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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 7, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... energy bills could go up by hundreds of pounds next year because of another big rise in wholesale prices. and it's causing more concern about the cost of living. the legal requirement for social distancing and bars, cafes and restaurants and northern ireland are to be lifted. the nhs in england and wales is to find the first ever study of patients living with secondary breast cancer. we speak to the british woman who joined the islamic state group with her young group, now in a camp in syria and asking to return home. the queen has launched the baton relay for next year's commonwealth games, which will take place in birmingham.
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good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. millions of households are now facing much higher power bills. businesses and analysts are warning that the sharp rise in energy prices will lead to households paying more for builds and everyday products. the boss of supermarket iceland said price rises were now inevitable, the business secretary has said uk gas supplies would be sufficient this winter, but acknowledged that more energy firms would fold in the coming months. kwasi kwarteng told energy providers that developing renewable sources will be the only way to protect against soaring gas prices long term — as our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey reports. just like the season's weather, bill payers are being warned the worst is yet to come. a host of energy companies have
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collapsed in recent weeks. their customers — moved to a new supplier — are already having to pay hundreds of pounds more a year than they expected. a price cap does protect millions of people from extreme rises in bills, but analysts say next year they'll still face a bill shock. for many, it's a worry, finding the money to cover it. i always said that if you had to walk around your house wearing a cardigan, there was something wrong. and guess what, i'm going around the house with a cardigan on because i only put my heating on for half an hour in the morning to take the chill away and half an hour at night. the rest of the time, i'm keeping warm the best way i can. under the price cap, a customer now pays £1,277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity. analysts expect that typical bill to rise to £1,600 when a revised but as yet undecided cap starts in april. compare that with a year ago, when you could have got a deal
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costing just over £850 a year. as the global economy has been switched back on after the height of the pandemic, the scramble for gas has not been matched by supply, leading to an unprecedented seven fold rise in wholesale prices. producers of everything from toilet roll to steel say that will feed through to higher prices in the shops. domestic customers may be protected from some of this volatility, but industry isn't. today, the business secretary told an energy industry conference that a renewed commitment to renewable energy generation in the uk was the only long—term solution. the recent issues that we have with the volatility of the gas price, incredible spikes and then falling back, it creates uncertainty in the market. falling back, it creates i think that shows exactly why we need vigorously
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...and and they will think about how to try to make a negative budget work for them, they will be making those sorts of decisions, which is why basically the sorts of decisions that we are going to make now will decide whether this is a crisis which we support vulnerable households through or whether it is a catastrophe that we watch people fall into. �* , , ., ., fall into. and this is going to contribute _ fall into. and this is going to contribute to _ fall into. and this is going to contribute to that _ fall into. and this is going to contribute to that awful - fall into. and this is going to i contribute to that awful phrase, excess deaths, the number of people who are dying unavoidably. weill. excess deaths, the number of people who are dying unavoidably.— who are dying unavoidably. well, you ho -e not, who are dying unavoidably. well, you hepe not. but — who are dying unavoidably. well, you hope not, but the _ who are dying unavoidably. well, you hope not, but the sad _ who are dying unavoidably. well, you hope not, but the sad truth _ who are dying unavoidably. well, you hope not, but the sad truth is - who are dying unavoidably. well, you hope not, but the sad truth is every l hope not, but the sad truth is every year on average about 10,000 people in the uk died directly as a result of living in a cold home. we pray, i pray everyday for a mild winter, but if it is not then that collision of incomes, higher bills and cold
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weather only goes one way and it goes one way by increasing the number of unavoidable winter deaths and for every death we think it is around six emergency visits to a hospital or a gp, so the pressure on the nhs both in terms of cost and in terms of activity for health professionals is so extreme that is a good enough reason in itself to do more to help people out of the situation. in more to help people out of the situation. . , ., ., , ., situation. in a nutshell, how do you revent situation. in a nutshell, how do you prevent peeple _ situation. in a nutshell, how do you prevent people falling _ situation. in a nutshell, how do you prevent people falling into - situation. in a nutshell, how do you prevent people falling into fuel - prevent people falling into fuel poverty? i prevent people falling into fuel ove ? ~ , . poverty? i think in this immediate crisis, poverty? i think in this immediate crisis. there _ poverty? i think in this immediate crisis, there is _ poverty? i think in this immediate crisis, there is a _ poverty? i think in this immediate crisis, there is a few _ poverty? i think in this immediate crisis, there is a few things - poverty? i think in this immediate crisis, there is a few things we - crisis, there is a few things we need from the regulator and from government. foranybody need from the regulator and from government. for anybody who has been forced to move supply because they have failed, we need to make sure that if you're going with a prepayment metre or a debt or you are going in receipt of something like the warm home discount rebate, you are not disadvantaged because you're moving across to a new supplier. what we are being taught is the price cap, which isn't about the fuel poverty measure, need to provide deeper and more enduring
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price protection following consumers, but really in this winter governmentjust needs to be... to understand the size of the problem and step in with more direct financial support for people on the lowest incomes and long term the way in which you reduce the exposure of people on the lowest incomes to those volatile global commodity prices is to do something about the appalling state of our homes. 0ur homes lose heat faster than almost anywhere in europe. for the sake of net—0, but also for the sake of fuel poverty and excess winter deaths, we need to commit at the spending review and beyond to the most dramatic energy efficiency programme directed to the worst first, to those households on low incomes and in the least efficient homes because thatis in the least efficient homes because that is the way in which you build fuel poverty out of peoplelives. adam scorer, national energy chief executive, thank you for talking to us. executive, thank you for talking to us, , , . , executive, thank you for talking to us, ., ,
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us. gas prices reached record levels toda , us. gas prices reached record levels today. following _ us. gas prices reached record levels today, following only _ us. gas prices reached record levels today, following only after- today, following only after president putin suggested it could... but he has suggested russia will only help if the pipeline he once gets its approval. we'rejoined now by tony brenton, former uk ambassador to moscow. thank you very much forjoining us. where does the balance of power really lie now? putin is in charge of his country and i don't think the russian deputy prime minister did exactly what you just suggested. what he did say was it would obviously help the situation if this new pipeline, the nord stream too, as it is called, opened, which is obviously true. figs opened, which is obviously true. as in, they will be able to pump more gas? in, they will be able to pump more .as? ., . , ., in, they will be able to pump more as? , ., ., .y gas? exactly, and europe obviously needs more — gas? exactly, and europe obviously needs more gas, _ gas? exactly, and europe obviously needs more gas, given _ gas? exactly, and europe obviously needs more gas, given the - gas? exactly, and europe obviously needs more gas, given the current| needs more gas, given the current level of supplies, the level of the price and the fact it is possible we have a very cold winter coming up. how often in the past has brush are reneged on a contract and blocked a shipment? reneged on a contract and blocked a shiment? ., reneged on a contract and blocked a shiment? . , ., shipment? never. i mean, in terms of their contracted _
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shipment? never. i mean, in terms of their contracted for _ shipment? never. i mean, in terms of their contracted for gas _ shipment? never. i mean, in terms of their contracted for gas supplies - shipment? never. i mean, in terms of their contracted for gas supplies to - their contracted for gas supplies to europe, they have never reneged. there was one brief moment in 2009 when supplies to europe was dropped, but that is because ukraine was stealing the gas, not because russia was stopping it. how stealing the gas, not because russia was stepping it— was stopping it. how much choice, thouh, was stopping it. how much choice, though. does _ was stopping it. how much choice, though, does the _ was stopping it. how much choice, though, does the west _ was stopping it. how much choice, though, does the west really - was stopping it. how much choice, though, does the west really have| was stopping it. how much choice, i though, does the west really have in dealing with russia? because it does seem that the west is concerned. 0bviously president putin on this occasion came to their rescue fairly speedily. occasion came to their rescue fairly seedil . , ., ,, .,, ., speedily. yes, no, the us has a rotten relationship _ speedily. yes, no, the us has a rotten relationship with - speedily. yes, no, the us has a rotten relationship with russia, j rotten relationship with russia, without doubt, and i can tell you lots of stories, but i won't trouble you because they are not directly relevant. but the factors on gas russia is very keen to be seen as a reliable supplier to the west and having got the pipeline is going in mid-1998, having got the pipeline is going in mid—1998, which is a bit about the current bloodstream to, the... is verily opposed and were eventually as well, having set those pipelines up as well, having set those pipelines up they have been delivering gas
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over the last 30 years entirely reliably and putin's response yesterday i'm pretty sure was a response... i have been in conversations with him on this where yes, it is nice to have astronomically high prices, but they would far rather have dependable prices and to be a dependable supplier, so that we won't turn and look for other suppliers.— look for other suppliers. indeed, this is not _ look for other suppliers. indeed, this is not just _ look for other suppliers. indeed, this is notjust about _ look for other suppliers. indeed, this is notjust about president i this is notjust about president putin's la jes, is it? he has got money to make. putin's lajes, is it? he has got money to make.— putin's lajes, is it? he has got money to make. that is right, no, current affairs _ money to make. that is right, no, current affairs is _ money to make. that is right, no, current affairs is not _ money to make. that is right, no, current affairs is not about - current affairs is not about largesse, and distilling gas is not about largesse, it is about national interest, and in this case russia's national interest coincides with europe's national interest. hosp national interest coincides with europe's national interest. how much will it have concentrated _ europe's national interest. how much will it have concentrated present - will it have concentrated present putin's mind when you hear that the french president emmanuel macron was talking about greater sovereignty over energy supplies, in other words being more self—reliant and resilient? i being more self-reliant and resilient?_ being more self-reliant and resilient? ., �* ~ ., . resilient? i don't know... well, france is _ resilient? i don't know... well, france is in _ resilient? i don't know... well,
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france is in a _ resilient? i don't know... well, france is in a slightly _ resilient? i don't know... well, france is in a slightly special. france is in a slightly special position because they have lots of nuclear reactors, but you don't hear that from the countries which are most dependent on russian gas. it is worth recalling that the eu, about 40% of the eu's imported gas comes from russia, so the dependence is very strong. and it is on both sides' interests to maintain that. you can talk about europe, often doing other things, but germany for example is closing down most of its nuclear and has not come up with any alternatives in the short term, although there will be renewables and things in time. and for the moment germany needs russian gas. sir tony brenton, i would love to hear some of those other stories, evenif hear some of those other stories, even if they are not entirely relevant, they are always fascinating. uk former ambassador to moscow, always good to talk to you, thank you so much. a pleasure. you are watching bbc news, it is approaching 5:15pm, these are headlines... energy bills could go up
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by hundreds of pounds next year because of another big rise in wholesale prices. the legal requirement for social distancing in bars, cafes and restaurants and northern ireland are to be lifted. the first—ever audit, we found out the number of people living in england with secondary breast cancer is set to go ahead. store what ministers have agreed to lift the legal requirement for social distancing in bars, cafe is a in northern ireland. the restriction will be scrapped from 31 october. northern ireland's first minister has been getting more details about the plans. i am leased details about the plans. i am pleased that _ details about the plans. i am pleased that by _ details about the plans. i am pleased that by the - details about the plans. i am pleased that by the end - details about the plans. i am pleased that by the end of. details about the plans. i —n pleased that by the end of october we will have restrictions on a wide range of issues completed at that point. there will be three areas left by the stage we get to the end of october that will be the wearing of october that will be the wearing of face coverings in some limited areas, and when it comes to the
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retention of risk assessments and also the retention of data around visitors to venues and hospitality and so on. and they will be low level mitigation measures that will stay in law. there will be guidance when it comes to a lot of the sectors that are operating across our society and economy that will remain in place in a voluntary guidance format, but by the end of october we will have moved to a point where there are three areas that we will continue to look out over the course of the winter, but will likely remain as a low—level regulatory interventions, so on the 14th of october we will have changes in terms of the numbers around the domestic settings in your own private dwelling and tourist accommodation. that will be limited still in respect of house parties and raves, in terms of a band being keptin and raves, in terms of a band being kept in place for that. and also the
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ability for people to stand in the indoor venues when it comes to performances. that will happen on the 14th of october. that performances. that will happen on the 14th of october.— the 14th of october. that was paul givan. the 14th of october. that was paul givan- let's _ the 14th of october. that was paul givan. let's speak _ the 14th of october. that was paul givan. let's speak to _ the 14th of october. that was paul givan. let's speak to our- the 14th of october. that was paul givan. let's speak to our ireland l givan. let's speak to our ireland correspondent, chris page. how much pressure have governance been from businesses to do away with these restrictions, chris? thea;r businesses to do away with these restrictions, chris?— businesses to do away with these restrictions, chris? they have been under considerable _ restrictions, chris? they have been under considerable pressure, - under considerable pressure, particularly from the hospitality industry. they and also people working in the entertainment sector, the legs of concert promoters, for example, has been pointing out that northern ireland at the moment is the part of the uk or ireland for that matter that has the most strict covid regulations, but all that is, as you heard from the first minister paul givan there, going to change over the course of this month. so much ministers have met this afternoon in the assembling building here at stormont at the outskirts of belfast and have decided basically to lift almost all of the remaining restrictions. the e—zines will start a week from now on thursday the 14th
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of october. currently there are limits on the number of people you can have inside your home, that is 15 from four households, but that will be scrapped. also on that date a change for concertgoers and other people who enjoy indoor arts performances because presently the rule is that if you go as a member of an audience you have to be seated, but stanley will come back so that will certainly open up the opportunity for concert bands on tour, who for at the moment are excluded quite often from northern ireland, but are able to tour the rest of the uk. because of that restriction, well, they will be able to come back here to play venues to full capacity. then on the 31st of october just full capacity. then on the 31st of 0ctoberjust in time for halloween night, a big moment for the hospitality industry, pubs, cafe is and restaurants will no longer have to have in place one metre social distancing. that rule will be lifted and hospitality business people have been saying that social distancing requirement has been very damaging to trade. so they are already very
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much welcoming that date that has been set. both paul givan and the deputy first minister have stressed that this does not mean the pandemic is over, people should remain cautious and they will still be some guidance to follow, particularly it is understood that ministers will be advising hospitality venues to have in place some measures to try to reduce the spread of the virus. for example, they can ask people if they have been doubly vaccinated or have had a negative test or have actually had a negative test or have actually had the virus over the last few months, but it is understood that will not be a legal requirement. it will not be a legal requirement. it will be advice. so all in all, major decisions being made here by the devolved to locate government today that will be welcomed by many in the business community in northern ireland. for many why do people, it will be a sign that things are gradually returning to some sense of normality. gradually returning to some sense of normali . ~ ., ., gradually returning to some sense of normali . ~ . ., ., normality. what are the covid figure is like in northern _
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normality. what are the covid figure is like in northern ireland? - is like in northern ireland? politicians are always keen to tell us they are following the science. yes, the ministers this afternoon received presentations input from the chief scientific 0fficer received presentations input from the chief scientific officer and the chief medical officer here, so they will say they have been following the advice. northern ireland has at various points in this pandemic had the highest infection rate of the uk's for nations and also points out there for the highest death rate. there has also been some concern in recent weeks that the vaccination uptake has not been quite as good as in the rest of the uk. that concern really emerged over the summer. but over the last fortnight really we have seen cases, the number of positive covert tests here start to fall. also the pressure on hospitals has eased slightly, although it is still very much an issue for the health service here, and, true to that we have fortunately the number of people here dying after a positive covid test her starting to fall as well, so the numbers have
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been pointing in the right direction. no one is expecting covid to disappear anytime soon, it is clear and you will hear this a lot from members of the medical profession, that the winter will probably still be tough, but in terms of the risk, ministers would say, and increased spread under increased pressure on the health service over the winter, and also the need to get the economy going again, open up society and restore freedoms people have been the thing, now they have decided the time is to go more towards opening up society while at the same time hoping people will remain mindful of the risks that still remain.— that still remain. chris, for the moment thank— that still remain. chris, for the moment thank you _ that still remain. chris, for the moment thank you very - that still remain. chris, for the moment thank you very much. j that still remain. chris, for the - moment thank you very much. chris pagein moment thank you very much. chris page in northern ireland. some breaking news for you now. this regards the takeover of newcastle united football club, which has been about 18 months in the making. the premier league newcastle football club at saintjames holdings limited
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today have settled the dispute over the takeover of the club by the consortium of pif pcp capital partners and rb sports and media. it follows the completion of the premier league's owners and directors test, which looks at the suitability of people to take over a club. the club has now been sold to the consortium with immediate effect. this is in part a group with saudi arabian backing. there have been concerns expressed by human rights groups such as amnesty international as to whether this sort of group was appropriate to be running a football club, but the decision has now been taken. the premier league has now received a legally binding reassurances that the kingdom of saudi arabia will not control newcastle united football club because of the concerns about that kingdom and its human rights record. all parties have concluded this process, says the press release, and they are pleased. this
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gives certainty and clarity to newcastle united football club and their fans, newcastle united football club and theirfans, it says. so newcastle united football club and their fans, it says. so there we are, breaking news. the first ever audit, which will find out the number of women in england with secondary breast cancer, is set to go ahead. funded by nhs england, and charities have campaigned for ten years for data to be gathered. drilling us now is the ceo of the breast cancer charity. dallas morgan. can you just explain to us what secondary breast cancer is? ., ., , , ., , cancer is? unfortunately secondary breast cancer _ cancer is? unfortunately secondary breast cancer has _ cancer is? unfortunately secondary breast cancer has got _ cancer is? unfortunately secondary breast cancer has got a _ cancer is? unfortunately secondary breast cancer has got a few - cancer is? unfortunately secondary breast cancer has got a few names| breast cancer has got a few names that all mean the same thing. it means it is incurable breast cancer. it means it is sometimes called stage iv or advance on metastatic breast cancer, but essentially it is when cells from the rest have essentially migrated to different parts of the body, often the lungs
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or the bones, sometimes the liver, the brain and sometimes the skin, but it is when the breast cancer has become incurable, but it can still become incurable, but it can still be treated. 50 become incurable, but it can still be treated-— become incurable, but it can still betreated. , �* , ., ., be treated. so why hasn't this data been gathered _ be treated. so why hasn't this data been gathered before _ be treated. so why hasn't this data been gathered before now? - be treated. so why hasn't this data been gathered before now? it - be treated. so why hasn't this data l been gathered before now? it seems like quite an oversight? it been gathered before now? it seems like quite an oversight?— like quite an oversight? it really does feel that _ like quite an oversight? it really does feel that way _ like quite an oversight? it really does feel that way for _ like quite an oversight? it really does feel that way for us. - like quite an oversight? it really does feel that way for us. we i like quite an oversight? it really i does feel that way for us. we have been banging on about this for ten years and it is absolutely essential to plan services for these women... 90% of the time we are talking about women here, although some men do get breast cancer. we are talking about a need for a really concrete data to plan services for these people with complex health needs and it is long overdue, but we are not going to go on about that, we are going to say this is great news because it means that the needs, the experiences, the challenges for these patients can now be properly understood and services can start to be properly planned. 50 services can start to be properly lanned. ., ., ., ,
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planned. so how will data be gathered? — planned. so how will data be gathered? well, _ planned. so how will data be gathered? well, it _ planned. so how will data be gathered? well, it is - planned. so how will data be gathered? well, it is going l planned. so how will data be| gathered? well, it is going to planned. so how will data be - gathered? well, it is going to be a really complicated _ gathered? well, it is going to be a really complicated and _ gathered? well, it is going to be a really complicated and expert - gathered? well, it is going to be a | really complicated and expert audit and it will be taking place in wales as well and we are not going to second guess exactly how they are going to do it because there are going to do it because there are going to do it because there are going to be the experts, you know, they will be a huge debate about how to deal with all this, but we are saying it has to be really comprehensive, really thorough, it has got to get really good buy in from all the experts who are involved in research and providing services to women, but importantly patients as well because it is patients as well because it is patients who are living with this incurable condition who are experiencing the kind of loneliness, the isolation and the feeling that nobody understands what they're going through because everyone thinks breast cancer is done, it is the good one to get, but actually 11,000 people die every year because of breast cancer and it is only by really tackling the fundamental challenges here, helping those with secondary breast cancer to live longer, to live life to the foal and
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to get those extra months and years through all those new treatments that are coming through and get those into clinics as quickly as possible. that is how we are going to beat this terrible disease and this audit is such a piece of good news because now these patients really do count and services can be improved. really do count and services can be imroved. �* �* , really do count and services can be imroved. �* �*, ., , ., improved. and it's not 'ust about prolonging * improved. and it's not 'ust about prolonging ufo. _ improved. and it's not 'ust about prolonging life, it _ improved. and it's not 'ust about prolonging life, it is _ improved. and it's notjust about prolonging life, it is about - improved. and it's notjust about prolonging life, it is about better quality of life while you are dealing with that terrible disease. i am dealing with that terrible disease. iam imagining. also, how soon, then, might women and some men, as you say, with secondary breast cancer might see the benefits of this? ~ ~ ., ., this? well, we know from experience in the health — this? well, we know from experience in the health world _ this? well, we know from experience in the health world that _ this? well, we know from experience in the health world that if— this? well, we know from experience in the health world that if you - in the health world that if you count things that no matter, and so, right from the very process of talking about this audit, getting it prioritised and getting it out there, it is already going to help with prioritising this group of patients who have, you know, have a
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really difficult outlook. and i know in our family where really difficult outlook. and i know in ourfamily where my really difficult outlook. and i know in our family where my sister has a secondary breast cancer, she has been living with secondary breast cancer for 11 years, whereas when she was diagnosed she was told she had two years to live, so if people knew more about how the disease might go, what their chances of having access to new and better treatment are, what support would be made available, it is all about making the most of the year is that you have and planning for that. it is very strange to see you so happy when we're talking about something so grim, so clearly this really is a wonderful development and i am so glad we have had the chance to talk to you about it. baroness delyth morgan, we hope to see the fruits of it born very quickly, thank you very much, baroness delyth morgan from breast cancer now. you can see more on this story in a special programme, don't write me off: living with secondary breast cancer, this sunday at 7.30pm on the bbc news channel.
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some breaking news now from the transport secretary, grant shapps, who says that from monday he is going to be cutting 47 destinations from the covid red travel vest. they include south africa, with just seven countries and territories remaining on that list. all others will be included in what is called the rest of the world category. he says he is also making changes so that travellers from england have fewer entry requirements by recognising those with fully vaccinated status from 37 new countries and territories, including india, turkey and ghana. they will be treated the same as uk fully vaccinated passages. there has been a discrepancy in the past according to where you have had yourjob. he says the measures marked today marked the next step of opening up travel around the world and provide stability for passengers and try to keep travel open on a permanent basis. time for a look at the
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weather forecast now. with nick miller. hello. it may feel milder out there, but there's plenty of cloud around. and for scotland and northern ireland, a weather front is hanging around all the way into the start of the weekend, and there will be outbreaks of rain at times, let us across parts of western less across parts of western scotland with the risk of flooding and disruption. also northwest england and wales seeing a bit of patchy rain through the afternoon. elsewhere through wales and england, mainly dry, a lot of cloud, a few brighter breaks, it's very mild across the board, but given any sunny spells in yorkshire, a few spots may reach towards 22 c. quite breezy to the west, further rain at times overnight into northern ireland and scotland, though northern scotland turning dryer. much of england and wales will be dry, some clearer spells around, some fog around parts of east anglia and southeast england, and overnight temperatures closer to where they should be by day at this time of year. tomorrow brings more rain to northern ireland and scotland, pushing back towards northern scotland. much of england and wales will be dry — overall a much brighter day with sunny spells here,
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though parts of east anglia and southeast england staying rather cloudy after early mist and fog clears.
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this bbc is news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines... more countries are removed from the uk government's red list, which requires travellers to stay in a quarantine hotel when they get back to the uk. a saudi led takeover of newcastle united football club has been approved. more on that in a moment in the sports bulletin. energy bills could go up by hundreds of pounds next year because of a big rise in wholesale prices, and it is causing more concern about the cost of living. the legal requirement for social distancing in bars, cafes and restaurants in northern ireland is to be lifted from the end of october. the nhs in england and wales are to fund the first ever study of patients living with secondary breast cancer. we speak to the british woman who joined the islamic state group with her young children, now in a camp in syria,
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and asking to return home. sport, and a full round—up with jane. the deal is done. the saudi backed takeover of newcastle united has gone through. confirmation has come from the premier league, who have said in a statement following the completion of the premier league's owners and directors test, the club has been sold to the consortium with immediate effect. we can cross live to our correspondent fiona trott who is at st james's park first. fiona of course a few hold—ups in the lead up to this takeover but bring it up to speed with how it has gone through. weill. with how it has gone through. well, over the past _ with how it has gone through. well, over the past few _ with how it has gone through. well, over the past few minutes - with how it has gone through. well, over the past few minutes let - with how it has gone through. -ii over the past few minutes let me just tell you first of all the city has erupted. i'm going to pause for a minute to see if you can hear the fans behind me.— fans behind me. chanting that's because _ fans behind me. chanting that's because they - fans behind me. chanting that's because they have i fans behind me. chanting . that's because they have been waiting 18 months for this, and after all this wrangling, like you
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say, there have been delays and false dawns over this new takeover deal. it has now been finalised. let me explain to you what the problem was last year, wyatt was put off. there were concerns that the saudi state would be controlling the club, a state that has been accused of human rights abuses. there were concerns, a dispute over alleged piracy with the broadcast of premier league matches. with this deal going through, we are assuming then that assurances have been given that with the public investment fund putting in the majority of the money, 80%, that it will be operating separately to the state, and that has allowed this deal to go through. just reading that statement now that has come through the premier league. it says the premier league has now received legally binding assurances of the kingdom of saudi arabia will not control newcastle united football club. that is why you can hear the hundreds of fans behind me
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at the moment cheering, cars going past this part of the city beeping their horns, because it hasn'tjust been the past 18 months of wrangling over whether or not this takeover was going to happen. many of the fans here have been criticising mike ashley, who has been in charge of the club over the past 1a years. i'm just looking through over towards the stadium now. hundreds of fans coming through, cheering and celebrating this news here this evening. they have been accusing mike ashley of not having any ambition, of not putting investment in the club. they have seen the club that they love be relegated twice, and that is why they were desperate for this deal to go through. £300 million deal that will make this club one of the richest in the world, and as you can hear, they are absolutely delighted. yes. world, and as you can hear, they are absolutely delighted.— world, and as you can hear, they are absolutely delighted. yes, fiona, we
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have had the — absolutely delighted. yes, fiona, we have had the atmosphere _ absolutely delighted. yes, fiona, we have had the atmosphere and - absolutely delighted. yes, fiona, we have had the atmosphere and seeing the reaction from the fans, but why is it so significant? what is it they believe this amount of money can do to help newcastle united? well, this is what the fans have been waiting for, because they say that with the previous owner mike ashley, there hasn't been any investment in the club, and they see now with this new investment, it gives them hope. hope that they can be playing top level football, that they can be winning trophies, and thatis they can be winning trophies, and that is something that is really, really exciting these fans at the moment. of course some reservations from other fans about the details of the ownership deal and what exactly that means, the finer detail of that, and of course that is something they will be pushing for over the coming days. of course amnesty international too saying we want the premier league to be changing its rules, we want some kind of compliance test for all takeover deals in the future. they
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want more transparency with that, but the majority of the fans here though will tell you that theyjust wanted this takeover. they were so desperate for it. £300 million making newcastle united one of the richest in the world. this club is the beating heart of the city so it is notjust the the beating heart of the city so it is not just the fans the beating heart of the city so it is notjust the fans here. let's move the camera around and show you how delighted they are. it is not just the fans here who say their lives will be transformed by this. the players. it's the city too, because this club is, like i say, the beating heart of newcastle. so this is why you see all the fans here, hundreds of them in and around the city centre, will be celebrating... the city centre, will be celebrating. . .- the city centre, will be celebrating... the city centre, will be celebratini... �* ., ., celebrating... all right, fiona trott, celebrating. .. all right, fiona trott. thank— celebrating... all right, fiona trott, thank you _ celebrating... all right, fiona trott, thank you so _ celebrating... all right, fiona trott, thank you so much - celebrating... all right, fiona trott, thank you so much for| celebrating... all right, fiona - trott, thank you so much for that, and well done for battling against what sounded a trumpet. fiona trott,
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live from st james's park with that breaking news about the takeover has been completed of newcastle united. we will have more for you on that in sports day at 6:30pm with 0lly foster. jane, thank you very much. the transport secretary grant shapps has announced that 47 countries, including south africa, are being taken of the uk travel red list from next monday, leaving just seven countries in it. this is what mr shapps had to sayjust a few minutes ago. it is honestly a major step forward for travel and for people wanting to travel and for the travel sector, with 47 countries coming off the red list, meaning people can now travel, amongst other changes. we know with coronavirus that things can change, but i do also think that at this stage, with so many people fully vaccinated, both here at home but also now abroad, that things have settled down a lot and that is why this is a major step forward today. by this is a major step forward today. by switching to lateral flow tests, you are removing the way the uk
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checks for variance. is that wise? 0ne checks for variance. is that wise? one of the great things now with people fully vaccinated from the uk is it is much easier to allow people to travel and also to accept 37 other countries whose tests or vaccinations we will now be able to accept. we will still want to have that checked in of a lateral flow test, but of course if that turns out to be positive, people will be able to immediately take a pcr test and they will be up to do that through the nhs in the normal way as well, and so it will be pretty quick and convenient to stop the good thing with the lateral flow test as you get your results very straightaway, people are accustomed to them and that should help. we are a well vaccinated _ to them and that should help. we are a well vaccinated country, _ to them and that should help. we are a well vaccinated country, why - to them and that should help. we are a well vaccinated country, why has i a well vaccinated country, why has it taken you so long to unlock international travel and help the struggling travel industry? in a sense we have _ struggling travel industry? in a sense we have been _ struggling travel industry? in —. sense we have been waiting for the rest of the world to catch up a bit with our extraordinary high levels of vaccination in the uk, and we are now able to remove 47 countries from
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the red list to take that down to just seven countries, and also accept vastly more double vaccinations, full vaccinations from elsewhere as they have got their numbers right up as well. the transport _ numbers right up as well. the transport secretary grant shapps. natwest bank has pleaded guilty to failing to present money laundering by one customer of nearly £400 million. the city regulator said natwest did not properly monitor the account of a bradford —based jeweller who was shut down in 2016. it is the first time a uk financial institution has faced criminal prosecution under anti—money—laundering laws. i think for other banks, this is a wake—up call as well. don't forget, this is the first time a british bank has faced criminal prosecutions and has pleaded guilty, and a lot of analysts are saying they did the right thing by saying pretty early
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on that yes, we are guilty of this. the criminal charges were only brought in much of this year. so this is quite a wake—up call to the rest of the banking industry as well. natwest will say, look, we spent £700 million in the past five years to try and prevent this kind of thing from happening, but it is a massive fight. they are facing a massive fight. they are facing a massive fine, prosecutors are wanting something like £340 million fine. so that will be reflected in their results which will come out next month, their third—quarter results, so it is a big blow to natwest, certainly. ajudge in the us has given permission for prince andrew's lawyers to get access to a confidential document which they believe will end a civil claim against him. virginia giuffre is pursuing a case against the duke of york. prince andrew has wise denied those allegations. prince andrew has accepted
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that he has to engage in this case, he has to basically file a defence, he has to basically say why he denies all of these allegations virginia giuffre has made against him. virginia giuffre's core allegation is she was a victim of effectively sexual trafficking control by the sex offender jeffrey epstein, who's since died. in 2009, she settled a really important case she brought against him in florida. that bit is really important, shaun. because that settlement included some kind of language that is currently confidential, in which lawyers say she promised not to sue anybody else in similar circumstances. the duke of york's lawyers clearly want to see this document because they believe it may stop the action in new york. here's the twist, that action was all about events in florida, and the allegations ms giuffre's making about the duke of york concern allegations of sexual assault in london, in manhattan, the us virgin islands — all of which the prince denies. so we have this situation here where they want to see this document which they may use to make an argument in court to stop the entire proceedings,
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but her lawyers are saying, fine, have a look. they seem to be pretty confident it's not going to give the prince and his lawyers what they're after. let's ta ke let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures now for the uk. 41,701 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period. the highest figure in over a month, as well as 122 deaths, that is people who have died within 28 days of a positive covert test. a british woman who took her children with her when shejoined the woman who took her children with her when she joined the islamic state group says the uk government should deal with the issue of allowing them to return. nicole jack is being held with her three daughters in the same syrian refugee camp as former iis bride shamima begum. home office as its priority is to ensure the uk's safety and security.
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this is no place for children to live. but thousands do. this squalid camp in northern syria houses the surviving children of islamic state group's fallen caliphate. shall i fix your slipper? amongst them are three british sisters. every time, you're too big for this. they are seven, nine and 12, and they live here with their mum, nicole jack. you, as a mother, decided to take your children to islamic state group territory. there were beheadings, there were murders, there were massacres. how would you explain that to anyone? i don't think, even if i explained it, everyone would understand. but it was about my family being together, do you understand? and honestly, secondly, what may have happened, we've never been witness to it, my children and i, honestly. you know? i haven't seen a beheading in my life. but her children have
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suffered trauma and loss. their father was killed fighting for is, as the group persecuted minorities and enslaved women. and their ten—year—old brother isaac died in an air strike in front of them. i really miss my family, i miss my granny, my aunties. i miss my grandmother, my other grandmother. all of those people, i miss them so much. this camp is run by the kurdish authorities. they want countries to take their citizens back. the uk is reluctant to allow the wives of islamic state group's foreign fighters to return to britain. they are viewed as a threat to national security. however, they are willing to repatriate british orphans and unaccompanied children. but nicole jack says her children can't go back without her, and so the only connection they have
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with the outside world are occasional lessons. hi, hey there, how are you guys? love you. and this video message to their granny. we hope we can come back soon to see you guys. let her come and face _ the consequences, but it is not fair and it is not right for these children to be languishingl in this place. enough is enough. they have already served a six—year sentence. i the british government wouldn't comment on nicole jack's case. they say those remaining in syria include dangerous individuals, and not to make securityjudgments based on gender and age. but charleen says, while her daughter should face justice, her grandchildren are innocent. poonam taneja, bbc news. it is coming up to a quarter to six, the headlines on bbc news. fans celebrate at st james's park as a saudi led takeover of newcastle united football club is approved. more countries are removed from the
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uk's government red list, which requires travellers to stay in a quarantine hotel when they get back to the uk. more on that story with the latest update to the uk's travel list which has been cut from 54 countries on the red list to just seven. let's speak to victoria fritz. how important is this going to be for businesses in the uk, then? i mean, it is we businesses in the uk, then? i mean, it is huge. isn't _ businesses in the uk, then? i mean, it is huge, isn't it? _ businesses in the uk, then? i mean, it is huge, isn't it? this— businesses in the uk, then? i mean, it is huge, isn't it? this is— businesses in the uk, then? i mean, it is huge, isn't it? this is what i it is huge, isn't it? this is what all the businesses who rely on inbound tourism have been waiting forfor inbound tourism have been waiting for for the last 18 months. inbound tourism have been waiting forfor the last 18 months. reducing from 54 to seven is enormous. just to take you through the ones that are still on there, the dominican republic, ecuador, panama, colombia, venezuela, paraguay and haiti. this is an enormous thing. it means really the beginning of the end for hotel quarantine, something that put huge number of people. why would you, unless you really had to, come and spend 11 days at a cost of more
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than £2000 in a hotel on your own? and why would you spend more money than going to other countries just for the cost of doing the pcr test and the like? so this is a huge thing. i mean, we have also seen an extension of inbound vaccination schemes as well so more people from all countries have been added to that list. people coming from india, from south africa, turkey for example. if they are fully vaccinated, they can come and all they need to do is the day two test. what it means for everyone else, it means that if you are coming to the uk, you are still going to have to quarantine if you haven't been fully vaccinated. in terms of vaccination status, we talking about people who had one of the four vaccines, the amy turner, jensen comedy pfizer and the astrazeneca. so of countries on that list. people coming back obviously who had those jabs in the uk. if they had had them in the us and the eu, but also a broader range
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of countries as well. so this is a huge thing for the travel industry. we are likely to see a big boost in the number of holidays that are going to be booked for the winter season. you know, big places like brazil, south africa, that are completely reliant on tourism as well. it means a of people are going to be going away because they know when they come back they are not going to have to sit in a hotel for a long time. what it means for families, it is an enormous thing forfamilies as well, families, it is an enormous thing for families as well, because they are trying to add up the cost of all of this against things like pcr tests, if you have children who would require those as well. so this is a really big deal, and it really does spell the end of hotel quarantine.— does spell the end of hotel iuarantine. �* . ., ., ., quarantine. and a huge amount of ex-ense quarantine. and a huge amount of expense that _ quarantine. and a huge amount of expense that went _ quarantine. and a huge amount of expense that went through - quarantine. and a huge amount of expense that went through it. i expense that went through it. victoria fritz, thank you very much was topcoat these changes save a troubled travel industry? let's speak to travel expert paul charles. it is what many people have been calling for for a long time. it is what many people have been calling forfor a long time. it is. calling for for a long time. it is, and it is a _ calling for for a long time. it is, and it is a long _ calling for for a long time. it is,
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and it is a long time _ calling for for a long time. it is, and it is a long time coming. i calling for for a long time. it is, | and it is a long time coming. far too long really for some countries who had to suffer months of lack of visitors, lack of money coming into their economies around the world, especially most countries in africa, who will be delighted tonight with this news. so it is to be welcomed that the list has shrunk down to seven countries, but you would have to ask why there needs to be a red list at all. other countries have taken away their red list. they have removed hotel quarantine, and they are seeing the same data as the uk medical authorities. are seeing the same data as the uk medicalauthorities. so are seeing the same data as the uk medical authorities. so i'm not sure why the uk is hanging on to this policy. i5 why the uk is hanging on to this oli . , ., ., ., why the uk is hanging on to this oli . , . ., ., policy. is it too late, though, to save some _ policy. is it too late, though, to save some companies - policy. is it too late, though, to save some companies that i policy. is it too late, though, to save some companies that are l policy. is it too late, though, to i save some companies that are just hanging on by the skin of their teeth? �* ., ., , hanging on by the skin of their teeth? �* . ., , ., ., teeth? i'm afraid it is too late to save some _ teeth? i'm afraid it is too late to save some of — teeth? i'm afraid it is too late to save some of the _ teeth? i'm afraid it is too late to save some of the smaller i teeth? i'm afraid it is too late to i save some of the smaller companies, the mum and pop companies two or three people perhaps you are desperate for cash to come into their businesses, and although this list has shrunk, which is to be welcomed. it means that people won't necessarily be booking immediately, they will still be booking for 2022,
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and of course that cash is not realised, if you like come into their businesses until the passengers actually travel. but there is no doubt there is a surge in bookings which has taken place in recent days, notjust because of the predeparture recent days, notjust because of the predepa rtu re test recent days, notjust because of the predeparture test being abolished, as of earlier this week, but also because of the reduction in the red list, which was expected. so the government has done the right thing, it has taken them a long time, but we now have to move on to seeing testing removed if you are fulljab, and also the removal of the red list. ,, and also the removal of the red list, ,, , , and also the removal of the red list. ,, ,, ., ., ., list. still passenger locator form is often to _ list. still passenger locator form is often to be — list. still passenger locator form is often to be filled _ list. still passenger locator form is often to be filled in _ list. still passenger locator form is often to be filled in as - list. still passenger locator form is often to be filled in as well. i l is often to be filled in as well. i mean, it can be quite a deluge of paperwork for people, come to? it is a ma'or paperwork for people, come to? it 3 a major deluge, and just pfaff and anoints the people, and i think that is one of the barriers that has been pretty many people. notjust that passenger located for bottles of the day two test when you come back to the uk. it is good news, a major victory for the department for transport tonight and the cabinet, in terms of ensuring you don't have
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to do a video interview at the end of this month, when pcr tests become antigen tests on david —— day two, so that is really good news but we still don't have a date as to when that change is going to happen, and if you are a family wanting to book for half term, you're properlyjust for half term, you're properlijst going for half term, you're propelejust going to for half term, you're properlijst going to hold off a bit for half term, you're properlyjust going to hold off a bit longer until you know that date. so the governmentjust needs to stop dithering on that and emerge with a date so the industry and consumers can plan. date so the industry and consumers can lan. ., date so the industry and consumers can lan. . ., , date so the industry and consumers can lan. . . , ., . ~' can plan. paul charles, good to talk to ou, can plan. paul charles, good to talk to you. some _ can plan. paul charles, good to talk to you. some good _ can plan. paul charles, good to talk to you, some good news. _ can plan. paul charles, good to talk to you, some good news. we i can plan. paul charles, good to talk. to you, some good news. we haven't had any for a while, have we? absolutely, thank you for stop nine months after _ absolutely, thank you for stop nine months after it _ absolutely, thank you for stop nine months after it was _ absolutely, thank you for stop nine months after it was rolled out, the astrazeneca covid vaccine has finally reached the antarctic. it was flown there this week to immunise the 23 staff never to have been keeping a british research station running through the polar winter. jonathan amos reports. it is literally at the end of the earth. this is the antarctic,
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a place of extremes where you really must avoid getting sick. which is why the arrival this week of the astrazeneca covid vaccine is so important. it will keep those who work on the white continent safe. getting the coronavirus jabs there, however, has been a grand challenge. it is a 10,000—mile flight from england to the rothera station, with stopovers required in africa and the falklands. but the astrazeneca vaccine is now in the arms of the scientists who reside on the antarctic peninsula during its cold, dark winter. they know it helps protect in case covid got to the station, but also they are going to be leaving in the next few months, anyway, so that group is going to do their summer season at rothera and then they are going back, and perhaps one of the scariest parts is when one of the team get back into uk society and covid, there are so many cases per day. so we are protecting that team before they have to get back on the air bridge flights back to the uk and back to see their family and friends. this is the furthest south the astrazeneca jab has reached. it means all continents have now received at least some doses.
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there has been very little covid, so far, in antarctica. just one isolated outbreak at a chilean research station. international science agencies want to keep it that way and anyone going south in the coming months will still have to quarantine. jonathan amos, bbc news. the queen's baton relay for the 2022 commonwealth games in birmingham has officially launched from buckingham palace was top just over nine months until the start of competition, the queen oversaw the start of the bat on's 90,000 milejourney queen oversaw the start of the bat on's 90,000 mile journey to all 72 nations and territories of the commonwealth, carrying a message that will be read out at the opening of the games on the 28th ofjuly. earlier my colleague spoke tojohn crabtree, the chair of the 2022 commonwealth games organising committee, and dame louise martin, president of the commonwealth games federation about the significance of the event. it federation about the significance of the event. , , ., , ., the event. it is unbelievable to believe we _ the event. it is unbelievable to believe we are _ the event. it is unbelievable to believe we are actually - the event. it is unbelievable to believe we are actually here i the event. it is unbelievable to i believe we are actually here today to start the games, because the
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queen with the pattern going on its journey to all the 72 countries of the commonwealth, that is a call to action, making sure all the athletes know the queen has invited them to birmingham, so 72 countries, and then back into the uk three weeks before the games, and then three days before the game is actually open, the pattern is in birmingham, and it goes around the whole of birmingham, into the stadium at the opening ceremony and her majesty will open the message and read it out and that is what the athletes want to hear, when she read that message out. they know what is in it but they don't know what she is asking them to do. so that is what it is all about. so asking them to do. so that is what it is all about.— it is all about. so it means there are now 294 _ it is all about. so it means there are now 294 days _ it is all about. so it means there are now 294 days before - it is all about. so it means there are now 294 days before these l it is all about. so it means there i are now 294 days before these games start. john crabtree, you are overseeing the whole birmingham development and set up. what sort of challenge has this been. i development and set up. what sort of challenge has this been.— challenge has this been. i think sometimes _ challenge has this been. i think sometimes i — challenge has this been. i think sometimes i smile _ challenge has this been. i think sometimes i smile when i challenge has this been. i think sometimes i smile when you i challenge has this been. i thinkl sometimes i smile when you say challenge has this been. i think i sometimes i smile when you say 294, sometimes _ sometimes i smile when you say 294, sometimes i _ sometimes i smile when you say 294, sometimes i don't. 294 days was that it has— sometimes i don't. 294 days was that it has had _ sometimes i don't. 294 days was that it has had its— sometimes i don't. 294 days was that it has had its challenges. we had a
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shorter— it has had its challenges. we had a shorter run — it has had its challenges. we had a shorter run to get into it, we didn't— shorter run to get into it, we didn't secure the games until four and a _ didn't secure the games until four and a half— didn't secure the games until four and a half years, normally might be seven— and a half years, normally might be seven or— and a half years, normally might be seven or eight to prepare, so we had to get— seven or eight to prepare, so we had to get going — seven or eight to prepare, so we had to get going very quickly. that�*s to get going very quickly. that's because durban _ to get going very quickly. that's because durban dropped - to get going very quickly. that's because durban dropped out. i to get going very quickly. that's i because durban dropped out. yes. then of course _ because durban dropped out. yes. then of course this _ because durban dropped out. yes. then of course this thing called covid _ then of course this thing called covid came along, and that meant, you know. — covid came along, and that meant, you know, most of our recruitment had started — you know, most of our recruitment had started or missed on the day covid _ had started or missed on the day covid started so we had a relatively small— covid started so we had a relatively small team — covid started so we had a relatively small team which has built up and built up— small team which has built up and built up and built up until next veer. — built up and built up until next veer. so — built up and built up until next year, so we started pretty much a part of— year, so we started pretty much a part of the — year, so we started pretty much a part of the first last year was when really _ part of the first last year was when really started ramping up, recruiting all these people who are working _ recruiting all these people who are working from home on zoom, no one quite _ working from home on zoom, no one quite knew_ working from home on zoom, no one quite knew what was going to happen to us _ quite knew what was going to happen to us our— quite knew what was going to happen to us. our two big capital sites, where _ to us. our two big capital sites, where they— to us. our two big capital sites, where they going to carry on building? they were magnificent, they did, — building? they were magnificent, they did, they were asked whether they did, they were asked whether they wanted to carry on, and being good _ they wanted to carry on, and being good brummies and black country people. _ good brummies and black country people, they said of course we will carry— people, they said of course we will carry on. _ people, they said of course we will carry on, regardless of the risk. i went— carry on, regardless of the risk. i went round — carry on, regardless of the risk. i went round and recently and the morale — went round and recently and the morale on — went round and recently and the morale on those two sites for the builders — morale on those two sites for the builders whojust kept going, they are doing — builders whojust kept going, they are doing a brilliantjob, on—time, on budget, — are doing a brilliantjob, on—time, on budget, slightly ahead of time. they are _ on budget, slightly ahead of time. they are doing fantastic. so it has been _ they are doing fantastic. so it has been a _ they are doing fantastic. so it has been a battle, a bit of a challenge, i been a battle, a bit of a challenge, i can't _ been a battle, a bit of a challenge, i can't deny— been a battle, a bit of a challenge, i can't deny that but we're actually in a good —
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i can't deny that but we're actually in a good place. so being able to do this today, — in a good place. so being able to do this today, we have had years to go, we have _ this today, we have had years to go, we have had — this today, we have had years to go, we have had our mascot being launched, _ we have had our mascot being launched, we have sold tickets, we have 40,000 volunteers to volunteering, but we are seeing the pattern _ volunteering, but we are seeing the pattern on— volunteering, but we are seeing the pattern on its way, it makes it real~ — pattern on its way, it makes it real. ., , ., ., ., real. dame louise, the commonwealth aimes real. dame louise, the commonwealth iames used real. dame louise, the commonwealth games used to — real. dame louise, the commonwealth games used to be _ real. dame louise, the commonwealth games used to be called _ real. dame louise, the commonwealth games used to be called the _ real. dame louise, the commonwealth games used to be called the friendly i games used to be called the friendly games, because of the spirit of generosity and inclusivity. is that still possible in this age of intense competition? it still possible in this age of intense competition? it certainly is and it certainly _ intense competition? it certainly is and it certainly is _ intense competition? it certainly is and it certainly is for _ intense competition? it certainly is and it certainly is for the _ and it certainly is for the commonwealth because we classify all of us together we're one big family, we all speak english. some of them are so lucky they can speak to a three languages but the commonwealth language in the village is english so that is how they can all sit mix together. it is really, really friendly, these are still the friendly games and long may they continue. in friendly games and long may they continue. ., ., , continue. in a moment, it will be time for the _ continue. in a moment, it will be time for the bbc _ continue. in a moment, it will be time for the bbc news _ continue. in a moment, it will be time for the bbc news at - continue. in a moment, it will be time for the bbc news at 6pm i continue. in a moment, it will be i time for the bbc news at 6pm with huw edwards, but now i look at the weather forecast with chris. hello again. for many of our some today
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has been very much a cloudy day compared with yesterday but it has been a good deal warmer as well. looking at the temperatures we had yesterday, 13 degrees appear yesterday, 13 degrees appear yesterday for stop this afternoon there are those temperatures have reached 20 degrees, so a jump of seven celsius. those temperatures are actually six or seven degrees above average for the time of year. they have been some breaks in the cloud, the best have been across parts of north—east england, really anywhere to the east of the pennines having the best of the sunshine coast we have seen a few breaks as well into the far south—west but some thicker cloud for northern ireland and scotland. that is where we have had our weatherfront bringing some positive rain and that front will be with us at least for the next 24 hours. there will be some further rain at times, northern ireland and western scotland overnight. further south england and wales a quiet night for many, maybe a bit of drizzle. mist and fog patches forming elsewhere some can be quite widespread and dense as we start friday, potentially quite slow to
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clear as well but eventually mist and fog tending to fit in and break up and fog tending to fit in and break up and again we will see a bit of sunshine coming through the clouds. the best of it probably across more central and eastern parts of england. maybe east wales not doing too badly as well. in any brighter moments, those temperatures climbing into the low 20s but even if you don't see a great deal of sunshine, it will still be warmer than it should be of the year. into the weekend, something of a change, cooler air will be pushing its way back southwards across the country, thatis back southwards across the country, that is behind this weather front, which is a cold front, the same one still bringing rain to northern ireland and scotland but it is going to finally shift away. so the brighter weather is expected to develop, western scotland and northern ireland as we go through the afternoon. the england and wales, if you morning in mist and fog patches but otherwise a quiet enough day, temperatures in the warmest areas again climbing to about 20 degrees but starting to cool down a little bit across scotland and northern ireland. into sunday, cooler and fresher air sinking in most parts of the uk. this is the weather front, just a
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slip of cloud, nothing significant on it. those temperatures getting a bit closer to normal, still above though, 15 in belfast and in edinburgh, still around 19 degrees in london. that is still quite a long way above average but into next week, high pressure around, a lot of quiet weather, temperatures getting closer to normal.
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today at six, a warning to households and businesses that energy prices are set to rise sharply in the year ahead. the energy price cap which limits the bills for domestic consumers could increase significantly in the spring and the industry says the long—term answer is clear. the biggest driver here is that international gas market, and we can't control it. what we can do is to move to domestic, clean sources of generation. for many consumers, it's a worrying time, with more than 1 million additional households reported to be heading for fuel poverty. we've already been told it's going to cost a hell of a lot more for people on meters. but we don't have the money to do it any other way round. that's the only way. it's like hand to mouth, you live day by day.
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we'll have the latest on the prospects for energy prices,

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