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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  October 7, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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meet two women who have made a huge impact on their sport. hello, i'm ros atkins with outside source. an approval has gone through for the takeover of newcastle united football club. it for the takeover of newcastle united football club.— football club. it shows that sports washin: football club. it shows that sports washing the _ football club. it shows that sports washing the tarnished _ football club. it shows that sports washing the tarnished regime - football club. it shows that sports washing the tarnished regime of i football club. it shows that sports| washing the tarnished regime of a human rights abusing country. there is now a frantic _ human rights abusing country. there is now a frantic search _ human rights abusing country. there is now a frantic search for _ is now a frantic search for survivors in the rubble of collapsed buildings. with energy costs rising globally, here in the uk, manufacturers are saying they will have to pass on pricing increases to consumers. and we will look again at
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the drug ivermectin and how supporting the use for covid is flawed. let's start with this developing story in the english premier league because in the past few hours, deal has been announced for a saudi takeover of newcastle united, the deal is worth around £300,000,000, just over 400,000,000 {300,000,000, just over 400,000,000 us £300,000,000, just over 400,000,000 us dollars and some are definitely celebrating the news. here is a tweet from newcastle's all—time top goal—scorer alan shearer. but the deal has been heavily criticised, too, here is amnesty international. your it shows that english football is open for business when it comes to sports washing the tarnished regime of a human rights abusing country. amnesty considers it fairly farcical that individuals implicated in war crimes or crimes against humanity can, if they've got deep
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enough pockets, buy their way into top—flight english football. those opposed to the takeover argue the premier league is ignoring its own rules, they are known as the owners and directors test out the fit and proper test which prohibits people from becoming an owner or director if they meet a number of criteria such as criminal convictions for a wide range of offences, a ban by a sporting a professional body, or breaches of certain key football regulations, such as match fixing and we know the consortium had to prove that the saudi state would not control newcastle football club, thatis control newcastle football club, that is relevant for a range of reasons, not least because, in february this year, the director of us national intelligence published a report which read... jamal khashoggi was killed in 2018. going live to
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newcastle's ground at saint james's park. tell us the process that led up park. tell us the process that led up to this announcement. well, this has been rumoured for 18 months and a few days ago, we very much thought it was kind of on the back and my not happen when things escalated very quickly yesterday afternoon we heard that the takeover would be completed imminently. that cracked on a little bit but then today, in the last couple of hours, was the statement from the premier league which confirmed that the takeover had been completed. the premier league said that they had settled their dispute with newcastle united over the takeover of the club, that the owners and directors test had been passed and also that they, and this i think is the key bit of the statement they released,
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had received a legally binding assurances that the kingdom of saudi arabia will not control newcastle united football club. that was the key stumbling block really to this deal which was agreed last april between mike ashley and the... which is spearheaded. the stumbling block which centred around what was the concern that the state would control newcastle united were settled that they would be separate entities and that has been given the green light for the saudi arabian public investment funds to... this 300,000,000 plus deal to allow the mike ashley regime to come to an end at four new ownership to come into place. stay with us, there are a couple of other strands to the story i want to pick up on. an argument
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which was key to achieving this deal writes a piracy dispute and the premier league broadcast band. he was a journalist from the daily telegraph talking us through this aspect of the story. llntiii aspect of the story. until yesterday. _ aspect of the story. until yesterday, he _ aspect of the story. until yesterday, he could - aspect of the story. until yesterday, he could not. aspect of the story. until- yesterday, he could not legally watch premier league football in saudi arabia because the premier league official broadcast partner be in sport has been blocked by the saudi state at every turn so they are being asked to sell a football club to a state that had been stealing from them. those piracy issues were resolved yesterday. had that been lifted, they paid $1,000,000,000 in damages to be in. and another aspect, make ashley has owned newcastle for the past 13 years and many are happy to see his reign come to an end. he was a member of the cup supporters trust. the last 14 years under mike ashley have just horrible as a fan, there
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has been no investment in the club. if you visited st james's park, you would see that it is falling apart, there are wires coming out the wall, places where tvs used to be, it needs painting, a new roof. bringing back our reporter _ needs painting, a new roof. bringing back our reporter from _ needs painting, a new roof. bringing back our reporter from st _ needs painting, a new roof. bringing back our reporter from st james's i back our reporter from st james's park. as you talk to fans, are they welcoming the takeover of the saudis? �* , , , saudis? there's 'ust been huge excitement. — saudis? there'sjust been huge excitement, really, _ saudis? there'sjust been huge excitement, really, here - saudis? there'sjust been huge excitement, really, here in - saudis? there'sjust been huge excitement, really, here in the| saudis? there'sjust been huge - excitement, really, here in the city since the deal was announced. i have lived in as part of the world for a number of years and of the years that i lived here and come of this club, i've never seen it quite error quite like this. there has been hundreds of fans gathering around saint james hundreds of fans gathering around saintjames park which is in the heart of the city, football is very much the heartbeat of newcastle and there is huge excitement for the possibility i think of what is to come and the prospect that this
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investment and what it could do for the club, for the area, and for the team, you mentioned mike ashley and his regime, in these 14 years, trust between the club and its supporters had eroded, hope had very much diminished. there was a famous banner that was unveiled here at st james's park which said we do not demand a team that wins, we demand a team that tries, and that very much summed up the sentiment of the fans under mike ashley, they felt there was no ambition. they are becoming the richest club in the world that fans feel like ambition could come back to the club and the desire and hope has returned. of course it is not that simple, there are fans i've spoken to who have very much torn about this new ownership who cannot separate the moral issues around human rights in saudi arabia from the ownership of the club but i think whoever you speak to, whether
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they are in favour or not, they are all united with the joy that the mike ashley regime will come to an end. aan a an earthquake in pakistan has killed hundreds of people. authorities say the death toll is likely to rise and many people were killed when structures collapsed. translation: i killed when structures collapsed. translation:— killed when structures collapsed. translation: ., ~ , ., , translation: i am 65 years old but i've never experienced _ translation: i am 65 years old but i've never experienced this - translation: i am 65 years old but i've never experienced this kind - translation: i am 65 years old but i've never experienced this kind of. i've never experienced this kind of a job before. it was so destructive. everyone run out of the house is praying to god. everyone run out of the house is praying to god-— everyone run out of the house is praying to god. hundreds of homes have been reduced _ praying to god. hundreds of homes have been reduced to _ praying to god. hundreds of homes have been reduced to rubble, - praying to god. hundreds of homes have been reduced to rubble, the i have been reduced to rubble, the army has been called in to help with rescue efforts at a number of critically ill people had to be evacuated by air to the provincial capital. he was one people whose
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home —— one woman whose home was destroyed. translation: the earthquake — destroyed. translation: tie: earthquake was destroyed. translation: tue: earthquake was devastating. destroyed. translation: tt2 earthquake was devastating. we were sleeping and woken up by the shock of the quake and panicked. we could not run anywhere because the earthquake was so strong. even the walls were collapsing. the home minister walls were collapsing. the home ministe , .. walls were collapsing. the home ministe ., “ ., minister spoke to bbc about the operation- _ minister spoke to bbc about the operation- we — minister spoke to bbc about the operation. we are _ minister spoke to bbc about the operation. we are giving - minister spoke to bbc about the operation. we are giving them l minister spoke to bbc about the - operation. we are giving them tents, food items. — operation. we are giving them tents, food items, non-food _ operation. we are giving them tents, food items, non-food items - operation. we are giving them tents, food items, non-food items and - operation. we are giving them tents, food items, non-food items and the | food items, non—food items and the localised administration is surveying how many houses are damaged. we hope that we can construct their homes. to a reporter followin: construct their homes. to a reporter following the — construct their homes. to a reporter following the events. _ construct their homes. to a reporter following the events. the _ construct their homes. to a reporter following the events. the epicentrel following the events. the epicentre ofthe following the events. the epicentre of the earthquake _ following the events. the epicentre of the earthquake as _ following the events. the epicentre of the earthquake as the _ following the events. the epicentre of the earthquake as the most - of the earthquake as the most damaged and there are two other districts which have also been damaged really badly so so far
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according to the civil administration, many injured are coming to a three hour drive away so right now the capital city as the one which is hosting much of the injured people right now and apart from that, nine injured have been taken away by the pakistan army helicopters which have been sent to give support to the people over there. helicopters have also been deployed and there are people from pakistan's army and the national disaster authority or trying to understand how much of the damage has been done and because it is a mountainous area so there is also sliding and the roads are blocked so thatis sliding and the roads are blocked so that is why people are... a limit is three hours drive away, it is still taking people hours to get to there. they are in the west of pakistan and although it is the biggest in terms of land, it is still the smallest when it comes to the population so the communication network is a really bad over there and because of that, most of the information like, for instance, even when this earthquake happened, it happened at three am but most of the country basically got to know about it at
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four am and by then a lot of damage had already been done. many people in the uk are facing higher costs of gas and electricity with energy supplier saying they have no choice but to pass on the increase to consumers. the energy price cap which is designed to protect domestic customers could also rise and charities are saying an additional 1.5 million households could find themselves in fuel poverty. price rises are flowing direct from russia to break from drill to grill and hitting everyone. susan powell has been hit and her energy company hacks a monthly bill
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to £25. i energy company hacks a monthly bill to £25. ., ., energy company hacks a monthly bill to £25. . ., ._ ., to £25. i an extra layer on if i get cold. to £25. i an extra layer on if i get cold- there _ to £25. i an extra layer on if i get cold. there is _ to £25. i an extra layer on if i get cold. there is only _ to £25. i an extra layer on if i get cold. there is only a _ to £25. i an extra layer on if i get cold. there is only a limit - to £25. i an extra layer on if i get cold. there is only a limit to - to £25. i an extra layer on if i get| cold. there is only a limit to what you can do. i change the light bulbs for economic ones. the money has to come from somewhere but i'm not quite sure where yet and it's a lot of money to find. but quite sure where yet and it's a lot of money to find.— of money to find. but that was before an _ of money to find. but that was before an even _ of money to find. but that was before an even bigger- of money to find. but that was before an even bigger surge i of money to find. but that was before an even bigger surge in international prices that could shop the energy cap by more than 30% in april. charities say that an extra 1.5 million households into fuel poverty. the prices paid nationally have not yet reached record but frankly incredible levels. for context, latest in summer price cap which rose 10% to £1277 for a typical one was raised by 65p per firm in the first half of the year.
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the price cap... energy bills of this size landing on the doorstep will notjust prove unaffordable for millions of ordinary households, it could prove unthinkable for a government that is priding itself on raising a real wage packet. more than the rate of inflation. other governments around europe have poured billions into lowering these bills but that poses a dilemma of subsidising energy at the precise time we are supposed to be dealing with climate change. the business is ultimately the long term solution will be reducing reliance on the likes of russia with domestic energy. likes of russia with domestic ener: . . likes of russia with domestic enere . . , , , ., energy. the recent issues we have the volatility _ energy. the recent issues we have the volatility of _ energy. the recent issues we have the volatility of the _ energy. the recent issues we have the volatility of the gas _ energy. the recent issues we have the volatility of the gas price, - the volatility of the gas price, incredible spikes and falling back
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leads to greater uncertainty in the market and i think that shows exact why we need vigorously to pursue new findings. why we need vigorously to pursue new findines. , ., why we need vigorously to pursue new findines. , . , .., . findings. they have been encouraged to use the websites _ findings. they have been encouraged to use the websites for _ findings. they have been encouraged to use the websites for years - findings. they have been encouraged to use the websites for years and - to use the websites for years and they find they do not work at the moment. the system seems completely broken right now. right moment. the system seems completely broken right nova— broken right now. right now the -rice ca- broken right now. right now the price cap is _ broken right now. right now the price cap is providing _ broken right now. right now the price cap is providing one - broken right now. right now the price cap is providing one of- broken right now. right now the price cap is providing one of the| price cap is providing one of the best value tariffs on the market and thatis best value tariffs on the market and that is because the changes we are seeing. but as the changes work through, we do expect the market to unlock and absolutely in the future we expect people to be able to switch but at a much higher price point. bills of £2000 for bigger than normal house. right now the price cap is protecting customers from the volatility we are seeing. at the binning of the gas pipelines in russia, energy is being used as a form of diplomacy. loyal customers have been reassured by its gas supply chief.
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have been reassured by its gas sopply chief-— have been reassured by its gas supply chief. have been reassured by its gas su -l chief. ., , supply chief. long term impacts with russia have — supply chief. long term impacts with russia have problems. _ supply chief. long term impacts with russia have problems. they - supply chief. long term impacts with russia have problems. they have - supply chief. long term impacts with | russia have problems. they have got problems. there are long—term solutions, more storage for gas, more insulation for homes but that is not going to alter a record energy crunch over the coming months. next to paris where survivors of an embassy must attack on the vatican concert venue in the city nearly six years ago —— the survivors of a islamist attack on the bataclan venue. i'm here because people who cannot speak and are not yourso people who cannot speak and are not your so cannot speak. i'm going to speakfor them. i've been doing it for six years but i will continue doing it because i think it is important. in november 2015, 130
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people were killed in a series of coordinated attacks across paris, 20 people are now on trial in relation to those attack and they include this man, the sole survivor and a self—proclaimed islamic state soldier. here is another of the victims. translation: soldier. here is another of the victims. tuna/mom- soldier. here is another of the victims. translation: here in the room, i victims. translation: here in the room. ithink— victims. translation: here in the room, i think there _ victims. translation: here in the room, i think there are _ victims. translation: here in the room, i think there are 2096 - victims. translation: here in the room, i think there are 2096 of - room, i think there are 20% of people who will testify and 80% of other victims will be there to support their friends, other victims will be there to support theirfriends, their support their friends, their relatives, support theirfriends, their relatives, so there is a realfamily of victims, people who are also gradually opening up a little more but had remained alone until the trial. while the trial was on a break, a lawyer who represents more than 20 survivors of the attack spoke to the bbc. tt’s than 20 survivors of the attack spoke to the bbc.— than 20 survivors of the attack spoke to the bbc. it's the occasion for them to — spoke to the bbc. it's the occasion for them to tell _ spoke to the bbc. it's the occasion for them to tell their _ spoke to the bbc. it's the occasion for them to tell their story, - spoke to the bbc. it's the occasion for them to tell their story, their i for them to tell their story, their personal— for them to tell their story, their personal story the way they've been through— personal story the way they've been through the whole thing and everything that happened to them after the —
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everything that happened to them after the attacks, in their personal lives, _ after the attacks, in their personal lives, their— after the attacks, in their personal lives, their professional lives and their_ lives, their professional lives and their family lives whether they were physically— their family lives whether they were physically wounded or survivors but with very _ physically wounded or survivors but with very serious psychological consequences, so it is the moment where _ consequences, so it is the moment where they— consequences, so it is the moment where they can explain all this and say also _ where they can explain all this and say also to— where they can explain all this and say also to the court what they expect — say also to the court what they expect from the trial. they do not expect _ expect from the trial. they do not expect much from the menu are accused — expect much from the menu are accused of— expect much from the menu are accused of having committed such a horrible _ accused of having committed such a horrible crimes but i think all the victims _ horrible crimes but i think all the victims are — horrible crimes but i think all the victims are different and they have their various expectations but what is probably common is the need to understand the urge to understand how these — understand the urge to understand how these young men could decide to
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kill young _ how these young men could decide to kill young people of their age. at a moment— kill young people of their age. at a moment when they were unarmed and completely— moment when they were unarmed and completely innocent, having a pleasant — completely innocent, having a pleasant time. and drinking glass of wine at _ pleasant time. and drinking glass of wine at a _ pleasant time. and drinking glass of wine at a cafe. they want to understand as much as possible and they know— understand as much as possible and they know they will have all the questions... sorry, all the answers to all— questions... sorry, all the answers to all their— questions... sorry, all the answers to all their questions. | questions... sorry, all the answers to all their questions.— to all their questions. i want to talk about _ to all their questions. i want to talk about covid _ to all their questions. i want to talk about covid 99 _ to all their questions. i want to talk about covid 99 they - to all their questions. i want to talk about covid 99 they drunk| talk about covid 99 they drunk called ivermectin. since the pandemic, some people promoted it as a treatment for covid 19 but there are questions about the evidence used to support that. we've talked
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about ivermectin before, a drug that can be used to treat humans. tts can be used to treat humans. tits generally safe and very good for parasite generally safe and very good for -arasite , , ., .., parasite this is the drug that can be used to _ parasite this is the drug that can be used to deepen _ parasite this is the drug that can be used to deepen horses. - parasite this is the drug that can be used to deepen horses. and | parasite this is the drug that can i be used to deepen horses. and the drug for which there is no evidence it helps treat covid. despite that, look at this. this is prescriptions in the us, demand for the drug is surging. this is why. the in the us, demand for the drug is surging. this is why.— in the us, demand for the drug is surging. this is why. the idea that ivermectin — surging. this is why. the idea that ivermectin was _ surging. this is why. the idea that ivermectin was a _ surging. this is why. the idea that ivermectin was a very, _ surging. this is why. the idea that ivermectin was a very, very - surging. this is why. the idea that i ivermectin was a very, very powerful treatment against covid 19 was based on a fairly small number of trials which had a very enormously positive results. . , ,, which had a very enormously positive results. . , ~ ., which had a very enormously positive results. . , ,, ., results. campaigners like to point to those studies _ results. campaigners like to point to those studies but _ results. campaigners like to point to those studies but there - results. campaigners like to point to those studies but there was - results. campaigners like to point to those studies but there was a l to those studies but there was a problem with that.— to those studies but there was a problem with that. there are a huge number of fraudulent _ problem with that. there are a huge number of fraudulent studies - problem with that. there are a huge number of fraudulent studies and i problem with that. there are a huge| number of fraudulent studies and we estimate _ number of fraudulent studies and we estimate a _ number of fraudulent studies and we estimate a third of them simply are fake _ estimate a third of them simply are fake. really audacious fraud. white these _ fake. really audacious fraud. white these trials either simply never occur— these trials either simply never occur or— these trials either simply never occur or the results that are being claimed _ occur or the results that are being claimed to — occur or the results that are being claimed to have been fabricated. the
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erou of claimed to have been fabricated. tt2 group of independent scientists look to all major trials for covid. the —— more than a third had serious errors and out of 26 studies, five had major red flags, for example numbers did not add up percentages were wrongly calculated. in a further five, were wrongly calculated. in a furtherfive, there were wrongly calculated. in a further five, there was evidence of fake data. still not clear how... these trials claim to have 100 patients and only got the raw data, it was the same 11 patients copied and pasted over and over again. the authors of that body say the data was either rigged or sabotaged and they want is that he was drawn but it's notjust that example. everything on trial that showed any evidence of ivermectin preventing covid 19 deaths was either fake or misrepresented, what happened? which leads us to this conclusion. mast misrepresented, what happened? which leads us to this conclusion.— leads us to this conclusion. most of those trials — leads us to this conclusion. most of those trials appear _ leads us to this conclusion. most of those trials appear to _ leads us to this conclusion. most of those trials appear to be _ leads us to this conclusion. most of those trials appear to be either i those trials appear to be either potentially fraudulent or so substantially flawed that the
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results cannot be trusted. . substantially flawed that the results cannot be trusted. , which brines us results cannot be trusted. , which brings us back _ results cannot be trusted. , which brings us back to _ results cannot be trusted. , which brings us back to what _ results cannot be trusted. , which brings us back to what one - results cannot be trusted. , which brings us back to what one of i results cannot be trusted. , which brings us back to what one of the | brings us back to what one of the main manufacturers told us once ago, that there is no scientific basis for a potential therapeutic effect against covid 19 from preclinical studies. nothing has changed since. there are studies ongoing with covid and ivermectin including one box of university but right now there is no evidence the strong treat covid in any study to the contrary has been found to have major flaws. t0 any study to the contrary has been found to have major flaws. to a found to have ma'or flaws. to a re eorter found to have ma'or flaws. to a reporter who — found to have ma'or flaws. to a reporter who has— found to have major flaws. to a reporter who has been - found to have major flaws. trr 2. reporter who has been working on found to have major flaws. t2 2 reporter who has been working on the story, i mentioned there is a study on ivermectin, does that mean some doctors believe it is at least worth investigating?— investigating? there was so much h -e and investigating? there was so much hype and floor— investigating? there was so much hype and floor around _ investigating? there was so much hype and floor around it _ investigating? there was so much hype and floor around it that i investigating? there was so much hype and floor around it that it i investigating? there was so much hype and floor around it that it is | hype and floor around it that it is almost _ hype and floor around it that it is almost in — hype and floor around it that it is almost in itself late leading people to investigate not necessarily because _ to investigate not necessarily because they believe there was a good _ because they believe there was a good reason to think it would help covid _ good reason to think it would help covid but — good reason to think it would help covid but also to answer the questions people were asking and quieten _ questions people were asking and quieten down some of the clamour in a sense _
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quieten down some of the clamour in a sense but— quieten down some of the clamour in a sense but what we find now is when you take _ a sense but what we find now is when you take out — a sense but what we find now is when you take out those seriously problematic trials you mention that the evidence all but collapses and we already have a stronger study from _ we already have a stronger study from canada which has also found no evidence _ from canada which has also found no evidence of— from canada which has also found no evidence of benefit. if from canada which has also found no evidence of benefit.— evidence of benefit. if you looked at another _ evidence of benefit. if you looked at another group _ evidence of benefit. if you looked at another group of _ evidence of benefit. if you looked at another group of studies, i at another group of studies, presumably you would not expect to find this degree of either fake or poorly calculated matter? — mac data. poorly calculated matter? - mac data. ., . poorly calculated matter? - mac data. ., , , poorly calculated matter? - mac data. .,, , ., , data. people said they were really shocked by _ data. people said they were really shocked by the — data. people said they were really shocked by the level _ data. people said they were really shocked by the level of _ data. people said they were really shocked by the level of issues i data. people said they were really| shocked by the level of issues they found, you do find issues, you do find sometimes even potential fraud in studies on some of the scientists we work with on this have a track record of rooting out scientific fraud and error free record of rooting out scientific fraud and errorfree pandemic and in other fields, fraud and errorfree pandemic and in otherfields, but this really fraud and errorfree pandemic and in other fields, but this really does seem unprecedented, the sheer volume of studies which cannot be trusted. were you surprised at what you have found? , ., , ,., , .,
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found? yes, absolutely, the real sur-rise found? yes, absolutely, the real surprise and _ found? yes, absolutely, the real surprise and what _ found? yes, absolutely, the real surprise and what is _ found? yes, absolutely, the real surprise and what is significant i surprise and what is significant here as well is that the studies were brought together by other separate scientists who aggregated them, took an average and said, this is an even higherform of them, took an average and said, this is an even higher form of research and pulled all the data and taking and pulled all the data and taking an average and it is really convincing and so once you find that the people are looking at that without even looking at the raw data, they were really surprised to find you could not trust the data they were being sent by scientists and they had to go and apply this level of thinking. t and they had to go and apply this level of thinking.— level of thinking. i wonder if they were surprised _ level of thinking. i wonder if they were surprised that _ level of thinking. i wonder if they were surprised that the _ level of thinking. i wonder if they were surprised that the findings i were surprised that the findings they were seeing were not cutting through to everyone because we see demand for ivermectin continues to go up. demand for ivermectin continues to a o u . _ ., demand for ivermectin continues to to u . _ ., , demand for ivermectin continues to a o u n . ., , , go up. that is right. it will be interesting — go up. that is right. it will be interesting to _ go up. that is right. it will be interesting to see _ go up. that is right. it will be interesting to see what i go up. that is right. it will be i interesting to see what happens after these findings because i think you will always have a kind of cool fringe of people who willjust not be persuaded no matter the evidence and even some of the major promoters we spoke to for this investigation, we spoke to for this investigation, we put the findings to them and they
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said, not only do they not believe it, they are still standing by their word and even said ivermectin works, nothing will persuade me otherwise. but i think there is a kind of confused a level of people you're just looking for something that works, they are worried and maybe this will sway some people in the direction of the evidence. tithe direction of the evidence. one euestion direction of the evidence. one question i— direction of the evidence. one question i had _ direction of the evidence. one question i had looking at reality check might work was whether the scientists who have done this study feel that this was a deliberate effort to twisty data to favour a ivermectin or whether itjust happened because of poor practice. it's an incredibly difficult thing to prove someone's intent, it is really hard to show that someone is actually actively committing fraud and so i think the most we can say here as there are such serious errors here that we really cannot trust the findings and if you're looking at something like rows of data being copied and pasted repeatedly or numbers in sequences that do not really come up randomly by chance, they only come up by
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people just typing them in, you by chance, they only come up by peoplejust typing them in, you do question how that happened but proving intent at this point is impossible. tt proving intent at this point is impossible-— proving intent at this point is impossible. proving intent at this point is im-ossible. �* ., . ., impossible. if you're watching and want to know _ impossible. if you're watching and want to know more _ impossible. if you're watching and want to know more about - impossible. if you're watching and want to know more about what i impossible. if you're watching and | want to know more about what was found, you can find the detailed article on the bbc website, bbc dot—coms slash news and i will be tweeting out variously of information on that as well in the coming hour or two. information on that as well in the coming hour ortwo. ijust want information on that as well in the coming hour or two. ijust want to mention a special report we are coming up in the second half of outside source looking at the concept of net zero. you probably had an awful lot about a particularly with the climate summit coming up. this is a goal that a number of countries including the uk are setting themselves to essentially get a point where the amount of carbon they emit is matched by the amount of carbon they help to absorb out of the atmosphere but there are some doubts and some questions about how the uk is going about achieving that. see you then.
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hello again, for many is, how much cloudier day than yesterday what a good deal warmer as well. looking at the temperatures we had yesterday, ballmer in north—east england, 13 c yesterday, this afternoon most 20 c. a jump of 7 c and yesterday, this afternoon most 20 c. ajump of 7 c and those yesterday, this afternoon most 20 c. a jump of 7 c and those temperatures are actually about 6— 7 c above average for the time of year. that means some breaks in the cloud and many to the east of the pennines of the best of the sunshine with a view breaks as well into the far south—west but some thicker cloud for northern ireland and scotland where we should have some weather front and that rain should be with us for the next 24—hour is. some further rain at times, northern
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ireland and further south, england and wales, quite nice from any car may be a bit of drizzle for western coast hills and many should be quite widespread and dense as we start friday, potentially quite close to your with fog thinning and breaking and some sunshine coming through the clouds of the best of which probably in central and eastern parts of england, maybe israel is not doing too badly as well but in any brighter moments, the temperatures climbing into the low �*20s but even if you do not take great your sunshine, still warmer than it should be at this stage of the year. into the weekend, something of a change, coolerairwill into the weekend, something of a change, cooler air will be pushing its way back southwards across the country which is behind this weather front which they call front and it's the same one still bringing rain to northern ireland and scotland but it will finally start to shift away so the brighter weather is going to develop in western scotland and northern ireland as we go through the afternoon then for england and
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wales, some morning with patches but i quite enough day with temperatures in the warmest areas again climbing to about 20 c but starting to cool down a little bit across scotland and northern ireland. on into sunday and northern ireland. on into sunday and a cooler and fresher our thinking in most parts of the uk, here is our weather front, just a strip of cloud, the bit of rain but nothing significant on it and those temperatures getting a bit closer to normal, still above, 15 in belfast and edinburgh, still around 19 c in london which is still quite a long way above average but into next week, high pressure lots of good weather with temperature is getting closer to normal.
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iam i am ross atkins with outside source. the england premier league has approved a saudi led takeover of newcastle football club. some fans have been welcoming the £300 million bid but human rights groups are critical. tt bid but human rights groups are critical. . ., . bid but human rights groups are critical. , ., , ., , critical. it shows that english football is — critical. it shows that english football is open _ critical. it shows that english football is open for - critical. it shows that english football is open for business | critical. it shows that english i football is open for business when it comes to sports washing the tarnished regime of human rights abusing country. the, tarnished regime of human rights abusing country.— abusing country. a powerful earthquake _ abusing country. a powerful earthquake has _ abusing country. a powerful earthquake has hit - abusing country. a powerful earthquake has hit pakistan | abusing country. a powerful i earthquake has hit pakistan killing at least 15 people. now a search for people in the rubble. in texas, a judge has blocked a near total ban on abortion and we are considering the drug ivermectin, as people who
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promote it as a use for covid, studies find, are flawed. aus a usjudge has temporarily blocked that new law in texas that effectively bans women from having an abortion. districtjudge robert pitman granted a request by the biden administration to prevent any enforcement of the law while its legality is being challenged. let's begin our coverage of this with the help of laura podesta from cbs. tt was a 113 page ruling and the judge was a 113 page ruling and thejudge cited with the department of justice. he said from the moment sb eight went into effect, women have been unlawfully prevented from exercising control over their lives in the ways that are protected by the constitution. so this is in line with what we have been hearing from legal experts, that the substance of this band really cannot be squared
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with the current precedent set by roe v wade, which decided that women have a constitutional right to privacy in making their own medical decisions and the decision to have an abortion in the first trimester is a private one between hope doctor. shes is a private one between hope doctor. �* . , ., is a private one between hope doctor. �* , , ., ~' ., is a private one between hope doctor. a ~ ., ., ., doctor. as you will know, abortion has lone doctor. as you will know, abortion has long divided _ doctor. as you will know, abortion has long divided american. - doctor. as you will know, abortion has long divided american. let's l has long divided american. let's hearfrom has long divided american. let's hear from two has long divided american. let's hearfrom two women has long divided american. let's hear from two women in texas. everything is so much worse. we want to see _ everything is so much worse. we want to see an— everything is so much worse. we want to see an end — everything is so much worse. we want to see an end to elective abortion in our— to see an end to elective abortion in our state — to see an end to elective abortion in our state from the moment of fertilisation that the new human being _ fertilisation that the new human being is— fertilisation that the new human being is created. it is fertilisation that the new human being is created.— being is created. it is crazy to think about _ being is created. it is crazy to think about how _ being is created. it is crazy to think about how we _ being is created. it is crazy to think about how we had i being is created. it is crazy to l think about how we had access being is created. it is crazy to i think about how we had access to safe abortions— think about how we had access to safe abortions and _ think about how we had access to safe abortions and other - think about how we had access to safe abortions and other that i think about how we had access to safe abortions and other that is i safe abortions and other that is taken _ safe abortions and other that is taken away— safe abortions and other that is taken away from _ safe abortions and other that is taken away from us. _ safe abortions and other that is taken away from us. me - safe abortions and other that is taken away from us. me and i safe abortions and other that isi taken away from us. me and my partner— taken away from us. me and my partner came _ taken away from us. me and my partner came to— taken away from us. me and my partner came to a _ taken away from us. me and my partner came to a mutual- taken away from us. me and my- partner came to a mutual agreement where _ partner came to a mutual agreement where we — partner came to a mutual agreement where we honestly _ partner came to a mutual agreement where we honestly thought _ partner came to a mutual agreement where we honestly thought it - partner came to a mutual agreement where we honestly thought it was i partner came to a mutual agreement| where we honestly thought it was the best to _ where we honestly thought it was the best to get _ where we honestly thought it was the best to get an — where we honestly thought it was the best to get an abortion. _ where we honestly thought it was the best to get an abortion. one - where we honestly thought it was the best to get an abortion. one to - where we honestly thought it was the best to get an abortion. one to this i best to get an abortion. one to this is a controversial— best to get an abortion. one to this is a controversial issue, _ best to get an abortion. one to this is a controversial issue, it - best to get an abortion. one to this is a controversial issue, it is- best to get an abortion. one to this is a controversial issue, it is one i is a controversial issue, it is one that— is a controversial issue, it is one that people _ is a controversial issue, it is one that people disagree _ is a controversial issue, it is one that people disagree on - is a controversial issue, it is onej that people disagree on ardently is a controversial issue, it is one i that people disagree on ardently but at the _ that people disagree on ardently but at the end _ that people disagree on ardently but at the end of— that people disagree on ardently but at the end of the _ that people disagree on ardently but at the end of the day— that people disagree on ardently but at the end of the day the _ that people disagree on ardently but at the end of the day— at the end of the day the question we ask is what _
quote
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at the end of the day the question we ask is what is _ at the end of the day the question we ask is what is the _ at the end of the day the question we ask is what is the pre-born i we ask is what is the pre—born child, what is in the mother's womb, is it a human being, worthy of legal protection and inherent with moral value and dignity, and if so that is what we are fighting for, that is why we are fighting to end abortion. this texas abortion law came into effect last month. it is the most restrictive of its type in the us. this is the us attorney general outlining his concerns with it. 5b outlining his concerns with it. se eight bans outlining his concerns with it. 5e eight bans nearly all abortions in the state after six weeks of pregnancy. before many women even know they are pregnant, and months before a pregnancy is viable. it does so even in cases of rape, sexual abuse, or incest. the texas senator iztryan _ sexual abuse, or incest. the texas senator bryan hughes _ sexual abuse, or incest. the texas senator bryan hughes is _ sexual abuse, or incest. the texas senator bryan hughes is the i sexual abuse, or incest. the texas| senator bryan hughes is the author of this bill. at the time he was passed, —— as pastor gave the bbc his argument as to why no exemptions were provided. the his argument as to why no exemptions were provided-— were provided. the rapist needs to be punished. _
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were provided. the rapist needs to be punished. no — were provided. the rapist needs to be punished, no question - were provided. the rapist needs to be punished, no question about i were provided. the rapist needs to i be punished, no question about that, we have _ be punished, no question about that, we have strong laws in texas to punish — we have strong laws in texas to punish those rapist. we have talked women _ punish those rapist. we have talked women in _ punish those rapist. we have talked women in those situations. we wouldn't — women in those situations. we wouldn't punish the unborn child because — wouldn't punish the unborn child because of a horrible act onto the mother~ — because of a horrible act onto the mother. that unborn child as a separate — mother. that unborn child as a separate human being. that unborn child in_ separate human being. that unborn child in her— separate human being. that unborn child in her mother's will miss the most _ child in her mother's will miss the most innocent, the most helpless a human— most innocent, the most helpless a human can — most innocent, the most helpless a human can ever be and she deserves our protection. we believe and texans— our protection. we believe and texans believe and i think we know in our— texans believe and i think we know in our hearts that when that heart is beating. — in our hearts that when that heart is beating, that is a human life, that— is beating, that is a human life, that human _ is beating, that is a human life, that human heartbeat as a sign of human— that human heartbeat as a sign of human life. we have to protect those little babies. the human life. we have to protect those little babies-— little babies. the way this law works as it — little babies. the way this law works as it can _ little babies. the way this law works as it can be _ little babies. the way this law works as it can be enforced i little babies. the way this law| works as it can be enforced by little babies. the way this law i works as it can be enforced by any individual from texas or elsewhere. it gives that individual the right to sue doctors who perform an abortion passed the six weak points, or they can sue anyone aiding or abetting that from happening. however, it does not allow a woman who has the procedure to be sued. legal experts say this is an attempt to sidestep the us constitution that gives women the freedom to choose. the texan governor greg abbott defended this, saying the most
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precious freedom is life itself. but president biden there was a democrat has described the law is an unprecedented assault on women's constitutional rights and the biden administration is pursuing legal action against it. while that is taking place, thejustice department filed an emergency motion to block enforcement of the law, and that is what has resulted in this ruling. amy has campaigned against the law. this is her reaction to what has happened. brute this is her reaction to what has happened-— happened. we are static. -- ecstatic- _ happened. we are static. -- ecstatic. we _ happened. we are static. -- ecstatic. we have _ happened. we are static. -- ecstatic. we have been i happened. we are static. -- i ecstatic. we have been waiting happened. we are static. -- - ecstatic. we have been waiting for a judge to basically declare this law unconstitutional and say how egregious it is and how it is just not in line with the constitutionality of the access to abortion. so we are celebrating, even though this might be a very short win. . ., , ._ even though this might be a very short win. . ., , , , ., short win. the victory may be short lived because _ short win. the victory may be short lived because the _ short win. the victory may be short lived because the decision - short win. the victory may be short lived because the decision has - lived because the decision has already been appealed. immediately after the ruling, the texas right to life committee tweeted an obama
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nominated judge blocked the texas heartbeat actor night but the state already appealed the ruling to a higher court in which we expect a fair hearing. he is more detail on the story from the bbc�*s gary o'donoghue. it the story from the bbc's gary o'donoghue-_ the story from the bbc's gary o'donouhue. , ., ., o'donoghue. it is worth pointing out that in terms — o'donoghue. it is worth pointing out that in terms of— o'donoghue. it is worth pointing out that in terms of these _ o'donoghue. it is worth pointing out that in terms of these legal - that in terms of these legal processes, this is an injunction against the law taking effect. it is not a ruling on the legality or constitutionality of the law, and it is also important to note that texas anticipated this. so it has a provision in place that says, look, you know, if you carry out abortions you know, if you carry out abortions you are still liable to this law if that injunction is eventually lifted. so if you do anything while there is an injunction in place, you could still end up being sued for $10,000 by private individuals if that injunction is eventually lifted. so the extent to which you will change anything on the ground is dubious. the other point worth making here is that this now goes to the fifth safest course of appeals in new orleans and that is an
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incredibly one of the most conservative courts in the country. it has already refused to intervene in this bill before it became law and it will get to the judge of the next few weeks about whether this injunction can stay in place. for the department ofjustice, for pro—choice campaigners, this is a very temporary moment and they will be thinking that the real key battles are to come.- be thinking that the real key battles are to come. gary was in washington- _ battles are to come. gary was in washington. we _ battles are to come. gary was in washington. we are _ battles are to come. gary was in washington. we are going - battles are to come. gary was in washington. we are going to - battles are to come. gary was in | washington. we are going to stay there because us senators appear to have reached an agreement to extend the country's debt ceiling. that is a limit on how much the government can borrow. it was due to be reached in less than two weeks, prompting fears that us would default on its national debt. the row between republicans and democrats had caused uncertainty in the markets. he is the senate majority leader announcing the decision. we have reached agreement _ announcing the decision. we have reached agreement to _ announcing the decision. we have reached agreement to extend - announcing the decision. we have reached agreement to extend the | announcing the decision. we have - reached agreement to extend the debt ceiling through early december and
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it is our hope we can get this done as soon as today. are it is our hope we can get this done as soon as today.— it is our hope we can get this done as soon as today. are north american business correspondent _ as soon as today. are north american business correspondent explain - as soon as today. are north american business correspondent explain what| business correspondent explain what that means. , ., business correspondent explain what that means. , . ., ., that means. they have agreed a dollar amount _ that means. they have agreed a dollar amount that _ that means. they have agreed a dollar amount that essentially i that means. they have agreed a i dollar amount that essentially sees the government repay its debts until early december. as you point out it is kicking _ early december. as you point out it is kicking the can down the road, we will be _ is kicking the can down the road, we will be back— is kicking the can down the road, we will be back having these conversations again in two months' time _ conversations again in two months' time and — conversations again in two months' time. and some of the tensions we saw about— time. and some of the tensions we saw about various other fiscal issues — saw about various other fiscal issues will also be very alive at that same _ issues will also be very alive at that same time because it is around that same time because it is around that time _ that same time because it is around that time that there is another deadline — that time that there is another deadline to avoid a government shutdown. so all of these conversations we've been having, we could _ conversations we've been having, we could he _ conversations we've been having, we could be back here again having those — could be back here again having those it — could be back here again having those it is— could be back here again having those. it is important though because _ those. it is important though because it is by time. that matters because _ because it is by time. that matters because the us treasury secretary had said _ because the us treasury secretary had said that october 18 was the day that the _ had said that october 18 was the day that the government would potentially default on its debts. in other— potentially default on its debts. in other words he potentially default on its debts. in other words be unable to pay its hills, _ other words be unable to pay its hills, and — other words be unable to pay its bills, and the potential catastrophic consequences that follow — catastrophic consequences that follow from that. there is some sort of suggestion that perhaps mitch mcconnell, the senate minority
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leader— mcconnell, the senate minority leader blinked on this one by offering — leader blinked on this one by offering this deal to democrats because — offering this deal to democrats because previously they had said they wouldn't help them get anywhere on this— they wouldn't help them get anywhere on this issue. in part it may be pressure — on this issue. in part it may be pressure from the business community. we saw many leaders gather— community. we saw many leaders gather at— community. we saw many leaders gather at the white house yesterday with some pretty ominous predictions about— with some pretty ominous predictions about what— with some pretty ominous predictions about what not passing the debt ceiling _ about what not passing the debt ceiling might do to the economy, not 'ust ceiling might do to the economy, not just here _ ceiling might do to the economy, not just here in _ ceiling might do to the economy, not just here in the united states but also around the world. we just here in the united states but also around the world.— just here in the united states but also around the world. we have a coule of also around the world. we have a couple of reports _ also around the world. we have a couple of reports now— also around the world. we have a couple of reports now that - also around the world. we have a. couple of reports now that connect to climate change. in a few minutes we will talk about net zero. but now let's look at life where temperatures get very hot, because we are looking ahead to cop26 will stop this is when 50 of the whelp�*s leaders will come together in glasgow. they are going to try and plot a way to limit global warming and in india heatwaves are increasingly common as a direct consequence of that global warming. the issue is particularly acute for people who live in slums where residents are forced to innovate in order to survive. my colleague
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reports for the bbc�*s life at 50 degrees series. no shade, no shelter. temperatures can hit 48 degrees. home is a slum in the indian city. shakeel obano is struggling. she asks for water. the heat is wiping everyone out. these are boils caused _ heat is wiping everyone out. these are boils caused by _ heat is wiping everyone out. these are boils caused by the _ heat is wiping everyone out. these are boils caused by the heat - heat is wiping everyone out. these are boils caused by the heat it - heat is wiping everyone out. these are boils caused by the heat it is i are boils caused by the heat it is very hot, it's how we spend the day. it is hotter in the evening. we cannot sleep at night, even on the roof. it is very difficult. but cannot sleep at night, even on the roof. it is very difficult.— roof. it is very difficult. but help is at hand- _ roof. it is very difficult. but help is at hand. push _ roof. it is very difficult. but help is at hand. push networks - roof. it is very difficult. but help is at hand. push networks for i roof. it is very difficult. but help is at hand. push networks for a l is at hand. push networks for a trust that helps families cool their homes. the charity has found that homes. the charity has found that homes like hers can hit 46 degrees inside. translation: let homes like hers can hit 46 degrees inside. translation:— inside. translation: let me tell ou, iwas inside. translation: let me tell you. i was in _ inside. translation: let me tell you. i was in a _ inside. translation: let me tell you, i was in a situation _ inside. translation: let me tell you, i was in a situation ten - inside. translation: let me tell you, i was in a situation ten times worse than you are. then they
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suggested i go for white paint. concrete holds the heat to the roof is like a sun trap, but if you paint the roof with white paint, it will reflect it. this simple solution will cool the house by three to four degrees. the housing trust offers her a loan of about 135 us dollars to pay for the paint. the effect is immediate. translation: before we would burn if— immediate. translation: before we would burn if you _ immediate. translation: before we would burn if you walked _ immediate. translation: before we would burn if you walked barefoot, i would burn if you walked barefoot, you couldn't stand here without slippers — you couldn't stand here without sli ers. . ., , you couldn't stand here without sliuers. . ., , , slippers. the charity has helped aint the slippers. the charity has helped paint the roofs _ slippers. the charity has helped paint the roofs of _ slippers. the charity has helped paint the roofs of 500 -- - slippers. the charity has helped paint the roofs of 500 -- 5000 | slippers. the charity has helped - paint the roofs of 500 -- 5000 homes paint the roofs of 500 —— 5000 homes were stop her neighbour say they are interested too. her grandson is one happy customer. translation: it used to be so hot that _ happy customer. translation: it used to be so hot that we _ happy customer. translation: it used to be so hot that we couldn't _ happy customer. translation: it used to be so hot that we couldn't stay - to be so hot that we couldn't stay indoors _ to be so hot that we couldn't stay indoors for — to be so hot that we couldn't stay indoors for a _ to be so hot that we couldn't stay indoors for a stretch _ to be so hot that we couldn't stay indoors for a stretch of— to be so hot that we couldn't stay indoors for a stretch of about - to be so hot that we couldn't stay indoors for a stretch of about five minutes — indoors for a stretch of about five minutes but — indoors for a stretch of about five minutes but now— indoors for a stretch of about five minutes but now it _ indoors for a stretch of about five minutes but now it is— indoors for a stretch of about five minutes but now it is not- indoors for a stretch of about five minutes but now it is not the - indoors for a stretch of about five i minutes but now it is not the case, it is much— minutes but now it is not the case, it is much cooler— minutes but now it is not the case, it is much cooler inside. _ minutes but now it is not the case, it is much cooler inside. today- minutes but now it is not the case, it is much cooler inside. today thisj it is much cooler inside. today this little _ it is much cooler inside. today this little boy— it is much cooler inside. today this little boy has— it is much cooler inside. today this little boy has drifted _ it is much cooler inside. today this little boy has drifted off. _ it is much cooler inside. today this little boy has drifted off.— little boy has drifted off. cooling our little boy has drifted off. cooling your house _ little boy has drifted off. cooling your house doesn't _ little boy has drifted off. cooling your house doesn't have - little boy has drifted off. cooling your house doesn't have to - little boy has drifted off. cooling your house doesn't have to cost| little boy has drifted off. cooling i your house doesn't have to cost the earth.
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stay with me. in a few minutes we will turn back to climate change because in our weekly in—depth look at one issue for the bbc website —— website, we will unpack the idea of net zero and while some are saying climate targets like this are insufficient, the way to achieving them is not moving fast enough. the uk government has announced that from next monday, 47 destinations will be taken off its covid read travel list. those countries still on the red list, just seven of them, where people entering the uk still have to quarantine in hotels and they are mostly confined to parts of central and southern america. our transport correspondent caroline davies has more. photos of family on the other side of the world. camilla who lives in brazil hasn't been back to the uk in two years will stop the
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news that it will come off the red list couldn't come sooner. she is due to give birth tomorrow. just believe really _ due to give birth tomorrow. juli believe really that this has finally happened. ifeel like i have been obsessively checking the news for the last couple of weeks. it is just great that it has finally happened. quite bewildering that it hasn't happened until now. the quite bewildering that it hasn't happened until now.— quite bewildering that it hasn't happened until now. the red list was 54 countries — happened until now. the red list was 54 countries long. _ happened until now. the red list was 54 countries long. from _ happened until now. the red list was 54 countries long. from monday - happened until now. the red list was 54 countries long. from monday at l 54 countries long. from monday at whistling —— shrink shrink to just seven, mostly in south america. rivals will still need to stay in a quarantine hotel. end was one of the first quarantine guests when he arrived in south africa in february for stop from monday, anyone arriving from there and from any of the other newly non—red countries won't need to self—isolate at all if they can show and full vaccination certificate the uk recognises. j’m certificate the uk recognises. i'm surrised certificate the uk recognises. i'm surprised it _ certificate the uk recognises. i'm surprised it has taken this long but i am happy— surprised it has taken this long but i am happy that it is happening. it means— i am happy that it is happening. it means i_ i am happy that it is happening. it means i get to see family and friends — means i get to see family and friends that i haven't seen for the
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past ten — friends that i haven't seen for the past ten months or so. i don'tjust speak— past ten months or so. i don'tjust speak for— past ten months or so. i don'tjust speak for myself, but i speak for all of— speak for myself, but i speak for all of the — speak for myself, but i speak for all of the south africans in the uk that have — all of the south africans in the uk that have been dying to go home. more _ that have been dying to go home. more countries's vaccination certificates will be recognised too but the policy has its limitations. other countries need to allow uk visitors in and those notjabbed with astrazeneca, pfizer, madonna or jansen will need to pay for two tests and self—isolate. borders that had been slammed shut are starting to reopen but travel is still a long way from normal. caroline davies, bbc news. we are here in the bbc news room and our lead story is that newcastle united is to be taken over by a saudi backed consortium, but human rights groups say this is unacceptable. every week, we produce an in—depth look at one of the
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week's main stories for the bbc web —— website and for a play in the uk too. this week we are looking at a key concept, as we approach the cop26 climate summit. the cop26 climate summit in glasgow is almost here. and one gold keeps coming up. net zero. met here. and one gold keeps coming up. net zero. ., here. and one gold keeps coming up. net zero-_ net _ here. and one gold keeps coming up. net zero._ net zero. - here. and one gold keeps coming up. net zero._ net zero. the - net zero. net zero. net zero. the united kingdom _ net zero. net zero. net zero. the united kingdom is _ net zero. net zero. net zero. the united kingdom is committed - net zero. net zero. net zero. the united kingdom is committed to l united kingdom is committed to achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. mel achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.— emissions by 2050. net zero is defined at _ emissions by 2050. net zero is defined at the _ emissions by 2050. net zero is defined at the point _ emissions by 2050. net zero is defined at the point where - emissions by 2050. net zero is defined at the point where any| defined at the point where any emissions are balanced by absorbing a equivalent amount from the atmosphere. in other words, the country reaches net zero when its c02 country reaches net zero when its co2 output matches the co t it takes out of the atmosphere, and commitments are being made. china wants to reach it by 2060, the us by 2050, and as we heard, the uk by 2052. in total more than 130 countries have either set, or are considering, a net zero target. at
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cop26, the uk is pushing its importance. irate cop26, the uk is pushing its importance-— cop26, the uk is pushing its imortance. ~ ., , importance. we need to pledge collectively _ importance. we need to pledge collectively to _ importance. we need to pledge collectively to achieve - importance. we need to pledge collectively to achieve carbon i collectively to achieve carbon neutrality, net zero, by the middle of the century, and that will be an amazing moment if we can do it. so far, so enthusiastic. but the climate activist greta tinbergen is unimpressed by what she is hearing from world leaders. build unimpressed by what she is hearing from world leaders.— from world leaders. build back better, from world leaders. build back better. blah — from world leaders. build back better, blah blah _ from world leaders. build back better, blah blah blah, - from world leaders. build back better, blah blah blah, green i better, blah blah blah, green economy, blood level. net zero x 2050. _ economy, blood level. net zero x 2050, blah — economy, blood level. net zero x 2050, blah blah blah. the economy, blood level. net zero x 2050, blah blah blah. the demand is for more actions, _ 2050, blah blah blah. the demand is for more actions, not _ 2050, blah blah blah. the demand is for more actions, not more - 2050, blah blah blah. the demand is for more actions, not more words, i for more actions, not more words, and head of its hosting of cop26, i want to look at the uk, and how it is approaching zero. because there are concerns. is approaching zero. because there are concerns-— are concerns. we've got the cop26 cominu u- are concerns. we've got the cop26 coming up in — are concerns. we've got the cop26 coming up in the — are concerns. we've got the cop26 coming up in the world _ are concerns. we've got the cop26 coming up in the world needs - are concerns. we've got the cop26 coming up in the world needs to i are concerns. we've got the cop26. coming up in the world needs to see real progress at that, and one of the things that will really help is if the host nation is seen to be
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really serious about it. and that entails look incoherent, notjust having a few headline statements. now, borisjohnson has outlined some aspects of his net zero plans was that this week he announced all the uk's electricity will come from clean energy by 2035. already, he had said, no sales of new petrol or diesel cars from 2030. there will be a ban on gas boilers in new homes from 2025 too and their other commitments as well. but they may not be enough. back injune, we heard this morning from the chief executive of the committee that advises the government.- executive of the committee that advises the government. when you look at the policy _ advises the government. when you look at the policy is _ advises the government. when you look at the policy is to _ advises the government. when you look at the policy is to deliver - advises the government. when you look at the policy is to deliver it, i look at the policy is to deliver it, i'm afraid — look at the policy is to deliver it, i'm afraid we are very off track vary— i'm afraid we are very off track vary substantially off track. really only about 20% of the policy commitments that the government has made would take us towards that goal of net _ made would take us towards that goal of net zero _ made would take us towards that goal of net zero emissions. in a made would take us towards that goal of net zero emissions.— of net zero emissions. in a report to parliament. — of net zero emissions. in a report to parliament, that _ of net zero emissions. in a report to parliament, that same - of net zero emissions. in a report i to parliament, that same committee noted we cannot rely on goodwill alone. it went on, it is hard to discern any copperhead strategy in the climate plans we have seen in
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the climate plans we have seen in the last 12 months. there are gaps and ambiguities. now, the uk government doesn't dispute more detail is needed, and it is coming. here is the financial times, reporting that the uk is due to release its net zero strategy ahead of cop26, but has dragged its heels on several related measures, including a long delay treasury review of how to fund net zero policies. and in a major speech this week, the chancellor of the exchequer rishi sunak did not mention how to fund net zero. in fact, he didn't mention climate at all. so we will have to wait for his spending review, and some argue the delay in releasing the net zero strategy has already created a problem. lord devon is chair of the same advisory committee we heard from earlier, he told the guardian the delay has left a space for people to complain, attack and undermine, and says that net zero hasn't been put into context by the government. one of the people lord devon refers to a steve baker, an
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influential backbench conservative mp. and while they have quite different views of net zero, steve baker echoes the need for more detail. ~ ., . ., , ., ., detail. what politicians have not done and enthusiasts _ detail. what politicians have not done and enthusiasts for - detail. what politicians have not done and enthusiasts for all - detail. what politicians have not done and enthusiasts for all of l detail. what politicians have not i done and enthusiasts for all of this have not done is explain to the publicjust how real the impact of this will be. it will change the way we work, the way we relax, the way we work, the way we relax, the way we transport ourselves. it will change even what we ate. lilo we transport ourselves. it will change even what we ate. no doubt there are going _ change even what we ate. no doubt there are going to _ change even what we ate. no doubt there are going to be _ change even what we ate. no doubt there are going to be real— change even what we ate. no doubt there are going to be real and - there are going to be real and impactful changes, and central to the discussion around them is cost. mark wallace of the conservative home website thinks steve baker has a point. j home website thinks steve baker has a oint. ~ , .,, ., ., a point. i think people hear an awful lot of— a point. i think people hear an awful lot of discussion - a point. i think people hear an awful lot of discussion about l a point. i think people hear an l awful lot of discussion about the importance of net zero, quite a lot less and _ importance of net zero, quite a lot less and steve says discussion about how, less and steve says discussion about how. and _ less and steve says discussion about how, and almost no discussion about the actual— how, and almost no discussion about the actual cost, the financial and economic— the actual cost, the financial and economic implications. that they have been studies _ economic implications. that they have been studies on _ economic implications. that they have been studies on this, - economic implications. that they have been studies on this, the i economic implications. that they i have been studies on this, the uk's independent budget for office responsibility says it could cost £1.4 trillion. it also said it would be cheaper to act than not to act.
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another report from last year concludes that the cost of decarbonisation will reach one to 2% of gdp in 2050. and adds it is ultimately affordable, and the cost of inaction will be far greater. now, to be clear, these are costs to be shared between the state, business and households. and not everyone sees the pursuit of net zero in terms of rising costs. this is the chairman of the conservative party. j is the chairman of the conservative ia . ., �* is the chairman of the conservative -a . ., �* , , is the chairman of the conservative party. i don't believe there is this trade-off between _ party. i don't believe there is this trade-off between addressing - party. i don't believe there is this| trade-off between addressing the trade—off between addressing the environment and the cost of living because i think if we get these measures right, we can actually save people money for example better insulation over time will reduce your energy bills. bhd insulation over time will reduce your energy bills.— insulation over time will reduce your energy bills. and if that is a ositive your energy bills. and if that is a positive projection _ your energy bills. and if that is a positive projection for _ your energy bills. and if that is a l positive projection for households, some see net zero as an economic positive on a national level. sam hall from the conservative environment network argues net zero is expected to be a netjob creator overall, a way to level up britain's
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industrial heartlands and a major export opportunity for uk businesses. and as we consider the uk and net zero, there is one issue that combines these national and household considerations, it is heating. domestic heating accounts for around 14% of all uk emissions will stop him gas boilers produce twice as much co2. the main greenhouse gas, as all of the uk's gas—fired power stations, that is according to one recent study. there is gas boilers need to go, and they will be replaced with technology like heat pumps. the question is how. my newsnight colleagues turned to this. flan how. my newsnight colleagues turned to this. . , ., how. my newsnight colleagues turned to this. . ,. , how. my newsnight colleagues turned to this. . ,, , ;;:: how. my newsnight colleagues turned to this. . ,. , ;;:: ., how. my newsnight colleagues turned to this. . , ;;:: ., ., to this. can you see 30 million of these going _ to this. can you see 30 million of these going into _ to this. can you see 30 million of these going into british _ to this. can you see 30 million of these going into british homes i to this. can you see 30 million of i these going into british homes over these going into british homes over the next 30 years, is it feasible at the next 30 years, is it feasible at the moment, do you think? personally no i don't, the moment, do you think? personally no i don't. and — the moment, do you think? personally no i don't. and l _ the moment, do you think? personally no i don't, and i don't _ the moment, do you think? personally no i don't, and i don't think— the moment, do you think? personally no i don't, and i don't think we - no i don't, and i don't think we will get — no i don't, and i don't think we will get there. there are power issues — will get there. there are power issues as— will get there. there are power issues as well as supply issues as well as— issues as well as supply issues as well as labour issues, i can't get enough — well as labour issues, i can't get enough engineers for my company and i'm only— enough engineers for my company and i'm onlya— enough engineers for my company and i'm only a small company.— i'm only a small company. shifting the uk's heating _
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i'm only a small company. shifting the uk's heating will— i'm only a small company. shifting the uk's heating will require - the uk's heating will require labour, skills and persuasion, and for net zero to be persuasive, well, it will need to feel fair. that issue came up in this article by the conservative mp esther mcvey. she wrote in clapping ourselves in a rush to get to zero while countries such as china continue to build airports and coal—fired power stations is not being green and saving the planet, it is being futile and stupid. now of course many don't agree with that, but esther mcvey article's illustrates the broader point is that if net zero doesn't feel fair, some won't buy into it. one recent survey found that half of people support making technological and lifestyle changes. a separate poll found almost half of uk adults support the plan to ban gas boilers. it is however hard to gauge this because people still haven't been told exactly what they will have to do. what is certain though is that half the population onside won't be enough for net zero. as the cbi puts it, the biggest
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challenge is likely to be the coordinated behavioural change and purchasing decisions of millions of householders. we will see if more detail on what this involves helps or hinders that, and while we wait for that detail, there is a risk the focus on the long—term goal of net zero distracts from doing something right now. let's return to that clip of greta thunberg. this right now. let's return to that clip of greta thunberg.— of greta thunberg. this is all we hear from _ of greta thunberg. this is all we hear from so-called _ of greta thunberg. this is all we hear from so-called leaders. - of greta thunberg. this is all we - hear from so-called leaders. words. hear from so—called leaders. words. words _ hear from so—called leaders. words. words that— hear from so—called leaders. words. words that sound great but so far has led _ words that sound great but so far has led to— words that sound great but so far has led to no action. the words that sound great but so far has led to no action.— has led to no action. the un's language _ has led to no action. the un's language is — has led to no action. the un's language is different - has led to no action. the un's language is different but - has led to no action. the un's language is different but its i language is different but its message is similar. it says while net zero is a critical longer term goal, steeped emissions cuts, especially by the largest greenhouse gas emitters, are imperative in the next five to ten years. and lest there is any doubt, that is not happening yet. the un says planned cuts by 2030 fall far short, and this is the uk's climate action
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champion. iii this is the uk's climate action champion-— this is the uk's climate action chamion. ,, . , , champion. if you add up everything that has been _ champion. if you add up everything that has been delivered _ champion. if you add up everything that has been delivered so - champion. if you add up everything that has been delivered so far- champion. if you add up everything that has been delivered so far we l that has been delivered so far we are still way off track and delivering on 1.5 degrees. shill are still way off track and delivering on 1.5 degrees. all of this is worth — delivering on 1.5 degrees. all of this is worth bearing _ delivering on 1.5 degrees. all of this is worth bearing in - delivering on 1.5 degrees. all of this is worth bearing in mind i delivering on 1.5 degrees. all of this is worth bearing in mind as we watch boris johnson this is worth bearing in mind as we watch borisjohnson and his father promoting the net zero policy. it is a goal that is at once hugely important and potentially irrelevant because net zero only matters if governments take action now to sharply reduce emissions, and take action now to make net zero possible by the middle of the century. if that doesn't happen, either time net zero arrives, it will be too late. you can find more analysis from outside source elsewhere on the bbc. each week we tackle a different subject. you can see videos on the bbc news website. you can also get audio versions on the bbc sounds app. that is wherever you are in the world. lots of ways to find us and of course you can do that through the details on the screen.
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just before we wrap up this hour let's quickly turn to south africa because it is marking the 90th birthday of the nobel peace prize winner desmond tutu. he attended a service at st george's cathedral in cape town where he served as the country's first black archbishop in the 1980s. the dalai lama and the widow of the late president nelson mandela were among those to take part in an online lecture in his honour. the nobel peace prizewinner was at the forefront of south africa's anti—apartheid struggle is very much involved in the creation of south africa's democracy. he has continued his work to this day as human rights activist. that is it from this edition of outside source. if you're watching on the bbc news channel in the uk i will say goodbye. if you're watching on bbc world news, iwill also goodbye. if you're watching on bbc world news, i will also mention in the next edition of outside source, we will be speaking to the new winner of the nobel prize for literature, who has some interesting
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things to say about colonialism, refugees and about being an african living in the uk. wherever you are watching in the world thanks for being with us. i will see you soon. all the best. goodbye. for many of us, today has been a much cloudier day compared to yesterday. but it has been a good deal warmer as well. if we look at the temperatures we had yesterday, in the north—east of england, 13 degrees yesterday, this afternoon those temperatures have reached 20 degrees here. so a jump of seven celsius. those temperatures are actually about six or seven degrees above average for the time of year. they have been some breaks in the cloud, the best across parts of north—east england, really anywhere to the east of the pennines having the best of the sunshine. a few breaks as well into the far south—west. but some of the cloud for northern ireland and scotland. that is where we have had our weather front bringing some pulses of rain. that front will be with us at least for the next 44 hours.
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there will be some further rain at times. northern ireland and western scotland overnight. for the south of england and wales, quieterfor many, maybe drizzle. some mist and fog patches forming elsewhere and some of those to be quite widespread and quite dense, as we start friday, potentially quite slow to clear as well but eventually mist and fog turning to fin and break up and again we will see some sunshine coming through the clouds, the best of it probably again across central and eastern parts of england. maybe east wales not doing too badly as well. in any brighter moments, those temperatures climbing into the low 20s, but even if you don't see a great deal of sunshine, it will still be warmer than it should be at this stage of the year. on into the weekend, something of a change. cool air will be pushing its way back southwards across the country. that is behind this weather front, a southwards across the country. that is behind this weatherfront, a cold front, it is the same one still bringing rain to northern ireland and scotland but it is finally going to shift away. so the brighter weather is expected to develop western scotland and northern ireland as we go through the
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afternoon. if you morning mist and fog patches but otherwise a quiet enough day for stop temperatures in the warmest areas again climbing to about 20 degrees, but starting to cool down a little bit across scotland and northern ireland. into some day, that cooler and fresher air sinking some day, that cooler and fresher airsinking in most some day, that cooler and fresher air sinking in most parts of the uk. this is our weather front, just a strip of cloud, nothing significant on it. those temperatures getting a bit closer to normal. still above, 15 in belfast and in edinburgh. still around 90 degrees in london, still quite a long way above average. into next week, high pressure around, a lot of quiet weather, temperatures are getting closer to normal.
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we are now both able to remove 47 countries from the red list, and take that down to seven countries. and also accept vastly more double vaccinations from elsewhere as they put their numbers right up as well. celebrations in their castle as the controversial takeover of the cities football club by a saudi backed consortium is completed. jt’s football club by a saudi backed consortium is completed. it's like a kid on christmas _ consortium is completed. it's like a kid on christmas morning. - consortium is completed. it's like a kid on christmas morning. it's - consortium is completed. it's like a kid on christmas morning. it's all i kid on christmas morning. it's all come at the _ kid on christmas morning. it's all come at the same _ kid on christmas morning. it's all come at the same time. - kid on christmas morning. it's all come at the same time. critics i kid on christmas morning. it's all. come at the same time. critics say this is another example of saudi
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arabia using sports to try to deflect the scrutiny of

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