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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 8, 2021 4:00am-4:31am BST

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hello, and welcome to bbc news. i'm ben boulos. our top stories: united states national security advisor urges action not with what the energy crisis causing a shortage of gas across europe. we have long been concerned about russia using energy as a tool of coercion and a political weapon. we've seen it happen before and we see it happen again. us senators agree to extend the country's ceiling for two months, avoiding a possible default on the country's national debt. the un secretary general called vaccine in equity immoral and stupid and calls for a 40% of people in all countries to be vaccinated by the end of the year. newcastle united fans
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celebrate a takeover by a saudi lead consortium in a deal worth more than $400 million. and after ten novels and praise for his uncompromising work on the effects of colonialism, tanzania's abdul razat gurnah is shocked to win the 2021 nobel prize for literature. you know, these days you get these cold calls, i thought, this is another one of them. and i picked it up and this guy said, "hello, you have won the nobel prize for literature." and i said, "come on, get out of here!" hello, a very warm welcome in america and around the globe. russia has been urged not to exploit the energy crisis causing gas shortages across
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europe. russia insists the problem lies with much of europe on the decision not to take out long—term contracts for which they are now paying the price. i for which they are now paying the price-— for which they are now paying the rice. . , u, . the price. i am very concerned. we struggle — the price. i am very concerned. we struggle enough. _ the price. i am very concerned. we struggle enough. struggle. the price. i am very concerned. | we struggle enough. struggle to afford that- _ we struggle enough. struggle to afford that. a _ we struggle enough. struggle to afford that. a record _ we struggle enough. struggle to afford that. a record demand - afford that. a record demand for gas and limited storage in the eu is fuelling politician's fears for the future. russia supplies 40% of the eu's natural gas imports. moscow once feared a fall in oil prices would undermine its economy. now it is calling the shots. watch the price of gas plummet as vladimir putin is televised, suggesting a possible increase of gas supply on wednesday. but he has little sympathy for his european
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customers. translation: ~ ., translation: all of the activities _ translation: all of the activities were _ translation: all of the activities were aimed - translation: all of the activities were aimed at l activities were aimed at curtailing the so—called long—term contract focusing on the transition gas exchange trading. it turns out this policy was wrong. it didn't account for uncertainties. russia's main dust producer insists it is blameless. translation: insists it is blameless. tuna/mom- insists it is blameless. translation: since the beginning _ translation: since the beginning of— translation: since the beginning of the - translation: since the beginning of the year, i translation: since the | beginning of the year, we translation: since the - beginning of the year, we have supplied foreign markets near record amounts of gas. increased deliveries to our largest supermarket, germany, by a third compared to the last year, 30 x 2.5 times, romania four times. we supplied additional volumes of gas along all routes including the ukrainian route is not difficult.— ukrainian route is not difficult. �* , ., difficult. but they have accused _ difficult. but they have accused russia - difficult. but they have accused russia of- difficult. but they have - accused russia of reducing supply. russia says the new underwater pipeline would save your�*s sticky situation, but only if germany and brussels quickly approved the project to get it flowing. not everyone
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thinks russia is acting reasonably.— thinks russia is acting reasonabl . ~ ., ., , reasonably. we have long been concerned _ reasonably. we have long been concerned about _ reasonably. we have long been concerned about russia - reasonably. we have long been concerned about russia using l concerned about russia using energy as a tool of coercion and a political weapon, we have seen it happen before and we could see it happen again. i think it would be a mistake for russia to try to exploit this. i think that would ultimately backfire and on them and they think they should respond to the market demands for increased energy supplies to europe. increased energy supplies to euro e. ., increased energy supplies to euroe. ., , ., ., europe. that comes from more demand as _ europe. that comes from more demand as countries _ europe. that comes from more demand as countries emerge . europe. that comes from more i demand as countries emerge from the pandemic, depleted storage tanks after a cold and to the winter. china consuming more gas and low wind speeds that reduce renewable energy. right now, russia remains under pressure to increase the supply driven by a volatile market which is also powering its bargaining position as well. for more on this, i spoke to the russian expert and about
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president vladimir putin's goals in the current crisis. i think he wants to exploit the situation as much as possible and high price of our good for russia. but as your other analyst mentioned, it comes at analyst mentioned, it comes at a cost, and the cost is that russia will not be perceived as a reliable energy partner if indeed it exploits its new position after the completion and becomes again the major gas exporter to the european union. whether or not it is seen as a reliable, credible source of energy, how many other options are there?— are there? there are not. that is what ukraine, _ are there? there are not. that is what ukraine, the _ are there? there are not. that is what ukraine, the united . is what ukraine, the united states congress, poland and other countries have asserted that if you build it, the new gas pipeline, the european
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union will become much more dependent on russian gas, and russia will, if possible, if given the opportunity, try to exploit that position. so it is an argument that has gone on throughout the building of the pipeline, and just as we are about to, russia is about to complete this gas pipeline, we now have to question high prices, and is russia creating an artificial scarcity in order to take advantage of the market?— to take advantage of the market? ,, ., , �* , ~ market? the us hasn't been keen on the gas — market? the us hasn't been keen on the gas pipeline. _ market? the us hasn't been keen on the gas pipeline. it _ market? the us hasn't been keen on the gas pipeline. it has - on the gas pipeline. it has veered from different tactics, talking about potential sanctions then try to woo western europe to not go ahead with the pipeline. but what is it offering in terms of support or alternatives to help if it didn't go ahead?— or alternatives to help if it didn't go ahead? that is the issue. didn't go ahead? that is the issue- the _ didn't go ahead? that is the issue. the united _ didn't go ahead? that is the issue. the united states -
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didn't go ahead? that is the issue. the united states is. didn't go ahead? that is the i issue. the united states is not really have an alternative supply other than to substitute for russian gas. so therefore, the united states is not in a strong position to find an alternative, moreover we could have imposed sanctions, but that would only hurt our european allies, and most specifically, germany. president biden decided that he wanted to reinforce our traditional alliances, not break them, and therefore, i think he agreed to go along with the completion of the pipeline and not to impose sanctions. pipeline and not to impose sanctions-— sanctions. democrats and republicans _ sanctions. democrats and republicans in _ sanctions. democrats and republicans in the - sanctions. democrats and j republicans in the senate sanctions. democrats and - republicans in the senate have reached a short—term deal which allows the government to borrow more money. it is aimed at preventing the us treasury from default on its debts for the first time ever. but the agreement only lasts for two months, so it is only a short
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term fix. months, so it is only a short term fix— term fix. we have reached agreement _ term fix. we have reached agreement to _ term fix. we have reached agreement to extend - term fix. we have reached agreement to extend the l term fix. we have reached - agreement to extend the debt ceiling through early december and it is our hope that we can get this done as soon as today. republican and democratic members and staff negotiated through the night in good faith _ through the night in good faith. the sun is moving toward the plan — faith. the sun is moving toward the plan i — faith. the sun is moving toward the plan i laid out yesterday to spare _ the plan i laid out yesterday to spare them you can people, 'ust to spare them you can people, just like — to spare them you can people, just like to spare the american people — just like to spare the american people and manufacturing crisis _ people and manufacturing crisis. , . , crisis. our correspondences senators — crisis. our correspondences senators will _ crisis. our correspondences senators will have - crisis. our correspondences senators will have to - crisis. our correspondences l senators will have to address theissue senators will have to address the issue again in december. look, this has taken some time for it to get to this stage, the last couple of hours the political drama sort of playing out, here in dc the democrats were hoping the republicans would get on board to try to at least get it through the senate, which they have done. they needed at least ten republicans, they got 11 republicans to help break the filibuster bit. it was then approved by the senate. it now has to go to the house to be approved, which it will be, because the democratic party controls the house,
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and it will then land on president biden's desk. he will then sign it, it will be m80 billion, which will cover spending until december 3. it does avert a huge crisis. i think it is probably an understatement to even call it that, because america, had it defaulted on its debts, it could have gone into recession. the economy is already in a precarious situation at the moment, americans would have experienced realfinancial hardship, people wouldn't have got paid, global markets would have been in turmoil, the credit rating agencies would have downgraded america's standing, so it has averted this crisis for now, but as you say, this is going to happen again in a couple of months, because this is only until december 3, which means that we will be talking about this all over again. police say they have rescued 187 villages abducted from their homes by criminal gangs. the terms who spent several
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weeks in captivity were reportedly freed by security forces after an operation in a forest. ireland is abandoning one of its key investment incentives by raising its corporate tax rate for the biggest companies from 12.5% to 15%. the increase is part of a global deal on tax reform, making it less attractive for multinational companies to shift their profits to places where the rate is lower. andy murray says everything wedding ring has been returned after a social media appeal. he tied the ring to the laces of his trainers which were drying under his car. the next morning the ring and shoes had gone. he thanked followers for spreading the word. the un secretary general has condemned the inequalities in the global supply of covid vaccines as immoral and stupid.
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the un was 40% of people in all countries to be vaccinated by the end of the year. translation: instead of global coordinated action to get - vaccine where they are needed most, we have seen vaccine hoarding, vaccine nationalism and vaccine diplomacy. we, of course, welcome efforts by countries to get vaccines to more places, but the plethora of global and regional and bilateral initiatives have failed to deliver. it has not got anywhere close to the first benchmark in all countries by the end of september. these, even though the number of those is required, comes to less than one week a global manufacturing. earlier i spoke to saad omer, director of the yale institute for global health. i asked if he agreed with the comments. it i asked if he agreed with the comments-— i asked if he agreed with the comments. , ., ._ comments. it is an extreme way of phrasing. — comments. it is an extreme way of phrasing. but — comments. it is an extreme way of phrasing, but it _ comments. it is an extreme way of phrasing, but it is _ comments. it is an extreme way of phrasing, but it is a _ of phrasing, but it is a correct way of raising the situation is. to reason global
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equity is inaccurate —— everyone partner interests, history willjudge us poorly if we let it go on the way it is going on when low income hundreds of less than 4% vaccine coverage and some countries have more than 70%. the other reason is in light of self—interest meaning that if this pandemic goes on, the chances of your variants go up. for both of these reasons, it is for both moral and reasons of self—interest, it is important to make sure that everyone gets the vaccine. where is the problem? there is no shortage of vaccines in total around the world. there are countries which have a number of surplus to their needs yet they are not getting to the low and middle income countries. it is the richer company is not making it available or the organisation not getting them to the right places? where is the problem? it is all of the above. there
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is the vaccine concentration in high income countries, there have been promises and entities haven't delivered on those promises. for example, europe announced a little more than half a billion doses, little more than 500 million doses, and you look at the actual delivery of those doses to local income countries, it is barely more than 7%. part of it is the modest announcements, and on top of that there is very lukewarm delivery of these that means, and that is the main issue where supply is the current issue. on top of that, we need more donation, more technology transfer, notjust technology transfer, not just that, technology transfer, notjust that, but proactive into an technology for low and middle income countries so they can be closer where needed. who
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income countries so they can be closer where needed.— closer where needed. who can solve the _ closer where needed. who can solve the problem _ closer where needed. who can solve the problem then? - closer where needed. who can solve the problem then? i - closer where needed. who can l solve the problem then? i think it will require _ solve the problem then? i think it will require leadership - solve the problem then? i think it will require leadership from i it will require leadership from the us, but the us cannot do it on its own. so it's own donations have ramped up but it hasn't acted on the technology transfer front, hasn't acted on the technology transferfront, but it hasn't acted on the technology transfer front, but it need europe, it needs china, it needs other countries as well to say that, look, it is in everyone positive interest to make this happen. there was an attempt around the un general assembly to have the summit, but a single event is not going to get us there. some of us are actually concerned about the approaching winter in the northern hemisphere, although several hundreds have increased their vaccination rates and some protection is there due to infections spreading in these countries, but there is still a lot of tender out there to start a fire. in that situation, some of us a little bit nervous that we have let
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these big gaps in protection persist in large countries out there in the world. to persist in large countries out there in the world.— there in the world. to stay with us here _ there in the world. to stay with us here on _ there in the world. to stay with us here on bbc - there in the world. to stay| with us here on bbc news. there in the world. to stay - with us here on bbc news. we hearfrom with us here on bbc news. we hear from the tanzania writer awarded visio public nobel prize for literature. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. they believe everything's going to be different from now on. they think their country will be respected in the world once more, as it used to be before slobodan milosevic took power. the dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. as the parade was reaching its climax, two grenades i exploded and a group of- soldiersjumped from a military truck taking part in a parade i and ran towards the president, firing from kalashnikov automatic rifles. - after 437 years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's
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tragic warship emerged. but even as divers worked to buoy her up, the mary rose went through another heart—stopping drama. i want to be the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of california. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines. the united states national security adviser has urged russia not to exploit the energy crisis that is causing a shortage of gas across europe. us senators have agreed to extend the country's debt ceiling for two months, avoiding a possible default on country's national debt. only proven has been given for a takeover of newcastle united football club. —— final
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approval. serious questions have been asked about the change of ownership because of persistent criticism of saudi arabia and its record on human rights. the charity amnesty international had urged the premier league to change its criteria in assessing the suitability of club owners, as dan roane reports. for many, because the celebration.— for many, because the celebration. these are the scenes at _ celebration. these are the scenes at st _ celebration. these are the scenes at st james - celebration. these are the scenes at st james pub . celebration. these are the l scenes at st james pub after scenes at st james pub after news that a £300 million saudi—led takeover of newcastle united was finally complete. how are you feeling? fantastic. the businesswoman _ how are you feeling? fantastic. the businesswoman who - how are you feeling? fantastic. | the businesswoman who fronted the bid you had a minority stake told me it would be transformative for the club. i think the club needs a lot of investment. we want to invest investment. we want to invest in the community, the academy, the infrastructure, notjust players and the business itself at every level.
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80% of the club will now be owned by saudi's sovereign wealth fund, chaired by the country's crown prince. a deal collapsed last year amid premier league concerns at possible state control of the club but today, it said assurances had been received and a dispute over alleged saudi tv piracy has also been resolved. the news brings to an end a turbulent era for the club. the fans increasingly disillusioned with the ill—year reign of mike ashley — the retail tycoon blamed for a lack of investment and ambition. chanting: we want ashley out! we want ashley out! the deal catapults newcastle to the very top of football's rich list after two relegations from the premier league under ashley's ownership. the fans of newcastle have been through an awful lot. i mean, the club is completely unrecognisable to the club that i used to play for. it's a really special place and it's been a long, tough road and there's definitely some really exciting times for the geordie fans to look forward to. but critics say this is another
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example of saudi arabia using sport to deflect scrutiny of its poor human rights record — especially given the alleged involvement of the crown prince in the murder of dissident journalist jamal khashoggi in 2018, which he denies. it represents the clearest attempt yet by saudi authorities to clean up their tarnished international human rights record via the route of purchasing a top flight football club. saudi ownership of stjames's park has always been much more about image management for crown prince mohammad bin salman and his government than it ever was about football. championship contenders back in the �*90s, newcastle united's long—suffering fans have yearned for a return to the glory days for years. the concern, however, is that those now at the helm may prove even more controversial than the man they have bought from.
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�*s early books including pilgrim puzzlement way consider life as migrant in the uk. the swedish academy commended his uncompromising and compassionate writing on the effects of colonialism and the experience of refugees. he is the first african to win the award in most two decades and will take home more thani million us dollars. he dedicated the prize to his readers. abdulrazak gurnah is the author of ten novels including paradise ancap desertion. he told the bbc where he was the moment he found out. i where he was the moment he found out-— found out. i was making myself a cu of found out. i was making myself a cup of tea _ found out. i was making myself a cup of tea just _ found out. i was making myself a cup of tea just before - found out. i was making myself a cup of tea just before lunch . a cup of tea just before lunch and somebody on the phone, you know these days you get these cold calls and i thought this was another one of them. i picked it up and this guy said
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hello? you have one the nobel prize for literature. i said come on, get out of here! leave me alone. but he talked me out of that and gradually persuaded me. when you write you right to the best of your understanding and ability. observing as carefully and hoping to get pleasure and that kind of thing. but at least for me i don't say i am doing this because i want something practical to come out of it. something that would change or anything because that is really up anything because that is really up to people. it is not up to a writer to stand or ride in a book. so i write with the best and leave it to let the thing do its work wherever. an english professor in the us and founder of african literary magazine says there have been celebrations around the world.
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it felt surreal. it felt like i had been waiting for for so long had finally happened and i was really, really happy. my coffee tasted way more delicious than usual this morning when i woke up and found out. ah! and i'm sure many share the same feeling, especially as mr gurnah is the first african to win the nobel prize for literature in more than two decades. what is the effect and the message that it sends out now that he has been awarded the prize? i mean, it sends a clear message that african literature is influential. we've known it for a very long time. it's shaped the discourse around literature, around politics, around questions of colonialism, power in ways that are significant. and this win just solidifies the fact that african literature has a large, global influence and it also
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kind of gives momentum to the kind of groups that we are seeing in contemporary african literature. in terms of the way that african literature has changed over the years, how would you say it has evolved and developed ? i mean, one quick way to measure how things have changed is to observe what i think of as a speculative term in african literature, is that we are moving away from the �*60s, the �*70s, the decades in which realism was kind of privileged and revered as the language orthe grammar of decolonisation and we are moving into a time when science—fiction, speculative fiction in all forms is beginning to be popular and i think certainly by readers all over the world, so there is a sense of generally accepting
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experimentation with form, with storytelling, with ideas, with concepts. it's something we're seeing way more than we saw the earlier decades. about 30 northern and central provinces in thailand have hit by flooding in recent weeks causing rivers to rise in bangkok. while many businesses have been threatened, one has usedit have been threatened, one has used it to their advantage. waiters tread through water to serve hungry customers. for this restaurant in thailand, as this restaurant in thailand, as this is going swimmingly. translation: it is exciting for fun —— and fun for me. we are eating and dipping in water at the same time. translation: it is a fun challenge. _ the same time. translation: it is a fun challenge. you _ the same time. translation: it is a fun challenge. you don't - is a fun challenge. you don't know— is a fun challenge. you don't know if— is a fun challenge. you don't know if you will get washed
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away — know if you will get washed away while eating. it know if you will get washed away while eating.- know if you will get washed away while eating. it takes its name from — away while eating. it takes its name from the _ away while eating. it takes its name from the river- away while eating. it takes its name from the river running l name from the river running through bangkok. it has not been an easy year. the pandemic caused many businesses in the area to shut during lockdown and recent bouts of flooding threatened to close the restaurant for good. but instead, the owners have seen an opportunity with customer footage of a unique dining experience now going viral on social media. experience now going viral on social media-— social media. translation: customers — social media. translation: customers come _ social media. translation: customers come here - social media. translation: customers come here for - social media. translation: customers come here for a l social media. translation: | customers come here for a lot of reasons. they enjoy the barbecue pork, the atmosphere and the waves. customers absolutely love the waves. come with the privilege of tire like shores, some even bring their kids and families to experience this. what i thought would be a crisis turned into an opportunity. it crisis turned into an opportunity-- crisis turned into an ouortuni . , ., ., ., opportunity. it is not always a simle opportunity. it is not always a simple affair— opportunity. it is not always a simple affair as _ opportunity. it is not always a simple affair as waves - opportunity. it is not always a simple affair as waves from . simple affair as waves from passing boats can knock over seating. but for now, rising water levels continues to bring in a wave of customers. as ever you can reach me and most of the team here on social
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media. you will find me there at an ample loss. plenty on the stories we have covered and others on the website. thanks for watching, see you soon. i buy. —— bye—bye. hello again. thursday saw the arrival of some very warm air indeed across the uk, with temperaturesjumping by seven degrees celsius in places. many of us had quite a bit of cloud, but we had some sunshine — for example, in north wales in denbighshire and next door to this in flintshire — that was where the warmest place in the country was. 22 degrees celsius the top temperature. that is eight degrees celsius warmer than it should be at this time of the year — the october average is ia degrees. now, we've had extensive cloud across the north—west for both scotland and northern ireland. here, a slow—moving weather front has been bringing rain through thursday. we've got more rain to come overnight into friday, friday night and into saturday as well for some across scotland and northern ireland because this front is barely budging. further southwards, well, we've got quite a bit of cloud reforming, some mist and fog patches turning quite dense.
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as well as that, there's a bit of drizzle around, so quite a murky start to the day for many in england and wales with that mist and fog and low cloud slow to thin and break. but eventually, come the afternoon, we should start to get some brighter weather through. the exception — well, for northern ireland and scotland, there's more rain here, heaviest in argyll and highland, and we've got a very weak weather front moving into east anglia and south—east england. that willjust thicken the cloud up enough to bring occasional spots of light rain or drizzle as well. but otherwise, very mild again — temperatures running into the low 20s. now this weekend, this cold front will start to push its way southwards. it is a weak front. it will bring some fresher air in from the north and west with temperatures easing down a few degrees as we go through the weekend. now, saturday — again, mist and fog patches to start the day across england and wales but probably a better chance of seeing some sunshine through the afternoon. the rain in scotland and northern ireland actually starts to budge, so it should brighten up across the north—west of both later in the afternoon, but the rain heading into
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cumbria and northumberland. that same weather front is this stripe of cloud across east anglia and the south—east on sunday. might get an odd spit of rain but essentially, a lot of dry weather on sunday, again with some sunny spells around, a few showers in northern scotland with strengthening winds here and the temperatures easing down — ia or 15 degrees scotland and northern ireland, the far north of england, still 17—19 across england and wales. but it'll continue to get a little bit fresher — those temperatures coming back closer to average in the week ahead.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: one of president biden's closest aides has urged russia not to exploit the current shortages of energy supplies. the national security adviserjake sullivan told the bbc that moscow had previously used energy as a political weapon. he warned that doing so now would backfire. us senators have agreed to raise the country's ceiling for two months after republicans dropped their opposition to the increase. the cap on government borrowing was due to be reached within weeks. the compromise still has to be formally approved by both houses of congress. the united nations secretary general has condemned the inequalities in the global supply of covid vaccines as immoral and stupid. the united nations says it is hoping that 40% of people in all countries will be vaccinated by the end of the year.

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