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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 7, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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higher energy costs could lead to higher prices in shops. a warning from business today. it comes as household energy bills could rise by hundreds of pounds next year. i put hundreds of pounds next year. i put my heating — hundreds of pounds next year. i put my heating on _ hundreds of pounds next year. i put my heating on for _ hundreds of pounds next year. i put my heating on for half _ hundreds of pounds next year. i mt my heating on for half an hour in the morning and half an hour at night. the rest of the time i am keeping one the best way i can. we look at what's behind the big energy price increases. prince andrew is granted access to a sealed document his lawyers say could end the sexual abuse case being brought by virginia giuffre. 20 years since us airstrikes began against al-qaeda after the 9/11 attacks, we hear about the impact of the long conflict on afghans. the queen launches the baton relay for next year's commonwealth games that will take place in birmingham. newcastle united football club could soon be in the hands of a saudi—backed group.
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human rights groups raise concerns about the takeover. and coming up on the bbc news channel, england all—rounder ben stokes is unlikely to play in the ashes in australia this winter after undergoing a second operation on an injured finger. good afternoon and welcome to the news at one. businesses and analysts are warning that the sharp rise in energy prices will lead to households paying more for bills and everyday products. the boss of supermarket iceland said price rises were now inevitable, and consultants cornwall insights warned the annual energy price cap could rise by £400 in spring. the business secretary has said uk gas supplies would be sufficient this winter, but acknowledged that more
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energy firms would fold in the coming months. kwasi kwarteng told energy providers that developing renewable sources will be the only way to protect against soaring gas prices long—term, as our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey reports. just like the season's weather, bill payers are being warned the worst is yet to come. a host of energy companies have collapsed in recent weeks. their customers — moved to a new supplier — are already having to pay hundreds of pounds more a year than they expected. a price cap does protect millions of people from extreme rises in bills but analysts say next year they will still face a bill shock. for many, it is a worry, finding the money to cover it. i always said that if you had to walk around your house wearing a cardigan, there was something wrong. and guess what, i'm going around the house with a cardigan on because i only put my heating on for half an hour in the morning to take the chill away and half an hour at night. the rest of the time i'm keeping
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warm the best way i can. under the price cap, a customer now pays £1277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity. analysts expect that typical bill to rise to £1600 when a revised but as yet undecided cap starts in april. compare that with a year ago, when you could have got a deal costing just over £850 a year. as the global economy has been switched back on after the height of the pandemic, the scramble for gas has not been matched by supply, leading to an unprecedented seven fold rise in wholesale prices. producers of everything from toilet roll to steel say that will feed through to higher prices in the shops. domestic customers may be predicted from some of this volatility, but industry isn't. today, the business secretary told an energy industry conference that a renewed commitment to renewable energy generation in the uk
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was the only long—term solution. the recent issues that we have with the volatility of the gas price, incredible spikes and then falling back, it creates uncertainty in the market. i think that shows exactly why we need vigorously to pursue our climate goals. with fresh warnings that council tax is also likely to rise sharply, everyone will need to brace and budget for a squeeze on theirfinances. kevin peachey, bbc news. yesterday president putin said russia would increase gas supplies to europe which did bring the price of wholesale gas down slightly. how has that noose been received, jessica? has that noose been received, jessica? ., ., , ., ., jessica? you only need to look at the impact _ jessica? you only need to look at the impact of _ jessica? you only need to look at the impact of president - jessica? you only need to look at the impact of president putin's i the impact of president putin's comments to see the power he seems to have, energy prices in europe is
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a huge issue. prices have been soaring, they have been reaching record highs down to a variety of factors but it has left eu member states scrabbling to act and the eu as well. the eu next week is expected to come forward with some possible short to medium—term measures to mitigate the situation. longer term it may be looking at gas market reforms, the joint procurement of emergency gas results as well. yesterday, interestingly, the french president emmanuel macron said europe needed to become more sovereign when it came to energy, more independent, then you look over to germany and you have the nordstrom gas pipeline that runs from russia. approval of that pipeline may be many months away but it has still led to fears the continent will only become more reliant on russia. the eu like the uk wants to move towards renewables, create a less volatile energy market but that is a long—term aim. short
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term there are fears of a difficult winter ahead. 0ur political correspondent peter saulljoins me now. customers are facing a real financial squeeze, so how much pressure is this putting on the government to act? the pressure is this putting on the government to act? pressure is this putting on the covernment to act? ., government to act? the government we are hearin: government to act? the government we are hearing is _ government to act? the government we are hearing is pretty — government to act? the government we are hearing is pretty determined - government to act? the government we are hearing is pretty determined not - are hearing is pretty determined not to intervene in the energy market. the business secretary said this morning he wouldn't be bailing out struggling energy firms. government insiders point to things like the energy as a way in which they have intervened in the past, that offers some level of protection but it only goes so far. that is likely to go up in the coming months. the government also says we have money there in place for people on low incomes who have been struggling throughout the pandemic, but there are lots of other things that are having an impact on people's back pockets. you have the removal of the universal credit uplift, inflation will likely go credit uplift, inflation will likely 9° up, credit uplift, inflation will likely go up, businesses having to absorb those extra energy costs which could
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feed through to the prices we pay at the shops, so the government is in no doubt under pressure to do something. the message we are hearing is we need to look towards relying less on energy from overseas, we need to produce more here the uk, the government says it will invest more in renewable energy and nuclear power. it is more about fundamental change rather than short—term fixes, a similar message to what we heard from the prime minister yesterday at the party conference but there are those who think that upbeat tone that we got from borisjohnson yesterday doesn't really chime that well with the struggles that people are feeling out there. a lot of people will face a difficult winter in terms of the cost of living and it's notjust the winter we are talking about. looking towards the spring there are national insurance rises on the way and a warning from the institute for fiscal studies that council tax bills could go up in the spring. the eu's preparing to table new proposals for the northern ireland protocol next week, according to the european commission vice president.
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marcos sefcovic says he hopes they'll form the basis for talks with the uk. the protocol avoids a hard border on the island of ireland by keeping northern ireland in the eu's single market for goods. but unionists argue it creates a trade border between northern ireland and great britain, undermining its constitutional position as part of the uk. natwest bank has pleaded guilty to failing to prevent alleged money—laundering of nearly £400 million by one customer. the city regulator said natwest did not monitor the account of a bradford —based jeweller which was shut down following a police raid in 2016. it is the first time a uk financial institution has faced criminal prosecution under anti—money laundering laws. today marks the 20th anniversary of us airstrikes against al-qaeda in afghanistan following the 9/11 attacks — the start of two decades
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of operations in the region for us forces. this summer, troops finally pulled out of the country, as it fell back under taliban rule. 0ur defence correspondentjonathan beale has been speaking to people who've been affected by the conflict. a simple, low—key ceremony at the national arboretum in staffordshire marked the start and the end of the long war in afghanistan. wreathes laid for those who made the ultimate sacrifice. there is an emptiness, there is a hole. 457 british military personnel lost their lives one of them was james hill, killed by an ied. he was just 23 and about to get married. his parents are proud of his service although the recent return of afghanistan to taliban control has been hard for them to bear. if we were to say now, yes, james's life was wasted, then that would hurt us all over again.
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one hand says, what the heck did we go there for? 0n the other hand, we stopped any terrorist atrocities and our streets. when you balance that, do you think the sacrifice that you have made of your only son has been worth it? no. nothing is worth it. that's not worth anything. many who survived still bear the physical and mental scars. luke lost both his legs a roadside bomb. sport has helped with his recovery. this summer he was due to take part in the tokyo paralympics. but because of an injury, instead he had to stay at home and witness the collapse of the country in which he once fought. it has been a mentally rough period for- the summer. from my point of view, _ we were on the ground removing ieds and giving people some safety, some
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bit of safety in the country and - kids the ability to go to school. i will never regret that, j i can hold my head high in what we did out there. if i could make a deal tomorrow and get my legs back, i would. i when the first british troops went into helmand in 2006, it was supposed to be a simple peace support operation but it soon turned into a bloody counterinsurgency war. stuart, who led the first deployment, believes it was all too little, too late, and ended too soon. we can be proud of what we try to do as soldiers. but in terms of those responsible for the strategic decisions, i don't think there's a great deal to crow about in terms of there being particular... you know, there is no victory here, we did not win that conflict. wars without victory often forgotten, but the
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hopes of all who served and lost loved ones, is that their sacrifice will never be forgotten. jonathan beale, bbc news. the first sea lord and chief of the naval staff has been appointed as the new armed forces chief. admiral sir tony radakin will take over as chief of the defence staff from general sir nick carter at the end of november. his new responsibilities will include leading and setting strategy for defence, as well as conducting operations and maintaining relationships with other military leaders. ajudge in the us has given permission for prince andrew's lawyers to get access to a confidential document, which they believe will end a civil claim against him. virginia giuffre is pursuing a case against the duke of york, alleging she was the victim of sexual assault. prince andrew has always denied those allegations. our legal affairs correspondent dominic casciani is here. how significant could this be? it could be significant. there's lots of caveats around that. going
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back, virginia guiffre, when she sued jeffrey epstein for sexual abuse, he settled that in 2009. we know from the documents in the prince andrew case that pass that settlement included some kind of language which is confidential at the moment, under which virginia guiffre promise not to sue other people connected to the allegations. this is where it gets interesting. the duke of york was a lawyers say we need to see that settlement because if that wedding is true, she can't take the duke of york to court for a similar case because she has already given away her rights. virginia guiffre's lawyers don't seem to be bothered by this. they have said, have a look at the document and that is because whatever the wording is, it covered events involving jeffrey epstein in one part of the us but not the places where virginia guiffre is making allegations against the
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prince, mainly manhunt and, of london and the us virgin islands. the duke of york and his lawyers will get to see this document. they had to come back to court in new york and say whether or not they will try to fight to stop the case of the wise it will continue. a domestic abuse charity is urging the home secretary to make tackling violence against women a priority for all police forces. refuge wants domestic abuse, homicide and sexual violence to be made a legal duty in the police, crime, sentencing and courts bill. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. 16 women whose lives were taken remembered today outside of the most famous police building in the country. this gathering was organised by the domestic abuse charity refuge, and some of its most high—profile campaigners were here in support. there needs to be more warnings towards men to stop this epidemic on the street, in homes, of bullying women,
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verbally or physically. because i think people don't do anything about it anymore. the silhouettes represent women killed by a serving or former police officer across the uk since 2009. most of the deaths happened in a domestic situation, the killer knew his victim. the exception was sarah everard, duped and falsely arrested by pc wayne couzens who kidnapped, raped and murdered her. her killing has provoked a national debate on the issue of violence against women. this week at the conservative party conference, the home secretary, priti patel, announced an enquiry into the sarah everard case. now she is being urged to include a specific focus on sexual violence and domestic abuse in new policing legislation. we really welcome the strong words from priti patel, our home secretary, and from borisjohnson, saying that ending violence against women and girls is one
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of his top priorities. we really need to see those words translate into action, action that will keep women safe. the home office says it will consider possible changes to the legislation and stressed its commitment to protecting women and girls. june kelly, bbc news. a judge has temporarily blocked a law in texas that effectively bans women from having an abortion. the biden administration had asked the court in austin to stop the law being enforced while challenges are ongoing. from 1st september, women in texas have been unable to obtain an abortion after six weeks of pregnancy. 0ur washington correspondent gary 0'donoghuejoins us now. gary, this is the latest development in a long legal battle. it is and this is no ruling on the constitution or legality of this particular law but are simply an injunction to stop it going into force and will be and has been
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appealed by texas. that appeal will be heard in the coming weeks, in the fifth circuit which is in new orleans which is one of the most 0rleans which is one of the most conservative courts in the country and it has already refused to intervene on this bill before it became law. there is a lot of worried people out there who were celebrating last night but things could change quite quickly. it's also worth saying that texas made provision in its legislation that should an injunction be put in place, abortion providers could still be sued if that was eventually lifted so it is not clear how much difference it will make on the ground in of women getting access to those exhibitors. for the time being, the law cannot operate —— to those services. it could all change in a matter of weeks.— in a matter of weeks. thank you, ga . it in a matter of weeks. thank you, gary- it is — in a matter of weeks. thank you, gary- it is 17 _ in a matter of weeks. thank you, gary. it is 17 minutes _ in a matter of weeks. thank you, gary. it is 17 minutes past - in a matter of weeks. thank you, gary. it is 17 minutes past one, l in a matter of weeks. thank you, l gary. it is 17 minutes past one, our top story... business is one of price rises at energy bills soar.
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and coming up, the british woman who took her children with her when she joined the islamic state group urges politicians to allow their return to the uk. ., , ., ~ ., , ., the uk. coming up, a saudi arabian takeover of— the uk. coming up, a saudi arabian takeover of newcastle _ the uk. coming up, a saudi arabian takeover of newcastle united - the uk. coming up, a saudi arabian takeover of newcastle united is - takeover of newcastle united is close to being agreed, approvalfrom the premier league could come in the next 24 hours after a consortium proved the saudi state would not have control of the club. the queen's baton relay for the birmingham 2022 commonwealth games has officially launched from buckingham palace. with just over nine months to the tournament, the queen oversaw the start of the baton�*s 90,000—mile journey to all 72 nations and territories of the commonwealth, carrying a message that will be read out at opening of the games on 28thjuly. reeta chakrabarti is at buckingham palace. reeta. martin, it has been such an uplifting day here, the first time
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we have seen her majesty the queen at her first major engagement at buckingham palace since the pandemic began. the commonwealth is an organisation that is very close to her heart and these games are of course taking place on home ground. they are the seventh to be held in the uk since the competition began over 90 years ago. and it is of course a special moment for birmingham which stepped in to host the games after the original winner, durban in south africa, was forced to pull out put up with a look back at the events of the morning, he is at the events of the morning, he is a midlands correspondent. it wouldn't be a proper ceremony without a military band. the crowd had come to see a significant moment, this comp made in birmingham, took pride of place. and the queen, as head of the commonwealth, placed a message in the baton which she will not read until the games begin. this is the start of an epicjourney which will take to 169 days, it will be taken
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across all 72 competing commonwealth nations and territories before arriving in birmingham nextjuly. it is a big day for the athletes as well boxer lauren price is an olympic and two—time commonwealth games medallist. olympic and two-time commonwealth games medallist.— games medallist. you're going away as team wales. _ games medallist. you're going away as team wales, with _ games medallist. you're going away as team wales, with the _ games medallist. you're going away as team wales, with the other- as team wales, with the other sports, to get involved and it's great for me and the welsh are very proud as well so to go away as team wales is pretty special. also proud as well so to go away as team wales is pretty special.— wales is pretty special. also at the heart of the _ wales is pretty special. also at the heart of the ceremony _ wales is pretty special. also at the heart of the ceremony were - heart of the ceremony were birmingham schoolchildren and hometown heroes, the volunteers who keep grassroots sports going in the west midlands.— keep grassroots sports going in the west midlands. from every corner of our ci to west midlands. from every corner of our city to every _ west midlands. from every corner of our city to every corner _ west midlands. from every corner of our city to every corner of _ west midlands. from every corner of our city to every corner of the - our city to every corner of the giohem — our city to every corner of the lobe. .. , �* . our city to every corner of the lobe... , �* ., ., globe... city, birmingham, has had to net globe... city, birmingham, has had to get ready — globe... city, birmingham, has had to get ready in _ globe... city, birmingham, has had to get ready in a — globe... city, birmingham, has had to get ready in a hurry _ globe... city, birmingham, has had to get ready in a hurry having - to get ready in a hurry having stepped in after original host durban pulled out. this is the alexander stadium which is being revamped and will host the opening and closing ceremonies as well as the athletics. birmingham reckons someone from every one of the commonwealth nations and territories lives that and often claims to be the youngest city by population in
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europe. far the youngest city by population in euro e. ., ., , the youngest city by population in euroe. ., ., , _, ., europe. for it to be coming to birmingham. _ europe. for it to be coming to birmingham, my _ europe. for it to be coming to birmingham, my home - europe. for it to be coming to birmingham, my home town, | europe. for it to be coming to i birmingham, my home town, i'm europe. for it to be coming to - birmingham, my home town, i'm very proud _ birmingham, my home town, i'm very roud. �* . , birmingham, my home town, i'm very roud. �* ., , , ., ., �*, proud. i'm really proud that it's happening _ proud. i'm really proud that it's happening in — proud. i'm really proud that it's happening in my _ proud. i'm really proud that it's happening in my city. _ proud. i'm really proud that it's happening in my city. and - proud. i'm really proud that it's happening in my city. and it'll. proud. i'm really proud that it's i happening in my city. and it'll get to show_ happening in my city. and it'll get to show the diversity and the good parts _ to show the diversity and the good parts of— to show the diversity and the good parts of the city. it to show the diversity and the good parts of the city-— parts of the city. it was also a chance to _ parts of the city. it was also a chance to highlight _ parts of the city. it was also a chance to highlight that - parts of the city. it was also a chance to highlight that the i chance to highlight that the commonwealth games is more than a sports event but a cultural one as well. the early ballot for tickets have sold out and while the crowds to date were not exceptionally large, they will be when the event starts next year. bud large, they will be when the event starts next year.— starts next year. and i am “oined now by rm. i starts next year. and i am “oined now by phil. we * starts next year. and i am “oined now by phil. we could h starts next year. and i am joined now by phil. we could hear- starts next year. and i am joined now by phil. we could hear from| starts next year. and i am joined . now by phil. we could hear from the voices are people in birmingham just how much it means to them could not just birmingham but the whole of the west mills because events will take place coventry and sandwell and you could not imagine a more multicultural place than sandwell and in wolverhampton. is a multicultural place than sandwell and in wolverhampton.— and in wolverhampton. is a big moment for— and in wolverhampton. is a big moment for the _ and in wolverhampton. is a big moment for the city _ and in wolverhampton. is a big moment for the city and - and in wolverhampton. is a big moment for the city and the i and in wolverhampton. is a big - moment for the city and the region which often feels overlooked and a bit disparaged put it this is really big event to get and i got it at the last minute and it's a good chance i
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think for birmingham and the region to showcase the transformation of the city had undergone put it is undergoing a renaissance, there has been a bit of a problem with the pandemic but things are coming back to light at the moment but people had not been there for a long time and i don't think they would recognise it now. this is what they want to get across, its a great opportunity to notjust highlight the city but the people who live there and to showcase birmingham and there and to showcase birmingham and the west midlands to the rest of the world. ~ . , the west midlands to the rest of the world. a , . «a the west midlands to the rest of the world. a , . ~ the west midlands to the rest of the world. a, , ., . ., the west midlands to the rest of the world. , ., . ., , world. many thanks. well, that is the start of _ world. many thanks. well, that is the start of the _ world. many thanks. well, that is the start of the queens _ world. many thanks. well, that is the start of the queens baton - world. many thanks. well, that is i the start of the queens baton relay and into in 294 days' time it will arrive in birmingham and its arrival will signal the start of the 2022 commonwealth games.- will signal the start of the 2022 commonwealth games. thank you very much. rita chakrabarti _ commonwealth games. thank you very much. rita chakrabarti at _ commonwealth games. thank you very much. rita chakrabarti at buckingham l much. rita chakrabarti at buckingham palace. at least 20 people have been confirmed to have died after an earthquake hit pakistan in the early hours of the morning. more than 300 people were injured, with the remote mountainous district of harnai in baluchistan
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the worst hit. emergency teams are scrambling to reach people trapped under the rubble of collapsed homes. the nobel prize for literature had been awarded to tanzania born novelist abdulrazak gurnah in a ceremony in stockholm this afternoon. he grew up on the island of zanzibar and arrived in england as a refugee is at the end of the 19605 point the swedish academy commended his uncompromising and compassionate writing on the effects of colonialism and the experience of refugees. a paramedic who was the ambulance operational command at the manchester arena attack has apologised to the family of a victim who could have survived if he had had quick at medical treatment. 28—year—old john atkinson died from injuries to his legs which were treatable. a public enquiry had said those trying to help him were told ijy those trying to help him were told by the paramedics to wrap him in blankets and leave him where he was our north of england corresponded judith moritz has been in court. what has been happening? this
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judith moritz has been in court. what has been happening? as you said, we what has been happening? as you said. we have _ what has been happening? as you said, we have learnt _ what has been happening? as you said, we have learnt that - what has been happening? as you said, we have learnt that john - said, we have learnt thatjohn atkinson died as a result of severe bleeding from his leg injuries. a member of the public tried to help, gave him a tourniquet he had made from a belt but no paramedics were with mr atkinson for nearly an hour and it was more than an hour and a half before he was taken to hospital. there had been problems lifting him out of the poyet where the explosion happened, there were not any stretchers and there were difficulties getting him onto a display board —— out of the foyer open to a police officer asked the operational commander, darren smith, for help but mr smith said to him he should leave mr atkinson where he was four now and blanket him up. today, the chairman of the manchester arena public enquiry, sir john saunders, said to dan smith, how did that happen but at what went wrong? this happened at a time when north west ambulance were at the seams and dan smith replied, "all
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the paramedics that wanted to do their very best. " and he said to their very best. " and he said to the family, "i'm very sorry his death will remain with him for a long time.. i'm truly sorry if any decision i made impacted on his survivability." we learn that by the time john survivability." we learn that by the timejohn atkinson was taken to hospital, there was a full trauma team waiting for him, they did their best to save the 28—year—old but around two hours after the explosion, very sadly, john atkinson lost his life. explosion, very sadly, john atkinson lost his life-— lost his life. judith, thank you very much- — a british woman who took her children with her when she joined the islamic state group says the uk government should "deal with the issue" of allowing them to return. nicole jack is being held with her three daughters in the same syrian refugee camp as former is bride shamima begum. the home office says its priority is to ensure the uk's "safety and security". poonam taneja has this exclusive report.
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this is no place for children to live. but thousands do. this squalid camp in northern syria houses the surviving children of islamic state group's fallen caliphate. shall i fix your slipper? amongst them are three british sisters. every time, you're too big for this. they are seven, nine and 12, and they live here with their mum, nicole jack. you, as a mother, decided to take your children to islamic state group territory. there were beheadings, there were murders, there were massacres. how would you explain that to anyone? i don't think, even if i explained it, everyone would understand. but it was about my family being together, do you understand? and honestly, secondly, what may have happened, we've never been witness to it, my children and i, honestly. you know, i haven't seen a beheading in my life.
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but her children have suffered trauma and loss. their father was killed fighting for is as the group persecuted minorities and enslaved women. and their ten—year—old brother isaac died in an air strike in front of them. i really miss my family, i miss my granny, my aunties. i miss my grandmother, my other grandmother. all of those people, i miss them so much. this camp is run by the kurdish authorities. they want countries to take their citizens back. the uk is reluctant to allow the wives of islamic state group's foreign fighters to return to britain. they are viewed as a threat to national security. however, they are willing to repatriate british orphans and unaccompanied children. but nicole jack says her children can't go back without her and so the only connection they have
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with the outside world are occasional lessons. hi, hey there, how are you guys? love you. and this video message to their granny. we hope we can come back soon and see you guys. let her come and face _ the consequences but it is not fair and it is not right for these children to be languishingl in this place. enough is enough. they have already served a six—year sentence. - the british government wouldn't on nicole jack's case. —— comment on the case. they say those remaining in syria include dangerous individuals and not to make securityjudgments based on gender and age. but charleen says, while her daughter should face justice, her grandchildren are innocent. poonam taneja, bbc news. it is expected that a £300 million takeover of newcastle united will be given the go—ahead today after the premier league and a consortium led
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ijy premier league and a consortium led by the saudi public investment fund reached an agreement over the terms. the premier league had previously raised concerns about the group's links to the saudi state. 0ur north of england correspondent fiona trott is at st james' park this afternoon. what is the reaction been there? lot of fans in the city this happening are saying they haven't slept a wink since the news started to come through last night, that 18 months of wrangling might be over. let me explain why the deal fell through last year. there was concern the saudi state would be controlling the saudi state would be controlling the club but we are now hearing that the club but we are now hearing that the public investment fund who are putting up 80% of the money will be operating separately from the state so it would overcome the owner and directors test. it also appears that an alleged piracy dispute involving the broadcasting a premier league matches may also have been resolved but there has been another concern of course, the saudi state has been accused of human rights abuses and thatis accused of human rights abuses and that is why today amnesty international has urged the premier league to change the rules, it wants
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a new human rights compliance test for all deals put its notjust the past 18 months that fans say have been difficult for them, with all this wrangling over a takeover. they would say it had been the past 14 years, a lot of them criticising mike ashley since he took over the club all that time ago. it has been relegated twice, there have been protests here and a petition handed to parliament over concerns about the way it was run. that is why the prospect of this deal means so much to them, they say could give them hope, the hope of playing top—level football, of winning trophies. this is a £300 million deal which would make newcastle one of the richest in the world and this club is the beating heart of this city. it would transform the lives notjust of the fans and players but newcastle as well. ., ., ., ,, , . time for a look at the weather. here's nick miller. and there's a catch, this is yesterday! it's we have had a bit
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about whether

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