the stadium national this afternoon.
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just hours after the england squad trained, you can see some damage to the side of the pitch and one of the dugouts had melted while the video assistant referee had been left. that match against england tomorrow will go ahead. meanwhile, whales are in action in a crucial world cup qualifier in the czech republic. the team just above them in the race to finish second. it's an injury history welsh team, the lights of gareth bayle. aaron ramsey is back. his return will lift the players around him.— his return will lift the players around him. ., ., , , , around him. you want big players, and aaron hasn't _ around him. you want big players, and aaron hasn't disappointed - around him. you want big players, and aaron hasn't disappointed us i around him. you want big players, | and aaron hasn't disappointed us in recent months and years. the two goals, and big games and he steps up, and this is a big game. members ofthe up, and this is a big game. members of the consortium, _ up, and this is a big game. members of the consortium, which _ up, and this is a big game. members of the consortium, which took - up, and this is a big game. members of the consortium, which took over. of the consortium, which took over at newcastle yesterday, said one of
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the first actions will be ——the — — the new owners met this morning at the stadium and call for newcastle fans to give them time to make more expansive changes. tt’s make more expansive changes. it's important that we don't just spend on the _ important that we don't just spend on the team. i think the ground is a shabby— on the team. i think the ground is a shabby and — on the team. i think the ground is a shabby and it needs improving. the training _ shabby and it needs improving. the training ground needs improving. they're _ training ground needs improving. they're going to invest in the city, which _ they're going to invest in the city, which is — they're going to invest in the city, which is a — they're going to invest in the city, which is a great thing for our people — which is a great thing for our people in— which is a great thing for our people in newcastle because i think the system deserves that. but there's— the system deserves that. but there's no doubt they need to do prayers — there's no doubt they need to do ra ers. . �* , ~ there's no doubt they need to do ra ers. ., �* , . ., prayers. england's ellen white and frank herbie _ prayers. england's ellen white and frank herbie have _ prayers. england's ellen white and frank herbie have been _ prayers. england's ellen white and frank herbie have been named - prayers. england's ellen white and frank herbie have been named on| prayers. england's ellen white and i frank herbie have been named on the shortlist for the women's award. there are five chelsea players on the plus arsenal striker. just over a day until the moche until the — —
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much anticipated contest in las vegas. siri defending the veldt from february 2020 — — fury. wilder accusing fury of cheating in that fight. accusing fury of cheating in that fi . ht. ., accusing fury of cheating in that fiiht. ., ., �* ~ , accusing fury of cheating in that fiiht. ., .,�* ~ , , fight. you don't think fury is angry as hell about _ fight. you don't think fury is angry as hell about that? _ fight. you don't think fury is angry as hell about that? i _ fight. you don't think fury is angry as hell about that? i mean, - fight. you don't think fury is angry as hell about that? i mean, he - fight. you don't think fury is angryj as hell about that? i mean, he has fight. you don't think fury is angry l as hell about that? i mean, he has a family. _ as hell about that? i mean, he has a family. he's— as hell about that? i mean, he has a family. hesa— as hell about that? i mean, he has a family, he's a clean _ as hell about that? i mean, he has a family, he's a clean sportsman. - as hell about that? i mean, he has a family, he's a clean sportsman. to l family, he's a clean sportsman. to call him _ family, he's a clean sportsman. to call him a — family, he's a clean sportsman. to call him a cheater— family, he's a clean sportsman. to call him a cheater on— family, he's a clean sportsman. to call him a cheater on absurd - call him a cheater on absurd charges which _ call him a cheater on absurd charges which we _ call him a cheater on absurd charges which we know— call him a cheater on absurd charges which we know are _ call him a cheater on absurd charges which we know are impossible - call him a cheater on absurd charges which we know are impossible and l call him a cheater on absurd charges i which we know are impossible and not true. , ., ., ., , which we know are impossible and not true. , ., ., .,, , which we know are impossible and not true. , ., ., ., , , ., true. lewis hamilton has been handed a irade true. lewis hamilton has been handed a grade penalty _ true. lewis hamilton has been handed a grade penalty for— true. lewis hamilton has been handed a grade penalty for this _ true. lewis hamilton has been handed a grade penalty for this weekend's - a grade penalty for this weekend's grand prix. his team will fit a new engine in his car, and that's what's triggered the penalty. he did have something to cheer about today. he was fast this in first and second practice at istanbul park. both men
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awarded central contract for england for the first time. olie robinson has also earned his first contract following a number of impressive test performance is early this year. not such good news for dom sibley after 12 months. he's lost his contract after losing his place in the test side. the bbc sport website has a full list of all 20 players who have been given a central contract. we'll have more in sportsday at 6.30. we're waiting on an announcement on the ashes series this winter. see you then. thank you very much, catherine. you'll be able to see the ceremony on bbc news. the short list includes a footbridge, a boat museum and
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university building southwest london. we have been looking at each of the six buildings on the shortlist and today is the turn of housing for workers in cambridge. let's take a look. we created a place that has a real sense of community and where the residents can feel they belong to. i'm kaori ohsugi, a director at stanton williams. we are the architects for the key worker housing at addington, north west cambridge. the project consists of ten buildings, containing 26a apartment buildings. the focus was on, sort of, creating spaces between the buildings, rather than the buildings. we created a network of interconnecting courtyards, a sequence of spaces of varying character and size responding to the social functions, starting from the public urban space of market square through to the much more community—focused landscape court.
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so, the buildings are arranged to frame these spaces. the positioning and the, kind of, undercuts that were introduced are intended to create moments of intimacy and a sense of a discovery. this project is key worker housing for the university of cambridge's staff and researchers. addington is a mixed—use development. we have accommodation, housing, retail, community centre, school, hotel. the university set out to establish and develop an extension to the city of cambridge which gives an opportunity for all staff and students to live and come andjoin and be part of the success story of the university of cambridge. the development is one of the largest storm water recycling schemes within the world. all water on the roof is stored and collected and then carried through into the attenuation point within the communal landscape court. to achieve the high demands for the daylight meant that the buildings become quite far
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apart and the building form quite simple. one of the challenges was, really, for us to create a kind of intimacy and sense of place. addington overall is a fabulous concept. | i am always bowled over. by the fact the university's undertaken this project. the units are well—spaced, well thought—out, love the design, i love the feel of it. it's actually quite a bit - of a luxury to come every day. when i visited a few months ago during the summer, i saw that people actually inhabiting these spaces. there's a picnic happening in the landscape court, the children's toys on the ground. there must�*ve been a sense of security there and people really inhabiting the spaces. that was the main focus for this project, but also, that's what it gives this project a meaning.
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just one of the contenders for this year's sterling prize. next week, it's on the 1ath of october. every five minutes in the uk, someone is admitted to hospital with a heart attack. most people survive, but the damage done can leave them prone to another, so researchers at addenbrooke's hospital and the british heart foundation have been trialling a drug that they hope can heal damaged hearts and make further attacks less likely. julian isn't the kind of person you'd expect to have a heart attack. a keen cyclist, healthy—eating, doesn't smoke, in his early 50s. but last summer, out of the blue... pretty normal day up until apm and i had this enormous pain in my chest and it and it was vice—like. and i said my wife, "i feel really, really ill." so, i went and lay down and the pain just didn't go away. at any point when you're kind
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of lying in bed in pain, did you think this might be a heart attack? no, because i didn't think it would happen to me, i thought i was too young to have a heart attack, i thought i was fit and healthy, i'd had no underlying symptoms. the previous weekend, i had been out on quite a long bike ride. so, just acting as normal, and then like a bolt out of the blue, you get that huge pain in your chest and you find yourself in papworth. so, julian hasjoined a drug trial here at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge. some people have an immune system that goes into overdrive following a heart attack and actually starts to damage the body, leaving the patient prone to another attack or a stroke. researchers hope this drug, aldesleukin, will cut that risk. if you think of the immune system as having good cop cells and bad cop cells. in these high—risk patients, we have a very high number of bad cop cells. so, in this trial, what we're
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trying to do is increase the good cell cop numbers, so it negates the harmful effects of the bad cop cells. and it's been shown to have very good results in other autoimmune conditions, such as diabetes, autoimmune hepatitis, hiv, hep b and hep c. julian, we're just about to give you an injection now. all the bloods are good, 0k? 0k. if this smaller trial is successful, the drug will need to be tested in large—scale human trials, but it could one day spare thousands of people the fear of having a second heart attackjust a few months after the first. the weeks after the attack, i just lost all confidence in my own body. i didn't want to do anything, and it's really building that confidence again in your own body, being able to go and to do things that you love, and if there's a drug out there that can help people get back to normality, that's got to be hugely beneficial. richard westcott, bbc news, cambridge.
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just a reminder of tonight's headlines. representatives from energy industries like steel and chemical producers have been meaning the government about the dramatic rise in wholesale gas prices. the biggest flu vaccination programme in nhs history is beginning a big concern about covid—19 flu spreading at the same time this winter. it's been confirmed that baroness casey will lead the review of the metropolitan police following the murder of sarah everard by a serving officer. coming up on bbc news, newcastle united's new owners have arrived. we will find out what's next for the club and asked if they've become one of the richest teams in the world. whales prepare for their crucial role of heart — — crucial qualifier against the czech republic. aaron
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ramsey returns to lead the

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