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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 8, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning. it's friday morning, welcome to bbc news. these are your headlines. i'm victoria derbyshire. more than a0 million people across the uk are being offered a flu jab this winter in the nhs's biggest flu vaccination campaign so far. footballer marcus rashford warns of the effects of the government's decision to remove the £20 uplift to universal credit introduced during the pandmemic. you've got to decide between are you going to eat or are you going to be worn in your house, these are decisions you don't want people to go through, never mind children. thee us steps up pressure on russia over the shortage of gas in europe warning moscow not to exploit the situation after it said it could increase supplies.
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travelers to england will soon be able to take a photo of a negative lateral flow test from home instead of paying for an expensive pcr test before and afterjourneys.- before and after “ourneys. people will want to — before and after “ourneys. people will want to do — before and afterjourneys. people will want to do the _ before and afterjourneys. people will want to do the right - before and afterjourneys. people will want to do the right thing - before and afterjourneys. people| will want to do the right thing and understand it is important not to ignore _ understand it is important not to ignore a — understand it is important not to ignore a positive pcr or lateral flow ignore a positive pcr or lateral flow test. _ ignore a positive pcr or lateral flow test, we trust people will carry— flow test, we trust people will carry on— flow test, we trust people will carry on doing the same thing. also coming up this hour... a special performance from the london symphony orchestra was live streamed to hundreds of care homes across the uk to thank staff and residents for their resilience during the pandemic.
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good morning. the nhs has launched its biggest campaign against winterflu, with more than a0 million people across the uk being offered a vaccine. health chiefs are worried about the prospect of flu and covid—19 circulating together. they fear people could be more vulnerable to catching flu this winter, because so few people caught it last year, as a result of the lockdowns and additional hygiene measures that were in place. our health correspondent naomi grimley reports. i've got together some of the country's leading medics to answer your vaccine questions... this is the latest media advert to remind us that it's notjust covid which we have to worry about this winter. flu could rear its head again, too. so more than a0 million people across the uk are being offered a flu jab in the biggest ever roll—out of the vaccine. those who will be able to get one free include the over—50s, those with certain health conditions, pregnant women, health care workers, and most children.
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lockdowns and extra hygiene measures squashed flu last winter, and that means the level of immunity in the population is likely to be lower this time round. there's also uncertainty about how effective the flu vaccine will be, because scientists have less information to go on when they guess the strain in advance. even if you've had flu vaccination last year, it's really important to get it every year because the strains of flu that are circulating do change. we are in a position where we're not quite as sure this year what's going to be circulating, but we have got some idea from the southern hemisphere, and flu vaccination is still your best way of getting protection. even if it doesn't provide complete protection, if you do get flu you are much less likely to be seriously unwell with it. and, really importantly, you're much less likely to pass it on to other people who could be even more vulnerable. flu normally kills around 11,000
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people every winter, but a report published earlier this year from the academy of medical sciences warned respiratory illnesses could hit very high levels, and flu deaths alone could reach 60,000 in worst case scenario. naomi grimley, bbc news. that talk to a viral adjust from the university of edinburgh, tell us more about the concerns regarding flu being much worse than last year —— regarding flu. flu being much worse than last year -- regarding fin-— flu being much worse than last year -- regarding flu. because we did not have exnosure _ -- regarding flu. because we did not have exposure to _ -- regarding flu. because we did not have exposure to influenza - -- regarding flu. because we did not have exposure to influenza last - have exposure to influenza last winter, immunity across the population is less than unusual. because people get a flu infection every five to ten years, it is unclear how important that fact is, it is unclear at this stage. the academy _ it is unclear at this stage. the academy of — it is unclear at this stage. the academy of medical - it is unclear at this stage. the
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academy of medical sciences says that by being much worse we mean more deadly, it could mean up to 60,000 flu jabs as opposed to an average year of around 11,000, i understand? —— it could mean up to 60,000 free deaths. understand? -- it could mean up to 60,000 free deaths.— 60,000 free deaths. yes, it will be determined — 60,000 free deaths. yes, it will be determined by _ 60,000 free deaths. yes, it will be determined by the _ 60,000 free deaths. yes, it will be determined by the strain, - 60,000 free deaths. yes, it will be determined by the strain, which - 60,000 free deaths. yes, it will be determined by the strain, which is. determined by the strain, which is difficult to predict. so determined by the strain, which is difficult to predict. 50 if determined by the strain, which is difficult to predict.— difficult to predict. so if that is difficult to predict. so if that is difficult to _ difficult to predict. so if that is difficult to predict, _ difficult to predict. so if that is difficult to predict, how - difficult to predict. so if that is difficult to predict, how have l difficult to predict. so if that is. difficult to predict, how have we got effective vaccines? arnie difficult to predict, how have we got effective vaccines? we usually look to which _ got effective vaccines? we usually look to which strains _ got effective vaccines? we usually look to which strains are _ look to which strains are circulating in the southern hemisphere, because flu follows the winter around the world, so we have looked at the strain in australia, one is causing 97% of cases, but china, which is ahead of us in lockdown measures and the progress through the covid pandemic, they have mainly influenza b, we are not certain, but the vaccines offer protection for multiple types of flu so we are trying to cover all bases,
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i would encourage people to get their flu vaccines because we also uncertain. ~ ., , . ., , uncertain. what difference does it make that covid-19 _ uncertain. what difference does it make that covid-19 is _ uncertain. what difference does it make that covid-19 is circulating i make that covid—19 is circulating and flu is circulating? b, make that covid-19 is circulating and flu is circulating?— make that covid-19 is circulating and flu is circulating? a couple of thins, and flu is circulating? a couple of things. the _ and flu is circulating? a couple of things, the first _ and flu is circulating? a couple of things, the first is _ and flu is circulating? a couple of things, the first is that _ and flu is circulating? a couple of things, the first is that hopefully | things, the first is that hopefully people are still taking care with wearing masks and social distancing, which will reduce flu activity as well as coronavirus, but if people were to have both infections at the same time we would expect that to lead to a really quite severe outcome, that has been determined from animal studies. this scenario is best avoided at the best way to do that is to get vaccines against both coronavirus and influenza. they both coronavirus and influenza. they both transmit in similar ways? absolutely, mainly by the respiratory route, so wearing masks or avoiding crowds indoors is the main way to prevent exposure to both
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viruses. �* ,., main way to prevent exposure to both viruses. ~ :: ., ., , viruses. about 40 million others will be invited _ viruses. about 40 million others will be invited for _ viruses. about 40 million others will be invited for a _ viruses. about 40 million others will be invited for a flu _ viruses. about 40 million others will be invited for a flu jab, - will be invited for a flu jab, everyone under 16 and over 50 and many in between with particular health conditions, it is really important people go for it? we have seen the incredible _ important people go for it? we have seen the incredible success - important people go for it? we have seen the incredible success of - important people go for it? we have seen the incredible success of the i seen the incredible success of the coronavirus vaccine programme and we can hope for the same with the flu vaccine programme, it is entirely safe to have both at the same time. thank you for talking to us this morning, dr eleanor gaunt, a biologist at edinburgh university. —— a virology test. the welsh government will publish its covid winter plan today, with a warning that businesses could have to shut again if there's a new variant or a drop in levels of immunity. but the current restrictions such as the instruction to work from home, if possible could be relaxed if cases fall. the us has stepped up the pressure on russia over the shortage of gas in europe, warning moscow not to exploit the situation. president biden's national security adviser, jake sullivan, told the bbc that russia, which is europe's primary supplier
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of gas, had previously used energy as a political weapon, but doing so now would be counterproductive. wholesale gas prices have soared amid rising demand across europe, but fell back this week after the russian president, vladimir putin, said moscow could increase supplies. mark lobel reports. the gas and electricity price surge is alarming consumers across europe. i am very, very worried. very concerned. we struggle enough. translation: there are mothers today have to choose between paying - for their energy bill or feeding their children. that is the problem. the colder weather is coming fast. we need to heat apartments. if you go to the poorer areas, where they are suffering, no one puts on the heating, because everyone knows they won't be able to pay for it. a record demand for gas and limited storage in the eu is fuelling politicians�* fears for the future. russia supplies a0% of the eu's natural gas imports.
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moscow once feared a falling oil price would undermine its economy. now it is calling the shots. watch the price of gas plummet as vladimir putin is televised suggesting a possible increase of gas supply on wednesday. but he has little sympathy for his european customers. translation: all of its activities were aimed at curtailing - the so—called long—term contracts focusing on the transition to gas exchange trading. it turns out this policy was wrong, it didn't account for uncertainties. russia's main gas producer insists it is blameless. translation: since the beginning of the year, we have supplied - foreign markets with near—record amounts of gas. we have increased deliveries to our largest consumer market, germany, by a third compared to last year, to turkey by two and a half times, to romania by four times. we've supplied additional volumes of gas along all routes, including the ukrainian route, as much as we could.
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but ukraine's gas operator says russia has reduced the amount it routes through the country between january and september by 17% compared to the previous year. russia says the new nord stream 2 underwater pipeline would save europe's sticky situation, but only if germany and brussels quickly approved the project to get it flowing. not everyone thinks russia is acting reasonably. we have long been concerned about russia using energy as a tool of coercion and a political weapon. we had seen it happen before and we could see it happen again. i think it would be a mistake for russia to try to exploit this, i think that would ultimately backfire on them and i believe that they should respond to the market demands for increased energy supplies to europe. that comes from more demand as countries emerge from the pandemic, depleted storage tanks after a cold engine to the winter, china consuming more gas and low wind speeds that reduce renewable energy.
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so right now, russia remains under pressure to increase supply, driven by a volatile market which is powering its bargaining position too. mark lobel, bbc news. marcus rashford has made a fresh attack on the government following the removal of the £20 a week uplift universal credit. he was speaking as he received an honorary —— honorary doctorate at the university of manchester for his work tackling child poverty. he said millions of people had lost a lifeline. i child poverty. he said millions of people had lost a lifeline.- people had lost a lifeline. i don't think the right _ people had lost a lifeline. i don't think the right point _ people had lost a lifeline. i don't think the right point for - people had lost a lifeline. i don't think the right point for it - people had lost a lifeline. i don't think the right point for it to - people had lost a lifeline. i don't think the right point for it to end | think the right point for it to end is when families are not in a stable situation, otherwise it makes no sense doing the work we have done in the past only to stop doing it in possibly one of the most vital stages, which we don't know, because the situation of the pandemic with
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covid could change at any moment as we have experienced when covid first came on the scene, and the fact we weren't prepared for it then. marcus rashford talking _ weren't prepared for it then. marcus rashford talking to _ weren't prepared for it then. marcus rashford talking to sally _ weren't prepared for it then. marcus rashford talking to sally nugent. i rashford talking to sally nugent. let's get more from our political correspondence helen catt. what do politicians say about what he has to say? politicians say about what he has to sa ? ~ ., . , politicians say about what he has to sa? , ., politicians say about what he has to sa ? ., ., politicians say about what he has to sa? , ., , ., say? marcus rashford has become a really reapected _ say? marcus rashford has become a really respected campaign _ say? marcus rashford has become a really respected campaign on - say? marcus rashford has become a really respected campaign on child l really respected campaign on child poverty issues, frankly there is a lot of time for him and when —— among mps in westminster, which is recognised and how the government has responded to what he said overnight. they congratulated him on the honorary doctorate and searches ongoing campaign work on high—profile campaigns had helped millions upon down the country —— and said that his ongoing campaign work. what he is saying today feeds into a discussion being had over quite a number of weeks in westminster where some conservative mps were pushing for the uplift to
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be kept, labour too have called for it to be capped. the labour leader sir keir starmer to bbc breakfast this morning that he backed marcus rashford, and this is what he said labour would do. rashford, and this is what he said labourwould do. —— rashford, and this is what he said labour would do. —— some labour mps have been calling for it to be. both talk at once. we would say what we said at our conference, we would increase the minimum — conference, we would increase the minimum wage to £10 an hour, because what so _ minimum wage to £10 an hour, because what so many— minimum wage to £10 an hour, because what so many people wanted the chance _ what so many people wanted the chance to — what so many people wanted the chance to earn more for the work they— chance to earn more for the work they are — chance to earn more for the work they are doing and keep more for the bills they are doing and keep more for the hills they— they are doing and keep more for the bills they have to pay etc, we would keep the _ bills they have to pay etc, we would keep the uplift, replace it after with a — keep the uplift, replace it after with a much better system but did not require — with a much better system but did not require people to work 29 hours to earn— not require people to work 29 hours to earn £20. — not require people to work 29 hours to earn £20, nobody can think that inspire, _ to earn £20, nobody can think that inspire, we — to earn £20, nobody can think that inspire, we would also increase the minimum _ inspire, we would also increase the minimum wage to £10 straightaway. —— nobody— minimum wage to £10 straightaway. —— nobody can— minimum wage to £10 straightaway. —— nobody can think that is. he
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minimum wage to £10 straightaway. -- nobody can think that is.— nobody can think that is. he was -ushed nobody can think that is. he was pushed and _ nobody can think that is. he was pushed and how— nobody can think that is. he was pushed and how labour- nobody can think that is. he was pushed and how labour would i nobody can think that is. he was i pushed and how labour would pay nobody can think that is. he was - pushed and how labour would pay the estimated £6 billion a year to pay for the £20 uplift alone, he was talking about cloying money back from covid contracts but there were questions about whether that would be enough to cover that scale of cost. the government had said the universal credit uplift was always a temporary measure designed to help claimants through the toughest stages of the pandemic and now the economy was starting to bounce back it was right to focus on helping people back into high—quality, well—paid jobs. people back into high—quality, well—paidjobs. it people back into high—quality, well—paid jobs. it said it had taken what called significant action to help people they recognise are worried about the cost of living. transport secretary grant shapps pay tribute to marcus rashford but said reinstating the uplift would come at a cost, likely to mean more taxes or putting up fuel duty or other ways of increasing that revenue. it is a live debate in westminster speaking
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more generally about the recognition that prices are going up around the board, particularly the squeeze on energy prices, there are concerns there is nervousness about how that will play out this winter.— will play out this winter. thank ou, will play out this winter. thank you. helen- — democrats and republicans in the senate have reached a short term deal which allows the government to borrow more money. it's aimed at preventing the us treasury from defaulting on its debts for the first time ever, but the agreement only lasts for two months so it's only a short term fix. we have reached agreement to extend the debt ceiling through early december, it is our hope we can get this done as soonest today. republican and democratic members and staff— republican and democratic members and staff negotiated through the night _ and staff negotiated through the night. the senator is moving towards the plan _ night. the senator is moving towards the plan i _ night. the senator is moving towards the plan i laid out yesterday to spare — the plan i laid out yesterday to spare the _ the plan i laid out yesterday to spare the american people a manufacturing crisis. our washington correspondent nomia iqbal says senators will have to address the issue
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again in december. this has taken some time to get to this stage, in the last couple of hours the political drama has played out here in dc that the democrats are hoping the republicans would get on board to try to at least get it through the signage, they needed at least ten republicans, they got 11 to help break the filibuster better. it was approved by the senate, it has to go to the house to be approved, which it will be because the democratic party controls the house, it will land on the desk of president biden, he will sign it, $a80 billion to cover spending until december to third. it reverts a huge crisis, it is probably an understatement to even call it that because america had not defaulted on its debts, it could have got into a recession. the economy is already precarious, americans would have experienced realfinancial hardship, experienced real financial hardship, people experienced realfinancial hardship, people would not have been paid, global markets would have been in
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turmoil, the credit rating agencies which have downgraded america's standing so it has averted the crisis for now, but this will happen again in a couple of months because it is only until december the 3rd, meaning we will be talking about this all over again.— this all over again. nomia iqbal reporting _ this all over again. nomia iqbal reporting the _ this all over again. nomia iqbal reporting. the headlines - this all over again. nomia iqbal reporting. the headlines on - this all over again. nomia iqbal| reporting. the headlines on bbc news... more than a0 million others across the uk have been offered a flu jab in the nhs' biggest everflu vaccination campaign. travelers to england will soon be able to take a photo of a negative lateral flow test from home instead of paying for an expensive piece test before and afterjourneys. marcus rashford wanted the effect of the government decision to remove the £20 a week increase to universal credit —— marcus rashford warns of the effect.
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every five minutes someone in the uk is admitted to hospital with a heart attack. they might survive but they can be prone to further heart attacks. researchers have been trialling a help and heal damaged hearts and make people less likely to suffer further attacks. richard westcott reports. julian is a keen cyclist, healthy eating, doesn't smoke, in his early 50s, but out of the blue last summer... aha, smoke, in his early 50s, but out of the blue last summer...— the blue last summer... a pretty normal day _ the blue last summer. .. a pretty normal day until— the blue last summer... a pretty normal day until about _ the blue last summer... a pretty normal day until about 4pm, - the blue last summer... a pretty normal day until about 4pm, i i the blue last summer... a pretty. normal day until about 4pm, i had the blue last summer... a pretty - normal day until about 4pm, i had an normal day until about apm, i had an enormous pain in my chest like a vice, and i said to my wife, ifeel really, really ill. i lay down at the pain did not go away. the fight at any point did you think it might be a heart attack? i did not think it would happen to me, i thought i was too young, fit and healthy, i
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had had no underlying symptoms. the previous weekend i had been out on quite a long bike ride so acting as normal, and then like a bolt out of the blue you get by huge pain in your chest and find yourself in papworth. your chest and find yourself in papworth— your chest and find yourself in pa worth. , ., .,, ., ., papworth. julian has “oined a drug trial at papworth. julian has joined a drug trial at addenbrooke's _ papworth. julian has joined a drug trial at addenbrooke's hospital. papworth. julian has joined a drug trial at addenbrooke's hospital in | trial at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge. some people have an immune system that goes into overdrive following a heart attack and it starts to damage the body, leaving the patient prone to another attack or a stroke. researchers hope this drug will cut that risk. if attack or a stroke. researchers hope this drug will cut that risk.— this drug will cut that risk. if you think of the _ this drug will cut that risk. if you think of the immune _ this drug will cut that risk. if you think of the immune system - this drug will cut that risk. if you think of the immune system is i this drug will cut that risk. if gm. think of the immune system is having good cop and bad cop cells, in these high—risk patients we have a very high—risk patients we have a very high number of bad cop cells, in this trial we are trying to increase the good cop furlough number so it negates the harmful effects of the bad cop cells. it has been shown to
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very good results and other conditions like diabetes, hepatitis, hiv. we are just about to give you your injection, julian. if hiv. we are just about to give you your injection, julian.— your injection, julian. if this smaller trial— your injection, julian. if this smaller trial is _ your injection, julian. if this smaller trial is successful i your injection, julian. if this. smaller trial is successful the your injection, julian. if this - smaller trial is successful the drug will need to be tested in large—scale human trials, but it could one day spa thousands of people the fear of having a second heart attack just a few months after the first. heart attack 'ust a few months after the first. «a heart attack 'ust a few months after the first. ., the first. the weeks after the attack, i lost _ the first. the weeks after the attack, i lost all _ the first. the weeks after the attack, i lost all confidence i the first. the weeks after the | attack, i lost all confidence in the first. the weeks after the - attack, i lost all confidence in my own body, i did not want to do anything and it is building that confidence again in your own body being able to do things that you love, if there is a drug that can help people get back to normality, that has to be hugely beneficial. transport secretary grant shapps has defended reducing the red listed seven countries, saying the vaccine in the uk and around the world had changed the calculation. he said
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because of vaccination the risks are massively reduced. he went on and called pcr tests expensive and cumbersome. yesterday the government confirmed it would not require those taking these tests to do it on a video call for verification. he said a photo of the tax would be accepted as proof. when challenged on whether the system of trust was robust enough, mr chat�*s said pcr testing had had no monitoring at all. you could do with _ had had no monitoring at all. ym. could do with actual flow test, which most viewers would be pretty familiar with —— do a lateralflow test. they can set healthy with your negative or positive and then. if positive you will automatically receive a pcr test, you will be in the nhs system as the normal test and trace, you will get the pcr without having to do anything further and being asked to isolate. if it is negative, you are free to go and that could be done as soon as coming through the gates,
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potentially at some airports, or you may have ordered eight has to be at your home, you carry it out, we blast people to take a photograph so you can see it is your test, that is age, job done, nothing further to do. age, 'ob done, nothing further to do. ., ., �* , ., , do. natalie bennett is from off broadway travel. _ do. natalie bennett is from off broadway travel. how - do. natalie bennett is from off broadway travel. how do - do. natalie bennett is from off broadway travel. how do you l do. natalie bennett is from off - broadway travel. how do you react to the changes and what does it mean to your customers? it is the changes and what does it mean to your customers?— your customers? it is fantastic news that they have _ your customers? it is fantastic news that they have reduced _ your customers? it is fantastic news that they have reduced the - your customers? it is fantastic news that they have reduced the red - your customers? it is fantastic news that they have reduced the red list, | that they have reduced the red list, we are hoping the foreign office advice for in—line with the traffic light system because unlike the maldives a couple of weeks ago, it took a few weeks for them to align, hopefully on monday foreign office advice will match the government traffic light system and people can start travelling and enjoy their holidays. start travelling and en'oy their holida s. ~ . , ' . holidays. what is the difference with the foreign _ holidays. what is the difference with the foreign office - holidays. what is the difference with the foreign office advice i holidays. what is the difference| with the foreign office advice at the moment?—
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with the foreign office advice at the moment? ., , . ., , , the moment? foreign office advises advisin: the moment? foreign office advises advising against _ the moment? foreign office advises advising against travel, _ the moment? foreign office advises advising against travel, south - advising against travel, south africa and mexico, the two big countries everyone has been waiting for, the traffic light system, they're coming off red but foreign office advice still advises against all but essential travel, so wealth thatis all but essential travel, so wealth that is in place you cannot get a travel insurance, therefore it does not open the destination for leisure travel. == not open the destination for leisure travel. , ., , not open the destination for leisure travel. ,., , ., , travel. -- so whilst that is in lace. travel. -- so whilst that is in place- i— travel. -- so whilst that is in place. i totally _ travel. -- so whilst that is in place. i totally understand i travel. -- so whilst that is in i place. i totally understand that, you need that to be aligned. but it is still an amazing _ you need that to be aligned. but it is still an amazing news, - you need that to be aligned. but it is still an amazing news, it - you need that to be aligned. but it is still an amazing news, it is - is still an amazing news, it is definitely a jumping the right direction, amazingly have all this and hopefully foreign office advice will match up and we can start to get people travelling again. in terms of people leaving england if they might be going somewhere at half term and going back, still not sure what tests they will be doing, what you think about that? the
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lateral flow coming in will be amazing but we need the government betting betting quickly, half—turn isjust betting betting quickly, half—turn is just around the corner so people will need to start booking tests, if families are booking tests now and they do not have to win two weeks, they do not have to win two weeks, they will have wasted a lot of money. i think it is amazing, it is very positive but the government need to get these things in place quickly to save families money. thank you, natalie. a new study suggests daily meat consumption in the uk has fallen by 17% over the past decade. researchers from oxford university suggest most people are eating less red and processed meats, but white meat consumpion has increased slightly. however, they say a more substantial reduction is required to reduce the environmental impact of our diets. the national food strategy recommends a 30% fall over the next ten years.
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south africa is still looking for answers after nine days of looting and violent protests back injuly. the unrest was sparked by the jailing of the country's former president jacob zuma. the protests were widely seen as a targeted campaign to undermine current president cyril ramaphosa. the riots died down after the deployment of thousands of soldiers. our correspondent nomsa maseko sent this report. the riots that shocked south africa three months ago. nearly 350 people died across two provinces affected by violent protests sparked by the jailing of former presidentjacobs jailing of former president jacobs uma. jailing of former presidentjacobs uma. the advanced began when a heavily armed gang hijacked trucks and torch more than 20 cars on the motorway which links sub—saharan africa's biggest port to the country's economic hub. we went back
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to these areas today. only a handful of the shopping malls related to satellite have reopened. in this eastern johannesburg satellite have reopened. in this easternjohannesburg township eastern johannesburg township several easternjohannesburg township several people are still missing. theirfamilies several people are still missing. their families suspect they perished in a gas explosion at the supermarket. police say the remains recovered here were burned beyond recognition and it will take awhile dna tests are concluded. —— take a while before dna tests are concluded. translation: i while before dna tests are concluded. translation: i need to find my son's _ concluded. translation: i need to find my son's remain _ concluded. translation: i need to find my son's remain so _ concluded. translation: i need to find my son's remain so i _ concluded. translation: i need to find my son's remain so i can - concluded. translation: i need to find my son's remain so i can have . find my son's remain so i can have peace. i had so many questions, i need to know what happened to my son. all i wanted to bury him, i need closure.— son. all i wanted to bury him, i need closure. while some families are counting _ need closure. while some families are counting the _ need closure. while some families are counting the human _ need closure. while some families are counting the human cost, - need closure. while some families| are counting the human cost, many others are trying to rebuild businesses. this is what remains of
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this woman's business. it is the first time she has returned to her clothing shop sincejuly�*s advanced. she is one of many small business owners whose businesses were not insured and she is looking to the state owned insurance company to bail them out.— bail them out. this shop is myself income, bail them out. this shop is myself income. and _ bail them out. this shop is myself income, and all— bail them out. this shop is myself income, and all of _ bail them out. this shop is myself income, and all of a _ bail them out. this shop is myself income, and all of a sudden - bail them out. this shop is myself income, and all of a sudden it - bail them out. this shop is myself income, and all of a sudden it is i income, and all of a sudden it is going, without any notice or prior arrangement whatsoever. it was just cut. arrangement whatsoever. it was 'ust cut. , , , arrangement whatsoever. it was 'ust cut. , , ., ., cut. experts say it will be another ear cut. experts say it will be another year before _ cut. experts say it will be another year before the _ cut. experts say it will be another year before the country's - cut. experts say it will be another| year before the country's economy recovers from the impact in the worst violence in postapartheid south africa.— worst violence in postapartheid south africa. ~ ., ., ,, . , south africa. what happened in july ha--ened south africa. what happened in july happened at — south africa. what happened in july happened at a _ south africa. what happened in july happened at a time _ south africa. what happened in july happened at a time when _ south africa. what happened in july happened at a time when we - south africa. what happened in july happened at a time when we were . south africa. what happened in july - happened at a time when we were busy trying to navigate a pandemic, something we were never prepared for a 2020. of something we were never prepared for a 2020. ijobs were lost notjust through through covid and also the
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unrest. we know through the looting of business premises, the retail sector, thejobs of business premises, the retail sector, the jobs were lost across a wide section of the economy. we need to move quicker to get those people backin to move quicker to get those people back in to employment to start the economy again. back in to employment to start the economy again-— economy again. while rebuilding continues. _ economy again. while rebuilding continues, it _ economy again. while rebuilding continues, it remains _ economy again. while rebuilding continues, it remains unclear- economy again. while rebuilding i continues, it remains unclear what the real because of the violence was, which has led many to believe it could happen again. the republic of ireland is abandoning one of its key strategies for attracting foreign investment, by raising its corporate tax rate to 15%. the increase is part of a global deal on tax reform, making it less attractive for multinational companies to shift their profits to places where the tax rate is lower. this is the right decision. it is a sensible and pragmatic decision made by the government in the interests of our country and ultimately a
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decision that i believe will be critical to conditions to create longer term certainty for businesses and investors, which in turn will be to the benefit of many thousands of employees in the future. eight locations have made it to the next stage of the contest to become the uk's city of culture in 2025. not all of them are cities, with cornwall and county durham among the contenders. the others include armagh city, stirling, wrexham and bradford. the title is awarded every four years and is currently held by coventry. let's bring you a full book at the weather forecast for today and the weekend. one thing that ties all of those cities together is the temperature this morning. a pretty mild start. when you have the sunshine, there has been some across lancashire in
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the last hour, a beautiful start over the pennines. or whether you have got the cloud, and a brace of rain, it was a soggy start today in northern ireland. temperatures well above where we would normally expect to start an october morning. temperatures around the region of seven or nine degrees, but even a cooler spot, seven or nine degrees, but even a coolerspot, in seven or nine degrees, but even a cooler spot, in the highlands, we have seen temperatures here drop no lower than nine degrees. most places sitting in the mid teens at the moment. another pretty warm day out there across the uk. but even though there across the uk. but even though the temperatures are up, the rain is falling for some. we got some heavy rain pushing into central south—western scotland. we had a brief respite from the rain in northern ireland, more showers pushing on. they will slide their way into other parts of western scotland as we go into the afternoon. it does mean that eventually, after some early rain in the east of scotland, things are brighten through the afternoon to the south, a bright afternoon to the south and east of northern ireland. england and wales, we still have missed on hill fog around across the south. some of the low cloud will take awhile to shift and break. but mostly sunny spells. when the sun is
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out, temperatures 20 or 23 degrees. a warm end to the day and a warm night for the vast majority. there will be more rain in western scotland. the rain will be heavy later in the night. england and wales stay largely dry. for north midland and northern england, greater chance of mist and fog. this is where the coolest conditions will be to start a saturday morning. towards the south—east corner, temperatures in single figures. the orange colours and the child, swept away by the weather front as we go through the weekend and towards the start of next week. here it is to start of next week. here it is to start saturday, bringing rain to begin with, western parts of scotland and northern ireland. it will brighten up through the day, turning whatever other parts of southern and western scotland. eventually, north—western lead, parts of wales. much of england and wales will stay dry. morning mist and fog should lift. sunny spells, not quite as warm as today. still high teens, low 20s, higher than they should be. feeling fresher, even with the sunshine across western scotland and northern ireland. the fresh air pushing southwards and eastwards into
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sunday. the weather front by the stage, nothing more than a zone of cloud, one or two motor showers in the south. showers pushed along by a stiff breeze on sunday. out in the sunshine, it will feel much fresher. temperatures for most 1390 degrees. pleasant enough in the sunshine. it is a step to something cooler, and as we go into next week, temperatures, instead of climbing into the low 20s, set into the low to mid teens for most, a few showers dotted round the coast. for the majority, next week is looking largely dry.
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hello this is bbc news with me victoria derbyshire. the headlines... more than a0 million of us across the uk are being offered a flu jab this winter in the nhs's biggest everflu vaccination campaign. travellers to england will soon be able to take a photo of a negative lateral flow test from home instead of paying for an expensive pcr test before
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and afterjourneys. marcus rashford warns of the effects of the government's decision to remove the £20 a week increase to universal credit. the us steps up pressure on russia over the shortage of gas in europe — warning moscow not to exploit the situation after it said it could increase supplies. and the young british asians trying to create lasting memorials to relatives who served with british forces during the first and second world war. now time for the sport. newcastle united fans are excited about the future, with the club in the hands of owners that are among the hands of owners that are among the richest in world football, steve bruce is not sure about his own future. he said that new owners often mean a pneumonic elite micromanager, but he wants time to prove himself, despite being without
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a win this season.— a win this season. steve knows he is under pressure- _ a win this season. steve knows he is under pressure. when _ a win this season. steve knows he is under pressure. when you _ a win this season. steve knows he is under pressure. when you go - a win this season. steve knows he is under pressure. when you go into i a win this season. steve knows he is. under pressure. when you go into any football club, you have to win games. i know how he feels for newcastle united. i think it has been very harsh on him and his family, at times. what he has had to put up with. but he took on an almost impossiblejob at put up with. but he took on an almost impossible job at newcastle, in very, very difficult circumstances. , ., ., circumstances. there were some great drama on the _ circumstances. there were some great drama on the pitch _ circumstances. there were some great drama on the pitch in _ circumstances. there were some great drama on the pitch in the _ circumstances. there were some great drama on the pitch in the nation's - drama on the pitch in the nation's league last night. in the semifinals of the tournament, france came from 2-0 of the tournament, france came from 2—0 down to beat belgium 3—2. karim benzema and killian mbappe brought them level, before a brilliant strike from hernandez. wales are in action tonight at a crucial world cup qualifier in the czech republic. the team just above them on goal difference in the race to finish second in the group, and in a play—off spot. it is an injury hit welsh team, with the likes of gareth bale missing. but another of their
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star players, aaron ramsey, is back after injury. he missed the win over belarus and the goalless draw with estonia, and his return will lift the players around him according to his manager. ibig the players around him according to his manager-— his manager. big games, you want our bi his manager. big games, you want your big players- — his manager. big games, you want your big players. and _ his manager. big games, you want your big players. and aaron - his manager. big games, you want your big players. and aaron has i his manager. big games, you want| your big players. and aaron has not disappointed in recent months and years, with help us qualify for the euros with those two goals. like i said, big gains, he steps up to the place, this is a big game for us. we are 'ust a place, this is a big game for us. we are just a day away from the most world heavyweight contest between tyson fury and deontay wilder. fury is defending the belt he won in 2020, but the way and will not have a face—off. they traded verbal blows in the press conference, with deontay wilder accusing tyson fury of cheating in the second fight. the promoter is keeping them apart. thea;r promoter is keeping them apart. they are not animals, _ promoter is keeping them apart. tie: are not animals, they promoter is keeping them apart. tte: are not animals, they are promoter is keeping them apart. t“t9:1 are not animals, they are sportsmen. i don't like face—offs at all. i think they are unnecessary. i think
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it dehumanises the fighters. i don't think it's good for the sport. but yeah, i did it not for those reasons, i did it because i was afraid what would happen, and that the fight could be cancelled. the 2016 olympic— the fight could be cancelled. the 2016 olympic cycling champion elinor barker say she is comforted by the success of laura kenny, sarah storey, after she revealed she was pregnant. barkerwould storey, after she revealed she was pregnant. barker would marco silva not knowing as telling she was pregnant. as others have shown, there is nothing to stop her returning to the top of her sport after the birth of her first child early next year. if this had happened to _ early next year. if this had happened to me a handfulj early next year. if this had i happened to me a handful of early next year. if this had - happened to me a handful of years earlier, at any point in my career, i probably would have immediately thought, well, that is my cycling career over. ifeel like thought, well, that is my cycling career over. i feel like because thought, well, that is my cycling career over. ifeel like because of these women i don't have to make this choice now. it doesn't have to affect my career for the next ten
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years. it's an opportunity that should still be given to riders. and it shouldn't really change anything. they still need supporting, and pregnant women are not necessarily a risk in a sporting environment. it can be an asset.— risk in a sporting environment. it can be an asset. elinor barker, they are. that can be an asset. elinor barker, they are- that is — can be an asset. elinor barker, they are. that is all— can be an asset. elinor barker, they are. that is all the _ can be an asset. elinor barker, they are. that is all the sport _ can be an asset. elinor barker, they are. that is all the sport for - can be an asset. elinor barker, they are. that is all the sport for now. i the chief executive of british airways has described the government's decision to slash the number of countries on the covid red list, from 5a to seven, as like "seeing light at the end of a very long tunnel". from monday, people arriving from destinations including brazil, mexico, south africa and thailand won't need to quarantine in a hotel. the government will also recognise more vaccine certificates, to confirm that people coming from abroad have been fully vaccinated against the virus. our transport correspondent caroline davies has more. piece by piece, plane by plane, international travel has been reopening. now the red list has dramatically reduced. the red list was 5a countries long. from monday, it will shrink to just seven — mostly in south america.
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arrivals from here will still need to stay in a quarantine hotel. it means that families like the pernies — who live in south africa — can come back to see loved ones in the uk. it's something they've been planning, even before the announcement. we know now that we can go home if we need to, and we can see parents and be there if anything happens. and likewise, ijust can't wait to get my parents back out here again and hopefully have a family christmas this year. right through this door, please. people jabbed in south africa will also have their vaccinations recognised, along with arrivals from 36 other countries newly added. it means they'll be able to avoid quarantine, but only if they've been jabbed using astrazeneca, pfizer, moderna orjanssen. the travel industry is pleased, but it's also waiting impatiently for the government to set a date for when they'll change the requirement from a pcr test to the cheaper lateral flow test for travellers arriving in the uk. the government have announced that they are changing the day two required test.
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at the minute, that's a pcr test. that will change to a lateral flow test. but we're still to hear that date, although we believe it will be some time at the end of this month. the government has said that they are aiming to implement that change by half term. some scientists are worried this decision is too early, while the virus still circulates and many globally are unvaccinated. obviously what we don't want to do is, while we are trying to get the virus under control in this country, introduce lots of new cases, because people will come and then they'll set up sort of clusters of infection in their friends and family as they come back from where they've been. but the government have argued that now is the time to bring down some of these boundaries and start to open back up to the world. caroline davies, bbc news. our health respondent is here. grant shapps this morning, what has he been saying? b5 shapps this morning, what has he been saying?— shapps this morning, what has he
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been saying? as you heard, one of the important _ been saying? as you heard, one of the important changes _ been saying? as you heard, one of the important changes that - been saying? as you heard, one of the important changes that is - been saying? as you heard, one of i the important changes that is coming in is a switch in the test that you have to take when you return to the uk. so, this is people from england at the moment, if you are fully vaccinated, in the past you needed what was a pcr test, so this is one where you send off, you normally get it delivered at home, you take it and it goes to a laboratory to be processed. it can be quite pricey, prices vary, but it can be up to £100, sometimes more than that. they are switching back to the lateral flow tests. these are the ones you take at home yourself. they are much faster. they give a result within 15 minutes. there has been some debate about when this change is coming in. grant shapps was talking about it this morning. a lot of pressure for the government to do this by half term holidays, which for most parts of england is the 25th of october that week. he says this morning he can't guarantee that, but he is hoping to do it by the end of october. the plan and the hope is to bring it in before half term.
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because of various complications about the shift, they might not be able to do it by that date. ii'idfa�*e able to do it by that date. have these lateral— able to do it by that date. have these lateral flow _ able to do it by that date. have these lateral flow tests - able to do it by that date. have these lateral flow tests got - able to do it by that date. have these lateral flow tests got better? at the start of this whole thing we were told they were not that specific or accurate.- were told they were not that specific or accurate. grant shapps, talkin: specific or accurate. grant shapps, talking this — specific or accurate. grant shapps, talking this morning, _ specific or accurate. grant shapps, talking this morning, was - specific or accurate. grant shapps, | talking this morning, was indicating they had. at the date on this, all they had. at the date on this, all the way through, lateral flows have been relatively effective at picking up been relatively effective at picking up people who have high levels of virus in their system. the pcr test, thatis virus in their system. the pcr test, that is seen as picking up people who have maybe had the virus for longer, but can no longer be infectious because they are picking up infectious because they are picking up traces of the virus that exists days or weeks after you have been infected. in that sense, it's quite good. there are disadvantages with the lateral flow test. you do it at home, so certain parts of this have to be taken on trust. it is no longer going to a laboratory. the government was trying to get round this by saying if you take this at home, you have to pay for it, you
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still have to pay for the test, you can't take on nhs one, it looks like you have to take a photo of the test, and send it off to this provider, to verify you actually have got a negative result, and you are not faking the system or doing something you shouldn't do. but you could use somebody _ something you shouldn't do. but you could use somebody else, _ something you shouldn't do. but youj could use somebody else, somebody who is negative, if you happen to be positive? who is negative, if you happen to be ositive? :, , :, :, positive? that is one of the criticisms, _ positive? that is one of the criticisms, there _ positive? that is one of the criticisms, there are - positive? that is one of the criticisms, there are not. positive? that is one of the| criticisms, there are not the positive? that is one of the - criticisms, there are not the checks and balances as you get with a pcr test. the other advantage with a laboratory test as you can do something called sequencing it, when it is in a laboratory, they look at the genetic make—up of your test result and they can tell what type of version, which variant of coronavirus that you have. that is useful for picking up coronavirus that you have. that is usefulfor picking up new coronavirus that you have. that is useful for picking up new variants that might be coming into the country, like the delta variant, that might spread more quickly, or might be more resistant to vaccines. you can't do that with a lateral flow test. the answer, the government says, is if you test positive on lateral flow, you then get a free nhs pcr test sent to you,
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which you then send off in a normal way to get sequenced and process that result in that way. of course, there is an issue here about whether people would do it in the way they said they would, whether that delay in getting the test through to you, to take some days, if that could mean you are infectious for that time on the virus can spread more quickly. there is some criticism from some scientists on that note. thanks very much, jim. more than a million asian people fought with the allies during the first and second world wars, and tens of thousands lost their lives. some young british asians think more should be done to remember those from the sub continent who helped britain through the wars. rahila bano from the bbc asian network has been speaking to families who are trying to establish lasting memorials to those who served. her grandfather served in the royal indian air force as an aircraft engineer during the second world war. , , :, :, :,
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war. here is my grandad, the one with the glasses _ war. here is my grandad, the one with the glasses on _ war. here is my grandad, the one with the glasses on one _ war. here is my grandad, the one with the glasses on one of- war. here is my grandad, the one with the glasses on one of the - with the glasses on one of the aircraft that they were working on. but she believes that he and others like him who supported the british war effort are forgotten heroes. when you see the media portray in people who fought in world war ii, you don't really think about south asians or anyone else who fought under the british flag at the time. there were millions in the first world war and second world war. even in the history books and on television you don't see their representation. she television you don't see their representation.— television you don't see their representation. she is not dearly one who thinks _ representation. she is not dearly one who thinks this. _ representation. she is not dearly one who thinks this. kassim - representation. she is not dearly one who thinks this. kassim felt| representation. she is not dearly i one who thinks this. kassim felt the same, so he can his father came up with the idea of a permanent tribute that they receive support from rochdale council. we that they receive support from rochdale council.— that they receive support from rochdale council. we spoke about caettin a rochdale council. we spoke about getting a memorial _ rochdale council. we spoke about getting a memorial up _ rochdale council. we spoke about getting a memorial up with - rochdale council. we spoke about getting a memorial up with the . getting a memorial up with the council. we are going to get metal cutouts, similar to the silent soldiers. they are going to be in the shape of soldiers from the indian subcontinent, they will be
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painted on their traditional khaki uniforms, so they look like they did at the time when they were fighting in the first and second world war. that men are as tough as the mules, fighters _ that men are as tough as the mules, fighters from — that men are as tough as the mules, fighters from the _ that men are as tough as the mules, fighters from the punjab _ that men are as tough as the mules, fighters from the punjab and - that men are as tough as the mules, fighters from the punjab and the - fighters from the punjab and the frontier~ — fighters from the pun'ab and the frontier. ~ :, :, :, frontier. more than 2.5 million manned the — frontier. more than 2.5 million manned the indian _ frontier. more than 2.5 million manned the indian army, - frontier. more than 2.5 million manned the indian army, and | frontier. more than 2.5 million - manned the indian army, and more than 89,000 indians died during both world wars. the than 89,000 indians died during both world wars. :, ~ , world wars. the indian army were involved in _ world wars. the indian army were involved in every _ world wars. the indian army were involved in every major— world wars. the indian army were involved in every major battle, . involved in every major battle, during 191a and 15, before being heavily involved in the middle east in particular. in the second world war, they fought in north africa, they fought up through italy as well, they played a humongous part in the defence of india itself, as the japanese attacked through burma. this is what people who we spoke to think about the memorial. t’itt this is what people who we spoke to think about the memorial.— think about the memorial. i'm really excited this. — think about the memorial. i'm really excited this, because _ think about the memorial. i'm really excited this, because i'm _ think about the memorial. i'm really excited this, because i'm one - think about the memorial. i'm really excited this, because i'm one of - think about the memorial. i'm really excited this, because i'm one of fewj excited this, because i'm one of few people _ excited this, because i'm one of few people in— excited this, because i'm one of few people in my familyjoining the army — people in my familyjoining the army. maybe more people learning about— army. maybe more people learning
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about their heritage, that their grandparents, great grandparents were in— grandparents, great grandparents were in the military, maybe they might— were in the military, maybe they might decide to do the same thing. i think might decide to do the same thing. think it is might decide to do the same thing. i think it is quite valid and quite good — think it is quite valid and quite good it— think it is quite valid and quite good it is— think it is quite valid and quite good it is a _ think it is quite valid and quite good. it is a thing _ think it is quite valid and quite good. it is a thing that - think it is quite valid and quite . good. it is a thing that happened. there's_ good. it is a thing that happened. there's no— good. it is a thing that happened. there's no point... _ good. it is a thing that happened. there's no point... not _ good. it is a thing that happened. there's no point... not that- good. it is a thing that happened. i there's no point... not that history has been _ there's no point... not that history has been whitewashed, _ there's no point... not that history has been whitewashed, but - there's no point... not that history has been whitewashed, but it - there's no point... not that history has been whitewashed, but it is - there's no point... not that history has been whitewashed, but it is a i has been whitewashed, but it is a very blinkered, _ has been whitewashed, but it is a very blinkered, narrow _ has been whitewashed, but it is a very blinkered, narrow view. - has been whitewashed, but it is a very blinkered, narrow view. i- has been whitewashed, but it is a very blinkered, narrow view. i think it's a good — very blinkered, narrow view. i think it's a good idea. — very blinkered, narrow view. i think it's a good idea, rochdale - very blinkered, narrow view. i think it's a good idea, rochdale is - very blinkered, narrow view. i think it's a good idea, rochdale is made. it's a good idea, rochdale is made up it's a good idea, rochdale is made up of a lot of different communities, and it will be... it will be a big thing for a lot of asians, because we don't have anything like that in rochdale. the indian soldiers will go on display in rochdale's memorial gardens in time for remembrance day. the headlines on bbc news... more than a0 million are being offered a flu jab this winter in the nhs's biggest everflu offered a flu jab this winter in the nhs's biggest ever flu vaccination campaign. travelers to england will soon be able to take a photo of a negative lateral flow test from home instead of paying for an expensive pcr test before and afterjourneys.
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marcus rashford warns of the effects of the government's decision to remove the £20 per week increase to universal credit. doctors are being warned to look out for a dangerous work—out trend called dry scooping stop it involves eating protein supplements meet, rather than diluting them in water. the worry is that teenagers or others may try it, spurred on by a flurry of internet videos. let's talk to nutrition scientist bridget, from the british nutrition foundation. what is the problem with this? :, :,: :, this? the main active ingredient of these powders _ this? the main active ingredient of these powders is _ this? the main active ingredient of these powders is caffeine. - this? the main active ingredient of these powders is caffeine. they . these powders is caffeine. they vary, in terms of the level of the caffeine content, from anything
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equivalent to one cup of filter coffee to three four. that's a lot of caffeine in one dose. if you are preparing these made up to the manufacturing structures, that is one thing. if you are eating the dry powder, you may be getting that there was much more quickly, and you may also be having more than the manufacturer recommends. the key issue here is the potentialfor having much too much caffeine at once. and what we don't know is how this impacts on the general population. we have research around caffeine and performance in athletes. but when you are looking athletes. but when you are looking at an athlete, that person is usually with a team around them looking after them, checking their medical health, they will be aware of their medical records. in the wider population, there can be a lot of variability in terms of how sensitive people are to caffeine, and we probably know that there are some people who can't have coffee in the evening, or they can't sleep. so, if you are getting a lot of caffeine in one go, there is the potential for unpleasant side—effects. they are not
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necessarily serious. it could just be feeling jittery, as perhaps we will have when we have had too much coffee. but if you are sensitive to caffeine, or if you have an underlying medical condition that you may not be aware of, then there is a potential risk ofjust having much too much caffeine at once. ok. do ou much too much caffeine at once. ok. do you believe _ much too much caffeine at once. 0k. do you believe that is dangerous if you have much too much caffeine at once? ~ , : :, , once? well, there is certainly the otential once? well, there is certainly the potential for _ once? well, there is certainly the potential for negative _ once? well, there is certainly the potential for negative effects - once? well, there is certainly the potential for negative effects on . potential for negative effects on your health. i think the difficulty is we just your health. i think the difficulty is wejust don't your health. i think the difficulty is we just don't know. we don't have the research. we don't know what they are doing, we don't know how people are taking them. clearly they are taking them according to these videos in a way that is not made up according to the manufacturer's instructions, which is usually one scoop of powder made up to be a drink, where you would be getting probably the caffeine more slowly, you would be getting water at the same time. so there is really no need to take supplements before you go to the gym or before you train. but if you are going to take them, it is really important to follow the manufacturer instructions and you don't take more, because these
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ingredients are powerful and potentially can affect your health. it's interesting you say you don't need supplements at all, all of the so—called nutritional drinks at all before you do some exercise or go to the gym. why do you say that? 50. before you do some exercise or go to the gym. why do you say that? so, we know from research _ the gym. why do you say that? so, we know from research in _ the gym. why do you say that? so, we know from research in athletes - the gym. why do you say that? so, we know from research in athletes that i know from research in athletes that some of these ingredients have the potential to benefit performance. but that really is at the elite level where people are doing very high level training. if you are just going to the gym to generally keep fit and you want to build muscle, you want to build endurance, you really don't need anything extra. your body is very capable of adapting to exercise and benefiting from it. you don't need extra supplements in order to support your body to do that. supplements in order to support your body to do that-— supplements in order to support your body to do that. thank you very much for talkin: body to do that. thank you very much for talking to — body to do that. thank you very much for talking to us. _ body to do that. thank you very much for talking to us. thank _ body to do that. thank you very much for talking to us. thank you. - a concert by the london symphony orchestra was live—streamed last night, free of charge, into hundreds of care—homes across the uk. the special performance was staged by the bristol beacon project
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to thank staff and residents for their resilience during the pandemic. jon kay reports. no bingo tonight. instead, residents at quarry house are waiting for a live performance by one of the best orchestras in the world. it's the first time we've had something like this for a long time. so, yes, looking forward to it. the london symphony orchestra are used to big audiences, but tonight every care home in the uk is invited. i always believe that music was one of the great healing arts and it's a way of reconnecting with people and also saying...thank you to all the people who've worked — often for very little thanks — in the last year and a half. and alsojust to kind of spread some of what we do in the hope that it'll make people feel better. ladies and gentlemen, thank you so much.
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applause. can't put into words, really, what it means. i didn't realise it was going to be so...so emotional. things are still not completely right, but. . . hope for the future. i think it's incredible and a wonderful picture, as well. you know, it feels as if you could be there. it was organised by the bristol beacon project, but watched in care homes from ayrshire... ..to surrey. it's been so stressful and we've had a lot of isolation in the homes. but it's all coming back and it feels great to bring joy and music back into the homes again. after nearly two years
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of pain, two hours ofjoy. laughter. jon kay, bbc news, bristol. yesterday we brought you the news that andy murray was in the dog house, after his trainers were stolen — with his wedding ring attached. well last night he gave an update saying he's been reunited with the shoes and the ring. he says the trainers still smell, in his words, horrific, but the good news is he's back in his wife's good books. just wanted to send a quick message to see a huge thanks for all of the messages and also to everyone for sharing the story about the shoes and the wedding ring. i had to make and the wedding ring. i had to make a few calls today and chat to the security of the hotel and everything, and a little update for everyone. would you believe it? they
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still absolutely stink, but the shoes are back. the wedding ring is back, and i am back in the good books. let's go!— back, and i am back in the good books. let's go! very happy for the coule. books. let's go! very happy for the couple- let's _ books. let's go! very happy for the couple. let's bring _ books. let's go! very happy for the couple. let's bring you _ books. let's go! very happy for the l couple. let's bring you the weather, here is matt. a very good start to the day across areas. the sun is out in shropshire. looking good with autumn colours, starting to show a hint of changing. it's not been the same everywhere. for some, it's not been the same everywhere. forsome, leaden it's not been the same everywhere. for some, leaden skies. it's not been the same everywhere. forsome, leaden skies. still threatening rain at the moment, but here we started with temperatures just shy of 16 degrees this morning. should be closer to seven or eight. it's an incredibly mild day out there. where you have the sunshine or the cloud. the rain at the moment in scotland is cheaply towards central and western areas. you can see the darker blues and heavy rain, sliding towards the grampians. drying out in northern ireland, but more showers pushing on. this area of heavy rain, that is directing itself towards the later sky, where
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we have seen close to 100 million metres of rain over the last few days. a wet afternoon in the far west of scotland. still reign in the east. drying up compared to what we are seeing over the next few hours. southern scotland brightens up, the southern scotland brightens up, the south and east of northern ireland do. while we still have lots of low cloud, mist and fog across the south of eglin, a better chance of sunshine. more sunshine around generally compared to yesterday the stock temperatures up to 23 degrees, should be no higher than 16 or 17. there is more rain to come in northern ireland, more heavy rain in scotland. mist and fog for england on the midlands. for the south and east, this is where temperatures will drop the furthest, with clearer skies around. the warm area we have, the orange colours, they will be squeezed away in the weekend. this is the cold front, it is there on saturday across western parts of scotland and northern ireland. heavy rain at times. brightening up for the afternoon. the rain pushes into the afternoon. the rain pushes into the eastern half of scotland for the second half of the day and to the
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south. it looks like we could see some rain, not a great deal come across north—west england and wales. to the south and east, sunny spells. temperatures down a little bit odd today. still getting into 21 degrees and one or two spots. a fresh end to the day in western scotland and northern ireland. the western air pushesit northern ireland. the western air pushes it behind a cold front. nothing more than an area of cloud and water treatment showers. the greatest chance of showers is the far north of scotland. more of a breeze for the western half of the country. out in the breeze it will feel substantially fresher than it does out there today. still pleasant enough with lighter wind in the south when the sun is on your back. there will be more sunshine at times as we go through the week ahead. there will be a fair bit of clout every now and again, bringing one or two showers. the bulk of them will be across parts of northern england, to the north of scotland and down across eastern parts as well. next week, looking dry but cooler for many. goodbye for now.
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let's bring you some live pictures now from the norwegian capital oslo, where the nobel peace prize winner will be announced. any second now, i think. good morning- _ any second now, i think. good morning- the _ any second now, i think. good morning. the no _ any second now, i think. good morning. the no region - any second now, i think. good morning. the no region nobel| morning. the no region nobel committee —— the norwegian nobel committee has decided to award the nobel peace prize 2021 to maria and
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dimitri for their efforts to safeguard

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