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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 7, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. as you join us, president biden is speaking in chicago. talking about the event — bennett — benefits of vaccination. he is looking, but i support for his vaccine mandate. texas appeals and a federaljudge�*s order temporarily blocking the ban on most abortions. speaking exclusively at the bbc, the us national security adviser urges russia not to exploit the growing global energy crisis. plus, i woman found herself on the receiving end of thousands of calls from fans of the hit series split game.
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welcome. president didn't buy it in chicago this hour. the home of united airlines, the first american carrier to impose a covid—i9 vaccine mandate on its entire workforce. in august, only 80% of the cabin crew were fully vaccinated. today, the company says 99% — proved since the white house that mandates work. there are still tens of millions of americans who have not been vaccinated but there is nothing evidence that biden and prosperous federal vaccine requirement for private sector employees, health care workers, and federal contractors is helping to lower the infection rate. a number of patients infection rate. a number of patients in us hospitals today, 68,760 is down 34% from the peak of the doubt to lower the infection rate. a number of patients in us hospitals
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today, 68,760 is down 34% from the peak of the delta leave earlier in september. , and it is misnamed. labor including the police unions as well as the firefighters stood up and endorsed me and because i kid with the governor i said i grew up in a town from delaware and from third grade on i went to school and the fire station was across the street. the guys i grew up they became ever a firefighter, a cop, or a priest. iwas became ever a firefighter, a cop, or a priest. i was unqualified for any of them so i had to be president. but look... of them so i had to be president. but look- - -_ of them so i had to be president. but look... , , , ., but look... the president is worming them u -. but look... the president is worming them un- it — but look. .. the president is worming them un- it is— but look... the president is worming them up. it is time _ but look... the president is worming them up. it is time to _ but look... the president is worming them up. it is time to this _ but look... the president is worming them up. it is time to this issue - but look... the president is worming them up. it is time to this issue of i them up. it is time to this issue of vaccine mandates. let us speak to from advisor to the president george w. bush and stephanie rawlings. the former mayor of baltimore. thank you former mayor of baltimore. thank you forjoining us. i want to start with you ron. i have been looking at a vaccine mandate in francejust to
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compare and when emmanuel macron made a speech injuly which demanded everyone who wanted to go into a bar or restaurant was vaccinated a million people in that 2a hour period went out and got vaccinated. such that france now from a very low start has one of the highest vaccination rates in the world. 74% of french people and they are vaccine ready so 74% have now had one vaccine. so the evidence is starting to look undeniable. the question is, is it ethical? i do think it is— question is, is it ethical? i do think it is ethical. _ question is, is it ethical? i do think it is ethical. when - question is, is it ethical? i do think it is ethical. when i - question is, is it ethical? i if think it is ethical. when i went to elementary school i had to have a certain series of shots before i was able to enroll in school and we did not have a pandemic back then. and you look at the magnitude of what covid—i9 has done in the united states and what extent around the world and you have to ask yourself can we take reasonable, sensible steps to make sure that we're all safe placement and so if the
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government can find a way to work with the private sector to have some kind of mandate and i for with the private sector to have some kind of mandate and ifor one regardless of my party affiliation have no problem if they can find a sensible solution.— sensible solution. stephanie, the conservatives _ sensible solution. stephanie, the conservatives over _ sensible solution. stephanie, the conservatives over here - sensible solution. stephanie, the conservatives over here in - sensible solution. stephanie, the conservatives over here in the . sensible solution. stephanie, the| conservatives over here in the uk, they don't particularly warm to vaccine mandates and vaccine passports. the republicans do not either and in congress. the thing is if you are a passenger on an airline or you are a patient in a hospital or you are a patient in a hospital oran or you are a patient in a hospital or an old person in a care home, it might be a decision to have a vaccine but your decision affects me right? i maybe that's the point that if you're going to work in a public setting, you have a responsibility to keep the person that you are treating or the person you're looking after safe. i treating or the person you're looking after safe.— treating or the person you're looking after safe. treating or the person you're lookin: after safe. ~' , ., looking after safe. i think when you talk about is _ looking after safe. i think when you talk about is it _ looking after safe. i think when you talk about is it ethical— looking after safe. i think when you talk about is it ethical to _ looking after safe. i think when you talk about is it ethical to mandate l talk about is it ethical to mandate the shot. what i am there is unethical is what is happening in too many places around the country where instead of providing useful, truly scientific information to many politicians are politicizing this decision and people are dying. when
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you know that you have something that can help save lives and you refuse to use it, i don't think that's ethical and i think the number of vaccines that we are seeing come on board, i think people are starting to wake up and realize that this is not a game, this is not playtime, this is not a time for a political debate, it is time to be safe and to save lives. i political debate, it is time to be safe and to save lives.— safe and to save lives. i want to talk to you _ safe and to save lives. i want to talk to you about _ safe and to save lives. i want to talk to you about other - safe and to save lives. i want to talk to you about other things. l safe and to save lives. i want to i talk to you about other things. we will move on from mandates because that's one of the big stories we are following in the week is the debt ceiling crisis. it was averted today from the time being at least, defendant have pushed it down the road and there has been a fudge in the senate today. they have raised the senate today. they have raised the debt ceiling, m80 billion which will take us into december but i am not entirely clear that it brings us to a solution does it? he
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not entirely clear that it brings us to a solution does it?— not entirely clear that it brings us to a solution does it? he does not. this is what — to a solution does it? he does not. this is what the _ to a solution does it? he does not. this is what the united _ to a solution does it? he does not. this is what the united states - this is what the united states senate does best rather than actually sitting down and building up actually sitting down and building up his sleeves and making the difficult decisions, they want to kick the can down the road to see what they can get confession wise from the other side. the republicans want to use this and say, aha! look at how much the democrats want to add to their debts, and we are going to run and for a bear good spandex. democrats want to say the republicans are not responsible and they don't want to come to the table and i this out. this is not white american congress has held in such low esteem. people want solutions rather than finger—pointing and this is only a two month stopgap and i think we need a much longer solution. the one thing you can say about mitch mcconnell the republican leader in the senate is that he's very good at selling things down and ijust very good at selling things down and i just wonder if very good at selling things down and ijust wonder if he has thought looking for a way out of this, if we take this down the road to december
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they would have to focus on this, maybe they cannot focus at the same time on those two really important bills they want to pass the infrastructure bail, and the much bigger human infrastructure bear which the republicans don't like. ii which the republicans don't like. if he really tested it to say can you walk and chew gum at the same time? of course. this is vintage mitch mcconnell. and as the male chorus reconciliation is the process that you can use to raise the debt ceiling and mitch mcconnell is trying to put in a very difficult position. it can be chew gum and walk and walk and talk at the same time? that's what he's trying to do but once again i think this is where the american people are tired in this town. just get it done and do a long—term fix and get a meaningful solution. long-term fix and get a meaningful solution. . , . long-term fix and get a meaningful solution. ,, , ., ., long-term fix and get a meaningful solution. ,, , . ., . solution. stephanie, i am looking at the christmas _ solution. stephanie, i am looking at the christmas had _ solution. stephanie, i am looking at the christmas had been _ solution. stephanie, i am looking at the christmas had been standing . the christmas had been standing there and behind every door there is a nightmare for the democrats. you have got the government spending that comes up and defend her, you
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know what the debt ceiling coming up, the infra structure bill stuck in the house, the spending bail on human infrastructure that is stuck in a nightmare for the democrats. you have got the government spending that comes up in defender, you let the debt ceiling coming up, the instructor bill stuck in the house, the spending bill on human infrastructure that is stuck in the senate, chaos is the right word, can we get it done in the space of four — six weeks? i we get it done in the space of four - six weeks?— - six weeks? i think that will de-end - six weeks? i think that will depend on — - six weeks? i think that will depend on two _ - six weeks? i think that will depend on two cemeteries. l - six weeks? i think that will depend on two cemeteries. i - six weeks? i think that will- depend on two cemeteries. i think the lack_ depend on two cemeteries. i think the lack of— depend on two cemeteries. i think the lack of cooperation from the republicans to have a long—term solution — republicans to have a long—term solution for the debt ceiling i think— solution for the debt ceiling i think it's _ solution for the debt ceiling i think it's a wake—up call for those senators— think it's a wake—up call for those senators who are holding out for a bipartisan — senators who are holding out for a bipartisan effort and until the voting — bipartisan effort and until the voting public value is a solution of a conflict — voting public value is a solution of a conflict i — voting public value is a solution of a conflict i think we'll be stuck in a conflict i think we'll be stuck in a space — a conflict i think we'll be stuck in a space where people are leaning political— a space where people are leaning political points by pointing down the road — political points by pointing down the road or by setting up roadblocks, all of the things that we have — roadblocks, all of the things that we have seen that has caused this gridlock— we have seen that has caused this gridlock in — we have seen that has caused this gridlock in our congress.— we have seen that has caused this gridlock in our congress. there are four trump — gridlock in our congress. there are four trump staffers, _ gridlock in our congress. there are four trump staffers, for _ gridlock in our congress. there are four trump staffers, for former - four trump staffers, for former trump staffers who have until the end of today to respond to a congressional subpoena from the house, january six committee, there
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they are. no indication whether any of them will submit to the subpoena but here is the statement from former president donald trump that he put out last night and i want to get your thoughts on it. what do you make of the timing of that statement stephanie? i make of the timing of that statement ste - hanie? ~ make of the timing of that statement stehanie? ~' ., stephanie? i think the former resident stephanie? i think the former president is — stephanie? i think the former president is continuing - stephanie? i think the former president is continuing to - stephanie? i think the former president is continuing to usei stephanie? i think the former . president is continuing to use his playbook — president is continuing to use his playbook. he feels like it's got him where _ playbook. he feels like it's got him where he _ playbook. he feels like it's got him where he is — playbook. he feels like it's got him where he is today even though he lost the _ where he is today even though he lost the election and his numbers are stitt— lost the election and his numbers are still high and i think his numbers— are still high and i think his numbers are higherthan are still high and i think his numbers are higher than any redemptive nominee on the republican party in _ redemptive nominee on the republican party in decades and as long as his numbers_ party in decades and as long as his numbers stay high and the republican party he _ numbers stay high and the republican party he will continue to sell the lie party he will continue to sell the tie and _ party he will continue to sell the lie and distort the truth about our democracx — lie and distort the truth about our democracy-— lie and distort the truth about our democra . , ., ., , , ., democracy. they are trouble is that ou have democracy. they are trouble is that you have people — democracy. they are trouble is that you have people connecting - democracy. they are trouble is that you have people connecting the - you have people connecting the republicans on the other side who
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are whitewashing this. there is revisionism going on on all sides on the republican side at the moment. i want to play you a clip from earlier in the week. as his vice president mike pence will of course condemned the interaction. he was right to condemn it because they were calling for him to be hanged. this is what he now thinks about it. i know the media wants to distract from the biden administration's failed agenda tjy biden administration's failed agenda by focusing on the one day in january and they want to use that one day to try and demean the character and intentions of 7a million americans who believe he could be strong again and prosperous again and supports our administration in 2016 and 2020. the question i have is, i know why he is doing that, he is doing that because the base is so strong and it's obviously coming out for donald trump, the numbers show us that. but there must be senior republicans when you talk to people in the party, i not asking the question, first of all, can donald trump win? because that is basic, since 2016 he
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lost the house, senate, and white house and if he does when, what sort of second term is it going to be? if the republicans that are going to have to deal with the fallout. i wish i had a really and optimistic assessment for you but i do not. donald trump seems to have a grip on the republican party. the former party of conservative ideals and strong national security, low spending and now it's the party of trump and it's all about trump all the time. many of the people i speak to say that we are heading in the wrong direction. if he wins, what does that mean for the country? if he does not win, what does that mean for the direction of the country and unfortunately there still aren't enough elder statesman in my party who are willing to stand up and say enough is enough, you lost the election, these people stormed the capital and broke the law, what i want to talk about that as opposed to talking about stopping this deal? it's disgraceful. hour to talking about stopping this deal? it's disgraceful.— it's disgraceful. how would you ex - lain it's disgraceful. how would you explain that — it's disgraceful. how would you explain that his _ it's disgraceful. how would you explain that his numbers - it's disgraceful. how would you explain that his numbers are i
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it's disgraceful. how would you - explain that his numbers are going up explain that his numbers are going up whilejoe biden and's are going down at that time when nine months on he is still questioning the election and still undermining us democracy?— election and still undermining us democracy? election and still undermining us democra 7�* , , ., democracy? because people look at donald trump _ democracy? because people look at donald trump and _ democracy? because people look at donald trump and they _ democracy? because people look at donald trump and they say - democracy? because people look at donald trump and they say he - democracy? because people look at donald trump and they say he is - donald trump and they say he is fighting for us and be believing what he is saying and we believe that election was stolen and too many republicans once you get outside of the enclave of washington, dc and the mayor is in baltimore and you get into more suburban, more metropolitan areas outside of the northeast corridor and people believe what the former president is saying and that's just really a disgrace. president is saying and that's 'ust really a disgracei really a disgrace. thank you very much. really a disgrace. thank you very much- lots _ really a disgrace. thank you very much. lots to _ really a disgrace. thank you very much. lots to discuss _ really a disgrace. thank you very much. lots to discuss today - really a disgrace. thank you very much. lots to discuss today in i much. lots to discuss today in america. some important things going on. a federaljudge in texas has blocked the state's controversial new abortion law. the bill, known as sb8, bans abortions after a foetal heartbeat is detected at six weeks and makes no exceptions for rape or incest. it had withstood a wave of early challenges. but wednesday�*s ruling,
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which stems from a case brought by the biden administration, will for the time being prevent the state from enforcing the law, while litigation continues. in hisjudgment, the us districtjudge robert pitman pulled no punches. he said the bill keeps women from "exercising control over their lives in ways that are protected by the constitution. that other courts may find a way to avoid this conclusion is theirs to decide. this court will not sanction one more day of this offensive deprivation of such an important right." officials in texas immediately appealed the ruling. the fifth circuit of the appeals court in texas is notoriously conservative. we are going to both sides of this argument. let's start with the pro—life side of the debate. rebecca parma is senior legislative associate with texas right to life in austin. thank you for being with us. tell us where are we right now in texas? if you wanted an abortion, could you need go and get one? yes.
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you wanted an abortion, could you need go and get one?— you wanted an abortion, could you need go and get one? yes. thank you for havin: need go and get one? yes. thank you for having me- _ need go and get one? yes. thank you for having me. with _ need go and get one? yes. thank you for having me. with judge _ need go and get one? yes. thank you for having me. with judge pittman's l for having me. withjudge pittman's ruling from last night things are at it up in the air. so the texas heartbeat act is temporary and joint because of his ruling and so what that means is the abortion industry could resume connecting abortions after the heartbeat is detectable but there is a provision in the act that even under an enjoyment like judge pittman gave him his ruling if an abortion is committed illegally after the heartbeat is detectable and that enjoyment is dissolved which we anticipate it will be those abortions could be held liable and there is a four—year statute of limitations so it's dicey if the abortion industry is connecting abortions after the heartbeat is detectable. abortions after the heartbeat is detectable-— abortions after the heartbeat is detectable. ~ , ., . ., detectable. when the state close to the a- eals detectable. when the state close to the appeals court. _ detectable. when the state close to the appeals court, they _ detectable. when the state close to the appeals court, they put - detectable. when the state close to the appeals court, they put the - the appeals court, they put the ruling on hold, and the second thing is overturn what the judge did last night. so that will be further down
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the road. what you are seeing is retrospectively, when it is set aside, they could be prosecuted? absolutely. that's what the texas heartbeat act is. the absolutely. that's what the texas heartbeat act is.— heartbeat act is. the language in the rulin: heartbeat act is. the language in the ruling is _ heartbeat act is. the language in the ruling is pretty _ heartbeat act is. the language in the ruling is pretty blonde. - heartbeat act is. the language in the ruling is pretty blonde. he i heartbeat act is. the language in i the ruling is pretty blonde. he says fully aware that depriving its citizens of this right by direct state action would be flagrantly unconstitutional. the state contrived and unprecedented and transparent statutory scheme to do that. flagrantly unconstitutional. that. flagra ntly unconstitutional. what that. flagrantly unconstitutional. what do you make of that? we were not surprised — what do you make of that? we were not surprised by _ what do you make of that? we were not surprised by his _ what do you make of that? we were not surprised by his ruling _ what do you make of that? we were not surprised by his ruling and - what do you make of that? we were not surprised by his ruling and he i not surprised by his ruling and he had already said how he was trying to block this law back in august on a different lawsuit and this is the result of what roe vs wade has given us, thejudiciary result of what roe vs wade has given us, the judiciary and result of what roe vs wade has given us, thejudiciary and having ideologies and having the outcome they want in mind and finding legal reasoning to make that outcome happen. and that's true for this law
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as well and we expect a fair hearing in this circuit and are optimistic the law will stay in effect. finally, are you pleased that it's been challenged? because you want to set it on the road to the supreme court? that set it on the road to the supreme court? �* . . set it on the road to the supreme court? �* ., , ., ., court? at texas right to life we are not afraid of— court? at texas right to life we are not afraid of any _ court? at texas right to life we are not afraid of any of _ court? at texas right to life we are not afraid of any of our— court? at texas right to life we are not afraid of any of our laws - court? at texas right to life we are not afraid of any of our laws going | not afraid of any of our laws going to the legal process and the supreme court already has a strong abortion case that they will be discussing in december and that is going to reach their areas before the heartbeat act and they will have a decision before the heartbeat act and so we will see what happens with the supreme court case in the mississippi case but we are certainly not afraid of our laws going to thejudicial are certainly not afraid of our laws going to the judicial system. going to the 'udicial system. thank ou ve going to the judicial system. thank you very much- _ i'm joined now by brigitte amiri, who is one of the attorneys on the case and deputy director of the aclu reproductive freedom project in new york city. how significant do you thinkjudge pittman's ruling was? his how significant do you thinkjudge pittman's ruling was?—
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pittman's ruling was? his ruling a is a very significant _ pittman's ruling was? his ruling a is a very significant and _ pittman's ruling was? his ruling a is a very significant and the - is a very significant and the department ofjustice lawsuit is a watershed moment in the fight for abortion access. we have never seen anything like it before from the department ofjustice and we are thrilled they got involved and we are thrilled that their preliminary injunction. the department of justice needed to get involved because the laws have been so extreme that has caused devastation in texas in terms of access to abortion. and the law was designed to evadejudicial review abortion. and the law was designed to evade judicial review which it has up until this moment. you 'ust heard what — has up until this moment. you 'ust heard what rebecca i has up until this moment. you 'ust heard what rebecca said, i has up until this moment. you 'ust heard what rebecca said, that h has up until this moment. you just i heard what rebecca said, that people could be prosecuted retrospectively and it's almost a foregone conclusion that the fifth circuit which is a conservative will set his judgment aside? tram which is a conservative will set his judgment aside?— which is a conservative will set his judgment aside? two things on that first, art judgment aside? two things on that first, part of — judgment aside? two things on that first, part of the _ judgment aside? two things on that first, part of the very _ judgment aside? two things on that first, part of the very crucial- first, part of the very crucial aspects is that the retroactive provision which is designed just as you heard to intimidate and threaten abortion providers that even if they are acting fully within the law they
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could still face lawsuits under the ruling which is ridiculous. it also evenif ruling which is ridiculous. it also even if the fifth circuit is hostile to this case there is still the supreme court and this case could make its way very quickly to the supreme court after a stop in the fifth circuit. the supreme court after a stop in the fifth circuit-— supreme court after a stop in the fifth circuit. the supreme court is 6-3 conservative _ fifth circuit. the supreme court is 6-3 conservative liberal. - fifth circuit. the supreme court is 6-3 conservative liberal. at - fifth circuit. the supreme court is 6-3 conservative liberal. at some j 6—3 conservative liberal. at some point it is going to face a test. whether or not they're going to take away our right that had already been given and one that has stood for decades. they're going to have to make a decision on this when way or the other whether it's the mississippi law or texas law. that's ri . ht. mississippi law or texas law. that's right- these — mississippi law or texas law. that's right. these are _ mississippi law or texas law. that's right. these are direct _ mississippi law or texas law. that's right. these are direct changes - mississippi law or texas law. that's right. these are direct changes to l right. these are direct changes to roe vs wade which has been the law of the land for more than 50 years and the supreme court is going to have to make this decision about whether it's going to continue to uphold those decades that's subcritical to peoples lives. thank ou ve subcritical to peoples lives. thank you very much — subcritical to peoples lives. thank you very much and _ subcritical to peoples lives. thank you very much and thank - subcritical to peoples lives. thank you very much and thank you - subcritical to peoples lives. thank you very much and thank you to i you very much and thank you to
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rebecca. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: us national security adviser sits down at the bbc and says the united states needs to stand up for itself when faced with a rising china. millions of households in the uk are now facing much higher energy bills over the coming year according to industry experts. the fuel poverty charity national energy action has warned as many as 1.5 million households could be pushed into fuel poverty next year if energy prices continue to rise. their chief executive, adam scorer, explained why. income erosion for those on the lowest incomes and the essentials of life coming up more. food, rent, council tax, and energy. it is the worst combination in a short period of time that i can imagine seeing and the impact on people is going to
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be absolutely drastic. 0nly go to bed at seven p.m., don't use the washing machine, don't use your cooker, don't buy clothes for your children, the sorts of decisions that too many people are having to make now and they're going to have hundreds of thousands more households being brought those decisions. jake sullivan, the united states national security adviser, has warned russia it should not be trying to exploit the worlds growing energy crisis. in an exclusive interview with the bbc�*s james landale, he said moscow had previously used energy as "a tool of coercion and a political weapon". but he said any attempt to exploit the situation this time would backfire. mr sullivan also had some words on the northern ireland protocol and urged both the eu and the uk to work together. he said the possibility of a return to a hard border between northern ireland and the republic was "of serious concern to the united states".
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energy, there is an energy crisis going on at the moment and a lot of people concerned about races — rising crises, how concern is the united states about europe's growing dependence on russia as a source of energy? we dependence on russia as a source of enerr ? ~ . dependence on russia as a source of enerr ? . ., ., dependence on russia as a source of enerr ? ~ ., ., , dependence on russia as a source of enerr ?~ ., ., , . energy? we have long been concerned about russia — energy? we have long been concerned about russia using _ energy? we have long been concerned about russia using energy _ energy? we have long been concerned about russia using energy as - energy? we have long been concerned about russia using energy as a - energy? we have long been concerned about russia using energy as a tool. about russia using energy as a tool of coercion— about russia using energy as a tool of coercion and a political weapon. he had _ of coercion and a political weapon. he had seen it happen before and we could see _ he had seen it happen before and we could see it— he had seen it happen before and we could see it happen again. that being _ could see it happen again. that being said, the larger challenge right— being said, the larger challenge right now is a global challenge with both oil— right now is a global challenge with both oil supplies and gas supplies and its— both oil supplies and gas supplies and it's a — both oil supplies and gas supplies and it's a challenge where their supply— and it's a challenge where their supply of— and it's a challenge where their supply of these sources of energy are not— supply of these sources of energy are not meeting the growing demand as economies recover. do are not meeting the growing demand as economies recover.— as economies recover. do you think russia will — as economies recover. do you think russia will try _ as economies recover. do you think russia will try and _ as economies recover. do you think russia will try and explain - as economies recover. do you think russia will try and explain this? - as economies recover. do you think russia will try and explain this? i i russia will try and explain this? i think it would be an mistake for russia — think it would be an mistake for russia to — think it would be an mistake for russia to try to exploit this and it will ultimately backfire on them and i will ultimately backfire on them and i believe _ will ultimately backfire on them and i believe they should respond to the market _ i believe they should respond to the market demands for increased energy supplies— market demands for increased energy supplies to _ market demands for increased energy supplies to europe. you market demands for increased energy supplies to europe.— supplies to europe. you spend six hours yesterday — supplies to europe. you spend six hours yesterday with _ supplies to europe. you spend six hours yesterday with china's - supplies to europe. you spend six hours yesterday with china's top | hours yesterday with china's top diplomats, what did you learn?
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first, when we are in an intense competition with china and it requires _ competition with china and it requires intense diplomacy we had an opportunity— requires intense diplomacy we had an opportunity to cover the full range of issues — opportunity to cover the full range of issues in — opportunity to cover the full range of issues in our relationship and to talk quite — of issues in our relationship and to talk quite directly and candidly with one — talk quite directly and candidly with one another about the areas where _ with one another about the areas where we — with one another about the areas where we have interest that i'm in a lot of— where we have interest that i'm in a lot of areas— where we have interest that i'm in a lot of areas where interest do not align— lot of areas where interest do not align and — lot of areas where interest do not align and what i learned among other things— align and what i learned among other things is— align and what i learned among other things is that china is certainly going — things is that china is certainly going to — things is that china is certainly going to look out for its interests and it's— going to look out for its interests and it's going to steadfastly defend its perspective on the world and it's incumbent upon us as the united states— it's incumbent upon us as the united states working with allies and partners — states working with allies and partners to make clear where we stand, _ partners to make clear where we stand. to — partners to make clear where we stand, to stand up for our friends, to stand _ stand, to stand up for our friends, to stand up — stand, to stand up for our friends, to stand up for our interests and that's— to stand up for our interests and that's why— to stand up for our interests and that's why i _ to stand up for our interests and that's why i communicated to him and what we _ that's why i communicated to him and what we intended to do. are that's why i communicated to him and what we intended to do.— what we intended to do. are all those allies _ what we intended to do. are all those allies on _ what we intended to do. are all those allies on the _ what we intended to do. are all those allies on the same - what we intended to do. are allj those allies on the same page? what we intended to do. are all. those allies on the same page? in europe, people talk more about corporation, on trade, on climate change, there's caution before getting into a confrontation between
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the united states and china. i getting into a confrontation between the united states and china.- the united states and china. i think there's a bit — the united states and china. i think there's a bit of— the united states and china. i think there's a bit of a _ the united states and china. i think there's a bit of a caricature - the united states and china. i think there's a bit of a caricature in - the united states and china. i think there's a bit of a caricature in the i there's a bit of a caricature in the media narratives around the relationship between the united states and europe when it comes to china. is this view that we fly over from the other side of the atlantic and just yell at the europeans about getting tougher on china. when in fact, there's increasing convergence. if you look at the eu strategy document on china it says china a competitor, partner, and a strategic rival. systemic rifle, i think is the exact phrase. a systemic rival. if you look at the way the united states looked at this we have a deep competition with china on a range of issues and yet we have to work with them where interests are aligned with it on climate change or public health or other issues. so actually what we have found and we saw the second week to trade and technology council in pittsburgh last week is that the united states and the europeans have a long agenda that is where we have things to work on together to align our interests in the face of
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increasing pressure and challenge from china. let's look at some of the day's other news. the oldest defendant ever to go on trialfor alleged nazi—era crimes has appeared in court in germany accused of complicity in the murder of more than 3,500 people. prosecutors say that the man, who is 100 years old, was a guard at one of the camps. the un security council has been told that increasingly alarming accounts of hunger—related deaths are emerging from the tigray region of ethiopia. the secretary general said life—saving humanitarian efforts were being crippled. he appealed to the ethiopian government to allow the unhindered movement of supplies. ajudge in the us has given permission for prince andrew's lawyers to get access to a confidential document, which they believe will end a civil claim against him. virginia guiffre is pursuing a case against the duke of york, alleging she was the victim of sexual assault. prince andrew has always denied those allegations.
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if you're one of the millions of people watching the squid game on netflix, you'll know the premise. cash—strapped contestants ring up a phone number to take part in a life and death children's game for money. but you probably won't know that the phone number displayed on screen actually dials through to someone's real phone, and it belongs to a south korean businesswoman. she's apparently received calls from more than 4,000 fan who have been calling up hoping to take part. netflix has said it will re—edit the scene to remove the woman's phone number. i don't know if i'm more shocked that there is a phone number out there that actually appears in the game show or whether i'm shocked it's actually 4000 people who are prepared to die to get the cash. stay with us on the bbc. we are dedicating the next half hour to unpacking the worlds supply chain crisis. we will be speaking to
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operators and factory owners and wholesale importers frustrated with how much the system is grinding to a halt and how that is impacting on their bottom line. stay with us. hello again. for many of us today has been a cloudier date compared with yesterday but it's been warmer as well. a look at the temperatures we had yesterday. in northeast england, 13 degrees yesterday. this afternoon those temperatures have reached 20 degrees here. ajump of seven celsius. those temperatures are about six or seven degrees above average for the time of year. some breaks in the cloud and they've been across parts of northeast england and to the east of the area having the best of the sunshine. a few breaks of well in the southwest. some thick cloud where we had our leather fronts bringing some some thick cloud where we had our leatherfronts bringing some rain. and it will be with us at least until the next 24 hours. they will
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be furthering at times. northern ireland neglect in scotland and ingrid and wales quiet night for many. some drizzle for a western coasts and heels in the northwest. some mist and fog patches forming elsewhere and some of those could be widespread and dance as we start friday and potentially slow to clear as well. it eventually mist and fog breaking and again we will see some sunshine coming through the best of it across my central and eastern parts of england. east wales not doing too badly as well. those temperatures will climb into the low 20s. temperatures will climb into the low 205. if temperatures will climb into the low 20s. if you don't see a lot of sunshine it will still be warmer thanit sunshine it will still be warmer than it should be at this stage of the year. into the weekend it would be a change. cool air will be pushing him southwards across the country. behind this weather front which is a cold front. it's bringing rain to in ireland and scotland that it will start to shift away so the bright weather is expected to be west scotland as we go through the
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afternoon. for england and wales at afternoon. for england and wales at a few mist and fog patches but a quiet day and temperatures in the warm areas and again claiming to 20 degrees but starting to cool down some more across scotland and northern ireland. in sunday, cool and fresh air sinking in most parts of the uk and here is our weather front, some of cloud and rain but nothing significant. those temperatures getting closer to normal, 15 in belfast and edinboro, stayed around 19 degrees in london. that's a long way above average. next week high—pressure with quiet weather and temperatures getting closer to normal.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. presidentjoe biden speaks on the importance of vaccine mandates in the united states. in texas, a federal judge blocks the state's restrictive new abortion law. but legal challenges by the state are already under way. coming up in the next half hour, we're drilling down on the global supply chain crisis. we'll speak to the man who runs this california port with a backlog of vessels waiting for space to dock. and also, we'll speak to the head of a puzzle company whose games like this one are stuck on a container vessel, unable to dock after being shipped all the way from china.
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the global supply chain is in crisis. no matter where in the world you're watching, this is a story that is going to impact you. it is a complex, interconnected problem. the good news as we emerge from this pandemic is that demand is surging. but unlocking a global economy that was closed for months on end has never been tried before. we have changed the way we work, how we view work, which means there are gaps in the labour force, the fuel is more expensive, so is transportation. there are kinks in every link of the supply chain which has thrown the entire system off—balance. you can see it very clearly in prices. take the cost of sending a single container from asia to the uk. it is now 14 times higher than it was to ship the same container before the pandemic. what once cost $1,300 is now $18,000. the average journey on the same route has doubled from 35 days to 70 days, largely due
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to congestion at uk ports. and when ships dock, there aren't enough drivers to pick up the containers that do arrive. we're going to spend the next half an hourfocusing on two different legs of that global supply chain, to show you what it's like for importers, exporters and port operators. one of those routes is from a chinese factory to a uk warehouse. the second is from a californian port to a factory in the midwest. gavin ucko is the ceo of the happy puzzle company here in the uk. they supply award—winning puzzles, games and puzzle books. his company is based in elstree, in hertfordshire, though gavin tonightjoins us from israel. welcome to the programme. i want to unpick this puzzle, 0k? and i want to fire some rapid questions at you. i want to get a full picture of what is going on. so let's use as an example the last order you made, the last contender that you ordered to
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stop where does it come from? where is the factory? that stop where does it come from? where is the factory?— is the factory? that container is cominr is the factory? that container is coming from — is the factory? that container is coming from an _ is the factory? that container is coming from an actual - is the factory? that container is coming from an actual factory l is the factory? that container is i coming from an actual factory that is... that would normally take 25—20 days from when it starts crossing until it reaches our warehouse. fiic until it reaches our warehouse. 0k. when ou until it reaches our warehouse. 0k. when you place _ until it reaches our warehouse. 0k. when you place your order and you speak to the factory, do they have the workforce to fulfil your order? yes, they do. do the workforce to fulfil your order? yes, they do-_ the workforce to fulfil your order? yes, they do. do they have a lori to ret that yes, they do. do they have a lori to get that order _ yes, they do. do they have a lori to get that order to _ yes, they do. do they have a lori to get that order to the _ yes, they do. do they have a lori to get that order to the port _ yes, they do. do they have a lori to get that order to the port side? -- i get that order to the port side? -- -- lor . get that order to the port side? -- —— lorry. they do. get that order to the port side? -- -- lorry. they do. and _ get that order to the port side? -- -- lorry. they do. and didn't - get that order to the port side? -- j -- lorry. they do. and didn't leave on time? — -- lorry. they do. and didn't leave on time? did _ -- lorry. they do. and didn't leave on time? did indeed _ -- lorry. they do. and didn't leave on time? did indeed leave - -- lorry. they do. and didn't leave on time? did indeed leave on - -- lorry. they do. and didn't leave | on time? did indeed leave on time. we have found _ on time? did indeed leave on time. we have found your— on time? did indeed leave on time. we have found your container. - on time? did indeed leave on time. j we have found your container. leo, our producer, has been searching for it all afternoon, you gave him the container number, and as you say, it left the port near shanghai on the 26th of august, aboard the msc
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isabella. you say should take a month in transit to land in york factory here, which means by my reckoning it should've arrived on the 23rd of september.— reckoning it should've arrived on the 23rd of september. that's right. it was due the 23rd of september. that's right. it was due to _ the 23rd of september. that's right. it was due to doc _ the 23rd of september. that's right. it was due to doc on _ the 23rd of september. that's right. it was due to doc on the _ the 23rd of september. that's right. it was due to doc on the 23rd - the 23rd of september. that's right. it was due to doc on the 23rd of- it was due to doc on the 23rd of september and we would've had it in our warehouse within a couple of days of that. it our warehouse within a couple of days of that-— days of that. it is not docked. in fact, it is _ days of that. it is not docked. in fact, it is here, _ days of that. it is not docked. in fact, it is here, anchored - days of that. it is not docked. in fact, it is here, anchored just i fact, it is here, anchored just outside felix told —— felixstowe. have you had any of data when it will doc? . . ., have you had any of data when it will doc? , , ., . will doc? first update we received is that it had _ will doc? first update we received is that it had been _ will doc? first update we received is that it had been delayed - will doc? first update we received is that it had been delayed from i will doc? first update we received i is that it had been delayed from the 20th of september until the 6th of october, which was yesterday, which 0ctober, which was yesterday, which was bad enough, or latest information which we received today is that it is due to doc on the ninth. that is on saturday. find ninth. that is on saturday. and who's waiting _ ninth. that is on saturday. and who's waiting for _ ninth. that is on saturday. and who's waiting for the _ ninth. that is on saturday. and who's waiting for the product? what are the customers saying to you
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because yellow first of all, i —— saying to you? -- saying to you? anybody in an industry geared _ -- saying to you? anybody in an industry geared towards - -- saying to you? anybody in an i industry geared towards christmas gifts at the moment is aware of the situation, so people are generally quite understandable there are delays, and that is partly because we are at the 7th of october, not the 7th of december, so there is not blind panic yet, but the shops are setting to fill up and people are starting to look for their christmas gifts. and if you've not got what you want, you will buy somewhere else. it is getting significant worse every day passes. [30 else. it is getting significant worse every day passes. do you have a truck, worse every day passes. do you have a truck. very — worse every day passes. do you have a truck, very quickly, _ worse every day passes. do you have a truck, very quickly, on _ worse every day passes. do you have a truck, very quickly, on the - a truck, very quickly, on the dockside from when the ship docks? judging by what has happened recently, we would like to think so, but that is not guaranteed, because the previous containers they came in, we had becoming booked, but they never turned up. and we rebooked them for the following day, they
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never turned up again, and the earliest we could rearrange it after that was after a two week delay, and we then had to pay two weeks worth of what they call a rent for the port actually holding on to our containers, now is in additional £3000, containers, now is in additional e3000, and thatjust adds insult to injury of the inflated prices that were currently paying for the space on the boat. —— we are currently paying. i on the boat. -- we are currently -a inr. ., �* on the boat. -- we are currently .a in._ .,�* 4' ., on the boat. -- we are currently -a inr. .,�* ~ ., ., on the boat. -- we are currently -a inr. ., �* ~ ., ., ., paying. i don't know what the margin is on a puzzle. _ paying. i don't know what the margin is on a puzzle, but _ paying. i don't know what the margin is on a puzzle, but i _ paying. i don't know what the margin is on a puzzle, but i cannot _ paying. i don't know what the margin is on a puzzle, but i cannot imagine l is on a puzzle, but i cannot imagine it is massivo. you've got container freight the cost to 18 times more, the problem at the dockside in the rising costs there, the rising cost of fuel when he gets to the warehouse, are you going have to pass that cost onto the christmas consumer? irate pass that cost onto the christmas consumer?— pass that cost onto the christmas consumer? ~ ., ., ., , consumer? we have done two things secificall consumer? we have done two things specifically to _ consumer? we have done two things specifically to try _ consumer? we have done two things specifically to try and _ consumer? we have done two things specifically to try and undo _ consumer? we have done two things specifically to try and undo the - specifically to try and undo the damage of this, so we passed on as little as possible. previously, our games came in a box which was that size — i don't know how well you can see that— and when i changed it into
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a box which is the size, so it is smaller and it is thinner, and it is more cramped and it is not as nice on the inside from the packaging one of you, but the difference that makes is that instead of being able to get 13,000 copies of the games onto a 40 foot container, we can now get 27,000, so it is more than double the quantity we can naturally get on, and so that more than halves the individual units shipping cost, but that does not go the whole way, it only as part of the way towards solving the problem. so, yes, the recommended retail price of this game has had to rise because we have no choice, and it is the same for everybody in every industry that is affected. we are quite fortunate because we are in a position to be able to sell games and slightly smaller boxes, but other industries, people importing things like garden furniture, you cannot shrink garden furniture, you cannot shrink garden furniture because people do not want
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chairs that are too small to sit on their garden, so a lot of people are stuck and it is punishing and it is going to send some smaller businesses out of business. gavin ucko, thank _ businesses out of business. gavin ucko, thank you _ businesses out of business. gavin ucko, thank you wendy _ businesses out of business. gavin ucko, thank you wendy for - businesses out of business. gavin ucko, thank you wendy for that. l businesses out of business. gavin ucko, thank you wendy for that. we wish you the very best of luck for we know that is very stressful. i can hear how stressful it is. so let's look at that same problem from the freight handlers perspective. richard ballantyne is the chief executive of the british ports association. he's in london. how long do you think it will take before the msc is able to doc? i cannot comment on a specific of particular ships, cannot comment on a specific of particularships, but all cannot comment on a specific of particular ships, but all i would say, and you will probably say he would say this would not be, this is very much a global issue at the moment, and actually in the uk, it is not as bad as it has been elsewhere, north america and itself, we have seen a lot more delays, actually, this is as a result of a big surge after the pandemic where
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we had various lockdowns, restrictions affecting demand, and then we had a big run on storage. warehousing and on—site storage facilities, open air storage facilities, open air storage facilities, all heavily overused, and now coupled with this awful driver haulage shortage— it really is a perfect storm for the justice industry to deal with. irate is a perfect storm for the 'ustice industry to deal with._ industry to deal with. we are lookinr industry to deal with. we are looking at — industry to deal with. we are looking at pictures _ industry to deal with. we are looking at pictures of - industry to deal with. we are - looking at pictures of felixstowe. what i can see is row upon row upon row of containers, and a lot of those containers are empty. is that part of the problem?— those containers are empty. is that part of the problem? yes, i will not comment specific _ part of the problem? yes, i will not comment specific and _ part of the problem? yes, i will not comment specific and situation - part of the problem? yes, i will not comment specific and situation at i comment specific and situation at felixstowe, but part of the problem global he has been getting containers, empty containers, back to source in asia, getting them back empty so they can be filled up with the products and commodities and
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toys and ship them back, but given the huge amounts of storage pressure there has been, it has been quite challenging for the shipping companies to get those empty containers back to asia. share companies to get those empty containers back to asia. are you actually saying _ containers back to asia. are you actually saying that _ containers back to asia. are you actually saying that there - containers back to asia. are you actually saying that there are i containers back to asia. are you i actually saying that there are ships in this day and age, when we are all debating climate change, having to sail back to asia empty because on the dockside we cannot get the containers empty quickly enough? hat containers empty quickly enough? iirrt completely empty, but not perhaps as full as they might normally be, and that's an efficiency thing, because if you as i understand it low though ships up and take —— it would take a lot longer and that would cause further delays in getting goods back around from asia. talk further delays in getting goods back around from asia.— around from asia. talk to me about the ort around from asia. talk to me about the port side. _ around from asia. talk to me about the port side, because _ around from asia. talk to me about the port side, because gavin, i around from asia. talk to me about the port side, because gavin, we i the port side, because gavin, we hope, in the next week or so, his puzzles are going to arrive. what is the processing time looking like today? is it any better than it was two or three weeks ago? i
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today? is it any better than it was two or three weeks ago?- two or three weeks ago? i won't comment _ two or three weeks ago? i won't comment on _ two or three weeks ago? i won't comment on the _ two or three weeks ago? i won't comment on the initial- two or three weeks ago? i won't comment on the initial times, i two or three weeks ago? i won't i comment on the initial times, but uk ports are doing quite well on an individual scale, ports are doing quite well on an individualscale, but ports are doing quite well on an individual scale, but dwell time — the time before it is collected, usually by a lorry — this is the peak point, coming up to early october, getting all those goods into go to factories, to distribution centres, to other facilities in factories, to distribution centres, to otherfacilities in preparation for christmas, so this really is hectic normally, and i think we are seeing some extra pressure because of the results of coming out of a global pandemic, brexit impacts on haulage, one or two other issues which are affecting everything. richard ballantyne, chief executive of the british ports association, thank you very much indeed.
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stay with us on bbc news. we are going to cross the atlantic to look at that same problem in the supply chain, this time through the eyes of a factory owner in illinois. and we will get the view of the executive port manager in long beach, california, one of the biggest container ports in america. a british woman who took her children with her when she joined the islamic state group says the uk government should "deal with the issue" of allowing them to return. nicole jack is being held with her three daughters in the same syrian refugee camp as shamima begum, whose british citizenship has been revoked. 0ur correspondent poonam taneja has this exclusive report. this is no place for children to live. but thousands do. this squalid camp in northern syria houses the surviving children of islamic state group's fallen caliphate. shall i fix your slipper?
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amongst them are three british sisters. every time, you're too big for this. they are seven, nine and 12, and they live here with their mum, nicole jack. you, as a mother, decided to take your children to islamic state group territory. there were beheadings, there were murders, there were massacres. how would you explain that to anyone? i don't think, even if i explained it, everyone would understand. but it was about my family being together, do you understand? and honestly, secondly, what may have happened, we've never been witness to it, my children and i, honestly. you know? i haven't seen a beheading in my life. let her come and face the consequences, but it is not fair and it is not right for these children to be languishing in this place. enough is enough. they have already served a six—year sentence.
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the british government wouldn't comment on nicole jack's case. they say those remaining in syria include dangerous individuals, and not to make securityjudgments based on gender and age. but charleen says, while her daughter should face justice, her grandchildren are innocent. poonam taneja, bbc news. so, in the last part of the programme, we heard from a games company in the uk and the port operator. but i don't want you to go away with the impression that is somehow a uniquely british problem. far from it. it's a global crisis — and it's taking its toll on the biggest economy in the world. long beach in california is the second biggest container port in america. this year, they will handle a record 20 million containers. a large percentage of that is
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the made in asia items that come into the united states that will flow through long beach and its neighbour, the port of los angeles. so let's speak, then, to a very busy man. mario cordero is the executive director of the port of long beach. welcome to the programme up. let's dive straight into the nitty—gritty. how many ships had you got at the moment and how many are out in the bay? moment and how many are out in the ba ? , ., ., . ., bay? currently, at anchor in the harbour, bay? currently, at anchor in the harbour. we _ bay? currently, at anchor in the harbour, we have _ bay? currently, at anchor in the harbour, we have 62 _ bay? currently, at anchor in the harbour, we have 62 vessels. i bay? currently, at anchor in the i harbour, we have 62 vessels. again, these are historic numbers. at port at the present time, together, we have right now about 28 vessels at birth in the complex here, that as you mentioned, this is the nation's largest container complex in the united states. 50 largest container complex in the united states.— united states. so how long is it takinr united states. so how long is it taking you _ united states. so how long is it taking you to — united states. so how long is it taking you to process _ united states. so how long is it taking you to process one i united states. so how long is it taking you to process one of. united states. so how long is it i taking you to process one of these ships when it comes in? and what are the problems you're encountering? number one of the usual time to
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unmount and under these vessels is three to five days, and here in southern california, we are receiving some of the mega vessels, some of the largest vessels in the world, so you're looking right five days, 16, 18,000 containers. the challenge is, with regard to the volume you referenced, that is an historic number when you talk about 20 million, and to put it into perspective, there is no other complex in the united states that even approximate half that, but as you probably indicated, this is a global supply chain issue, and all this is rooted in covid, going back to spring of 2020. fin this is rooted in covid, going back to spring of 2020.— this is rooted in covid, going back to spring of 2020. on the dockside, i read to spring of 2020. on the dockside, i read today — to spring of 2020. on the dockside, i read today you've _ to spring of 2020. on the dockside, i read today you've got _ to spring of 2020. on the dockside, i read today you've got truckers i i read today you've got truckers wasting five to six hours to get the products that have been landed on the dockside. is that becoming the biggest problem, getting people through the port to take things away, so that you've got space to
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work? ., ., away, so that you've got space to work? . ., ., ., away, so that you've got space to work? . . ., ., ., work? yeah, at the port of long beach, work? yeah, at the port of long beach. we _ work? yeah, at the port of long beach. we are _ work? yeah, at the port of long beach, we are tracking - work? yeah, at the port of long beach, we are tracking return i work? yeah, at the port of long i beach, we are tracking return time, we have six container terminals, and as you indicated, there are challenges. two to three hours... the latest turnover we completed here, that is averaging a 40 minute turn time weight, but nevertheless, clearly, there are bottlenecks and supply chain, whether it is the vessels at anchor all the way to the distribution centres in the region here, so obviously the supply—chain has been compromised, and clearly from a global perspective, we have a global disruption in the supply chain. i global disruption in the supply chain. ~ ., ., global disruption in the supply chain. ,. ., . . . chain. i know that you change operations — chain. i know that you change operations in _ chain. i know that you change operations in the _ chain. i know that you change operations in the port - chain. i know that you change operations in the port so i you are now 24/7. do you have the manpower to do that? irate you are now 24”. do you have the manpower to do that?— you are now 24”. do you have the manpower to do that? we have the
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manpower- — manpower to do that? we have the manpower- we _ manpower to do that? we have the manpower. we have _ manpower to do that? we have the manpower. we have volunteers i manpower to do that? we have the manpower. we have volunteers to l manpower to do that? we have the i manpower. we have volunteers to move forward to have a 24/7 framework, and again, this ultimately would be and again, this ultimately would be a vision around the clock, operations, like they do in asia, and this is something i talked about even before this crisis. the 20 million containers we are moving here is not surprising stub this was the forecast back ten years. what is surprising is how it got triggered and how the surge came upon us after the first six month of 2020, which frankly from a global perspective, beach was not immune. we were challenged from what covid brought on —— long beach was not immune. brought on -- long beach was not immune. ., ., , , ., immune. your opposite number at the port of los angeles, _ immune. your opposite number at the port of los angeles, he _ immune. your opposite number at the port of los angeles, he is _ immune. your opposite number at the port of los angeles, he is not - port of los angeles, he is not following suit. he does not think 20 47 operations are the answer because, he says, there is not enough truck drivers and warehouse workers that they would need to bolster the operation. what would you say to that?—
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bolster the operation. what would you say to that? number one, there is legitimacy — you say to that? number one, there is legitimacy that _ you say to that? number one, there is legitimacy that you _ you say to that? number one, there is legitimacy that you cannot - you say to that? number one, there is legitimacy that you cannot flip i is legitimacy that you cannot flip the switch to a 24/7 operation, so any short—term, absolutely, there's go to be challenges. in the midterm and long—term, i think that i will be proven correctly. like i said, we are not reinventing the wheel now stop this is exactly what is happening the ports of origin. your earlier speaker on the show referenced ningbo — the ports in china are 24/7, so this is something that i am not only expressing before the pandemic, but you have ceos of the pandemic, but you have ceos of the major carriers, likejerry the major carriers, like jerry mixon, the major carriers, likejerry mixon, who is also called for 24/7, given, again, containers, from the ports of origin from a 24/7 operation and, again, it will take time — this is not going to be a quick fix— but the important thing is we have now triggered that we are
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going to put up the money and the time to have these extended gates which are extremely necessary. whether you call a 20 47 or you call it 16-5, whether you call a 20 47 or you call it16—5, no whether you call a 20 47 or you call it 16—5, no matter how you want to break it down, we need to move quickly for extended gates. maria quickly for extended gates. mario cordero, quickly for extended gates. mario cordero. we _ quickly for extended gates. mario cordero, we are _ quickly for extended gates. mario cordero, we are going _ quickly for extended gates. mario cordero, we are going to - quickly for extended gates. mario cordero, we are going to let i quickly for extended gates. mario cordero, we are going to let you go. you've got to get those shifts in, you a very busy man! so what does all that mean, then, to the factories across america that are waiting for parts? many of them will work on a just in time basis. many of them supply parts that will go into bigger machines. they are one part of a bigger manufacturing effort. nicole wolter is president and ceo of hm manufacturing. they produce gears and pulleys used in a variety of industrial equipment. welcome to the programme. nice to have you with us.— have you with us. thanks for having me. are have you with us. thanks for having me- are you — have you with us. thanks for having me. are you having _ have you with us. thanks for having me. are you having a _ have you with us. thanks for having me. are you having a stressful i have you with us. thanks for having i me. are you having a stressful time? yes, ifeel me. are you having a stressful time? yes, i feel i — me. are you having a stressful time? yes, i feel i don't _ me. are you having a stressful time? yes, i feel i don't sleep, _ me. are you having a stressful time? yes, i feel! don't sleep, my - me. are you having a stressful time? yes, i feel i don't sleep, my team i yes, ifeel i don't sleep, my team is not sleeping either, and if like mining should really be chief of
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staff, the executive just to so many different things instead of what i should be doing these days. so what are ou should be doing these days. so what are you waiting _ should be doing these days. so what are you waiting for? _ should be doing these days. so what are you waiting for? we _ should be doing these days. so what are you waiting for? we heard i should be doing these days. so what are you waiting for? we heard the i are you waiting for? we heard the problems at the port over there in la? what are you waiting for and where does it come from? to la? what are you waiting for and where does it come from? to me, it is work forceful _ where does it come from? to me, it is work forceful to _ where does it come from? to me, it is work forceful to buy _ where does it come from? to me, it is work forceful to buy cannot i is work forceful to buy cannot member in the past eight months when everyone out the factory floor has been out in the shop working for an entire week of and so it has been really difficult to try to get the products out and to please customers, because i am happy to do with swing shifts, people not feeling, becoming back because of covid, people that have to take care of their elderly parents or their spouses or kids and so it really has been quite difficult to try to get people to work, come to work, and said that is really stifling everything in terms of getting product out for my customers. another issue is material. i am still waiting on some sort of material that i will not be getting till december, so all of that really put a damper on getting things out.
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and of those particles your gears and pulleys, are they coming from around america or through the ports? for me, a lot of the material is coming from different areas, canada, pennsylvania in the united states, i'm waiting for bearings from japan, material from the i'm waiting for bearings from japan, materialfrom the uk, so it is i'm waiting for bearings from japan, material from the uk, so it is this issue or your attorney do crisis management you try to help out your customers to see what you could do differently to maybe try a different product or a different service so we can get this inventory out and onto the factory floors, because you do a lot for food beverage and packaging and semi conductors, and in the states right now, semiconductors are really taking a huge hit for the chip shortages right now. i mentioned you can get three quarters of a gear or a pulley builds, but if you're ready for a ball bearing, it sits there — that's the problem. correct, yes. sits there - that's the problem. correct. yes-— sits there - that's the problem. correct, yes. sits there - that's the problem. correct, es. ., . ., correct, yes. your customers say to ou, we correct, yes. your customers say to you. we are — correct, yes. your customers say to you. we are happy _ correct, yes. your customers say to you. we are happy to _ correct, yes. your customers say to you. we are happy to pay— correct, yes. your customers say to you, we are happy to pay for- correct, yes. your customers say to
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you, we are happy to pay for the i you, we are happy to pay for the overtime, what you're saying is you advertise for extra workers to come in and theyjust are not there? absolutely. and that's a struggle. you can do a lot of things. you can swing shifts, you can ask different people to come in. i have an open indeed job openings report, where try to get people to come in, offer different incentives, different training, full benefits, just to excite people to want to come to work in manufacturing, but if it is not the workforce, it is the supply chain on the other side of the services, whether it is the ball bearings we are waiting for. i had an entire order waiting for. i had an entire order waiting for. i had an entire order waiting for six weeks at the dock they had not even touched yet, and so anything of that in terms of, they're hurting for workforce and i'm try to get at the door, crisis management getting yelled and screamed at, no matter how much money they put in front of me i
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am... ~ . money they put in front of me i am... . ., ., ., am... we heard throughout the last half there's — am... we heard throughout the last half there's loads _ am... we heard throughout the last half there's loads of _ am... we heard throughout the last half there's loads of demand - am... we heard throughout the last half there's loads of demand there i am... we heard throughout the last| half there's loads of demand there - half there's loads of demand there — it is getting things from h a b. what about when the product is finished? do you have a truck waiting at the gate, ready to take it to the customer.— waiting at the gate, ready to take it to the customer. absolutely, we do. you it to the customer. absolutely, we do- you can _ it to the customer. absolutely, we do. you can source _ it to the customer. absolutely, we do. you can source a _ it to the customer. absolutely, we do. you can source a trucker. it i do. you can source a trucker. it de-ends do. you can source a trucker. it depends on _ do. you can source a trucker. it depends on the _ do. you can source a trucker. it depends on the time _ do. you can source a trucker. it depends on the time and i do. you can source a trucker. it depends on the time and it i do. you can source a trucker. it i depends on the time and it depends on the day. we try to get truckers in your every other day, we are even using third service parties to try to get in here as well, we are trying to even do in an industrial park band together to see if we can usually strokes to keep the product yelling, and so we have to get resourceful —— get together trying get the product going. resourceful -- get together trying get the product going.— get the product going. nicole wolter, get the product going. nicole wolter. we — get the product going. nicole wolter, we wish _ get the product going. nicole wolter, we wish you - get the product going. nicole wolter, we wish you all i get the product going. nicole wolter, we wish you all the i get the product going. nicole i wolter, we wish you all the best in illinois. thank you very much. it is a complex picture, but i hope over
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the last half hour, we have brought it altogether, just to show how all these interconnecting parts are buckling and straining and how there is a problem in the global supply chain. we will see you next week. hello. compared with the rather cool weather at the start of the week, things have now turned milder, especially if you had the sunshine. not many did on thursday, but where the sun came out in lincolnshire, the temperature rose above 20, a temperature which we didn't get in the whole of october last year. many stayed with the cloud, some foggy, but even with this sort of weather, it's milder. so what's going on? we have low pressure well to our north—west, ex—hurricane sam, staying away from us, but we do have ahead of it a feed of air coming from quite a long way south of the uk. it's mild, yes, but these colours don't necessarily translate into sunshine. in fact, there's been a lot of cloud and moisture coming up with the air from the south, and a weather front that scraped across scotland and northern ireland. notjust cloud but rain,
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and another day of that on and off, most persistent in western scotland, during friday. most of england and wales dry, some fog in east anglia and the south—east rather slow to clear, mayjust clear to low cloud during the day, whereas for many parts of england and wales, it's going to be a brighter day. more places seeing, more places realising temperatures of 20, 21, maybe even 22 degrees celsius. we've also got some very mild nights at the moment, temperatures closer to where they should be by day at this time of year. here's the weather front — still there, close to scotland and northern ireland as we go into the start of the weekend, maybe delivering some heavier rain for a time, but it is beginning to gradually move its way southwards, may reach into parts of northern england and north wales going into saturday evening. the rest of england and wales looking dry, some fog patches gradually clearing during saturday and maybe not as high those temperatures but it is still mild in some sunny spells. overnight into sunday, this weather front finally clears southwards. before it does so, parts of west scotland, west highlands, into argyll could end up with 100mm of rain, with the risk of flooding and transport disruption for as long as it rains. that has now cleared by sunday.
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all we're left with is a strip of cloud and barely any rain moving further south through england and wales, with bright skies, blustery showers in northern scotland following on behind, and temperatures are heading down, and that's a process that continues into next week. may have high pressure close by, it looks like there'll still be a weather front snaking down towards scotland again during monday, so we mayjust see another spell of rain running into particularly western areas on monday, whereas elsewhere, cloud increasing across northern ireland and northern england. the further south you are, you'll see some sunshine and temperatures are sinking down closer to average for the time of year, maybe even a little below in some spots. high pressure again close by for tuesday, still that weather front close by too. not much in the way of rain on that. may not be in exactly this position but it's sinking a little bit further southwards through the uk, a few spots of rain. a keen northerly breeze close to that north sea coast, all of that contributing to a much chillier feel to the weather,
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compared with what we have at the moment. and high pressure there for wednesday, thursday, in fact for much of the second half of next week. a bit of uncertainty about when this will start to clear away and we get some rain—bearing atlantic weather fronts moving back in towards the uk, but until that happens, it'll be mainly dry. so let's sum up next week's weather for the uk, and it does look as if, with high pressure becoming established, it will deliver a lot of dry weather across us. we've noticed things are going to be cooling down by day and by night, and compared to the very mild nights we have at the moment, more of us could well see our first frost of the season starting midweek next week. that's your weather for the week ahead.
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tonight at 10pm... households and businesses are warned that energy prices are set to rise sharply in the year ahead. industry says the rising cost of energy on the global market is bound to be largely passed on to the consumer. for many homes, it's a worrying time, with more than a million additional households reported to be heading for fuel poverty. the money's got to come from somewhere, but i'm not quite sure where yet, and it's a lot of money to find. and business leaders have added their voices to those expressing alarm at the challenges ahead. also tonight... newcastle united fans celebrate a takeover by a saudi—backed consortium, but the deal is criticised by human rights groups. from next monday, dozens of destinations will be taken off the uk government's red list, in the latest review of covid travel rules.

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