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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 8, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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let's bring you some live pictures now from the norwegian capital oslo, where the nobel peace prize winner will be announced. any second now, i think. good morning- _ any second now, i think. good morning- the _ any second now, i think. good morning. the no _ any second now, i think. good morning. the no region - any second now, i think. good morning. the no region nobel| morning. the no region nobel committee —— the norwegian nobel committee has decided to award the nobel peace prize 2021 to maria and dimitri for their efforts to
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safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace. maria and dmitry are receiving the piece prize for their courageous fight for freedom of expression in the philippines and in russia. at the same time, they are representatives of all journalists who stand same time, they are representatives of alljournalists who stand up for this ideal in a world in which democracy and freedom in the press face increasingly adverse conditions. maria uses freedom of expression to expose abuse of power, use of violence and growing authoritarianism in her native country, the philippines. in 2012
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she co—founded a digital media company for investigated journalism which she still heads. as a journalist and the ceo of that company, ressa has shown herself to be a fearless defender of freedom of expression. she has focus critical attention to the duterte regime's merger anti—drug campaign. the number of deaths is so high that the campaign resembles a war waged against the population of the country. —— murderous anti—drug campaign. maria ressa and her organisation had documented how social media is being used to spread
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fake news and manipulate the public discourse. dmitry muratov has for decades defended freedom of speech in russia under increasingly challenging conditions. in 1993 he was one of the founders of an independent newspaper. since 1995 he has been the newspaper's editor in chief for a total of 2a years. novaya gazeta is the most independent newspaper in russia today with a fundamentally critical attitude towards power. it's back to base journalism and professional integrity have made it an important source of information on sensible
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aspects of russian society rarely mentioned by other media —— it's fact —based journalism. since it started in 1993, novaya gazeta has published critical articles on subjects ranging from corruption, police violence, unlawful arrests, electoral fraud and trial factories and the use of russian military forces both within and outside russia. novaya gazeta's opponents have responded with harassment, threats, violence and murder. since the newspaper's starch, six of which journalists have been killed, including one who wrote revealing
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articles on the war in chechnya. despite the killings and threats, editor in chief muratov has refused to abandon the newspaper's independent policy. he has consistently defended the right of journalists to write anything about whatever they want as long as they comply with the professional and ethical standards of journalism. free, independent and fact —based journalism serves to protect against abuse of power, lies and propaganda. the norwegian nobel committee is convinced that freedom of expression and freedom of information help to ensure and inform the public. these
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rights are crucial prerequisites for democracy and protect against war and conflict. the award of the nobel peace prize to maria ressa and dmitry muratov is intended to underscore the importance of protecting and defending these fundamental rights. without freedom of expression and freedom of the press, it will be difficult to successfully promote fraternity between nations, disarmament and a better world order to succeed in our time. this year's award of the nobel peace prize is therefore firmly anchored in the provisions of alfred
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nobel's will. thank you very much. studio: twojournalists have been awarded the nobel peace prize for 2021, one from the philippines, one from russia. maria ressa, a high—profilejournalist from russia. maria ressa, a high—profile journalist in the philippines who was actually found guilty of libel in the philippines in a case seen as a test of the country's media freedom. as we saw there, she has used freedom of expression to oppose oppression and has documented how social media has been used to spread misinformation. the otherjournalist is the russian editor in chief of the most independent newspaper in russia, dmitry muratov. he has used his efforts since 1993, since his newspaper was set up, to fight for freedom of expression. editor in chief of novaya gazeta, the most independent newspaper in russia today. six of its journalists have
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been killed, just think about that for a moment, six of itsjournalists have been killed as they went about theirjob. as we heard, despite that, he, dmitry muratov, has consistently defended the right of his journalists to write independent, fact —based pieces, whether they be critical of the current government of russia or not. in the uk, the nhs has launched its biggest campaign against winter flu, with more than a0 million people across the uk being offered a vaccine. health chiefs are worried about the prospect of flu and covid—19 circulating together. they fear people could be more vulnerable to catching flu this winter, because so few people caught it last year, as a result of the lockdowns and additional hygiene measures that were in place. our health correspondent naomi grimley reports. i've got together some of the country's leading medics to answer your vaccine questions... this is the latest media advert to remind us that it's notjust
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covid which we have to worry about this winter. flu could rear its head again, too. so more than a0 million people across the uk are being offered a flu jab in the biggest ever roll—out of the vaccine. those who will be able to get one free include the over—50s, those with certain health conditions, pregnant women, health care workers, and most children. lockdowns and extra hygiene measures squashed flu last winter, and that means the level of immunity in the population is likely to be lower this time round. there's also uncertainty about how effective the flu vaccine will be, because scientists have less information to go on when they guess the strain in advance. even if you've had flu vaccination last year, it's really important to get it every year because the strains of flu that are circulating do change. we are in a position where we're not
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quite as sure this year what's going to be circulating, but we have got some idea from the southern hemisphere, and flu vaccination is still your best way of getting protection. even if it doesn't provide complete protection, if you do get flu you are much less likely to be seriously unwell with it. and, really importantly, you're much less likely to pass it on to other people who could be even more vulnerable. flu normally kills around 11,000 people every winter, but a report published earlier this year from the academy of medical sciences warned respiratory illnesses could hit very high levels, and flu deaths alone could reach 60,000 in worst case scenario. naomi grimley, bbc news.
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dr eleanor gaunt from the university of edinburgh spoke about this. there is a concern — of edinburgh spoke about this. there is a concern that _ of edinburgh spoke about this. there is a concern that the _ of edinburgh spoke about this. there is a concern that the immune - of edinburgh spoke about this. ii” is a concern that the immune profile across the population is less than usual, because people get a flu infection every five to ten years it isn't clear how important it is, we do not know at this stage. figs isn't clear how important it is, we do not know at this stage. as naomi mentioned in _ do not know at this stage. as naomi mentioned in her _ do not know at this stage. as naomi mentioned in her report, _ do not know at this stage. as naomi mentioned in her report, the - do not know at this stage. as naomi l mentioned in her report, the academy of medical sciences says that by much worse we mean more deadly, it could be 60,000 deaths from flu, as opposed to an average year of around 11,000? gil paterson worst case scenario and it will be really determined by which strains of flu come to us, which is difficult to predict. so how have we managed to get vaccines that will be effective? we usually look to what strains circulating in the southern hemisphere, flu follows the seasons. in australia we know that influenza
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a is a circulating right now, causing 97% of flu cases, but looking to china, i had us in terms of the doctor measures and progress through the covid pandemic, they have mainly influenza b so we're not certain, but the vaccines have a mix of strains so they will offer protection to multiple types of flu, we are trying to cover all bases, i would encourage people to get flu vaccines because we are so uncertain this year. vaccines because we are so uncertain this ear. ~ ., vaccines because we are so uncertain this ear. ~ . , . ., , this year. what difference does it make that covid-19 _ this year. what difference does it make that covid-19 and - this year. what difference does it make that covid-19 and flu - this year. what difference does it make that covid-19 and flu are i make that covid—19 and flu are circulating? make that covid-19 and flu are circulating?— circulating? firstly hopefully eo - le circulating? firstly hopefully peeple are _ circulating? firstly hopefully people are still _ circulating? firstly hopefully people are still taking - circulating? firstly hopefully people are still taking care | circulating? firstly hopefully i people are still taking care with wearing masks and social distancing, which will reduce flu as well as coronavirus, but if people were to have both infections at the same time we would expect that to lead to a really quite severe outcome, that has been determined from studies, so
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this scenario is really best avoided, the best way to do that is to get vaccines against both coronavirus and influenza. the? to get vaccines against both coronavirus and influenza. they both transmitted similar _ coronavirus and influenza. they both transmitted similar ways? _ coronavirus and influenza. they both transmitted similar ways? they - coronavirus and influenza. they both transmitted similar ways? they bothj transmitted similar ways? they both mainly transmitted _ transmitted similar ways? they both mainly transmitted by _ transmitted similar ways? they both mainly transmitted by respiratory i mainly transmitted by respiratory routes, so wearing masks and avoiding crowds indoors is the best way to prevent exposure to both of those viruses.— way to prevent exposure to both of those viruses. about 40 million will be invited for _ those viruses. about 40 million will be invited for the _ those viruses. about 40 million will be invited for the flu _ those viruses. about 40 million will be invited for the flu jab, _ be invited for the flu jab, everybody under 16 and over 50 as well as many in between with particular health conditions, it is really important people go for it? absolutely, we had seen the incredible success of the coronavirus vaccine programme and we can really help for the same with the flu vaccine programme too, it is entirely safe to have both vaccines at the same time. the welsh government will publish its covid winter plan today, with a warning that businesses could have to shut again if there's a new variant or a drop in levels of immunity. but the current restrictions such
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as the instruction to work from home, if possible could be relaxed if cases fall. the us has stepped up the pressure on russia over the shortage of gas in europe, warning moscow not to exploit the situation. president biden's national security adviser, jake sullivan, told the bbc that russia, which is europe's primary supplier of gas, had previously used energy as a political weapon, but doing so now would be counterproductive. wholesale gas prices have soared amid rising demand across europe, but fell back this week after the russian president, vladimir putin, said moscow could increase supplies. mark lobel reports. the gas and electricity price surge is alarming consumers across europe. i am very, very worried. very concerned. we struggle enough. translation: there are mothers today have to choose between paying - for their energy bill or feeding their children. that is the problem. the colder weather is coming fast. we need to heat apartments. if you go to the poorer areas, where they are suffering, no one
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puts on the heating, because everyone knows they won't be able to pay for it. a record demand for gas and limited storage in the eu is fuelling politicians�* fears for the future. russia supplies 40% of the eu's natural gas imports. moscow once feared a falling oil price would undermine its economy. now it is calling the shots. watch the price of gas plummet as vladimir putin is televised suggesting a possible increase of gas supply on wednesday. but he has little sympathy for his european customers. translation: all of its activities were aimed at curtailing - the so—called long—term contracts focusing on the transition to gas exchange trading. it turns out this policy was wrong, it didn't account for uncertainties. russia's main gas producer insists it is blameless. translation: since the beginning of the year, we have supplied - foreign markets with near—record
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amounts of gas. we have increased deliveries to our largest consumer market, germany, by a third compared to last year, to turkey by two and a half times, to romania by four times. we've supplied additional volumes of gas along all routes, including the ukrainian route, as much as we could. but ukraine's gas operator says russia has reduced the amount it routes through the country between january and september by 17% compared to the previous year. russia says the new nord stream 2 underwater pipeline would save europe's sticky situation, but only if germany and brussels quickly approved the project to get it flowing. not everyone thinks russia is acting reasonably. we have long been concerned about russia using energy as a tool of coercion and a political weapon. we had seen it happen before and we could see it happen again. i think it would be a mistake for russia to try to exploit this, i think that would ultimately backfire on them and i believe that they should respond
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to the market demands for increased energy supplies to europe. that comes from more demand as countries emerge from the pandemic, depleted storage tanks after a cold end to the winter, china consuming more gas and low wind speeds that reduce renewable energy. so right now, russia remains under pressure to increase supply, driven by a volatile market which is powering its bargaining position too. mark lobel, bbc news. the us has stepped up pressure on russia over the shortage of gas in europe, which is the story behind just covered, i think. president bidenjon president biden djokovic letsjust bidenjon president biden djokovic lets just leave bidenjon president biden djokovic letsjust leave that bidenjon president biden djokovic lets just leave that story, apologies. the england and manchester united footballer marcus rashford has made
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a fresh attack on the government following the removal of the £20 a week uplift to universal credit. he was speaking at a ceremony at the university of manchester as he received an honorary doctorate for his work tackling child poverty. the player said millions of people had lost a lifeline. i don't think that the right point for it to end is when families aren't in a stable situation. otherwise it makes no sense doing the work that we've done in the past, only to, you know, stop doing it in possibly one of the most vital stages, which we don't know, because the situation of the pandemic, with covid could change at any moment, as we've experienced when covid first came on the scene, and the fact that we weren't prepared for it then, we should definitely be prepared for it now. our political correspondent helen catt said what politicians say about this. a . , catt said what politicians say about this. . , ., catt said what politicians say about this. ., ., catt said what politicians say about this. , ., , ., this. marcus rashford has become a really prospective _ this. marcus rashford has become a really prospective campaign - this. marcus rashford has become a really prospective campaign on - this. marcus rashford has become a really prospective campaign on child poverty issues, there is a lot of time for him among mps at
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westminster, which is reflected in how the government has responded to what he said overnight. they congratulated him on his honorary doctorate and set its ongoing campaigning and charity work and high—profile campaigns had helped millions upon down the country —— and said his ongoing campaigning charity work. what he said today echoes and feeds into a discussion over many weeks in westminster was some conservative mps were pushing for the uplift to be kept, labour too. sir keir starmer the labour leader this morning told bbc breakfast that he backed marcus rashford, this is what he said labour would do. it rashford, this is what he said labour would do.— rashford, this is what he said labour would do. it would stay, we would not make _ labour would do. it would stay, we would not make the _ labour would do. it would stay, we would not make the cut, _ labour would do. it would stay, we would not make the cut, we - labour would do. it would stay, we would not make the cut, we would | would not make the cut, we would replace _ would not make the cut, we would replace it — would not make the cut, we would replace it with something better. both _ replace it with something better. both talk at once. we would also say what we said at our conference last week, we would increase _ our conference last week, we would increase the minimum wage to £10 an
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hour because what so many people one tie think— hour because what so many people one tie think it's _ hour because what so many people one tie think it's the chance to earn more _ tie think it's the chance to earn more money for their work and to keep— more money for their work and to keep more — more money for their work and to keep more of it for the bills they have _ keep more of it for the bills they have to — keep more of it for the bills they have to pay, etc —— what so many people _ have to pay, etc —— what so many peorrie want. _ have to pay, etc —— what so many people want, i think. we would keep the uplift _ people want, i think. we would keep the uplift and replace it with a much — the uplift and replace it with a much better system which did not reliably _ much better system which did not reliably put to work 29 hours to earn _ reliably put to work 29 hours to earn £20. — reliably put to work 29 hours to earn £20, nobody can think that is fair. earn £20, nobody can think that is fair~ we _ earn £20, nobody can think that is fair. we would increase the minimum wa-e fair. we would increase the minimum wage to _ fair. we would increase the minimum wage to £10 _ fair. we would increase the minimum wage to £10 straightaway. he fair. we would increase the minimum wage to £10 straightaway.— wage to £10 straightaway. he was -ushed wage to £10 straightaway. he was pushed and _ wage to £10 straightaway. he was pushed and how— wage to £10 straightaway. he was pushed and how labour— wage to £10 straightaway. he was pushed and how labour would - wage to £10 straightaway. he wasj pushed and how labour would pay wage to £10 straightaway. he was - pushed and how labour would pay the estimated £6 billion a year to keep the £20 uplift alone, he talked about getting that money from 19 contracts, there are questions over how much that would bring in, whether it would be anywhere near enough to cover that scale of cuts. in a statement the government said the universal credit uplift was always a temporary measure designed to help claimants through the toughest stages of the pandemic and now the economy was starting to bounce package was right to focus on
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helping people back into high quality, well—paid jobs. it said it had taken what it called significant action to help people who they recognise are worried about the cost of living this winter. transport secretary grant shapps paid tribute to marcus rashford but said reinstating the uplift which, at a cost, likely to mean more taxes or increasing fuel duty or another way of bringing in revenue, so this is a really live debate in westminster, theissue really live debate in westminster, the issue about cost of living and more generally the recognition that prices are increasing above the board, especially the crease and energy prices, and there are concerns about how this will play out this winter —— especially the screens around energy prices. democrats and republicans in the senate have reached a short term deal which allows the government to borrow more money. it's aimed at preventing the us treasury from defaulting on its debts for the first time ever, but the agreement only lasts for two months so it's only a short term fix. we have reached agreement to extend
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the debt ceiling through early december, it is our hope we can get this done as soon as today. republican and democratic members and staff negotiated through the night. the senate is moving towards the plan i laid out yesterday to spare the american people a manufacturing crisis. our washington correspondent nomia iqbal says senators will have to address the issue again in december. it has taken some time for it to get to this stage. in the last couple of hours the political drama playing out here in dc that the democrats are hoping the republicans would get on board to try to at least get it through the senate, they needed at least ten republicans, they got 11 to help break they got 11 to help break the filibuster bit. it was approved by the senate, it has to go to the house to be approved, which it will be because the democratic party controls the house, it will land on the desk of president biden, he will sign it,
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$480 billion to cover spending until december 3rd. it averts a huge crisis, it is probably an understatement to even call it that because call it that because america, america, had it defaulted on its debts, it could have got into a recession. the economy is already precarious, americans would have experienced realfinancial hardship, people would not have been paid, global markets would have been in turmoil, the credit rating agencies would have downgraded america's standing, so it has averted the crisis for now, but this will happen again in a couple of months because it is only until december 3rd, meaning we will be talking about this all over again. it's a grim statistic. every five minutes someone in the uk is admitted to hospital with a heart attack. most people survive, but the damage done can leave them prone to fresh attacks. so, researchers at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge and the british heart foundation have been trialling a drug that they hope can heal damaged hearts and make people less likely to suffer further attacks. our science correspondent richard westcott reports.
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julian isn't the kind of person you would expect to have a heart attack. a keen cyclist, healthy eating, doesn't smoke, in his early 50s, but last summer, out of the blue... a pretty normal day until about 4pm. and i had an enormous pain in my chest, vice—like, and i said to my wife, i feel really, really ill. i lay down and the pain didn't go away. at any point did you think it might be a heart attack? i didn't think it would happen to me, i thought i was too young, fit and healthy, i had no underlying symptoms. the previous weekend i had been out on quite a long bike ride. so acting as normal, and then like a bolt out of the blue you get by huge pain in your chest and find yourself in papworth.
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julian hasjoined a drug trial at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge. some people have an immune system that goes into overdrive following a heart attack and actually starts to damage the body, leaving the patient prone to another attack or a stroke. researchers hope this drug will cut that risk. if you think of the immune system as having good cop and bad cop cells, in these high—risk patients we have a very high number of bad cop cells. so in this trial we are trying to increase the good cop cell number so it negates the harmful effects of the bad cop cells. it has been shown to hvae very good results in other autoimmune conditions like diabetes, hepatitis, hiv. we are just about to give you your injection, nowjulian. if this smaller trial is successful the drug will need to be tested in large—scale human trials, but it could one day spare thousands
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of people the fear of having a second heart attackjust a few months after the first. the weeks after the attack, i lost all confidence in my own body. i didn't want to do anything. and it's building that confidence again in your own body, being able to do things that you love. if there is a drug that can help people get back to normality, that has got to be hugely beneficial. this year's nobel peace prize has been won by two journalists, maria ressa from the philippines, and the russian, dmitry muratov. the chairwoman of the nobel committee said they received awards due to their fight for freedom said they received awards due to theirfight forfreedom in said they received awards due to their fight for freedom in their countries. she said maria ressa and dmitry muratov represented all
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journalists across the globe who studied for democracy and freedom of the press. the prize includes a cheque for more than $1 million. howard johnson is the bbc�*s philippines corresponded and he knows maria ressa, to our audience around the world, who might not have heard of her, all about maria? maria ressa is a courageous _ heard of her, all about maria? m1 —. ressa is a courageousjournalist, as you said, she was born in the philippines and moved to america during the time of martial law and dictator ferdinand marcos in the 19805, dictator ferdinand marcos in the 1980s, she came back to set up rappler, this news website in the philippines which has been very hard hitting with its journalism, philippines which has been very hard hitting with itsjournalism, she really pushed for boats of the values of american democracy, western democracy, pushing forward due process, freedom of the press, this is something in the philippines that really hits a brick wall with politicians who for a long time have
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had the unity. the rappler website has obviously caused difficulties for the 230 government, roger regurgitated broughton a drug war when he was elected in 2016 and i have been allegations of extrajudicial killings, some people say between 7000 and 10,000 alleged drug suspect without due process. this is being investigated by the international criminal court but her website rappler has been at the forefront of exposing these issues with allegations that police killed people with no due process, no right to a coach, no right to say we were innocent. some say a shoot first, ask questions later policy. i understand she was also found guilty of libel, which was seen as a test of libel, which was seen as a test of media freedom in the philippines? i covered the trial extensively from the first trial to the last eight,
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she was found guilty last year, she currently has seven cases against her including another cyber libel case, tax evasion and allegations of foreign ownership, and in that case last year when she was found guilty of cyber libel, that was a big shock and a blow to manyjournalists in the philippines who have suddenly had this chilling effect, worried that may be the same thing will happen to them. at the moment it is being appealed, going to the court of appeal in the philippines, but maria ressa has big backers around the world, she is supported by george and amal clooney, friends with hillary clinton and in 2018 she was named type person of the year and there is an online campaign at the moment with a 20. seven streaming videos reporting her, anybody can to that because like—minded people around the world
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to clearly see she is being attacked by max in the philippines —— with a 24/7 stream. has by max in the philippines -- with a 24” stream-— 24/7 stream. has she reacted to winnin: 24/7 stream. has she reacted to winning the _ 24/7 stream. has she reacted to winning the award _ 24/7 stream. has she reacted to winning the award yet? - 24/7 stream. has she reacted to winning the award yet? about i 24/7 stream. has she reacted to l winning the award yet? about this has just been breaking winning the award yet? about this hasjust been breaking in winning the award yet? about this has just been breaking in the last hour also. thank you for telling us about her, howard. a journalist and rights activist from the philippines and a journalist from russia have won the nobel peace prize. more than 40 million are being offered a flu jab this winter in the nhs was not the biggest everflu this winter in the nhs was not the biggest ever flu vaccination campaign. travelers to england will soon be able to take a photo of a negative lateral flow test from home instead of paying for an expensive pcr test. the us steps up pressure on russia over the shortage of gas in europe, warning moscow not to
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export the situation, after it said it could increase supplies. alan shearer has said that saudi arabia's human rights record cannot be swept under the carpet, after the club was taken over by a saudi led consortium yesterday. the supporters celebrated the deal, as it brought mike ashley's turbulent 14 years at st james's park to mike ashley's turbulent 14 years at stjames's park to an end. here are some of what he had to say. i also understand _ some of what he had to say. i also understand all— some of what he had to say. i also understand all of _ some of what he had to say. i also understand all of the _ some of what he had to say. i also understand all of the issues that l understand all of the issues that come with it. i think it's absolutely right we talk about the human rights issues, and we can't brush it under the carpet. we have to educate ourselves in that. but we also know that the newcastle fans don't set the owners and directors test, and that has been passed. we already have the chinese, we have russians, we have abu dhabi, we also have americans, and we are about to have americans, and we are about to have a world cup in qatar, so i
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think it is very unfair to label the fans, criticised newcastle fans for being excited.— being excited. lets talk to oscar ave , a being excited. lets talk to oscar avery, a newcastle _ being excited. lets talk to oscar avery, a newcastle supporter. being excited. lets talk to oscar i avery, a newcastle supporter who being excited. lets talk to oscar - avery, a newcastle supporter who is one of those who actually opposes the takeover of the club. he is also a serving labour counsellor in the city, but is speaking on a personal capacity. do you oppose the takeover foal stop, or capacity. do you oppose the takeover foalstop, orjust capacity. do you oppose the takeover foal stop, orjust buy this consortium? br; foal stop, or 'ust buy this consortium?_ foal stop, or 'ust buy this consortium? j consortium? by the saudi consortium. i am not consortium? by the saudi consortium. i am not opposed _ consortium? by the saudi consortium. i am not opposed in _ consortium? by the saudi consortium. i am not opposed in general— consortium? by the saudi consortium. i am not opposed in general to - consortium? by the saudi consortium. i am not opposed in general to a - i am not opposed in general to a change in ownership, but... i... i would have almost have taken almost anyone apart from this consortium. explain why? it anyone apart from this consortium. expiain why?— explain why? it essentially, alan shearer broached _ explain why? it essentially, alan shearer broached it _ explain why? it essentially, alan shearer broached it quite - explain why? it essentially, alan shearer broached it quite well, l explain why? it essentially, alan l shearer broached it quite well, the human rights situation in saudi arabia cannot be brushed under the carpet. the saudi owned government
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investment forum is not separate from the state, it is integral to the state, managed by the state, the crown prince is the head of investment firm, see cannot separate their human rights record from the consortium taking over the club. they have such a heterosis record, not only in terms of what happened with jamal khashoggi, the journalist, their general treatment of free speech in saudi arabia, the treatment of women, lgbt people, their treatment of religious minorities, democracy and human rights activists, labour activists, trade unionists, it is reallyjust appalling on every level. i understand why fans are excited, why people are jubilant and happy to see the back of mike ashley. i was no fan of mike ashley. but i think we have gone from bad to worse on an ethical level in terms of the ownership of the club. share
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ethical level in terms of the ownership of the club. are you a season ticket _ ownership of the club. are you a season ticket holder? _ ownership of the club. are you a season ticket holder? no, - ownership of the club. are you a season ticket holder? no, i'm i ownership of the club. are you a i season ticket holder? no, i'm not. do ou season ticket holder? no, i'm not. do you go — season ticket holder? no, i'm not. do you go to _ season ticket holder? no, i'm not. do you go to st — season ticket holder? no, i'm not. do you go to st james's _ season ticket holder? no, i'm not. do you go to st james's park? - season ticket holder? no, i'm not. do you go to st james's park? are| do you go to st james's park? are used to. do you go to st james's park? are used to- i _ do you go to st james's park? are used to. i have _ do you go to st james's park? site: used to. i have fallen out do you go to st james's park? 2.2 used to. i have fallen out of do you go to st james's park? 22 used to. i have fallen out of love, as a lot of people have, with the regime, and moved more towards grassroots football, as a lot of people have. but i've been a newcastle fan for over 20 years, i've always been rooting for the club, this paint will see what is happening now. club, this paint will see what is happening nova— club, this paint will see what is haenin now. ., , happening now. how can you protest, or is it too late? _ happening now. how can you protest, or is it too late? in _ happening now. how can you protest, or is it too late? in most respects, i or is it too late? in most respects, it is too late- _ or is it too late? in most respects, it is too late. there _ or is it too late? in most respects, it is too late. there is _ or is it too late? in most respects, it is too late. there is very - or is it too late? in most respects, it is too late. there is very little i it is too late. there is very little that can be done now. i think people can still vote with their feet and say, do they want to give money to the club, do they want to go through the club, do they want to go through the turnstiles in the same way that people protested that way against mike ashley. but it's too late, the moment for decision was previously, and i don't think the premier league should have backed down from it. i
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don't think they have conducted themselves well. there was a real lack of transparency in the process. but i don't think that they should have been found fit and proper to run a football club. 50. have been found fit and proper to run a football club.— have been found fit and proper to run a football club. so, what do you think our run a football club. so, what do you think your fellow _ run a football club. so, what do you think your fellow newcastle - think your fellow newcastle supporter should do?- think your fellow newcastle supporter should do? well, i understand _ supporter should do? well, i understand why _ supporter should do? well, i understand why they - supporter should do? well, i understand why they are - supporter should do? well, i- understand why they are excited, i understand why they are excited, i understand that lots of people are reallyjubilant about understand that lots of people are really jubilant about investment thatis really jubilant about investment that is coming into the city, and i think people have to make decisions for themselves. think people have to make decisions forthemselves. i'm think people have to make decisions for themselves. i'm not going to tell people how to live their lives. i'm not going to sit in judgment of my fellow fans. i really understand why they are excited, why they are happy, and i'm not going to criticise them for continuing to support the club. but i think we all have to look at our unconscious and decide what we are going to do —— our own conscience, to do so in a way which is not with criticise each other, fans have no control over this process, they have no control over who was going to own the club. they are really not the blameworthy party here. we just need to decide
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what we are going to do individually, and be mature, as adults. i certainly won't be in any way attending the club going forward. ,.., �* , way attending the club going forward. ~ , way attending the club going forward. �* , ~' forward. oscar avery, sounding like he is turning _ forward. oscar avery, sounding like he is turning his _ forward. oscar avery, sounding like he is turning his back— forward. oscar avery, sounding like he is turning his back on _ forward. oscar avery, sounding like he is turning his back on the - forward. oscar avery, sounding like he is turning his back on the club i he is turning his back on the club because of who has taken over. south africa is looking for answers after nine days of looting violent protests in july. the unrest was sparked by the jailing of the country's former president jacob zuma. the protests were widely seen as a targeted campaign to undermine current president cyril ramaphosa. the riots died down after the deployment of thousands of soldiers. our correspondent nomsa maseko sent this report. the riots that shocked south africa three months ago. nearly 350 people died across two provinces affected by violent protests sparked by the jailing of former
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president jacob zuma. the unrest began when a heavily armed gang hijacked trucks and torched more than 20 cars on the motorway which links sub—saharan africa's biggest port to the country's economic hub. we went back to these areas today. only a handful of the shopping malls looted have reopened. in this eastern johannesburg township several people are still missing. their families suspect they perished in a gas explosion at the supermarket. police say the remains recovered here were burned beyond recognition and it will take a while before dna tests are concluded. translation: i need to find my son's remains so i can have peace. - i have so many questions, i need to know what happened to my son. all i wanted to bury him, i need closure.
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while some families are counting the human cost, many others are trying to rebuild businesses. this is what remains of this woman's business. it is the first time she has returned to her clothing shop since july's advance. she is one of many businesses that were not insured and are looking to the state owned company to bail them out. this shop is my sole income, and all of a sudden it is going, without any notice or prior arrangement whatsoever. it was just cut. experts say it will be another year before the country's economy
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recovers from the impact of the worst violence in post—apartheid south africa. need to understand that what happened injuly happened when we were busy trying to navigate a pandemic, something that never elite of us were prepared for in 2020. a lot ofjobs were of us were prepared for in 2020. a lot of jobs were lost, of us were prepared for in 2020. a lot ofjobs were lost, notjust to covid, but through the unrest. we know through the looting, the destruction of business premises, shops, retailsectors, destruction of business premises, shops, retail sectors, thejobs that were lost across a wide section of the economy. we need to move quicker to get as people back into employment, so that we start to drive the economy again. while rebuilding continues, it remains unclear what the real cause of the violence was, which has led many to believe it could happen again. pig farmers in the uk are warming of tens of thousands of animals to be slaughtered in weeks, due to labour shortages in abattoirs being blamed
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on brexit and the covid pandemic. the nationalfarmers union said what is happening is a human disasterfor farmers. let's talk to a pig farmer, kate morgan, a farmer in yorkshire. i wonder if you could explain to the audience around the world what the situation is now in terms of trying to find the abattoir staff to humanely slaughter your picks? well, the situation — humanely slaughter your picks? -ii the situation unfortunately hasn't changed much. we have been talking to you now for a week, and every day that goes by, there are more pics that goes by, there are more pics that have been backlogged because we cannot slaughter them, because we don't have the staff in the abattoir. we have had nothing from the government, there is no positive story. this is emotionally draining. every pig farmer in this country is struggling at the moment. the government cannot even respond to us. ~ , ., y ., government cannot even respond to us. ~ , ., government cannot even respond to us. why do you say it is emotionally drainin: ? us. why do you say it is emotionally draining? this— us. why do you say it is emotionally draining? this is _ us. why do you say it is emotionally draining? this is our— us. why do you say it is emotionally draining? this is our livelihood. -
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us. why do you say it is emotionally draining? this is our livelihood. we | draining? this is our livelihood. we are only doing _ draining? this is our livelihood. we are only doing our— draining? this is our livelihood. we are only doing ourjob. _ draining? this is our livelihood. we are only doing ourjob. we - draining? this is our livelihood. we are only doing ourjob. we have - are only doing ourjob. we have fulfilled our contract that we have had. this is not the farmer's fault, this is higher up in the food supply. all we're asking for some help. supply. all we're asking for some hel. ~ ., , ., , supply. all we're asking for some hel. ~ ., , , help. when do you need help buy? what is the — help. when do you need help buy? what is the timescale _ help. when do you need help buy? what is the timescale on _ help. when do you need help buy? what is the timescale on this? - help. when do you need help buy? what is the timescale on this? we| what is the timescale on this? we needed what is the timescale on this? 2 needed help three weeks ago, months ago. the timescale is so, so critical. people are killing pigs now. we are personally weeks away from having to make this horrendous choice and it will destroy us. loath? choice and it will destroy us. why do ou choice and it will destroy us. why do you say _ choice and it will destroy us. why do you say that? _ choice and it will destroy us. why do you say that? because - choice and it will destroy us. why do you say that? because we - choice and it will destroy us. why | do you say that? because we farm choice and it will destroy us. why - do you say that? because we farm to feed the nation, _ do you say that? because we farm to feed the nation, not _ do you say that? because we farm to feed the nation, not to _ do you say that? because we farm to feed the nation, not to throw - do you say that? because we farm to feed the nation, not to throw it - do you say that? because we farm to feed the nation, not to throw it in i feed the nation, not to throw it in the bin. this is food waste. there are people starving in this country, in the world, and our government are prepared to let others throw healthy protein into the bin, and that is criminal. they are telling schools
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to stockpile food. yet we are going to stockpile food. yet we are going to be throwing food in the bin. this is criminal. this is so, so serious. if you don't get the abattoir staff that are needed to humanely slaughter your picks, does that mean you will have to kill them? yes. slaughter your picks, does that mean you will have to kill them?— you will have to kill them? yes, we are juggling — you will have to kill them? yes, we are juggling and — you will have to kill them? yes, we are juggling and doing _ arejuggling and doing everything about our power to not get to that situation. emotionally, physically, financially, we are in the worse position that uk agriculture has ever found position that uk agriculture has everfound itself, and the government could help us, they are not even talking to us. the supply chain is not talking to us, nobody is talking to the farmer. we are forgotten. is talking to the farmer. we are foruotten. ~ , ., is talking to the farmer. we are forgotten-— is talking to the farmer. we are foruotten. ~ , ., i. ~ ., is talking to the farmer. we are foruotten. ~ , ., ~ ., forgotten. why do you think that you are forgotten. _ forgotten. why do you think that you are forgotten. if— forgotten. why do you think that you are forgotten, if that _ forgotten. why do you think that you are forgotten, if that is _ forgotten. why do you think that you are forgotten, if that is true? - forgotten. why do you think that you are forgotten, if that is true? i - are forgotten, if that is true? i don't know. nobody values is. nobody realises that during the pandemic we carried on, 24—7, to make sure you
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have food on your plate. we are so vital. if you do not want a british pig producer, then that is fine. we will stop what we are doing. we need you to accept you will have low welfare pork on your plate that does not meet the standards that we meet. if the prime minister is watching now, what do you want from him? step u - , now, what do you want from him? step u, prime now, what do you want from him? (on up, prime minister, do what yourjob is meant to do and protect the british public.— is meant to do and protect the british ublic. 2 ., ., , ., ., british public. what does that mean in ractical british public. what does that mean in practical terms, _ british public. what does that mean in practicalterms, though? - british public. what does that mean in practicalterms, though? he - british public. what does that mean l in practicalterms, though? he needs to net in practicalterms, though? he needs to get people — in practicalterms, though? he needs to get people into — in practicalterms, though? he needs to get people into this _ in practicalterms, though? he needs to get people into this country, - to get people into this country, skilled people into the country, now, as in today, to sort this problem out. the uk agriculture industry is just a mess. all we want to do is feed you. that is all we are asking, we just want to fulfil our contract and feed the nation. you will know that the government have said that the shortages are the stresses and strains, as the uk
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moves towards a high skilled, high wage economy, as they call it, and that you are addicted to cheap, foreign labour, and you have to pay more to get british people to do thesejobs. what do more to get british people to do these jobs. what do you say to that? i say borisjohnson, come and see my farm, come and talk to my people i employ. because i pay them really well. i look after them. as does every farmer in this country. come and see us and have this conversation face—to—face, because we are dire, this is desperate. this is not ourfight, it is we are dire, this is desperate. this is not our fight, it is the process a's fight. come and speak to me, have the guts to stand up and talk to us. is have the guts to stand up and talk to us. , have the guts to stand up and talk tous., , have the guts to stand up and talk tous., ., to us. is it possible that within weeks you _ to us. is it possible that within weeks you might _ to us. is it possible that within weeks you might be _ to us. is it possible that within weeks you might be able - to us. is it possible that within weeks you might be able to i to us. is it possible that withinj weeks you might be able to be to us. is it possible that within i weeks you might be able to be in to us. is it possible that within - weeks you might be able to be in a position where you have to shoot your own pigs? flit position where you have to shoot your own pigs?— your own pigs? of course it is possible! _ your own pigs? of course it is possible! why _ your own pigs? of course it is possible! why do _ your own pigs? of course it is possible! why do you - your own pigs? of course it is possible! why do you think. your own pigs? of course it is| possible! why do you think we your own pigs? of course it is - possible! why do you think we are trying to talk to everybody? it is
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so possible, we are going to waste millions of tonnes of good food. of course it is possible! look at the state of us!— state of us! you are obviously, i can see. — state of us! you are obviously, i can see, everyone _ state of us! you are obviously, i can see, everyone can - state of us! you are obviously, i can see, everyone can see - state of us! you are obviously, i can see, everyone can see and l state of us! you are obviously, i - can see, everyone can see and hear that you are absolutely at the end of your tether, is that... i wonder what you think when you see the prime minister making the odd joke about bacon sandwiches, as he has done interviews this week? he about bacon sandwiches, as he has done interviews this week?- about bacon sandwiches, as he has done interviews this week? he 'ust a buffoon. i want i done interviews this week? he 'ust a buffoon. i want to i done interviews this week? he 'ust a buffoon. i want to meet * done interviews this week? he 'ust a buffoon. i want to meet him h done interviews this week? he just a buffoon. i want to meet him and - done interviews this week? he just a buffoon. i want to meet him and get| buffoon. i want to meet him and get my chance to say something to him. kate, i'm really grateful that you have spoken to us today. thank you very much. and obviously we are going to keep reporting on this issue. and thank you for talking to us here on bbc news, kate. i wish you all the best. thank you. kate morgan, a pig farmer who really is at the end of her tether and invited the prime minister, the british prime minister to go to herfarm in yorkshire, to see what the situation is. she needs help, she says, from
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the government, they need more staff and she said she pays her staff that she has at the moment well. she looks after them. the nobel peace prize has been awarded to two journalists, maria ressa and dmitry muratov. the nobel committee praised the efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, and maria ressa is answering questions now. . . maria ressa is answering questions now. ., ., ., ., , now. yet again we are a testing round, now. yet again we are a testing ground. the _ now. yet again we are a testing ground, the cambridge - now. yet again we are a testing l ground, the cambridge analytica whistle—blower christopher wiley called the philippines the petrie dish, the most number of compromised accounts was the united states, the country with a second most was the philippines. facebook itself said that we were ground zero, agreeing with that. so what is happening here, we are being insidiously manipulated in what has become a
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behaviour modification system. and this is part of what you are hearing being exposed at the us senate by facebook�*s former employee, a former product manager, frances haugen. this is our world today. so why the philippines? i think part of it is because we are english speaking, we adapt to the technology, we have similar technology as the west, but i think more than that we live in different worlds. so, how do i track this? ijust go back to this moment thatis this? ijust go back to this moment that is so existential, the defence of our democracy in the philippines, the defence of our rights, human rights, the fact that we have no idea exactly how many people have been killed in a brutal drug war. you have come in plain view, you see the police rolling back the numbers from 7000 to 2000, that was in 2017.
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and we go to 2021, and you have human rights groups saying that it is tens of thousands, 30,000 plus, when you have the police saying something completely different. this hall of mirrors has to change, at a time of accountability, which does come. asjournalists we have time of accountability, which does come. as journalists we have to just hold the line. this is something we say all the time. having said this, do you think it will change the perception of people who are sceptical about the media? you know, the media has been demonised in the past how many years, we are at the front lines, and we see it on a daily basis, all of those comments. is this something that will change that, people starting to trust the media again? the failure of trust is a by—product of the failure of facts, the
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manipulation of our public. again, you go back to the core problem. journalists are not blameless in this. we certainly are humans. tech platforms will claim that al this. we certainly are humans. tech platforms will claim that ai will do better. but it has biases programmed by the public. an american biologist, wilson, he studies emergent behaviour. he said the crises we are facing now are paleolithic emotions, the emotions of our godlike technology. when you don't have facts, you don't have truth, you don't have trust. trust holds us together to be able to solve the complex problems that the world is facing today. with the
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media it is often about shooting the messenger, ortrying media it is often about shooting the messenger, or trying to solve that in many different ways. what it is to be a journalist today, i hope there is energy for all of us to continue to work with the facts. lets assume in on your experience. 35 years as a journalist, what does this award mean for you? do you feel vindicated? how will this affect your career now? i’m vindicated? how will this affect your career now?— vindicated? how will this affect your career now? i'm not sure. my -hone your career now? i'm not sure. my phone has — your career now? i'm not sure. my phone hasjust — your career now? i'm not sure. my phone hasjust exploded. - your career now? i'm not sure. my phone hasjust exploded. we - your career now? i'm not sure. my phone hasjust exploded. we just l phone hasjust exploded. wejust keep doing what we are doing. we have a lot of work ahead of us, we are just have a lot of work ahead of us, we arejust beginning the have a lot of work ahead of us, we are just beginning the election season in the philippines, three pillars, technology, journalism and
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community. we are building a platform where we will build a community around facts and evidence based reasoning. iam community around facts and evidence based reasoning. i am also part of different groups that are demanding legislation, globally, the forum for industry and democracy, publishing a white paper to look for structural solutions, because these are structural problems. these algorithms divide us, and radicalise us. on the second part, independent journalism, we are not only working in the philippines to continue doing that, but i think it is an existential moment for independent media. that's part of the reason that i accepted a co—chair along with mark thompson, a former ceo of the new york times, the international fund for public interest, to try to raise money so that we are going to be able to help independent media survive. finally, and this is the least of it, the
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community. i don't think it could have survived without all of the support that we received in the last six years, but in the last five and a half years. our communities of action, the elevator pitch for rappler, that it is communities in action. we must stick to that mission, so we can create the world we want to live in.— we want to live in. there are so many people — we want to live in. there are so many people greeting - we want to live in. there are so many people greeting you, - we want to live in. there are so many people greeting you, i i we want to live in. there are so| many people greeting you, i am we want to live in. there are so - many people greeting you, i am sure you are getting it on your phone as well. it is all over the comment section. good to see good comments on our comment section, people saying this is well deserved, you are such an inspiration, after a culture of being silenced, a culture of fear and culture of being silenced, a culture of fearand impunity culture of being silenced, a culture of fear and impunity being prevalent in the philippines and in many places in the world, this is a win for you, forjournalists, for
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rappler and courage. what is your personal message to everybody out there afraid to speak up who might want to be a journalist, but are having second thoughts. what do you tell yourself, share this with everybody else who is watching you and saying that you are an inspiration.— and saying that you are an insiration. , ., ., , inspiration. first of all, there is no better— inspiration. first of all, there is no better time _ inspiration. first of all, there is no better time to _ inspiration. first of all, there is no better time to be _ inspiration. first of all, there is no better time to be a - inspiration. first of all, there is | no better time to be a journalist. the times when it is most dangerous is the time when it is most important. this is the best time to be a journalist, if you are just starting out. journalism will test you mentally, intellectually, physically, spiritually, morally. you learn to draw the lines. the book that is with my edison i was called how to stand up to a
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dictator, but every chapter is a microbe personal lesson, and then a macro. we might talk about social media platforms, but this one is about... ., ., , ., about... the “ournalist that was awarded the — about... the journalist that was awarded the nobel _ about... the journalist that was awarded the nobel peace - about... the journalist that was | awarded the nobel peace prize, about... the journalist that was - awarded the nobel peace prize, being due by one of her own members of staff on rappler. about 30 provinces in thailand have been hit by flooding, causing water levels to rise in the river that flows through bangkok. while many businesses have been threatened, one has used it to their advantage. wading through water to feed hungry customers. for this restaurant, businesses going swimmingly. it is this restaurant, businesses going swimmingly— this restaurant, businesses going swimminrl . , . ., swimmingly. it is exciting and fun, we are eating _ swimmingly. it is exciting and fun, we are eating and _ swimmingly. it is exciting and fun, we are eating and in _ swimmingly. it is exciting and fun, we are eating and in water- swimmingly. it is exciting and fun, we are eating and in water at - swimmingly. it is exciting and fun, we are eating and in water at the l we are eating and in water at the same time. it we are eating and in water at the same time-—
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same time. it is a fun challenge, ou same time. it is a fun challenge, you don't — same time. it is a fun challenge, you don't know _ same time. it is a fun challenge, you don't know if _ same time. it is a fun challenge, you don't know if you _ same time. it is a fun challenge, you don't know if you will- same time. it is a fun challenge, you don't know if you will get - you don't know if you will get washed — you don't know if you will get washed away— you don't know if you will get washed away while _ you don't know if you will get washed away while eating. i you don't know if you will get i washed away while eating. the you don't know if you will get washed away while eating. the cafe takes its name _ washed away while eating. the cafe takes its name from _ washed away while eating. the cafe takes its name from the _ washed away while eating. the cafe takes its name from the river- takes its name from the river running through bangkok. it has not been an easy year. the pandemic caused many businesses in the area to shut during lockdown. recent bouts of flooding threatens to close the restaurant for good. instead, the restaurant for good. instead, the owners have seen an opportunity, with customer footage of a unique dining experience now going viral on social media. translation: customers come here for— social media. translation: customers come here for a — social media. translation: customers come here for a lot _ social media. translation: customers come here for a lot of _ social media. translation: customers come here for a lot of reasons. - social media. translation: customers come here for a lot of reasons. they - come here for a lot of reasons. they enjoy the barbecue pork, the atmosphere and the waves. customers absolutely love the waves. they come with appropriate attire, like shorts. some bring their kids and families to experience this. i thought it would be a crisis turned into an opportunity. it’s thought it would be a crisis turned into an opportunity.— thought it would be a crisis turned into an opportunity. it's not always a simle into an opportunity. it's not always a simple affair. _ into an opportunity. it's not always a simple affair. as _ into an opportunity. it's not always a simple affair. as the _ into an opportunity. it's not always a simple affair. as the waves - into an opportunity. it's not always a simple affair. as the waves from | a simple affair. as the waves from passing boats can knock over seating. but for now, rising water levels continue to bring in a wave of customers.
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we will bring you the latest news headlines on the hour and the latest sport. now it is time for a look at the weather. whether you have sunshine or rain at the moment, there is one unifying thread through the weather, and that is just how mild it feels. we certainly started the day are incredibly mild note, close to an october record part of scotland and northern ireland. even in the coldest spots, temperatures still two three degrees above the average. it is because we have southerly wind, and with that has come the rain. scotland and northern ireland saw the warmest conditions, outbreaks of rain continuing. the south—east of northern ireland will dry out, looking brighter and eastern parts of scotland. a bit brighter in england and wales, although some of the mist will linger into the afternoon, where you
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have the sunny spells, temperatures 20 or 23 degrees. another very mild one for early october. and it leads us into another warm night. more rain to come in northern ireland, particularly later in the night. the same across western scotland, the odd patch of drizzle elsewhere. most misty in parts of northern england, north midlands and north wales. some of the clearer skies towards the south—east, this is where temperatures will drop the furthest comment to single figures. most, like yesterday and this morning, starting in the teens. the warm area is denoted by the orange colours on this charge, notice how the cold front through the weekend starts to push them away, back into the continent. the blues indicating that there is a hint of something fresher on the way. we will have a wet start for northern ireland and western parts of scotland. brightening up your through the day. east of scotland will turn wetter, and we will see some outbreaks of rain developing in north—west england and through parts of wales. south and east of that, the morning murk should clear. temperatures not hired today but getting into the high teens and low 20s for some, a
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pressure into the north and west. fresh air pushing southwards through the night and into sunday. a cooler start on sunday. the weather front lingering across southern counties, more cloud here. one or two mega showers. the main chance of showers across northern scotland, some heavy and thundery, pushed along by a blustery wind. the vast majority on sunday will have a day with some sunny spells. feeling a little bit cooler in the sunshine, but still nice enough once you are in it. it means is we go to next week that the fresh air will be with us throughout. there will be a few showers dotted around for scotland and eastern england. for most, a predominantly dry week lies ahead.
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this is bbc news, i'm ben mundy. these are our headlines at 11. more than 40 million of us across the uk are being offered a flu jab this winter, in the biggest ever flu vaccination campaign from the nhs. the us steps up pressure on russia, over the shortage of gas in europe, warning moscow not to exploit the situation, after it said it could increase supplies. travellers to england will soon be able to take a photo of a negative lateral flow test from home, instead of paying for an expensive pcr test before and afterjourneys. i think most people want to do the right thing, everyone understands it's important not to ignore a positive pcr test or lateral flow test indeed for when it comes to covert and we trust people will the government is accused of not
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doing enough to stop the needless killing of animals. we doing enough to stop the needless killing of animals.— doing enough to stop the needless killing of animals. we don't farm to throw it in the _ killing of animals. we don't farm to throw it in the bin. _ killing of animals. we don't farm to throw it in the bin. this _ killing of animals. we don't farm to throw it in the bin. this is _ killing of animals. we don't farm to throw it in the bin. this is food - throw it in the bin. this is food waste — throw it in the bin. this is food waste. there is people starving in this country and the world, our government are prepared to let astral— government are prepared to let astral healthy protein into the bent and that's— astral healthy protein into the bent and that's criminal. one astral healthy protein into the bent and that's criminal.— astral healthy protein into the bent and that's criminal. one and dmitry muratov when _ and that's criminal. one and dmitry muratov when this _ and that's criminal. one and dmitry muratov when this years _ and that's criminal. one and dmitry muratov when this years nobel - and that's criminal. one and dmitry l muratov when this years nobel peace prize. the nhs has launched its biggest campaign against winterflu, with more than 40 million of us across the uk being offered a vaccine. health chiefs are worried about the prospect of flu and covid 19 circulating together. they fear people could be more
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vulnerable to flu this winter, because so few people caught it last year, because lockdowns meant we mixed less, and we were all washing our hands a lot and being generally more hygienic. our health correspondent, naomi grimley, reports. i've got together some of the country's leading medics to answer your vaccine questions... this is the latest media advert to remind us that it's notjust covid which we have to worry about this winter. flu could rear its head again, too. so more than 40 million people across the uk are being offered a flu jab, in the biggest ever roll—out of the vaccine. those who will be able to get one free include the over—50s, those with certain health conditions, pregnant women, health care workers, and most children. lockdowns and extra hygiene measures squashed flu last winter, and that means the level of immunity in the population is likely to be lower this time round.
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there's also uncertainty about how effective the flu vaccine will be, because scientists have less information to go on when they guess the strain in advanced. even if you've had flu vaccination last year, it's really important to get it every year because the strains of flu that are circulating do change. we are in a position where we're not quite as sure this year what's going to be circulating, but we have got some idea from the southern hemisphere, and flu vaccination is still your best way of getting protection. even if it doesn't provide complete protection, if you do get flu you are much less likely to be seriously unwell with it. and, really importantly, you're much less likely to pass it on to other people who could be even more vulnerable. flu normally kills around 11,000 people every winter, but a report published earlier this year from the academy of medical sciences warned respiratory illnesses could hit very high levels, and flu deaths alone could reach 60,000
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in worst case scenario. naomi grimley, bbc news. the welsh government will publish its covid winter plan today, with a warning that businesses could have to shut again, if there's a new variant or a drop in levels of immunity. but the current restrictions, such as the instruction to work from home, if possible, could be relaxed if cases fall. ofgem has said it expects the price cap to rise significantly next april because of the increase in wholesale gas costs. several smaller firms have been forced out of business and the chief executive said all companies were feeling the strain. he said the price cap was there to stop firms making unfair profits, but the legitimate costs had to be passed through to customers. the us has stepped up the pressure on russia over the shortage of gas in europe, warning moscow not
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to exploit the situation. wholesale gas prices have soared amid rising demand across europe, but fell back this week, after the russian president, vladimir putin, said moscow could increase supplies. mark lobel reports. the gas and electricity price surge is alarming consumers across europe. i am very, very worried. very concerned. we struggle enough. translation: there are mothers today have to choose between paying - for their energy bill, or feeding their children. that is the problem. the colder weather is coming fast. we need to heat apartments. if you go to the poorer areas, where there is suffering, no—one puts on the heating, because everyone knows they won't be able to pay for it. a record demand for gas and limited storage in the eu is fuelling politicians�* fears for the future. russia supplies 40% of the eu's natural gas imports. moscow once feared a falling oil price would undermine its economy. now it's calling the shots.
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watch the price of gas plummet, as vladimir putin is televised suggesting a possible increase of gas supply on wednesday. but he has little sympathy for his european customers. translation: all of its activities were aimed at curtailing - the so—called long—term contracts, focusing on the transition - to gas exchange trading. it turns out this policy was wrong, it didn't account for uncertainties. j russia's main gas producer insists it is blameless. translation: since the beginning of the year, we have supplied - foreign markets with near—record amounts of gas. we increased deliveries to our largest consumer market, germany, by a third compared to last year, to turkey by two and a half times, to romania by four times. we've supplied additional volumes of gas along all routes, including the ukrainian route, as much as we could. but ukraine's gas operator says russia has reduced the amount it routes through the country between january and september by 17% compared to the previous year.
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russia says the new nord stream 2 underwater pipeline would save europe's sticky situation, but only if germany and brussels quickly approved the project to get it flowing. not everyone thinks russia is acting reasonably. we have long been concerned about russia using energy as a tool of coercion and a political weapon. we have seen it happen before and we could see it happen again. i think it would be a mistake for russia to try to exploit this, i think that would ultimately backfire on them and i believe that they should respond to the market demands for increased energy supplies to europe. that comes from more demand as countries emerge from the pandemic, depleted storage tanks after a cold end to the winter, china consuming more gas, consuming more gas, and low wind speeds that reduce renewable energy. so right now, russia remains under pressure to increase supply, driven by a volatile market
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which is powering its bargaining position, too. mark lobel, bbc news. the transport secretary has defended changing the number of red list countries to seven, saying vaccination has reduced the risks. grant shapps also said he hopes pcr covid tests can be replaced with lateral flow tests for people arriving in the uk, which will make the process both quicker and cheaper. and that's why we are so keen to get it back to a lateral flow test, only possible because so many people are vaccinated, both here and abroad now. and i know that there is real, you know, everyone is really keen to see that done as quickly as possible. and i know that, as i say, my colleagues over at the department of health are working very hard on that and we will be able to say more about it soon, i think. let's hear from a representative of the travel industry about the changes. stephaniejepson is a partner at courney world travel. thank you forjoining us. for those
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that don't know, briefly explain the holiday process at the moment. you have not holiday process at the moment. you have got to — holiday process at the moment. you have got to do _ holiday process at the moment. ym. have got to do a passenger locator form before you travel, some countries you need to do a test before you go, to come home to the uk, at the moment, you need to do a test, when you get here on day two and feel a passenger locator form in. it's a pcr test, so they are quite expensive. 50 in. it's a pcr test, so they are quite expensive.— in. it's a pcr test, so they are quite expensive. in. it's a pcr test, so they are uuite exensive. , , i. quite expensive. so the expense you as one of the — quite expensive. so the expense you as one of the benefits _ quite expensive. so the expense you as one of the benefits with _ quite expensive. so the expense you as one of the benefits with changing | as one of the benefits with changing collateral for, as one of the benefits with changing collateralfor, what as one of the benefits with changing collateral for, what are the other benefits? it’s collateral for, what are the other benefits? �* , ., ., benefits? it's going to give confidence _ benefits? it's going to give confidence to _ benefits? it's going to give confidence to people. - benefits? it's going to give confidence to people. a i benefits? it's going to give - confidence to people. a family of four can cost up to £200 for these pcr tests when you come home so by using the cheaper lateral flow test is, it's going to open up the market for us, it really is, and create consumer confidence, which is what we need now. it needs to be
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uncomplicated. travel has got to get back to normal levels. fin uncomplicated. travel has got to get back to normal levels.— back to normal levels. on that consumer— back to normal levels. on that consumer confidence - back to normal levels. on that consumer confidence you - back to normal levels. on that - consumer confidence you mentioned, this must be a huge relief for businesses like yours. with a step towards normality in a way. yes. businesses like yours. with a step towards normality in a way. yes, it is. it's towards normality in a way. yes, it is- its huge _ towards normality in a way. yes, it is. it's huge for— towards normality in a way. yes, it is. it's huge for us. _ towards normality in a way. yes, it is. it's huge for us. all— towards normality in a way. yes, it is. it's huge for us. all we - towards normality in a way. yes, it is. it's huge for us. all we need i is. it's huge for us. all we need now is the countries that are coming onto the red list, for some of those to open up to us because they are not all open. once they open up to us, then this guy is the limit. what us, then this guy is the limit. what about the argument _ us, then this guy is the limit. what about the argument that _ us, then this guy is the limit. what about the argument that some people say this should be about protecting this country from the virus and new limits and by opening up the travel situation, you could bring in new variants of covid—19? situation, you could bring in new variants of covid-19?— situation, you could bring in new variants of covid-19? that's going to be the case _ variants of covid-19? that's going to be the case forever, _ variants of covid-19? that's going to be the case forever, isn't - variants of covid-19? that's going to be the case forever, isn't it? i to be the case forever, isn't it? this virus isn't going to go away. there is always going to be mutations in the virus, so, as long as people are responsible, and do their tests when they come home, you've got the passenger locator
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forms as well, it will, it's got to get back to the open.— get back to the open. with the responsibility _ get back to the open. with the responsibility of _ get back to the open. with the responsibility of potentially i get back to the open. with the i responsibility of potentially taking photos rather than a web link with professionals, is there room for people to navigate that in ways they may be should not?— people to navigate that in ways they may be should not? possibly, unless the tests have _ may be should not? possibly, unless the tests have a _ may be should not? possibly, unless the tests have a code _ may be should not? possibly, unless the tests have a code on _ may be should not? possibly, unless the tests have a code on their - may be should not? possibly, unless the tests have a code on their and i the tests have a code on their and you know that that person has put that test, there's got to be some way of doing it so it can be cheated. like with the pcr tests, at the moment, you have to have an order number and that order number is linked to your passenger locator form, so if these tests now, the lateral flows could be something along those lines, that would help us tremendously and stop people being naughty. ladle
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us tremendously and stop people being naughty-— us tremendously and stop people being naughty. we are not sure on the date from _ being naughty. we are not sure on the date from the _ being naughty. we are not sure on the date from the switch _ being naughty. we are not sure on the date from the switch from - being naughty. we are not sure on the date from the switch from the | the date from the switch from the pcr collateral but the october half term is imminent. how important is it for a business like yours to maximise travel ahead of that october half term? it’s maximise travel ahead of that october half term?— october half term? it's huge, because october _ october half term? it's huge, because october half- october half term? it's huge, because october half term i october half term? it's huge, - because october half term signals the end of the summer season. as you know, we have lost most of our summer season, so we need people to be able to travel, it's a shame this didn't come earlier, for us and it industry, so that more countries would have opened up and during the long school holidays more people could have travelled, but we are just grateful this is happening now. many thanks for your time, thank you forjoining us. many thanks for your time, thank you forjoining us— marcus rashford has made a fresh attack on the government, following the removal of the £20 a week uplift to universal credit. he was speaking at a ceremony at the university of manchester,
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as he received an honorary doctorate for his work tackling child poverty. the player said millions of people had lost a lifeline. i don't think that the right point for it to end is when families aren't in a stable situation. otherwise it makes no sense, doing the work that we've done in the past, only to, you know, stop doing it in possibly one of the most vital stages, which we don't know, because the situation of the pandemic with covid could change at any moment, as we've experienced when covid first came on the scene, and the fact that we weren't prepared for it then, we should definitely be prepared for it now. i spoke to our political correspondent helen catt and asked what politicians say about this. well, marcus rashford has become a really respected campaigner on child poverty issues, there is a lot of time for him, frankly, among mps here in westminster, and that's recognised in how
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the government has responded to what he said overnight. they've congratulated him on receiving that honorary doctorate and said that his ongoing campaigning and charity work and high—profile campaigns had helped millions ap and high—profile campaigns had helped millions of people up and down the country. what he's saying today does echo and feed into a discussion over many weeks in westminster where some conservative mps were pushing for the uplift to be kept, labour too have been calling for it to be kept. sir keir starmer the labour leader this morning told bbc breakfast that he backed marcus rashford, here's what he said labour would do. it would stay, we would not make the cut, we would then replace it with something better. but i'd go further than that... both talk at once. we would also say what we said at our conference last week, which is that we would increase the minimum wage to £10 an hour, because what so many people want is the chance to earn more money for their work they're doing
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and to keep more of it for the bills they have to pay etc. we would keep the uplift and then replace it with a much better system that did not require people put to work 29 hours to earn £20, nobody can think that is fair. we would also increase the minimum wage to £10 straightaway. he was pushed on how labour would pay for that, its estimated to cost £6 billion a year to keep the £20 uplift alone, he talked about clawing back money money from covid contracts, there are questions over how much that would bring in, would it be anywhere near enough to cover that scale of costs. the government, in a statement, said the universal credit uplift was always a temporary measure, designed to help claimants through the toughest stages of the pandemic and now the economy was starting to bounce, it was right to focus on helping people back into high quality, well—paid jobs. it also said it had taken what it called significant action to help
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people who they recognise are worried about the cost of living this winter. grant shapps the transport secretary speaking earlier also paid tribute to marcus rashford, but said reinstating the uplift would come at a cost, and that would be likely to mean more taxes or increasing fuel duty or another way of bringing in revenue, so this is a really live debate in westminster, the issue about cost of living, more generally the recognition that prices are increasing above the board, particularly the squeeze around energy prices, and there are concerns about how this will play out this winter. the nhs is offering millions of people a flu vaccine this year. it's an response of the concerns about the prospect of flu and covid—19 circulating at the same time.
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joining me now is dr naomi forrester soto, a virologist from keele university. how worried should be about covid and flu circulating together? that is about jewel— and flu circulating together? that is aboutjewel infection and flu circulating together? that is about jewel infection at and flu circulating together? tryst is about jewel infection at the same is aboutjewel infection at the same time could lead to significantly worse outcomes. we have not yet experienced that because there was hardly any flu last year either because of lockdown or the precautions people were taking such as masquerading and social distancing. nobody is sure it's likely as the restrictions are easily liked end up with an increase of flu cases and there are predictions out there that suggest a flu season could be worse this year as a result of having none for the past year. fin as a result of having none for the ast ear. as a result of having none for the past year-— past year. on the predictions element and _ past year. on the predictions element and the _ past year. on the predictions element and the guessing i past year. on the predictions i element and the guessing going past year. on the predictions - element and the guessing going on, because flu almost disappeared last year, how are scientists able to work out what strain we may face this year?
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work out what strain we may face this ear? , ., work out what strain we may face this ear? ,., .., , , this year? there were some flu cases last ear this year? there were some flu cases last year and — this year? there were some flu cases last year and we _ this year? there were some flu cases last year and we could _ this year? there were some flu cases last year and we could sequence - last year and we could sequence those and see what kind of genetics that flu had and then use a prediction tool to try and work out how much that is going to change. you have to develop a vaccine about six months and as lance, that's why something is a flu vaccine is better than others, we are better at it some years than others. in general, theissueis some years than others. in general, the issue is that nobody was exposed last year and we build up immunity over time and even that immunity from the previous year can help mitigate that from a slightly different flu vaccine this year. even though it has changed you have immunity from the year before because you were exposed to it or had the vaccine. because nobody was exposed we may see people more exposed we may see people more exposed and vulnerable than last otherwise. the exposed and vulnerable than last otherwise. ., , ,., exposed and vulnerable than last otherwise. ., , , otherwise. the overriding message is if ou can otherwise. the overriding message is if you can get — otherwise. the overriding message is if you can get the _ otherwise. the overriding message is if you can get the flu _ otherwise. the overriding message is if you can get the flu jab, _ otherwise. the overriding message is if you can get the flu jab, get - otherwise. the overriding message is if you can get the flu jab, get it. - if you can get the flu jab, get it. is anything else we can do to protect against it?—
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is anything else we can do to protect against it? honestly, with flu, its respiratory _ protect against it? honestly, with flu, its respiratory infection - protect against it? honestly, with flu, its respiratory infection just l flu, its respiratory infectionjust like rotavirus, social distancing, ventilation, wearing a mask, all those things will help with flu, they are not the most popular things in the world but they are very useful against the coronavirus and the flu. if you are concerned, i would suggest those and getting the vaccine. , ., . . . vaccine. this flu vaccine include secondary _ vaccine. this flu vaccine include secondary school _ vaccine. this flu vaccine include secondary school children - vaccine. this flu vaccine include secondary school children up i vaccine. this flu vaccine include secondary school children up to j vaccine. this flu vaccine include - secondary school children up to the age of 16. what's the significance of that? , . , age of 16. what's the significance ofthat? , ., , . , of that? generally, the flu affects rimaril of that? generally, the flu affects primarily the _ of that? generally, the flu affects primarily the very _ of that? generally, the flu affects primarily the very old _ of that? generally, the flu affects primarily the very old and - of that? generally, the flu affects primarily the very old and very i primarily the very old and very young which is why children are offered the vaccine, but i think the reason they are being offered up to the, for all secondary age schoolchildren is to try to mitigate any more disruption to learning this year as well. if we can vaccinate that cohort, they are much less likely to be up sick with the flu and contribute to transmission of it. , , ., , ., .,
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it. given the stories we have heard about the nhs _ it. given the stories we have heard about the nhs being _ it. given the stories we have heard about the nhs being under - it. given the stories we have heard i about the nhs being under pressure, administering 40 million flu jab is, how might that affect the pressure on the nhs that exists? i how might that affect the pressure on the nhs that exists?— how might that affect the pressure on the nhs that exists? i would say the nhs is very _ on the nhs that exists? i would say the nhs is very good _ on the nhs that exists? i would say the nhs is very good at _ on the nhs that exists? i would say the nhs is very good at delivering l the nhs is very good at delivering flu jab is, they do it every year. the hope is that by vaccinating more people, that will reduce the number of people who end up in hospital with flu which will significantly reduce the pressure at the worst things in the winter when we have really high transmission rates of infections so i think a bit of extra pressure now trying to get the vaccine out as pogba worth it in the long run. within the last hour, two journalists have won the nobel peace prize. maria ressa from the philippines and dmitry muratov from russia were awarded the prize "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace".
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this was the moment the announcement was made. the norwegian nobel committee has decided to award the nobel peace prize for 2021 to... ..maria ressa and dmitry muratov, for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace. they are receiving the peace prize for their courageous fight for freedom of expression in the philippines and in russia. at the same time, they are representatives of all journalists who stand up for this ideal in the world in which democracy and freedom of the press face increasingly adverse conditions.
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with me in the studio is our diplomatic after the announcement, one said she was in shock after hearing she had won. she said without facts, nothing was possible. won. she said without facts, nothing was possible-— was possible. when you do not have facts, ou was possible. when you do not have facts. you do — was possible. when you do not have facts. you do not — was possible. when you do not have facts, you do not have _ was possible. when you do not have facts, you do not have truth, - was possible. when you do not have facts, you do not have truth, you i was possible. when you do not have facts, you do not have truth, you do| facts, you do not have truth, you do not have trust. trust is what holds us together to be able to solve the complex problems our world is facing today. so when you attack the media, often times it's about shooting the messenger. or trying to solve that in many different ways, but the recognition of how difficult it is to be a journalist today is, this is for you and i hope energy for all of us to continue the battle for the
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facts. ,, , ., us to continue the battle for the facts, ,, , ., ., ., with me in the studio is our diplomatic correspondent caroline hawley. tell us about her courageous work. you saw her determination. both winners, they came out of 329 nominees, both have stood up against state power at great personal risk. as you said earlier, she co—founded this digital site which regularly reports on the anti—drugs campaign of the state and its a campaign that has become so deadly that the chairwoman of the norwegian committee said it basically amounted to a war being waged against the people of the philippines. the website has responded saying that honoured and astounded and that this award recognises all the journalists who continue to shine a light even in the darkest and toughest hours.
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certainly a significant boost for her personally and for the journalists she works with. what boost 42? _ what boost 42? we were talking about great personal risk. dmitry muratov is the editor for the main independent newspaper in russia, it's investigative, it has exposed corruption, abuses of power, been highly critical of the ruling elite, especially vladimir putin, and six of its journalists have been killed and he has said that this is an award in their memory. some people will say and some people were asking the nobel committee, what does journalism some people were asking the nobel committee, what doesjournalism have to do with peace? the message from the committee was that free fact —based independentjournalism protect against abuses of powers, lies and war propaganda. that's what they said. fin lies and war propaganda. that's what the said. ., ,., , they said. on that point, the prize this time around _ they said. on that point, the prize this time around is _ they said. on that point, the prize this time around is the _ they said. on that point, the prize
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this time around is the first - they said. on that point, the prize this time around is the first were l this time around is the first were journalists since 1935. give us the significance of that. awarding this to journalists. significance of that. awarding this tojournalists. ladle significance of that. awarding this to journalists.— to “ournalists. we are in and year of to journalists. we are in and year of fake news. _ to journalists. we are in and year of fake news, at _ to journalists. we are in and year of fake news, at a _ to journalists. we are in and year of fake news, at a time _ to journalists. we are in and year of fake news, at a time when - to journalists. we are in and year of fake news, at a time when the j of fake news, at a time when the nobel committee said that freedom of expression is facing adverse conditions, so i think the hope is that this is a significant boost and will encourage people to carry on shining a light to investigate abuses of power and definitely a real boost for these two, for the journalists they work with and for journalists they work with and for journalists around the world working in dangerous circumstances. many thanks,. a new study suggests daily meat consumption in the uk has fallen by 17% over the past decade. researchers from oxford university suggest most people are eating less red and processed meats, but white meat consumption has increased slightly. however, they say a more substantial reduction is required to reduce
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the environmental impact of our diets. the national food strategy recommends a 30% fall over the next ten years. cristina stewart led the study out of the university of oxford and joins me now. many thanks for joining many thanks forjoining us. what is the significance of these numbers? it's really encouraging to see that meat consumption is decreasing in the uk, it's good to know we are moving in the right direction, but as you said, 17% in a decade is quite a modest reduction. we really do need to try and accelerate this because if not we are going to meet these reduction targets. hora because if not we are going to meet these reduction targets.— these reduction targets. how big an im act these reduction targets. how big an impact does — these reduction targets. how big an impact does it _ these reduction targets. how big an impact does it have _ these reduction targets. how big an impact does it have on _ these reduction targets. how big an impact does it have on the - impact does it have on the environment?— impact does it have on the environment? 2 ., , . environment? quite a big impact, broadly speaking, _ environment? quite a big impact, broadly speaking, dishes - environment? quite a big impact, broadly speaking, dishes with - environment? quite a big impact, i broadly speaking, dishes with meat have a much higher environmental impact and plant—based dishes. there is huge variation and impacts depending on how and where it is
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produced but broadly speaking, plant—based dishes have a lower impact. we try to estimate the change in our study, we looked at six different environmental indicators, including land use, greenhouse gas emissions, other pollutants entering the air and freshwater west drawl. we found a significant reduction across all of those indicators. it has a big impact. those indicators. it has a big imact. ., ., impact. you find that here in the uk, i impact. you find that here in the uk. i wonder— impact. you find that here in the uk, i wonder how _ impact. you find that here in the uk, i wonder how this _ impact. you find that here in the uk, i wonder how this compares| impact. you find that here in the - uk, i wonder how this compares when you look at the global picture. that's the caveat we had in the study. the estimates we reported were based on globalfood production systems. it was an average basically of lots of different global production systems. they are approximate but we are more interested in that change rather than absolute impact. ladle interested in that change rather than absolute impact. we mentioned that key national— than absolute impact. we mentioned that key national target, _ than absolute impact. we mentioned that key national target, we - than absolute impact. we mentioned that key national target, we are - than absolute impact. we mentioned that key national target, we are not. that key national target, we are not near that, that key national target, we are not nearthat, how that key national target, we are not near that, how do we get to that? over the next ten years, we need to
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double our efforts. if you are someone who eats meat every day, that would look like to meet free day a week, it does not to be too daunting, you don't need to go vegetarian, but try to reduce your meat consumption is.— vegetarian, but try to reduce your meat consumption is. many thanks we have to leave — meat consumption is. many thanks we have to leave it _ meat consumption is. many thanks we have to leave it there _ meat consumption is. many thanks we have to leave it there but _ meat consumption is. many thanks we have to leave it there but thanks - have to leave it there but thanks forjoining us. have to leave it there but thanks forjoining us— another incredibly mild day out there for early october but while some of you had the sunshine this afternoon, others, the rain continues, particularly northern ireland and western scotland the rate will be on and off. away from that, largely dry, murky across southern areas, not enough breeze to shift that cloud away, sunny spells for the north and more breeze in the west, all from a southerly direction. once the sun is out, temperatures could be anywhere between 20 and 23, even where it's
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raining it's milder than you would expect the stage in the year. tonight, it stays mild across the country, more rain to come in western scotland and northern ireland, particularly later in the night, drizzle elsewhere, misty and foggy. night, drizzle elsewhere, misty and foggy, apart oh across night, drizzle elsewhere, misty and faggy, apart oh across parts night, drizzle elsewhere, misty and foggy, apart oh across parts of england, cooler start tomorrow down towards the south and east. brightening in western scotland and northern ireland but turning down through the day, eastern scotland, north and west england and wales. bye for now.
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hello this is bbc news, the headlines. more than 40 million of us across the uk are being offered a flu jab this winter, in the biggest ever flu vaccination campaign from the nhs. the head of the uk's energy regulator warns prices will rise significantly next year because of soaring increases in wholesale gas costs. travellers to england will soon be able to take a photo of a negative
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lateral flow test from home — instead of paying for an expensive pcr test before and afterjourneys. as pig farmers fear for their livlihoods, the government is accused of not doing enough to stop the needless culling of thousands of animals. and journalists maria ressa from the philippines and dmitrhy muratov from russia win this year's nobel peace prize. a special performance from the london symphony orchestra was live streamed from care forms across the uk to thank staff and residents. good morning. newcastle united fans are excited about the future —
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members of the consortium are meeting this morning to hold talks with manager steve bruce whose future looks uncertain but he told the daily telegraph he wants more time to prove himself even though the club are second bottom and without a win.— the club are second bottom and without a win. steve nosy is under ressure, without a win. steve nosy is under pressure. when — without a win. steve nosy is under pressure, when you _ without a win. steve nosy is under pressure, when you go _ without a win. steve nosy is under pressure, when you go and - without a win. steve nosy is under pressure, when you go and to - without a win. steve nosy is under pressure, when you go and to any| pressure, when you go and to any footballjob pressure, when you go and to any football job you pressure, when you go and to any footballjob you have to win games. i feel a lot of sympathy for him, i know how he feels about newcastle, it has been very harsh on him and his family what he has had to put up with but he took on an impossible job and very difficult circumstances. the takeover of newcastle has been criticised by amnesty international, accusing saudi arabia of sportswashing human rights issues. in 2018, prominantjournalist jamal khashoggi was killed while visiting the saudi consulate in istanbul, with the alleged involvement of the saudi crown
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prince, mohamed bin salman. he denies the claims. khashoggi's fiancee told bbc radio 5 live breakfast that newcastle fans celebrating the takeover are effectively condoning such killings. it is giving those people who have a link with_ it is giving those people who have a link with this crime, the chrome plans— link with this crime, the chrome plans and — link with this crime, the chrome plans and other people in the administration, ed bowlby really bad message _ administration, ed bowlby really bad message to the world —— it will be a really— message to the world —— it will be a really bad _ message to the world —— it will be a really bad message to the world and difficult _ really bad message to the world and difficult to _ really bad message to the world and difficult to receive justice. the premier league said they "have now received legally binding assurances that the kingdom of saudi arabia will not control newcastle united football club. all parties are pleased to have concluded this process which gives certainty and clarity
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to newcastle united football club and their fans." you can read more on the bbc sport website. lewis hamilton's prospects of winning this weekend's turkish grand prix have taken a setback. the championship leader will have a 10—place grid penalty for a new engine in his mercedes. he was fastest in first practice in istanbul this morning. we're just over a day away, now from the much anticipated world heavyweight contest between tyson fury and deyontay wilder in las vegas. fury is defending the belt he won back in february 2020, but today's weigh in will not have a face off. the pair traded verbal blows in the press conference, earlier in the week, with wilder accusing fury of cheating in that fight. so the promoter is keeping them apart. they are not animals, they are sportsmen, i do not like face—offs at all, i think the out unnecessary, and dehumanises the fighters and i do not think it is good for the
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sport but here either did not for those reasons, i did it because i was afraid what would happen and the fate could be cancelled. the 2016 olympic cycling champion, elinor barker says she is reassured by the success of laura kenny, sarah storey and lizzie diegnan, after she revealed she was pregnant. barker won silver this year in the team pursuit in tokyo, not fully knowing she was pregnant at the time. as others have shown, including diegnan — who won the famous paris—roubaix, race just last weekend — there's nothing to stop her returning to the top of her sport after the birth of her first child — due early next year. if this had happened to me a few years earlier and make idiot i probably would have immediately thought that as my cycling career over, but because of these women i do not have to make that choice, it doesn't have to affect my career for the next ten years. it is an opportunity that should still be
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given to riders and should not really change anything and pregnant women are not necessarily a risk and a sporting environment, they can be an asset. that's all the sport for now. some breaking news, we had healing the conservative mp and former member of cabinetjames brokenshire member of cabinet james brokenshire have member of cabinetjames brokenshire have died, his family have released a statement saying it is with deep sadness we announce has death at the age of 53, he died peacefully yesterday with family members by his bedside, he had been an hospital since sunday after his condition rapidly deteriorated. more on this from jonathan blake.
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he had been suffering from lung cancer. yes, sad news to report that the james brokenshire the former cabinet minister has died, the news has come in a statement from his family which you mentioned and it confirms that with deep sadness they are mostly death of james brokenshire at the age of 53. they describe him as a brilliant government minister and the various roles he held, a couple and cabinet as secretary of state for housing and northern ireland, but more junior ministerial rules under david cameron. they describe him as a educated constituency mp, bexley and said cup for the past 11 years. and they describe him most importantly
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in the statement as a loving father to has three children, a devoted husband and faithful friend to so many. the statement goes on to say the family would like to thank all the family would like to thank all the nhs staff particularly those at guy's and st thomas in london who killed four gems with warmth and judgments and professionalism over the past three years and they would like to ask privacy as a family at this time. —— guy's and st thomas who cared forjames. his cancela first detected in 2017, he had part of his lung removed and an operation which wasjudged to of his lung removed and an operation which was judged to have of his lung removed and an operation which wasjudged to have been successful in 2018, but earlier this year stepped back from duties as a minister and year stepped back from duties as a ministerand mp year stepped back from duties as a minister and mp when it turned out
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to he had 41 l again and was suffering from cancer still. —— fallen ill again. suffering from cancer still. —— fallen illagain. he suffering from cancer still. —— fallen ill again. he will be much missed in parliament and westminster, he was a well liked mp, very popular man and respected across party lines as well so i am sure we will see tributes coming in from those who knew him. and we will bring you those on bbc news. thank you for now. pig farmers in the uk are warning that tens of thousands of animals could be slaughtered within weeks due to labour shortages in abbatoirs, that are being blamed on brexit and the covid pandemic. the national farmers union said what's happening in the sector is a �*human disaster�* for farmers.
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elliott pig farmer kate morgan explained how difficult it is. ladle explained how difficult it is. we are onl explained how difficult it is. 2 are only doing ourjob, be have fulfilled our contract, this is not the fault of the farmer, it is in the fault of the farmer, it is in the higher and the food supply chain and the farmer as emotionally and turmoil, we are struggling so much at all we are asking for is some help. at all we are asking for is some hel. ~ ., , ., , at all we are asking for is some hel. ~ ., , , help. when do you need help buy? what is the — help. when do you need help buy? what is the timescale? _ help. when do you need help buy? what is the timescale? three - help. when do you need help buy? | what is the timescale? three weeks a . o, what is the timescale? three weeks ago. months — what is the timescale? three weeks ago. months ago- — what is the timescale? three weeks ago, months ago. the _ what is the timescale? three weeks ago, months ago. the timescale - what is the timescale? three weeks ago, months ago. the timescale as| what is the timescale? three weeks i ago, months ago. the timescale as so critical, people are killing pigs now, we are personally weeks away from making this horrendous choice and it will destroy us. mit? from making this horrendous choice and it will destroy us.— and it will destroy us. why do you sa that? and it will destroy us. why do you say that? because _ and it will destroy us. why do you say that? because we _ and it will destroy us. why do you say that? because we found - and it will destroy us. why do you say that? because we found to i and it will destroy us. why do you | say that? because we found to we farm to feed _ say that? because we found to we farm to feed the _ say that? because we found to we farm to feed the nation, _ say that? because we found to we farm to feed the nation, this -
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say that? because we found to we farm to feed the nation, this is i farm to feed the nation, this is food waste, people are starving and our government is prepared to throw healthy protein into the bin and thatis healthy protein into the bin and that is criminal. we are going to be throwing food and the ben and this is so serious. —— food in the bin. joining me is the founder ofjames alexander find joining me is the founder ofjames alexanderfind foods joining me is the founder ofjames alexander find foods which sales to farm shops and customers. thank you forjoining us. your reaction to the pig farmer kate morgan therefore. i completely echo what kate has said, these pig farmers and the wider farming community have what so hard throughout the pandemic, they have not stopped working, they are effectively superheroes and
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absolutely the government really does need to intervene particularly with the supply chain issues with the hgv shortage and they need to step and to start issuing these covid visas that need to be put in place to get more staff, more workers. talking to my manufacturing site in cumbria, we pre—ordered all are turkey, plenty time to order a large quantity but talking to head of production, you have to be extremely thick—skinned to work in that industry and it is a crying shame that so many of these agricultural colleges, one of which in cumbria has recently closed founded in 1896, a real shortage of skilled apprentices out there. there
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is a new initiative, a new farm opened and cumbria trying to follow one from the traditions but it has a big critical moment. you mentioned the visas and _ big critical moment. you mentioned the visas and trying _ big critical moment. you mentioned the visas and trying to _ big critical moment. you mentioned the visas and trying to get _ big critical moment. you mentioned the visas and trying to get stuff- the visas and trying to get stuff from abroad to help, is that the appetite from abroad to come and help? appetite from abroad to come and hel ? ., ., ,, ., ., help? from what i know the wage oint of help? from what i know the wage point of view _ help? from what i know the wage point of view has _ help? from what i know the wage point of view has to _ help? from what i know the wage point of view has to change, - help? from what i know the wage point of view has to change, they | point of view has to change, they add a very similar echo to the hgv shortage, working conditions. talking to my head produce up—to—date, he did it for six months, it is not a pleasant place to be and it messes with 1�*s head, at is really difficult place. at the moment the retailers, the shelves are being filled up with a lot of imported food and the uk has some of the best welfare standards in the
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world so this should have been planned months and months ago, the government saw this coming and we are not careful and something does not happen immediately at is going to be very difficult for families but i thick it is an absolute crying shame going on to what kate was saying that we have these food banks and so many food going to waste, it is a real shame. and so many food going to waste, it is a realshame. into and so many food going to waste, it is a real shame.— is a real shame. into october, lookin: is a real shame. into october, looking ahead _ is a real shame. into october, looking ahead to _ is a real shame. into october, looking ahead to christmas, i is a real shame. into october, - looking ahead to christmas, where does that leave us question mark that i talk of shortages on various shelves? i that i talk of shortages on various shelves? ,, ., . ., , ., ., that i talk of shortages on various shelves? ,, ., . ., ., ., shelves? i know certainly a lot of my customers — shelves? i know certainly a lot of my customers i'm _ shelves? i know certainly a lot of my customers i'm telling - shelves? i know certainly a lot of my customers i'm telling them i shelves? i know certainly a lot of| my customers i'm telling them on shelves? i know certainly a lot of - my customers i'm telling them on my my customers i�*m telling them on my website to basically order now to avoid supply issues. we placed on
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the back injune after seeing a 500% increase in sales last year mainly due to the pandemic but this year i think is probably going to be much the levels for smaller food producers which the uk relies on an there are so many that have struck up there are so many that have struck up many farm shops struck up which we supply to throat the pandemic and that trained seems to be continuing. this year particularly with the excess furlough money a lot of consumers will of course want to support and by british, support our farmers, they are equal to the nhs and the police etc. so there needs to be immediate government intervention in order to try and solve this crisis particularly with the opening of visas but i think the foreign visas needs to last at least 12 months. . ~
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foreign visas needs to last at least 12 months. ., ,, , ., ., foreign visas needs to last at least 12 months-— foreign visas needs to last at least 12 months. ., ,, , ., ., ., , more than 40 million of us across the uk are being offered a flu jab this winter, in the biggest ever flu vaccination campaign from the nhs. the head of the uk�*s energy regulator warns prices will rise significantly next year because of soaring increases in wholesale gas costs. as pig farmers fear for their livlihoods, the government is accused of not doing enough to stop the needless culling of thousands of animals. a court in israel has begun hearing arguments in the custody battle for a six year old boy who was the sole survivor of a cable car crash in italy in may. an italianjudge had given guardianship of eitan biran, to his paternal aunt who lives in italy, but last month his maternal grandfather flew him to israel
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without her permission. the bbc�*s middle east correspondent — yolande knell is at the court in tel aviv and explained the background to the case it was five months ago this awful cable car accident in the north of italy where eitan biran had been living with his father who was training to be a doctor. they had gone to a beauty spot for a family day out with two of his great—grandparents and younger great—grandpa rents and younger brother. great—grandparents and younger brother. it is not when the cable car accident happened at was the protective hug of his father that saved him from the full impact of the crash so he was the sole survivor, considered to be something of a medical he survived anti—spent several weeks in hospital. it was an italianjudge who several weeks in hospital. it was an italian judge who gave custody now, it was an italian judge who gave custody to his aunt, a doctor who lives in italy, and then it was just last month that
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eitan biran�*s grandfather was visiting from israel, he took the little boy out saying he was going to buy him some toys, but he never returned. he actually used an israeli passport that he had acquired for the little boy to take him into switzerland and to bring him here on an israeli, on a privatejet. he has appeared since on israeli television, talking about his decision to do that. this case has been very much in the public eye, it continues to be so, although thejudge has previously asked for privacy of all of those involved to be respected. south africa is still looking for answers after 9 days of looting and violent protests which took place injuly. the unrest was sparked by the jailing of the country�*s former president jacob zuma. the protests were widely seen as a targeted campaign to undermine current president cyril ramaphosa. the riots died down after the deployment of thousands of soldiers. our correspondent nomsa maseko sent this report. crowd shout. the riots that shocked south africa three months ago. nearly 350 people died across two
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provinces which were affected by violent protests sparked by the jailing of former president, jacob zuma. the unrest began when a heavily armed gang hijacked trucks and torched more than 20 cars on the m3 motorway which links sub—saharan africa�*s biggest port to the country�*s economic hub. today, we went back to these areas. only a handful of the shopping malls that were looted or set alight have reopened. here in thembisa, a township in easternjohannesburg, several people are still missing. their families suspect they perished in a gas explosion at this supermarket. police have said the remains that were recovered here were burnt beyond recognition, and it could take a while before dna tests are concluded. she sobs. translation: i need to find my son's remains so i can have peace. - i have so many questions.
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i need to know what happened to my son. all i want is to bury him — i need closure. while some families are counting the human cost, many others are trying to rebuild their businesses. this is what remains of this woman�*s business. it�*s the first time she has returned to her clothing shop since july�*s unrest. she is one of many small business owners whose businesses were not insured and is looking to the country�*s state—owned insurance company to bail them out. this was my sole income, this shop, and now all of a sudden it's gone, without any notice or prior arrangement, nothing whatsoever, nothing planned — just cut.
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experts say it will be another year before the country�*s economy recovers from the impact in the worst violence in post—apartheid south africa. i think we need to understand what happened injuly happened at a time when we were busy trying to navigate a pandemic, something that none of us were ever prepared for in 2020. a lot ofjobs were lost, not just through covid but through this unrest. we know through the looting, the destruction of business premises, shops, retail sector, thejobs that were lost across a wide section of the economy. we need to move quicker to get those people back in to employment so that we start to drive the economy again. while the rebuilding continues, it remains unclear what the real cause of the violence was, which has led many to believe that it could happen again. nomsa maseko, bbc news, south africa. it�*s a grim statistic. every five minutes someone in the uk is admitted to hospital with a heart attack.
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most people survive, but the damage done can leave them prone to fresh attacks. so, researchers at addenbrooke�*s hospital in cambridge and the british heart foundation have been trialling a drug that they hope can heal damaged hearts and make people less likely to suffer further attacks. our science correspondent richard westcott reports. julian isn�*t the kind of person you would expect to have a heart attack. a keen cyclist, healthy eating, doesn�*t smoke, in his early 50s, but last summer, out of the blue... a pretty normal day until about 4pm. and i had an enormous pain in my chest, vice—like, and i said to my wife, i feel really, really ill. i lay down and the pain didn�*t go away. at any point did you think it might be a heart attack? i didn�*t think it would happen to me, i thought i was too young, fit and healthy, i had
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no underlying symptoms. the previous weekend i had been out on quite a long bike ride. so acting as normal, and then like a bolt out of the blue you get a huge pain in your chest and find yourself in papworth. julian hasjoined a drug trial at addenbrooke�*s hospital in cambridge. some people have an immune system that goes into overdrive following a heart attack and actually starts to damage the body, leaving the patient prone to another attack or a stroke. researchers hope this drug will cut that risk. if you think of the immune system as having good cop and bad cop cells, in these high—risk patients we have a very high number of bad cop cells. so in this trial we are trying to increase the good cop cell number so it negates the harmful effects of the bad cop cells.
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it has been shown to have very good results in other autoimmune conditions like diabetes, hepatitis, hiv. we are just about to give you your injection, now, julian. if this smaller trial is successful the drug will need to be tested in large—scale human trials, but it could one day spare thousands of people the fear of having a second heart attackjust a few months after the first. the weeks after the attack, i lost all confidence in my own body. i didn�*t want to do anything. and it�*s building that confidence again in your own body, being able to do things that you love. if there is a drug that can help people get back to normality, that has got to be hugely beneficial. a concert by the london symphony orchestra was live—streamed last night, free of charge, into hundreds of care—homes across the uk. the special performance was staged by the bristol beacon project to thank staff and residents
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for their resilience during the pandemic. jon kay reports. no bingo tonight. instead, residents at quarry house are waiting for a live performance by one of the best orchestras in the world. it�*s the first time we�*ve had something like this for a long time. so, yes, looking forward to it. the london symphony orchestra are used to big audiences, but tonight every care home in the uk is invited. i always believe that music was one of the great healing arts and it's a way of reconnecting with people and also saying...thank you to all the people who've worked — often for very little thanks — in the last year and a half. and alsojust to kind of spread some of what we do in the hope that it'll make people feel better. ladies and gentlemen, thank you so much. applause.
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can�*t put into words, really, what it means. i didn�*t realise it was going to be so...so emotional. things are still not completely right, but. . . hope for the future. i think it's incredible and a wonderful picture, as well. you know, it feels as if you could be there. it was organised by the bristol beacon project, but watched in care homes from ayrshire... ..to surrey. it�*s been so stressful and we�*ve had a lot of isolation in the homes. but it�*s all coming back and it feels great to bring joy and music back into the homes again. after nearly two years
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of pain, two hours ofjoy. laughter. jon kay, bbc news, bristol. a look at the weather. weather sunshine or rain there is one unifying thread and that is how mild it feels, started incredibly mild, temperatures close to the october record for early morning across scotland and northern ireland and evenin scotland and northern ireland and even in the highlands of scotland temperature stole 23 the average. southerly winds with us, but with that comes the rain, scotland and ireland saw the warmest conditions, southeast and northern ireland are drying out and looking brighter in the east of scotland, brighter through england and wales over some of the mist and loch lomond will
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angen of the mist and loch lomond will anger, when you have sunny spells temperatures 20—23. mild for early october and it leads us into another warm night but more rain to come later in the late, same and western scotland, drizzle elsewhere, mostly dry, misty to date in northern england and the midlands, screw the skies in the south—east tablatures drop the furthest like yesterday and this morning starting in the teens. one may unrelated by the orange colours, the cold front through the weekend pushes them away into the continent, the blues indicating something fresher on the way. saturday morning a wet start for northern ireland and the west of scotland, brightening through the day but eastern scotland turning wetter, outbreaks of rain and drizzle in north—west england and parts of wales. the morning mark should clear, sunny spells and to temperatures not quite as high as today but into the high teens and
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low 20s for some, a fresher end pushing southwards through the night into sunday, april starts or a weather front lingers, into sunday, april starts or a weatherfront lingers, cloudier, one or two cheryl�*s, the greatest chance across northern scotland, some heavy and thundery, the vast majority will have a dry day with good long sunny spells, colour and the sunshine but nice enough once you are a net. enter next week refreshing will be with us throughout, a future was dotted at own for scotland and eastern england but for most predominantly a dry week ahead.
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this is bbc news with me, ben mundy. the headlines... more than 40 million of us across the uk are being offered a flu jab this winter, in the biggest ever flu vaccination campaign from the nhs. the head of the uk�*s energy regulator warns prices will rise significantly next year because of soaring increases in wholesale gas costs. travellers to england will soon be able to take a photo of a negative lateral flow test from home instead of paying for an expensive pcr test before and afterjourneys. i think most people want to do the right thing, everyone understands it�*s important not to ignore a positive pcr test or lateral flow test indeed for when it comes to covid and we trust people will carry on the same thing.
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as pig farmers fear for their livlihoods, the government is accused of not doing enough to stop the needless culling of thousands of animals. we farm to feed the nation, we don't farm to throw it in the bin in the bin this is food waste, there are people starving the government is prepared to allow throwing away and that is criminal. journalists maria ressa from the philippines and dmitrhy muratov from russia win this year�*s nobel peace prize. conservative mp and former member of the cabinetjames brokenshire has died, aged 53 after suffering from lung cancer. the nhs has launched its biggest campaign against winterflu,
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with more than 40 million of us across the uk being offered a vaccine. health chiefs are worried about the prospect of flu and covid 19 circulating together. they fear people could be more vulnerable to flu this winter, because so few people caught it last year, because lockdowns meant we mixed less, and we were all washing our hands a lot and being generally more hygienic. our health correspondent, naomi grimley, reports. i�*ve got together some of the country�*s leading medics to answer your vaccine questions... this is the latest media advert to remind us that it�*s notjust covid which we have to worry about this winter. flu could rear its head again, too. so more than 40 million people across the uk are being offered a flu jab, in the biggest ever roll—out of the vaccine. those who will be able to get one free include the over—50s, those with certain health conditions, pregnant women, health care workers, and most children. lockdowns and extra hygiene measures
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squashed flu last winter, and that means the level of immunity in the population is likely to be lower this time round. there�*s also uncertainty about how effective the flu vaccine will be, because scientists have less information to go on when they guess the strain in advanced. even if you've had flu vaccination last year, it's really important to get it every year because the strains of flu that are circulating do change. we are in a position where we're not quite as sure this year what's going to be circulating, but we have got some idea from the southern hemisphere, and flu vaccination is still your best way of getting protection. even if it doesn't provide complete protection, if you do get flu you are much less likely to be seriously unwell with it. and, really importantly, you're much less likely to pass it on to other people who could be even more vulnerable. flu normally kills around 11,000 people every winter, but a report published earlier this
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year from the academy of medical sciences warned respiratory illnesses could hit very high levels, and flu deaths alone could reach 60,000 in worst case scenario. naomi grimley, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to dr naomi forrester soto, a virologist from keele university. there is concern that duel infection at the same time could lead to significantly worse outcomes. we have not yet experienced that because there was hardly any flu last year, either because of lockdowns or the precautions people were taking, such as mask—wearing and social distancing.
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nobody is sure which of those contributed the most or if all three contributed. it�*s likely as the restrictions are eased, we�*ll end up with an increase of flu cases and there are predictions out there that suggest a flu season could be worse this year as a result of having none for the past year. on the predictions element and the guessing going on, because flu almost disappeared last year, how are scientists able to work out what strain we may face this year? there were some flu cases last year and we could sequence those and see what the genetics of that flu was and then use a prediction tool to try and work out how much that is going to change. you have to develop a vaccine about six months in advance, that�*s why something is a flu vaccine is better than others, we are better at it some years than others. in general, the issue is that nobody really was exposed last year and we built up immunity over time and even that immunity from the previous year can help mitigate the infection from a slightly different flu vaccine this year.
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even though it has changed you have immunity from the year before because you were exposed to it or had the vaccine. there�*s a concern because nobody was exposed we may see people more vulnerable than last otherwise. the overriding message is if you can get the flu jab, get it. is there anything else we can do to protect against it? honestly, with flu, it�*s a respiratory infection just like coronavirus, social distancing, ventilation, wearing a mask, all those things will help with flu, they are not the most popular things in the world but they are very useful against the coronavirus and the flu. if you are concerned, i would suggest those and getting the vaccine. this flu vaccine include secondary school children up to the age of 16. what�*s the significance of that? generally, the flu affects primarily the very old and very young
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which is why children are offered the vaccine, but i think the reason they are being offered up to, for all secondary—age schoolchildren is to try to mitigate any more disruption to learning this year as well. if we can vaccinate that cohort, they are much less likely to be off sick with the flu and to contribute to transmission of it in the community. given the stories we have heard about the nhs being under pressure, administering 40 million flu jabs, how might that affect the pressure on the nhs that exists already? i mean, i would say the nhs is very good at delivering flu jabs, they do it every year. expanding will create some more pressure. but the hope is that by vaccinating more people, that will reduce the number of people who end up in hospital with flu which will significantly reduce the pressure at the worst time in the winter when we have really high transmission rates of infections so i think a bit
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of extra pressure now trying to get the vaccine out is probably worth it in the long run. the welsh government will publish its covid winter plan today, with a warning that businesses could have to shut again, if there�*s a new variant or a drop in levels of immunity. but the current restrictions, such as the instruction to work from home, if possible, could be relaxed if cases fall. we will be going live to mark drakeford�*s announcing those plans. joining me now to tell us more as our correspondentjames joining me now to tell us more as our correspondent james reynolds. give us the background. 1995. our correspondent james reynolds. give us the background.— our correspondent james reynolds. give us the background. 1995, he was workin: give us the background. 1995, he was working with — give us the background. 1995, he was working with panorama _ give us the background. 1995, he was working with panorama when - give us the background. 1995, he was working with panorama when the - working with panorama when the reporter martin bashir asked him to mock up some fake bank statements.
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the graphic designer said he did not know what it�*s for. this was seen as vital in persuading insist diana to give the interview. subsequently might know the dyson report said that wish you had used deceit but the key factor for the graphic designer was that he was sidelined. after having locked up statements, after having tried to raise the alarm, he was sidelined. he told bbc he suffered a difficult two or three years. he did not get work from the bbc as he expected. he visited the bbc as he expected. he visited the bbc in june bbc as he expected. he visited the bbc injune this year to get a full apology from the director—general and now this settlement has been announced, the terms remain confidential.— announced, the terms remain confidential. , . confidential. the significance? the ersonal confidential. the significance? the personal apology. _ confidential. the significance? the personal apology, and _ confidential. the significance? the personal apology, and the timing. | confidential. the significance? the | personal apology, and the timing. it brings it to an end for him. he spoke to victoria derbyshire in the studio earlier in the year, saying he still felt hurt, he needed an
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apology from the bbc, a few weeks later he came through the front door, was met by the director—general and got that apology. he said there would be discussions about a financial settlement, that has potentially for hunt ended on that chapter. maw; hunt ended on that chapter. many thanks. the energy regulator, ofgem, has said it expects the price cap to rise significantly next april, because of the big increase in wholesale gas costs. several smallerfirms have been forced out of business recently, and ofgem�*s chief executive jonathan brearley said all companies were feeling the strain. he said the price cap was there to stop firms making unfair profits, but that legitimate costs had to be passed through to customers. meanwhile, the us has stepped up the pressure on russia, over the shortage of gas in europe, warning moscow not to exploit the situation. wholesale gas prices have soared amid rising demand across europe, but fell back this week after the russian president, vladimir putin, said moscow could increase supplies. mark lobel reports. the gas and electricity price surge
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is alarming consumers across europe. i am very, very worried. very concerned. we struggle enough. translation: there are mothers today have to choose between paying - for their energy bill, or feeding their children. that is the problem. the colder weather is coming fast. we need to heat apartments. if you go to the poorer areas, where there is suffering, no—one puts on the heating, because everyone knows they won't be able to pay for it. a record demand for gas and limited storage in the eu is fuelling politicians�* fears for the future. russia supplies 40% of the eu�*s natural gas imports. moscow once feared a falling oil price would undermine its economy. now it�*s calling the shots. watch the price of gas plummet, as vladimir putin is televised suggesting a possible increase of gas supply on wednesday. but he has little sympathy for his european customers. translation: all of its activities were aimed at curtailing - the so—called long—term contracts, focusing on the transition - to gas exchange trading. it turns out this policy was wrong,
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it didn't account for uncertainties. j russia�*s main gas producer insists it is blameless. translation: since the beginning of the year, we have supplied - foreign markets with near—record amounts of gas. we increased deliveries to our largest consumer market, germany, by a third compared to last year, to turkey by two and a half times, to romania by four times. we�*ve supplied additional volumes of gas along all routes, including the ukrainian route, as much as we could. but ukraine�*s gas operator says russia has reduced the amount it routes through the country between january and september by 17% compared to the previous year. russia says the new nord stream 2 underwater pipeline would save europe�*s sticky situation, but only if germany and brussels quickly approved the project to get it flowing. not everyone thinks russia
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is acting reasonably. we have long been concerned about russia using energy as a tool of coercion and a political weapon. we have seen it happen before and we could see it happen again. i think it would be a mistake for russia to try to exploit this, i think that would ultimately backfire on them and i believe that they should respond to the market demands for increased energy supplies to europe. that comes from more demand as countries emerge from the pandemic, depleted storage tanks after a cold end to the winter, china consuming more gas, and low wind speeds that reduce renewable energy. so right now, russia remains under pressure to increase supply, driven by a volatile market which is powering its bargaining position, too. mark lobel, bbc news.
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james brokenshire has died aged 53 of lung cancer. we will have more on that on bbc news. right now, we are saying goodbye to viewers on bbc two. the transport secretary has defended changing the number of red list countries to seven, saying vaccination has reduced the risks. grant shapps also said he hopes pcr covid tests can be replaced with lateral flow tests for people arriving in the uk, which will make the process both quicker and cheaper. and that�*s why we are so keen to get it back to a lateral flow test, only possible because so many people are vaccinated, both here and abroad now. and i know that there is real, you know, everyone is really keen to see that done as quickly as possible. and i know that, as i say, my colleagues over at the department of health are working very hard on that and we will be able to say more about it soon, i think.
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members of the consortium which took over at newcastle united yesterday are meeting at st james�*s park for the first time this morning. we�*ve got a big project ahead of us, patience, it�*s got to take time, but we are going to get there. it�*s a new area, we are very excited for the fans. ~ . , new area, we are very excited for the fans. ~ ., , i. , .,, ., the fans. what is your first 'ob at the fans. what is your first 'ob at the club, do i the fans. what is your first 'ob at the club, do you i the fans. what is your first 'ob at the club, do you think? _ the fans. what is your first job at the club, do you think? we - the fans. what is your first job at the club, do you think? we have| the fans. what is your first job at. the club, do you think? we have got to take it step-by-step, _ the club, do you think? we have got to take it step-by-step, it's - to take it step—by—step, it�*s our first day, we are going to look at things and take everything they buy day.
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wales are in action tonight, in a crucial world cup qualifier, in the czech republic, the team, just above them on goal difference, in the race to finish second and in the play off spot. it�*s an injury hit welsh team, with the likes of gareth bale missing, but another of their star players, aaron ramsey, is back after injury. the midfielder missed last month�*s win over belarus, and damaging goaless draw with estonia, and his return will lift the players around him according to his manager. big games, you want your big players and again. _ big games, you want your big players and again, he hasn't disappointed us in recent— and again, he hasn't disappointed us in recent years. helping us qualifying for europe with two goals, — qualifying for europe with two goals, big games, he stepped up to the plate _ goals, big games, he stepped up to the plate and this is a big game for us. lewis hamilton�*s prospects of winning this weekend�*s turkish grand prix have taken a setback. the championship leader will have a ten—place grid penalty for a new engine in his mercedes. he was fastest in first practice in istanbul this morning. we�*re just over a day away, now from the much anticipated world heavyweight contest between tyson fury and deyontay wilder in las vegas. fury is defending the belt he won back in february 2020, but today�*s weigh in will not have a face off. the pair traded verbal blows
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in the press conference, earlier in the week, with wilder accusing fury of cheating in that fight. so the promoter is keeping them apart. they are not animals, they are sportsmen. i don�*t like face—offs at all, i think they are unnecessary, i think it dehumanises the fighters, and i don�*t think it�*s good for the sport. but here, i did that, not for those reasons, i did it because because i was afraid what would happen and that the fight could be cancelled. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. james brokenshire has died at the age of 53. he suffered from lung cancer and was the conservative mp
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for sidcup, he died on thursday evening. we can speak to the conservative mp who was a good friend ofjames brokenshire. many thanks forjoining us this afternoon. very sad news from westminster. your initial reaction? it's westminster. your initial reaction? it�*s utterly heartbreaking. i�*m in shock, like so many of my colleagues. i can�*t believe i�*m not going to be able to sit down with james again and have a laugh about life and chat about the issues we both cared about and my thoughts are with his family who are the most wonderfulfamily and i�*m just wonderful family and i�*m just devastated. wonderfulfamily and i�*m just devastated. shes wonderfulfamily and i'm 'ust devastatedi wonderfulfamily and i'm 'ust devastated. a , ., devastated. as is so often the case with social media, _ devastated. as is so often the case with social media, james _ devastated. as is so often the case i with social media, james brokenshire battled, documented his battle with cancer. ~ .., battled, documented his battle with cancer. . .., . " battled, documented his battle with cancer. 2 . ~ ., cancer. when he came back to parliament _ cancer. when he came back to parliament after _ cancer. when he came back to parliament after his _ cancer. when he came back to parliament after his first - cancer. when he came back to | parliament after his first battle with cancer, he had resigned as northern ireland secretary and came back, the first speech he gave was about lung cancer and a man who had
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never smoked was diagnosed with lung cancer, his 50th birthday when he stood down as northern ireland secretary, he talked about people getting cheques, getting tested, i know he started with symptoms and did not know what it was because someone that age you had never smoked would not expect to have it. he was such a campaign of raising awareness, but this is a disease that he affects people a matter your lifestyle or age, you need to be aware of the symptoms and take action on it. so when it came back that second time, the security minister, i know how diligently he worked through despite the fact he was battling this most horrendous of illnesses and i know he had to stand down eventually, due to, it�*s so tragic he will not be back in parliament fighting for those
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causes. , , . ., , ., ., , causes. the speech aside, what was his im act causes. the speech aside, what was his impact on _ causes. the speech aside, what was his impact on british _ causes. the speech aside, what was his impact on british politics? - his impact on british politics? james was very understated, coming through lots of people, but incredibly generous, with colleagues, so well—known in parliamentary party, some ministers you never see in parliament because their briefs are such that they are in their departments and note get the chance to meet callie, that was neverjames. he was there, he came in before me, 2005 in, i was 2010, but i knew him so well, when i went to the home office in 2014, taking over a lot of his brief and the first minister who had worked on the modern slavery agreement which i then took on, and the way that he dealt with that and his sensitivity on those most incredibly difficult issues, but then the support he gave to me as a new minister, i simply would not have been able to do the job without him. he took on the
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immigration reef, the security brief, housing secretary and of course he was secretary of state for northern ireland and that deal the struck in january 2020, when stormont was restored, he was the architect of that deal and i know when i came in in 2018 when i was made secretary of state, i picked up an agreement he had drafted which the party signed up to two years later. james came up with these ideas and worked so hard on this issue and he will be so missed by all of us. {in issue and he will be so missed by all of us. ., ., ,, . a, , all of us. on that work ethic, boris johnson saying _ all of us. on that work ethic, boris johnson saying if— all of us. on that work ethic, boris johnson saying if the _ all of us. on that work ethic, boris johnson saying if the government | johnson saying if the government needed something done well and speedily and sensibly explained, james was a man to do it, adding he was the nicest, kindest and most unassuming of politicians.- unassuming of politicians. that's absolutely right. _ unassuming of politicians. that's absolutely right. james - unassuming of politicians. that's absolutely right. james was - unassuming of politicians. that's absolutely right. james was a i unassuming of politicians. that'sl absolutely right. james was a star at dealing with any difficult issue at dealing with any difficult issue at the dispatch box. if he knew
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there was a difficult issue, james brokenshire would go to that dispatch box, never query it, he would go in and explain the government position, very sensibly, very rationally, and really calm down situations that other politicians might perhaps inflame, james never did that.— james never did that. finally, how will james be _ james never did that. finally, how willjames be remembered? - james never did that. finally, how willjames be remembered? he i james never did that. finally, howl willjames be remembered? he will james never did that. finally, how- willjames be remembered? he will be remembered — willjames be remembered? he will be remembered by _ willjames be remembered? he will be remembered by me _ willjames be remembered? he will be remembered by me most _ willjames be remembered? he will be remembered by me most of— willjames be remembered? he will be remembered by me most of all- willjames be remembered? he will be remembered by me most of all as - willjames be remembered? he will be remembered by me most of all as a i remembered by me most of all as a friend, and politics you don�*t get many friends, actually. he was a genuine friend and that�*s how i will remember him most, but i think he will be remembered as a fantastic constituency mp and one of the nicest colleagues that any of us could ever wish to have and i can assure you, everyone took select the whatsapp groups, they were on fire this morning with everybody wanting to add their condolences but their comments about how much they liked james, how much they valued his friendship, that is how he will be
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remembered i think, by so many of us. a great parliamentarian, great constituency mp but above all, a great friend. constituency mp but above all, a great friend-— constituency mp but above all, a treat friend. ., ., r ., , ., , great friend. canon bradley, many thanks forjoining _ great friend. canon bradley, many thanks forjoining us _ great friend. canon bradley, many thanks forjoining us on _ great friend. canon bradley, many thanks forjoining us on bbc - great friend. canon bradley, many| thanks forjoining us on bbc news. mark drakeford mark dra keford is mark drakeford is holding a press conference. i mark drakeford is holding a press conference-— conference. i am here to update --eole conference. i am here to update people on _ conference. i am here to update people on the — conference. i am here to update people on the outcome - conference. i am here to update people on the outcome of- conference. i am here to update people on the outcome of the i conference. i am here to update - people on the outcome of the latest three week review of the coronavirus regulations. and then to look ahead at how we can keep wales safe and keep wales open during the months ahead. three weeks ago, when i was
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last year, the number of people following it with coronavirus was rising every day in wales. that trend continued into the first half of this three week cycle. it resulted in the highest. of new cases of coronavirus that we have seen through the pandemic for some this was driven by high numbers of infections in younger people, the rates in under 25 is being around four times higher than the rates in people aged 60 and over. the numbers have started to fall back to below 500 cases per 100,000 people but thatis 500 cases per 100,000 people but that is still very high. at the same time we have seen reductions in the number of people in hospital with covid—19. the nhs and social care continues to be under immense strain
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from non—pandemic and emergency pressures. i would like to ask everybody today to think about how we can support our national health service, thinking carefully about the care we need, and going to an accident and emergency department should never be the first or only choice for every health problem. this week, having closely examined the indicators and taking advice from our scientific and medical advisers, the cabinet has decided that wales will remain at a let level zero. this means that there will be no substantial changes to the rules over the next three weeks, beyond those already announced. that of course includes the covid passport which will become a legal requirement from monday for certain
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venues and events. everyone aged over 18 will need to show a covid passport proof of a negative lateral flow test if they are entering a nightclub or similar venue indoor non—seated events for more than 500 people, outdoor non—seated events for more than 4000 people, and any event where there is more than 10,000 people present. while there are no substantial new changes, the education minister has set out this week new measures to help schools and colleges minimise disruption for staff and students. from today we will make it easier for a staff and students. from today we will make it easierfor a loved one to be visited in a care home. care homes and care home visiting is have been some of the most challenging issues during the pandemic. from today onwards, care home providers
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will have the discretion to allow visitors to take lateral flow tests at home rather than at the care home in, itself. they will no longer have to ask visitors to socially distance when making a visit to a room or designated visiting room. restrictions around gifts including food and drink will also be eased. if we can, we will always look for opportunities to make people�*s lives easier while also keeping wales safe. i want now to turn to the autumn and winter months that lie ahead. this slide shows the results of the modelling work carried out for us by swansea university. this is the most likely scenario that the
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model offers us. it takes into account how people mix, vaccine immunity levels, and how delta variant is behaving. the dotted blue tells us how the model suggested the delta wave would work itself out in wales. the thick black line shows what actually happened in terms of the number of cases reported. as you can see, the model has proved so far remarkably accurate in predicting the way this wave of coronavirus would happen here in wales. we have tracked the model very closely and as you can see, cases have started to reduce again in wales as the model would have predicted, and if we continue to track the model in the way that we have over recent
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times, then we will see those numbers continuing to reduce over the weeks ahead. now, although that means the modelling forecasts look positive, coronavirus has not gone away and the pandemic is not over. our medical advisers are concerned about higher levels of flu this winter, as well as increases in other respiratory viruses. today, we have published an updated coronavirus control plan which sets out how we will keep wales safe and keep wales open over this challenging period. there are three main ways in which we will do this. through our test, trace, protect system, and through the basic but essential measures we all take in
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our everyday life to protect one another. i will check with the first of those three defences, vaccination because vaccination remains the single most important defence against the virus, our autumn covid—19 booster programme started at the end of last month. so far, around 130,000 people have already received their booster. vaccinations for 12—15 —year—olds have accelerated this week and the feedback from vaccination centres so far has been very positive. everyday, more people in wales are taking up their offer of vaccination. and it is never too late to be vaccinated in wales. if you haven�*t had your covid vaccine yet, you can make arrangements to haveitin yet, you can make arrangements to have it in one of many centres right
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across wales and the details are therefore you on our website and on therefore you on our website and on the websites of our local health boards. next week, the health minister will publish an updated vaccine strategy, setting out plans and timescales for the programme and the coming months. level we have at the moment. and that would be very different to last christmas, far more like the sort of christmases that we were used to. all that does depend, as i said in my opening statement, on us all doing the things that keep us safe. i want to thank all of them for the vital work they do, you have helped to spread the snow of the virus time and again. over the recent period. we will need your support again over this winter. our advice about testing if you have symptoms has not
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changed, get a pcr test effort you have symptoms, if it is positive stay at home and isolate. this is the best way to break the chain of transmission. we have recently seen very high numbers of people coming forward for pcr tests and wales, up to 190,000 people and a week at the end of september. effie level of demand grows still further we will have to make some choices about how we this point to that demand and we are working closely with the rest of the uk to put those plans in place. our updated coronavirus control plan also shows how we will use our ttp capacity to best effect those numbers also go on rising. the third and final set of measures that help to keep us safe from coronavirus and
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those very practical things we have all learned to do successfully throughout the pandemic, washing hands regularly, keeping social distance, wearing a face covering in crowded public places, working from home whenever possible, meeting people outdoors where possible and keeping end all spaces will ventilate. they make indoor spaces. if we keep doing these things together began keep wales safe and open during this winter. i will now take questions from journalists. that is marco richter that has government covid—19 briefing, we will leave that they are. —— mark drake front confirming they will
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remain at alert level zero, and that the covid pass or common for things like make clubs and plans for the pandemic over the winter adding he is working closely with the uk, more on that through the day. pig farmers in the uk are warning that tens of thousands of animals could be slaughtered within weeks due to labour shortages in abbatoirs, that are being blamed on brexit and the covid pandemic. the national farmers union said what�*s happening in the sector is a �*human disaster�* for farmers. earlier pig farmer kate morgan explained how difficult it is. we are only doing ourjob, be have fulfilled our contract, this is not the fault of the farmer, it is in the higher and the food supply chain and the farmer is emotionally in turmoil, we are struggling so much at all we are asking for is some
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help. when do you need help by? what is the timescale? three weeks ago, months ago. the timescale is so critical, people are killing pigs now, we are personally weeks away from making this horrendous choice and it will destroy us. why do you say that? because we farm to feed the nation, this is food waste, people are starving and our government is prepared to throw healthy protein into the bin and that is criminal. we are going to be throwing food in the bin and this is so serious. a court in israel has begun hearing
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arguments in the custody battle for a six year old boy who was the sole survivor of a cable car crash in italy in may. an italianjudge had given guardianship of eitan biran, to his paternal aunt who lives in italy, but last month his maternal grandfather flew him to israel without her permission. the bbc�*s middle east correspondent — yolande knell is at the court in tel aviv and explained the background to the case yes, it was five months ago, this awful cable car accident in the north of italy. that�*s where eitan biran had been living with his father, who was training to be a doctor. they had gone out to a beauty spot for a family day out, with two of his great—grandparents and his younger brother. it�*s thought, when the cable car accident happened, it was the protective hug of eitan�*s father that saved him from the full impact of the crash. he was the sole survivor, it was considered to be something of a miracle that he survived and he spent several weeks in hospital.
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now, an italianjudge gave custody to his aunt, a doctor who lives in italy, and then it was just last month that eitan biran�*s grandfather was visiting from israel, he took the little boy out saying he was going to buy him some toys, but he never returned. he actually used an israeli passport that he had acquired for the little boy to take him into switzerland and to bring him here on an israeli, on a privatejet. he has appeared since on israeli television, talking about his decision to do that. this case has been very much in the public eye, it continues to be so, although thejudge has previously asked for privacy of all of those involved to be respected.
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democrats and republicans have agreed on a short—term deal and the senate. ladle agreed on a short-term deal and the senate. ~ ., .,. ., agreed on a short-term deal and the senate. ~ ., .. ., ., senate. we have reached agreement to extend the debt — senate. we have reached agreement to extend the debt ceiling _ senate. we have reached agreement to extend the debt ceiling through - extend the debt ceiling through early december and we hope to get this done as soon as today. republican and democratic members and staff— republican and democratic members and staff negotiated through the night _ and staff negotiated through the night and good faith, the senate is moving _ night and good faith, the senate is moving towards the plan laid out to spare _ moving towards the plan laid out to spare the _ moving towards the plan laid out to spare the american people a manufactured crisis. it has taken some hours to get to the stage, the democrats are hoping the stage, the democrats are hoping the republicans would get on board to get it through the senate, needed in this ten republicans, they got 11 to help break the filibuster bits, it then was approved by the senate, it then was approved by the senate, it has to go to the house to be approved which it will be because the democratic party controls the
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house and it will then land on president buys and�*s desk, it will be $480 billion to cover spending until december thud. it adverts a huge crisis, an understatement to call at that because america had it defaulted on debts could have gone into a decision. the economy is on at americans would have experienced real financial hardship, at americans would have experienced realfinancial hardship, people real financial hardship, people would realfinancial hardship, people would not have got paid, global markets would have been in turmoil, the credit rating agencies would have downgraded america so it has averted this crisis for now but this is going to happen again and a couple of months because it is only until december three which means we will talk about it again. south africa is still looking for answers after 9 days of looting
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and violent protests which took place injuly. the unrest was sparked by the jailing of the country�*s former president jacob zuma. the protests were widely seen as a targeted campaign to undermine current president cyril ramaphosa. the riots died down after the deployment of thousands of soldiers. our correspondent nomsa maseko sent this report. crowd shout. the riots that shocked south africa three months ago. nearly 350 people died across two provinces which were affected by violent protests sparked by the jailing of former president, jacob zuma. the unrest began when a heavily armed gang hijacked trucks and torched more than 20 cars on the m3 motorway which links sub—saharan africa�*s biggest port to the country�*s economic hub. today, we went back to these areas. only a handful of the shopping malls that were looted or set alight have reopened. here in thembisa, a township in easternjohannesburg, several people are still missing. their families suspect they perished in a gas explosion at this supermarket.
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police have said the remains that were recovered here were burnt beyond recognition, and it could take a while before dna tests are concluded. she sobs. translation: i need to find my son's remains so i can have peace. - i have so many questions. i need to know what happened to my son. all i want is to bury him — i need closure. while some families are counting the human cost, many others are trying to rebuild their businesses. this is what remains of this woman�*s business. it�*s the first time she has returned to her clothing shop since july�*s unrest. she is one of many small business owners whose businesses were not insured and is looking to the country�*s state—owned insurance company to bail them out.
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this was my sole income, this shop, and now all of a sudden it's gone, without any notice or prior arrangement, nothing whatsoever, nothing planned — just cut. experts say it will be another year before the country�*s economy recovers from the impact in the worst violence in post—apartheid south africa. i think we need to understand what happened injuly happened at a time when we were busy trying to navigate a pandemic, something that none of us were ever prepared for in 2020. a lot ofjobs were lost, not just through covid but through this unrest. we know through the looting, the destruction of business premises, shops, retail sector, thejobs that were lost across a wide section of the economy. we need to move quicker to get those people back in to employment so that we start to drive
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the economy again. while the rebuilding continues, it remains unclear what the real cause of the violence was, which has led many to believe that it could happen again. nomsa maseko, bbc news, south africa. two journalists have won the nobel peace prize. maria ressa from the philippines and dmitry muratov from russia were awarded the prize "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace". this was the moment the announcement was made. the norwegian nobel committee has decided to award the nobel peace prize for 2021 to... ..maria ressa and dmitry muratov, for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace.
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they are receiving the peace prize for their courageous fight for freedom of expression in the philippines and in russia. at the same time, they are representatives of all journalists who stand up for this ideal in the world in which democracy and freedom of the press face increasingly adverse conditions.
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ididn�*t i didn�*t have evil have integrity of elections of guardrails are not put had owned... there are repercussions if you do a study someone does not like and i think the public have realised we will keep doing those stories, journalists will keep doing those stories. that�*s what i hope.
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what will give us more power to do this. more than 40 million of us across the uk are being offered a flu jab this winter, in the biggest ever flu vaccination campaign from the nhs. the head of the uk�*s energy regulator warns prices will rise significantly next year because of soaring increases in wholesale gas costs. as pig farmers fear for their livlihoods, the government is accused of not doing enough to stop the needless culling of thousands of animals. it�*s a grim statistic. every five minutes someone in the uk is admitted to hospital with a heart attack. most people survive, but the damage done can leave them
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prone to fresh attacks. so, researchers at addenbrooke�*s hospital in cambridge and the british heart foundation have been trialling a drug that they hope can heal damaged hearts and make people less likely to suffer further attacks. our science correspondent richard westcott reports. julian isn�*t the kind of person you would expect to have a heart attack. a keen cyclist, healthy eating, doesn�*t smoke, in his early 50s, but last summer, out of the blue... a pretty normal day until about 4pm. and i had an enormous pain in my chest, vice—like, and i said to my wife, i feel really, really ill. i lay down and the pain didn�*t go away. at any point did you think it might be a heart attack? i didn�*t think it would happen to me, i thought i was too young, fit and healthy, i had no underlying symptoms. the previous weekend i had been out on quite a long bike ride. so acting as normal, and then like a bolt out of the blue
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you get a huge pain in your chest and find yourself in papworth. julian hasjoined a drug trial at addenbrooke�*s hospital in cambridge. some people have an immune system that goes into overdrive following a heart attack and actually starts to damage the body, leaving the patient prone to another attack or a stroke. researchers hope this drug will cut that risk. if you think of the immune system as having good cop and bad cop cells, in these high—risk patients we have a very high number of bad cop cells. so in this trial we are trying to increase the good cop cell number so it negates the harmful effects of the bad cop cells. it has been shown to have very good results in other autoimmune conditions like diabetes, hepatitis, hiv. we are just about to give you your injection, now, julian. if this smaller trial is successful
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the drug will need to be tested in large—scale human trials, but it could one day spare thousands of people the fear of having a second heart attackjust a few months after the first. the weeks after the attack, i lost all confidence in my own body. i didn�*t want to do anything. and it�*s building that confidence again in your own body, being able to do things that you love. if there is a drug that can help people get back to normality, that has got to be hugely beneficial. more than a million asian people fought with the allies during the first and second world wars, and tens of thousands lost their lives. some young british asians think more should be done to remember those from the sub continent who helped britain through the wars. rahila bano from the bbc asian network has been speaking to families who are trying to establish lasting memorials to those who served
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sumayya awan�*s grandfather bashir served in the royal indian air force as an aircraft engineer during the second world war. here is my grandad, the one with the glasses on one of the aircraft that they were working on in world war ii. but sumayya believes that he and others like him who supported the british war effort are forgotten heroes. when you see the media portraying in people who fought in world war ii, you don�*t really think about south asians or anyone else who fought under the british flag at the time. there were millions over the first world war and second world war. even in television, history books you don�*t see their representation. she�*s not the only one who thinks this. kasim ul—haq whose great grandfather fought in burma felt the same. so he and his father came up with the idea of a permanent tribute, and they�*ve received support from rochdale council. we�*ve spoken to the council about getting a memorial up. we are going to get some
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metal cutouts, similar to the silent soldiers. they are going to be in the shape of soldiers from the indian subcontinent, they will be painted like the south asian soldier, in their traditional khaki uniforms, so they look as they were at the time when they were fighting in the first and second world war. the men are as tough as the mules, fighters from the punjab _ and north—west frontier, men who have spent - their lives in the open. more than 2.5 million manned the indian army, and more than 89,000 indians died during both world wars. the indian army were involved in every major battle, during 1914—15, before being heavily involved in the middle east in particular. in the second world war, they fought in north africa, they fought up through italy as well, and played a humongous part in the defence of india itself, as the japanese attacked through burma. this is what people who we spoke to think about the memorial.
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i'm just really excited this, because i'm one of the few people in my familyjoining the army. now maybe more people learning about their heritage, that their grandparents, great grandparents were in the military, maybe they might decide to do the same thing as well. i think it's quite - valid and quite good. it is a thing that happened. there's no point... not that history has been i whitewashed, but it is a very blinkered, narrow view. i think it�*s a good idea, because rochdale is made up of a lot of different communities, and it will be... it will be a big thing for a lot of asians, because we don�*t have anything like that in rochdale. the indian soldiers will go on display in rochdale�*s memorial gardens in time for remembrance day. rahila bano, bbc north west tonight, rochdale. the riba stirling prize, for britain�*s best new building, will be announced next week — in a live programme here on the bbc news channel. the shortlist includes a footbridge in tintagel, a boat museum
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in the lake district and a university building in south west london. over the coming few days we�*ll be looking at each of the 6 buildings on the shortlist. today is the turn of some housing for key workers in cambridge. let�*s take a look. we created a place that has a real sense of community and where the residents can feel they belong to. i�*m kaori ohsugi, a director at stanton williams. we are the architects for the key worker housing at addington, north west cambridge. the project consists of ten buildings, containing 264 apartment buildings. the focus was on, sort of, creating spaces between the buildings, rather than the buildings. we created a network of interconnecting courtyards, a sequence of spaces of varying character and size responding to the social functions, starting from the public urban space of market square through to the much more
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community—focused landscape court. so, the buildings are arranged to frame these spaces. the positioning and the, kind of, undercuts that were introduced are intended to create moments of intimacy and a sense of a discovery. this project is key worker housing for the university of cambridge�*s staff and researchers. addington is a mixed—use development. we have accommodation, housing, retail, community centre, school, hotel. the university set out to establish and develop an extension to the city of cambridge which gives an opportunity for all staff and students to live and come andjoin and be part of the success story of the university of cambridge. the development is one of the largest stormwater recycling schemes within the world. all water on the roof is stored and collected and then carried through into the attenuation point within the communal landscape court.
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to achieve the high demands for the daylight meant that the buildings become quite far apart and the building form quite simple. one of the challenges was, really, for us to create a kind of intimacy and sense of place. addington overall is a fabulous concept. | i am always bowled over. by the fact the university's undertaken this project. the units are well—spaced, well thought—out, love the design, i love the feel of it. it's actually quite a bit - of a luxury to come every day. when i visited a few months ago during the summer, i saw that people actually inhabiting these spaces. there�*s a picnic happening in the landscape court, the children�*s toys on the ground. there must�*ve been a sense of security there and people really inhabiting the spaces. that was the main focus for this project, but also that�*s what it gives this project a meaning.
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and there will be live coverage of the award ceremony here on the bbc news channel on the 14th of october yesterday we brought you the news that andy murray was in the dog house, after his trainers were stolen — with his wedding ring attached. well — last night he gave an update saying he�*s been reunited with the shoes and the ring. he says the trainers still smell, in his words, "horrific" — but the good news is he�*s back in his wife�*s good books. just wanted to send a quick message to see a huge thanks to say a huge thanks for all of the messages and also to everyone for sharing the story about the shoes and the wedding ring. i had to make a few calls today and chat to the security of the hotel and everything, and a little update for everyone. would you believe it? they still absolutely stink, but the shoes are back. the wedding ring is back,
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and i am back in the good books. let�*s go! eight locations have made it to the next stage of the contest to become the uk�*s city of culture in 2025. not all of them are cities — with cornwall and county durham among the contenders. the others include armagh city, stirling, wrexham and bradford. the title is awarded every four years — and is currently held by coventry plenty of this so far today, after mist and murk and rain for others but whatever your weather study has been one unifying factor as the feel of the weather, an incredibly mild night with temperature setting out i�*m night with temperature setting out i'm 16 night with temperature setting out i�*m 16 for some, higher than daytime maximum should be at this time of year. a mild start, rather cloudy, sunshine has been hit and miss and mostly across the north of england.
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with the stubborn weather front still setting across the far north—west of scotland and northern ireland, bringing pointless feet of rain along west facing coast. elsewhere a slow improvement, brighter skies, some glimpses of sunshine continuing, where that happens we may see temperatures peaking at 21 degrees, above where they should be for the time of year. through this evening and overnight we keep the front to the far north—west spelling and or cloud to the west again, clearer skies to the east so temperatures may fall into single figures but that this would be unlikely to see the best of the sunshine to start the weekend. it looks like weather fronts and orange mean warm, up to the north—west with the cooler tones cooler and that will be the study as the weekend progresses. saturday starts with some sunshine across central and southern areas, the weather front to graduate meandering across the scottish borders to the north of
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england and north wales, light showers by then. pressure conditions behind it, 13—15 ahead of it, still mild for the time of year. for the second half of the weekend high pressure builds from the west, two weather fronts to clear, the first in the south—east just weather fronts to clear, the first in the south—eastjust a band of cloud, no more than that but it will take its time using an behind some sunshine, blustery winds, gales to the far north of scotland and sharp showers as well but on the whole sunday not bad, more sunshine than we have seen recently about temperatures in little thresher, 14-16 temperatures in little thresher, 14—16 for many, 19 or 20 and the south. the high pressure stays for next week, dry weather but noticeably fresher.
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the biggest flu vaccination programme in nhs history is launched as winter approaches. more than 40 million people will be eligible for a free vaccination — with medics concerned about flu and covid circulating together. it�*s because of this significant risk to individuals of co—circulation, so the circulation together of both covid and flu, and the likelihood that will cause more serious disease, and people are more likely to go to hospital. we�*ll find out how this winter is looking for the health service. also this lunchtime... millions of households will face higher energy bills next year, warns the regulator, because of the rising cost of gas. as the footballer marcus rashford is recognised for his work on child poverty,

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