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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 7, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. fuel bills predicted to rise even more as gas prices reach a record high. the business secretary is due to face industry bosses for the first time since the start of the crisis. 20 of the crisis. years since the start of uk military 20 years since the start of uk military operations in afghanistan and commemorative services will take place in london and here at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. we will speak to some of those taking part in about half an hour. here at gatwick airport people setting off for holidays with
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big changes to travel rules kick in. we will look at the new rules on how they might change further and what it means for the half term holiday and winter getaway plans. we look at what will be done to make this festive season a success. and could christmas be coming early for newcastle united fans. a major hurdle to a deal for newcastle is removed. a weather front draped across western scotland and northern ireland will produce rainbow but it will be worn for the next days for all of us. it's thursday, october the 7th. our top story. householders are being warned their energy bills could rise by another £400
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early next year after gas prices soared to record levels. that's on top on rises caused by the higher energy price cap that came into effect last week. the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, will face industry bosses later today as the sector deals with an unprecedented spike in wholesale costs. kevin peachey reports. just like the season's weather, bill payers are being warned the worst is yet to come. a host of energy companies have collapsed in recent weeks. their customers moved to a new supplier are already having to pay hundreds of pounds more a year than they expected. a price cap does protect millions of people from extreme rises in bills, but analysts say, next year, they will still face a bill shock. under the price cap, a customer now pays £1277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity. analysts expect that typical bill to rise to £1600 when a revised but as yet undecided cap starts in april. compare that with a year ago, when you could have got a deal
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costing just over £850 a year. we are competing with the rest of the world, the rest of europe, for gas supplies. unfortunately, it is the reality. price comparison sites, which historically talk about how much we can save you by switching. but the reality is that is not there at the moment, and very few people for the whole of this year, really, have been in a position where they would be able to save, compared to last year. still, producers confirmed they halted production at times of high demand, showing that industry, as well as consumers, is feeling the impact of rising costs. some of the heat was drawn from the crisis yesterday when russia said it would increase gas supplies to europe, helping to limit the latest surge in wholesale gas prices. but it hasn't ended cause for the uk government to step in. the business secretary will be expected to address concerns of the energy sector today. but then also the worries of businesses and consumers
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in the weeks to come. a premier league footballer has been arrested on suspicion of sexually assaulting a woman. the man is in his 20s and plays for brighton and hove albion. he was arrested at a nightclub in brighton early on wednesday. the club said it was helping police with the investigation. prince andrew's legal team has been granted permission to review a sealed document they believe will end the sexual abuse lawsuit against him. the document details a settlement between the duke of york's accuser, virginia guiffre, and the convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein. the prince has categorically denied ms guiffre�*s claims. people who have had covid, as well as being double vaccinated, have greater protection from the virus, according to new research. a study run in collaboration with king's college london researchers, found that an individual�*s protection against the virus can be as much as 94 per cent if they have tested positive in the past and received both jabs.
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that falls to 65 per cent if a person is unvaccinated. ministers in northern ireland will meet today to formally review the country's covid restrictions. people in northern ireland are currently still required to keep a distance in hospitality venues, and household gatherings are limited to fifteen people. any decisions made today will come into force in a week's time. nine months after it was rolled out, the astrazeneca covid vaccine has finally reached the antarctic. it was flown there this week to immunise the 23 staff members who've been keeping a british research station running through the polar winter. 0ur science correspondent jonathan amos reports. it is literally at the end of the earth. this is the antarctic, a place of extremes, where you really must avoid getting sick. which is why the arrival this week of the astrazeneca covid
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vaccine is so important. it will keep those who work on the white continent safe. getting the coronavirus jabs there, however, has been a grand challenge. it is a 10,000—mile flight from england to the rothera station, with stopovers required in africa and the falklands. but the astrazeneca vaccine is now in the arms of the scientists who reside on the antarctic peninsula during its cold, dark winter. they know it helps protect in case covid got to the station, but also they are going to be leaving in the next few months, anyway, so that group is going to do their summer season at rothera and then they are going back and perhaps one of the scariest parts is when one of the team get back into uk society and covid, there are so many cases per day. so we are protecting that team before they have to get back on the air bridge flights back to the uk and back to see their family and friends. this is the furthest south the astrazeneca jab has reached. it means all continents have now received at least some doses. there has been very little covid, so far, in antarctica.
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just one isolated outbreak at a chilean research station. international science agencies want to keep it that way and anyone going south in the coming months will still have to quarantine. jonathan amos, bbc news. let's pick up the weather. that is a lovely picture. it is from the library. i can tell you lovely blue skies but today some cloud. it is a mild start. at the moment, temperatures in northern ireland are 17 degrees in places and western parts of the uk between 14—16 and these temperatures are set to rise as we go through the next few days. this morning starting with cloud. some of it will break up and we will see sunshine. a weather front across northern ireland and scotland. it is a waving weather front and will be
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with us the next days and it is literally doing that so we will not see rain in the same places but predominantly scotland and northern ireland. we could see large rain totals in western scotland. these are the temperatures. maybe we could get up to 21 if we see sunshine for any length of time. the same waving weather front tonight. it waves further south. cloudy tonight. also, some mist and fog patches forming and that will take time to lift. with the subtle change in wind direction war should see sunshine. again, the waving weather front, waving further back to western scotland and the west of northern ireland. these are the temperatures we can expect overnight but by day tomorrow, a high of up to possibly 22.
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it is getting warmer. thanks. we're expecting to hear that more countries are to be removed from the government's so called red list later today — that's the list of countries from which travellers currently have to stay in a government approved quarantine hotel. the traffic light system that has restricted foreign travel during the pandemic was scrapped at the start of this week as part of moves to ease the rules around foreign travel. so what does this mean for holidaymakers? ben boulos is at gatwick airport. it could mean changes happening and talk us through what is expected. a crucial week for anyone planning foreign travel perhaps for half term or going in search of winter sun. the traffic light system dictated foreign travel since may, when coronavirus restrictions started to be lifted, but it has changed this week. let's look at the new rules.
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the traffic light system of bringing amber and red countries has gone and is replaced by a simpler system of red list countries and the rest of the world. what happens if you go on holiday to a country that is not on the red list. if you have no vaccine and under 18 orfully the red list. if you have no vaccine and under 18 or fully vaccinated, you no longer have to do a predeparture you no longer have to do a predepa rtu re test before you no longer have to do a predeparture test before catching your flight home. predeparture test before catching yourflight home. you predeparture test before catching your flight home. you also predeparture test before catching yourflight home. you also no longer have to do a day eight pcr test when you arrive back in the uk and you do not have to isolate at home. what you have to do is book, pay for and take a day two covid test. at the moment it has to be a pcr test but the government is looking to change that to a cheaper lateral flow test but has not given a date, and you also have to fill in a passenger locator form also have to fill in a passenger
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locatorform before also have to fill in a passenger locator form before catching a flight home. if you go to a red list country, you have to pay £2285 for an 11 night stay at a government approved quarantine hotel in the uk and at the moment there are about 50 countries on the red list including south africa, mexico, tunisia. we expect the government to take a number of the list and that would open up a number of more long call destinations. we can talk about this in detail with simon calder, travel editor of the independent. some changes to the foreign office travel advice, what is the latest? it is changes to the foreign office travel advice, what is the latest?- advice, what is the latest? it is a fast moving _ advice, what is the latest? it is a fast moving week. _ advice, what is the latest? it is a fast moving week. we _ advice, what is the latest? it is a fast moving week. we woke - advice, what is the latest? it is a fast moving week. we woke up l fast moving week. we woke up yesterday and there were 32 countries on the okay to go list from the department for transport but on the foreign office, no go
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list. although that is not the law like the red list it is significant because it means travel insurance is typically not valid and holiday companies do not operate there but suddenly we discovered countries such as bangladesh, gambia and ghana were no longer at risk. we expect cuts to the red list today and as soon as those have happened, we understand the foreign office will take those countries off the no go list. we have two lists and they are getting more aligned.— getting more aligned. people still have to take _ getting more aligned. people still have to take a _ getting more aligned. people still have to take a day _ getting more aligned. people still have to take a day two _ getting more aligned. people still have to take a day two pcr - getting more aligned. people still have to take a day two pcr list i getting more aligned. people still. have to take a day two pcr list when they come back, which could be expensive. when my to change to the cheaper lateral flow?— cheaper lateral flow? sometime later in october. the _ cheaper lateral flow? sometime later in october. the government - cheaper lateral flow? sometime later in october. the government says - cheaper lateral flow? sometime later in october. the government says it . in october. the government says it is keen to get this change imposed by the time the half term holiday in england and wales are coming to an end. if you are going away in the last week of october you should find
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instead of paying up to £70 per person for pcr test, you might pay 25. so well worthwhile the saving, but no clarity as to when that might happen and lots of people are booking tests they may not need my advice is do not bucket until the night before you come home because there is no advantage and a possible thanks. ,, ., ., ~ there is no advantage and a possible thanks. ,, ., . ~ , ., , thanks. simon calder. a few people asked me when _ thanks. simon calder. a few people asked me when i _ thanks. simon calder. a few people asked me when i came _ thanks. simon calder. a few people asked me when i came to _ thanks. simon calder. a few people asked me when i came to gatwick. asked me when i came to gatwick airport where i was flying too. i am not, but as sooner some countries come off the list i am happy to go to a report there for you. very good of you. we will pass that one up the chain. we can look at the papers. and many feature reaction to borisjohnson�*s party conference speech.
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"there may be trouble ahead" is the is headline, as it reports the prime minister "shrugs off britain's cost of living crisis". the paper says a "buoyant prime minister argued that the uk is facing post brexit transition problems on the way to a higher wage economy. the daily mirrorfocuses on a shortage of abattoir workers, which the paper says could mean that up to 100,000 pigs could be culled and burned rather than sold as food. the times says the prime minister is facing a "business backlash", reporting that pro—brexit industry leaders have accused the government of treating them like a bogeymen over labour shortages. "business is not an endless sponge that can keep absorbing costs in one go," iceland's managing director told the paper. finally, if you want to get to the bottom of the social media outage earlier this week, then look no further than the daily star. it reports that the psychic uri geller is blaming
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extra terrestrials for the problems that affected facebook, instagram and whatsapp. iam keen i am keen to learn his evidence for that. not so much, really. these are nice pictures. sometimes it is nice to look at a nice picture. the inside pages of the times newspaper and a lovely, smiling picture of her majesty the queen. the most delightful picture. this is a meeting with the royal regiment of canadian artillery. i am not sure if you can pick it out on the cameras. everybody is smiling. 0ne you can pick it out on the cameras. everybody is smiling. one of the officers here. these two at the back. a lovely picture. i picked out a picture. 0n back. a lovely picture. i picked out a picture. on page 27.
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mohammed ali made pictures and this made £700,000 at auction. this story from the daily telegraph involving... you look at this picture, one of the rugby internationals, ireland against wales. ireland where green, wales where read. people who suffer from colourblindness, they have difficulty distinguishing between red and green. from 2027, these two teams will not play in those colours to avoid people having that. bill
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beaumont is the head of world rugby and suffers from colourblindness. the reason it is such a long time, apparently all the kits are predetermined for that period of time. would it work if one changed colour? because it is the distinction? and they are focusing on red and green. joe wicks was a familiar face to many of us during lockdown, as he attempted to keep the nation active with his online workouts. nowjoe is hoping to keep children fit in both mind and body as he visits primary schools to see how children are faring pos pandemic. if there is anyone who knows how to make an entrance, it isjoe wicks.
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he is travelling the country on a tour trying to encourage children to exercise following lockdown. the issue we face, _ exercise following lockdown. tue: issue we face, obesity exercise following lockdown. tte: issue we face, obesity and the issue with that but also mental health is massive. it is something after lockdown, there are kids with anxiety and depression and struggling. if i can come into schools and give one kid a moment of enjoyment and something to focus on... used exercise from an young age to deal what was going on at home, it was my coping mechanism. at home, it was my coping mechanism. at this school in croydon teachers say the beast is needed. we this school in croydon teachers say the beast is needed.— this school in croydon teachers say the beast is needed. we have seen thins the beast is needed. we have seen things children _ the beast is needed. we have seen things children have _ the beast is needed. we have seen things children have written, - things children have written, suicidal writings, seven and eight—year—olds that i haven't seen in my career. jae eight-year-olds that i haven't seen in my career-— in my career. joe wicks believes neaative in my career. joe wicks believes negative social— in my career. joe wicks believes negative social media _ in my career. joe wicks believes negative social media is - in my career. joe wicks believes negative social media is part - in my career. joe wicks believes negative social media is part ofl in my career. joe wicks believes i negative social media is part of the problem. t negative social media is part of the roblem. , , , problem. i visited my secondary school and _ problem. i visited my secondary school and the _ problem. i visited my secondary school and the head _ problem. i visited my secondary school and the head teacher - problem. i visited my secondary| school and the head teacher said
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even before the lockdown, the mental health of children were suffering in school because of social media. 0nline is constant, you cannot escape it. we have to learn to guide children. we cannot resist tech, it will always be in our lives, but it is learning to follow accounts that are positive and avoid things that will bring you down and affect your self—esteem. fix, will bring you down and affect your self-esteem— self-esteem. a theme that runs throu . h self-esteem. a theme that runs through all _ self-esteem. a theme that runs through all of _ self-esteem. a theme that runs through all of joe's _ self-esteem. a theme that runs through all ofjoe's work, - self-esteem. a theme that runs through all of joe's work, from i through all ofjoe's work, from cooking, exercise, and now working out whilst reading to more than 300 children. t out whilst reading to more than 300 children. . , ., ., out whilst reading to more than 300 children. . , . ., ., out whilst reading to more than 300 children. ., . ., ., ., , _ children. i was amazed and so happy he came because _ children. i was amazed and so happy he came because he _ children. i was amazed and so happy he came because he inspired - children. i was amazed and so happy he came because he inspired me - children. i was amazed and so happy he came because he inspired me to. children. i was amazed and so happy i he came because he inspired me to do more _ he came because he inspired me to do more work_ he came because he inspired me to do more work outs and to be strong and fit. , ., , more work outs and to be strong and fit. ,._ _ more work outs and to be strong and fit. _ ., fit. usually, in assembly, we would sit there and _ fit. usually, in assembly, we would sit there and just _ fit. usually, in assembly, we would sit there and just sit _ fit. usually, in assembly, we would sit there and just sit and _ fit. usually, in assembly, we would sit there and just sit and face - fit. usually, in assembly, we would sit there and just sit and face the l sit there and just sit and face the front _ sit there and just sit and face the front but — sit there and just sit and face the front but it_ sit there and just sit and face the front. but it was _ sit there and just sit and face the front. but it was nice _ sit there and just sit and face the front. but it was nice to- sit there and just sit and face the front. but it was nice to have - sit there and just sit and face the front. but it was nice to have anl front. but it was nice to have an assembly— front. but it was nice to have an assembly where _ front. but it was nice to have an assembly where we _ front. but it was nice to have an assembly where we can - front. but it was nice to have an assembly where we can get - front. but it was nice to have an
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assembly where we can get up. front. but it was nice to have an. assembly where we can get up and front. but it was nice to have an- assembly where we can get up and be activo _ assembly where we can get up and be activo ht_ assembly where we can get up and be active. �* , active. at first, when i met him, i was surprised. — active. at first, when i met him, i was surprised, because _ active. at first, when i met him, i was surprised, because i - active. at first, when i met him, i was surprised, because i did - active. at first, when i met him, i was surprised, because i did not i was surprised, because i did not think he would ever come to my school. ~ , , ., ~' think he would ever come to my school. ~ , , ., ~ , ., school. ever. why did you think you would never — school. ever. why did you think you would never come _ school. ever. why did you think you would never come to _ school. ever. why did you think you would never come to your - school. ever. why did you think you would never come to your school? | school. ever. why did you think you would never come to your school? i just thought it wasn't possible. it is notjust these pupils experiencing the impossible. joe is now off to visit a handful of schools across the country. that is a lively morning at school. imagine keeping control of them. he did a good job. charlie, you did not want to introduce this. i am very comfortable with it. it's early october, but you may well have spotted those christmas decorations.
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) from turkeys, to fake christmas trees, jayne mccubbin has been looking at how some people have started preparing for the festive season early and how businesses will cope. brace yourself. it is only 78 sleeps to christmas. have you gone early, girls? we have. to christmas. have you gone early, girls? we have-— to christmas. have you gone early, girls? we have. have you gone early? we have. girls? we have. have you gone early? we have- there _ girls? we have. have you gone early? we have. there is _ girls? we have. have you gone early? we have. there is a _ girls? we have. have you gone early? we have. there is a real— girls? we have. have you gone early? we have. there is a real excitement i we have. there is a real excitement about the prospect _ we have. there is a real excitement about the prospect of _ we have. there is a real excitement about the prospect of a _ we have. there is a real excitement about the prospect of a real- about the prospect of a real christmas this year. have you ever been this early? tia. christmas this year. have you ever been this early?— christmas this year. have you ever been this early? no. i am normally a christmas eve _ been this early? no. i am normally a christmas eve person. _ been this early? no. i am normally a christmas eve person. i— been this early? no. i am normally a christmas eve person. i think- christmas eve person. i think everybody is excited for this year. but there — everybody is excited for this year. but there is concern. the shortage of drivers for— but there is concern. the shortage of drivers for food, _ but there is concern. the shortage of drivers for food, things - but there is concern. the shortage of drivers for food, things like - of drivers for food, things like that. people do panic buy with the
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food and i don't think they should. but here you are panic buying toys. step insidejed's world. and through the medium ofjust one bauble he will talk us through the pressure putting prices up and supply down. we have had covid and still have it. we have had covid and still have it. we have had just recently typhoons in the south china seas that has put 4000, 5000 ships seeking refuge in different ports. we have port congestion in the world. reduced tonnage on the water, not as many ships on the water. no empty containers, a massive shortage of empty containers. shipping costs have gone from something like $4000 up have gone from something like $4000 up to £20,000, which makes something like that, normally worth a dollar, is worth a fiver now because of shipping costs. it is causing
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massive problems. there is a worldwide shortage of artificial christmas trees.— worldwide shortage of artificial christmas trees. global forces are at play and _ christmas trees. global forces are at play and also — christmas trees. global forces are at play and also the _ christmas trees. global forces are at play and also the b _ christmas trees. global forces are at play and also the b word - christmas trees. global forces are at play and also the b word and i christmas trees. global forces are | at play and also the b word and we are notjust talking baubles. in 2019, a government brexit briefing warned this could happen. 0peration yellowhammer warned of supply chain shortages, disruption, panic buying and price increases that could disproportionately hit those who could least afford them. this week on this program, the prime minister gave his thoughts. llse on this program, the prime minister gave his thoughts.— gave his thoughts. use a christmas will be better— gave his thoughts. use a christmas will be better this _ gave his thoughts. use a christmas will be better this year _ gave his thoughts. use a christmas will be better this year and - gave his thoughts. use a christmas will be better this year and people | will be better this year and people will be better this year and people will think— will be better this year and people will think it — will be better this year and people will think it is _ will be better this year and people will think it is not _ will be better this year and people will think it is not likely— will be better this year and people will think it is not likely to - will be better this year and people will think it is not likely to be - will think it is not likely to be worse — will think it is not likely to be worse because _ will think it is not likely to be worse because last _ will think it is not likely to be| worse because last christmas will think it is not likely to be - worse because last christmas was awful _ worse because last christmas was awful i— worse because last christmas was awful. ., worse because last christmas was awful. ~' , ., , , worse because last christmas was awful. ~ , ., , , , ., awful. i think christmas this year will be considerably _ awful. i think christmas this year will be considerably better- awful. i think christmas this year will be considerably better than i will be considerably better than last yeah — will be considerably better than last ear. ., , ., will be considerably better than last ear. . ., will be considerably better than i last year-— how last year. that is a low base. how normal will _ last year. that is a low base. how normal will it _ last year. that is a low base. how normal will it be? _ last year. that is a low base. how normalwill it be? i— last year. that is a low base. how normal will it be? i think - last year. that is a low base. how normal will it be? i think we - last year. that is a low base. how normalwill it be? i think we have| normal will it be? i think we have reliable _ normal will it be? i think we have reliable supply chains. you normalwill it be? i think we have reliable supply chains.— normalwill it be? i think we have reliable supply chains. you are not worried about _ reliable supply chains. you are not worried about supply _ reliable supply chains. you are not worried about supply chains? - reliable supply chains. you are not| worried about supply chains? there
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are obviously _ worried about supply chains? there are obviously issues _ worried about supply chains? there are obviously issues we _ worried about supply chains? there are obviously issues we have - worried about supply chains? there are obviously issues we have to - are obviously issues we have to address — are obviously issues we have to address. ., . ., ., , are obviously issues we have to address. ., . ., address. the chancellor has said there is no _ address. the chancellor has said there is no magic— address. the chancellor has said there is no magic wand - address. the chancellor has said there is no magic wand to - address. the chancellor has said there is no magic wand to make | there is no magic wand to make disruption disappear overnight. and christmas is ten weeks away. sally's traditional christmas turkey farm on the wirral is doing a roaring trade. 0rders have gone through the roof. half the birds are already sold. they are so excited to order. they want to get organised and they are looking forward to having a normal christmas. by, looking forward to having a normal christmas. �* , ., , looking forward to having a normal christmas. �* , . , , christmas. a big family christmas. that they could _ christmas. a big family christmas. that they could not _ christmas. a big family christmas. that they could not have _ christmas. a big family christmas. that they could not have last - christmas. a big family christmas. j that they could not have last year. they are ordering slightly larger birds with the anticipation of having everyone round. the other four set play _ having everyone round. the other four set play is — having everyone round. the other four set play is people _ having everyone round. the other four set play is people are - having everyone round. the other four set play is people are awarel having everyone round. the other. four set play is people are aware in the wider industry, there is a supply and demand problem. there is and that applies _ supply and demand problem. there is and that applies to _ supply and demand problem. there is and that applies to larger—
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and that applies to larger producers. and that applies to larger producers-— and that applies to larger producers. and that applies to larger roducers. �* , , ., , , and that applies to larger roducers. �* , , ,, , , ., producers. because these turkeys are roduced, producers. because these turkeys are produced, slaughtered, _ producers. because these turkeys are produced, slaughtered, dressed - producers. because these turkeys are produced, slaughtered, dressed by. produced, slaughtered, dressed by local people on site, sally is not affected by the shortage of hgv drivers, c02 or seasonal european staff, but other factors are pushing turkey prices up. staff, but other factors are pushing turkey prices up— turkey prices up. prices on the whole have — turkey prices up. prices on the whole have gone _ turkey prices up. prices on the whole have gone up. - turkey prices up. prices on the whole have gone up. there - turkey prices up. prices on the| whole have gone up. there are turkey prices up. prices on the - whole have gone up. there are fuel implications, the price of chicks was up this year. the price of feed is up enormously. how many for dinner last year? six, tops, including youngsters. this yeahhopefully _ including youngsters. this yeahhopefully twice - including youngsters. this yeahhopefully twice as many. a handful of towns have decided to cancel the christmas lights switch on this year but others like blackpool will go big on festivities and go early. brilliant. salt and vinegar. lots of it. last christmas
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was rubbish for uk theatreland. his performance of elf was cancelled as rehearsals finished, a casualty of covid. you have definitely gone early. t covid. you have definitely gone earl . ., ~ ., covid. you have definitely gone earl . . . . w , covid. you have definitely gone earl. . . . w , covid. you have definitely gone earl. . . ., early. i have. what makes you say that? just my _ early. i have. what makes you say that? just my usual— early. i have. what makes you say that? just my usual outfit! - early. i have. what makes you say that? just my usual outfit! the - early. i have. what makes you say i that? just my usual outfit! the town really needs — that? just my usual outfit! the town really needs it. _ that? just my usual outfit! the town really needs it. absolutely. - that? just my usual outfit! the town really needs it. absolutely. i - that? just my usual outfit! the town really needs it. absolutely. i think l really needs it. absolutely. i think the country _ really needs it. absolutely. i think the country needs _ really needs it. absolutely. i think the country needs it. _ really needs it. absolutely. i think the country needs it. we - really needs it. absolutely. i think the country needs it. we have - really needs it. absolutely. i think. the country needs it. we have been through so much. theatres have been dark, hospitality has taken a knock, so we are coming back with a force. in october. christmas comes early. there is a fuel crisis so i set off from the north pole. there's and angle! from the north pole. there's and antle! , , ., from the north pole. there's and antle! _ .,
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angle! this year, we will en'oy christmas. �* angle! this year, we will en'oy christmas, but i angle! this year, we will en'oy christmas, but not i angle! this year, we will en'oy christmas, but not yet, i angle! this year, we will enjoy christmas, but not yet, not. angle! this year, we will enjoy i christmas, but not yet, not quite christmas, but not yet, not quite christmas as we know it. that has got me in the christmas spirit. i am happy for you. time now to get the news where you are. good morning with your news from london and the south—east, i'm victoria hollins. the first phase of the grenfell tower inquiry recommended that disabled people have personalised emergency evacuation plans. they're common in workplaces but rare in residential properties. the government had stated the plans were �*usually unrealistic�* it has now retracted that advice while new guidance is drawn up a move welcomed by campaigners. personal evacuation plans are not a luxury but a necessity but a matter of life and death and it affects the disabled person and the human
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dilemma that family members cannot leave theirfamily dilemma that family members cannot leave their family members behind dilemma that family members cannot leave theirfamily members behind in a situation like that. in a statement the government said "we are committed to improving fire safety which is why we are intending shortyl to implement legislation to deliver the majority of the grenfell phase one recommendations and will be providing guidance in due course." gatwick airport is proposing to cap aircraft noise if its plans to get a second runway into regular use are successful. under its proposals the northern runway currently used for taxi ing and emergencies would be used routinely. the airport says new quieter planes in the future will replace older noisier ones. 0pponents though say the expansion will be environmentally damaging. a cross party, cross borough petition is launching today calling for a new hospital for north east london to replace whipps cross. the �*whipps won�*t wait�* campaign wants the government to commit funds pledged by borisjohnonson in 2019 for a new hospital. the a and e at whipps cross was closed earlier this year
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afterflooding during heavy rain. an invasive �*stink bug�* that causes crop damage has been found at rhs wisley in surrey. the brown marmorated stink bug was trapped as part of a project to monitor its spread. the pest is native to asia and has recently spread to parts of europe and the us. so far it�*s only spread in southern england but its feared it could spread further north because of climate change. a new range of coins from the royal mint are being unveiled at hampton court palace. they were inspired by king henry viii�*s heraldic beasts from lions and panthers to a bull, greyhound and a unicorn which he chose to line the moat bridge of the palace. �*expanded�*, an immersive art exhibition in partnership with the national theatre starts today. the works featured are brought to life through cutting edge, immersive technologies, including interactive virtual reality, 360 films, and live performances. it runs until 17th october in leake street. well if you�*re heading out on public transport this morning
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this is how tfl services are looking right now. largely overcast skies as the day draws on an cloud will break up, allowing sunny spells to develop but they should remain dry throughout and we will see a top temperature of 16 or 19 degrees. this evening and tonight, cloud will build back in although the odd clear spell will remain. i�*m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. coming up on breakfast this morning. jermainejenas, the former england footballer turned tv presenter, will tell us about his campaign to stamp out racism from social media. we�*re with the former marine and triple amputee mark 0rmrod ahead of his epic cycling challenge
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to raise money for a veterans�*s charity, and he kept the nation fit during lockdown nowjoe wicks tells us how he�*s helping children stay fit in both mind and body after the pandemic. today marks the 20th anniversary of us airstrikes against al qaeda in afghanistan following the 9/11 attacks the start of two decades of operations in the region for us and allied forces. this summer, troops finally pulled out of the country, as it fell back under taliban rule. 0ur defence correspondentjonathan beale has been speaking to some of those involved in the conflict. 457 british military personnel lost their lives in afghanistan. 0ne 457 british military personnel lost their lives in afghanistan. one of them was clear and brian hill is only son, james. it them was clear and brian hill is only son, james.— them was clear and brian hill is only son, james. it never leaves us. we don't have _ only son, james. it never leaves us. we don't have a _ only son, james. it never leaves us. we don't have a son _ only son, james. it never leaves us. we don't have a son any _ only son, james. it never leaves us. we don't have a son any more. - only son, james. it never leaves us. we don't have a son any more. we i we don�*t have a son any more. we don�*t have any other children. there
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is an emptiness. there is a whole that nothing can fill. remembrance da for that nothing can fill. remembrance day for most _ that nothing can fill. remembrance day for most people _ that nothing can fill. remembrance day for most people is _ that nothing can fill. remembrance day for most people is november. that nothing can fill. remembrance l day for most people is november the 11th, day for most people is november the iith. but— day for most people is november the 11th, but for the likes of us, remembrance day is everyday. it�*s remembrance day is everyday. it's nearl 12 remembrance day is everyday. it�*s nearly 12 years to the day that james hill was killed by an improvised explosive device in helmand province. it wasjust improvised explosive device in helmand province. it was just and about to get married. his parents are proud of his service and his sacrifice. though the recent return of afghanistan to tell a man control has been hard for them to bear. tt has been hard for them to bear. if we were to say now, yes, james's we were to say now, yes, james�*s life was wasted, then that would hurt us all over again because we have to believe that what he did made a difference. and what they all did, and they gave so much, notjust the ones who died, but the ones who carry on with injuries. {line
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the ones who died, but the ones who carry on with injuries.— carry on with in'uries. one hand sa s, carry on with in'uries. one hand says. what — carry on with in'uries. one hand says. what the— carry on with injuries. one hand says, what the heck _ carry on with injuries. one hand says, what the heck did - carry on with injuries. one hand says, what the heck did we - carry on with injuries. one hand says, what the heck did we go i says, what the heck did we go therefore, and the other hand says, we stopped — therefore, and the other hand says, we stopped any terrorist atrocities on our— we stopped any terrorist atrocities on our streets. and as claire said, another— on our streets. and as claire said, another nine — on our streets. and as claire said, another nine slash 11. it's very, very— another nine slash 11. it's very, very difficult.— another nine slash 11. it's very, very difficult. when you balance that, do very difficult. when you balance that. do you _ very difficult. when you balance that, do you think— very difficult. when you balance that, do you think the _ very difficult. when you balance that, do you think the sacrifice i very difficult. when you balance i that, do you think the sacrifice you have made of your only son has been worth it? ., have made of your only son has been worth it? tia. no. nothing is worth worth it? no. no. nothing is worth it. that's worth it? no. no. nothing is worth it- that's not _ worth it? no. no. nothing is worth it. that's not worth _ worth it? no. no. nothing is worth it. that's not worth anything. - worth it? no. no. nothing is worth it. that's not worth anything. i - it. that's not worth anything. i mean, it. that's not worth anything. i mean. with — it. that's not worth anything. i mean. with a _ it. that's not worth anything. i mean, with a piece _ it. that's not worth anything. i mean, with a piece of- it. that's not worth anything. i i mean, with a piece of equipment it. that's not worth anything. i - mean, with a piece of equipment over a patch _ mean, with a piece of equipment over a patch of— mean, with a piece of equipment over a patch of ground _ mean, with a piece of equipment over a patch of ground that _ mean, with a piece of equipment over a patch of ground that had _ mean, with a piece of equipment over a patch of ground that had been - a patch of ground that had been walked — a patch of ground that had been walked on— a patch of ground that had been walked on 30 _ a patch of ground that had been walked on 30 or— a patch of ground that had been walked on 30 or 40 _ a patch of ground that had been walked on 30 or 40 people - a patch of ground that had been i walked on 30 or 40 people already and then— walked on 30 or 40 people already and then a — walked on 30 or 40 people already and then a massive _ walked on 30 or 40 people already and then a massive explosion, - walked on 30 or 40 people already and then a massive explosion, andj walked on 30 or 40 people alreadyi and then a massive explosion, and i stepped _ and then a massive explosion, and i stepped on — and then a massive explosion, and i stepped on a — and then a massive explosion, and i stepped on a pressure _ and then a massive explosion, and i stepped on a pressure plate - and then a massive explosion, and i stepped on a pressure plate ied - and then a massive explosion, and ij stepped on a pressure plate ied and thankfully— stepped on a pressure plate ied and thankfully it — stepped on a pressure plate ied and thankfully it was _ stepped on a pressure plate ied and thankfully it was only— stepped on a pressure plate ied and thankfully it was only me _ stepped on a pressure plate ied and thankfully it was only me who - stepped on a pressure plate ied and thankfully it was only me who got i thankfully it was only me who got hurt, _ thankfully it was only me who got hurt. but — thankfully it was only me who got hurt, but thankfully— thankfully it was only me who got hurt, but thankfully it _ thankfully it was only me who got hurt, but thankfully it was - thankfully it was only me who got hurt, but thankfully it was only. thankfully it was only me who got l hurt, but thankfully it was only me. luke hurt, but thankfully it was only me. luke is— hurt, but thankfully it was only me. luke is one — hurt, but thankfully it was only me. luke is one of— hurt, but thankfully it was only me. luke is one of one _ hurt, but thankfully it was only me. luke is one of one of— hurt, but thankfully it was only me. luke is one of one of more - hurt, but thankfully it was only me. luke is one of one of more than. hurt, but thankfully it was only me. i luke is one of one of more than 300 british troops who lost limbs in afghanistan but has battled through his severe injuries with the help of sport. he was due to take part in
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the tokyo paralympics this summer but because of an injury he had to stay home and witness the collapse of the country in which she once fought. and the desperate scenes of those trying to leave.— those trying to leave. getting in'ured those trying to leave. getting injured are — those trying to leave. getting injured are not _ those trying to leave. getting injured are not going - those trying to leave. getting injured are not going to i those trying to leave. getting | injured are not going to tokyo those trying to leave. getting i injured are not going to tokyo and then afghanistan withdrawal, it�*s been a rough a mentally rough period for the summer. from my point of view, we were on the ground, moving the ied and giving people safety on the ied and giving people safety on the kids ability to go to school and i will never regret that i can hold my head high with what we did out there. if i could make a deal to mother get my legs back, i would. mr; mother get my legs back, i would. my idea of alnwick — afghanistan is that the — idea of alnwick — afghanistan is that the intent of what we were trying _ that the intent of what we were trying to — that the intent of what we were trying to do was write the content was flawed. too little, too late and we quit _ was flawed. too little, too late and we quit way— was flawed. too little, too late and we quit way too soon. and that is the great — we quit way too soon. and that is the great tragedy of afghanistan.
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stuart _ the great tragedy of afghanistan. stuart led the first british troops into helmand province in 2006. he commanded the 3rd battalion, the parachute regiment and suffered the first serious casualties of the war. with dozens injured and 15 killed. what was then supposed to have been a simple, pee support operation turned into a bloody counterinsurgency conflict. alejos if you want to pick the positives out, you can turn around and say we gave the afghans 20 years of an opportunity about how life might be different. that opportunity about how life might be different. ., , opportunity about how life might be different. . , ., , different. that is true. the trouble is, that opportunity _ different. that is true. the trouble is, that opportunity never- different. that is true. the trouble is, that opportunity never realised | is, that opportunity never realised itself fully because they are back in control, but i don�*t think we can be proud of the outcome. we can be proud of what we tried to do as soldiers. but in terms of those responsible for the strategic decisions, i don�*t think there is a great deal to crow about in terms of
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there being a particular victory, there being a particular victory, there is no victory here. we did not win that conflict.— win that conflict. there was little fanfare when _ win that conflict. there was little fanfare when the _ win that conflict. there was little fanfare when the last _ win that conflict. there was little fanfare when the last british i win that conflict. there was little i fanfare when the last british troops left afghanistan earlier this year. this, the low—key ceremony in kabul before the chaotic exit. war is without victory are often forgotten. but the hopes of all of those who served their and who lost loved ones is that they sacrifice will never be forgotten. 0ur reporter tim muffett is at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire, where a remembrance service will be held later this morning. there are commemoratives services at 731 in london and another one at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. t national memorial arboretum in staffordshire.— staffordshire. i am standing in front of the — staffordshire. i am standing in front of the bastian _ staffordshire. i am standing in front of the bastian memoriall staffordshire. i am standing in i
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front of the bastian memorial and this replicates the design of the bastian memorial wall in camp bastion in helmand province in afghanistan and there are materials from the wall in the memorial here and the names of many of those who died in that conflict and in about an hour�*s time there will be a wreath—laying ceremony and a salary will be led by the pipe major, peter grant, who i am delighted to say joins us this morning. how important is it for you to take part in the event this morning? tt�*s is it for you to take part in the event this morning? it's really important _ event this morning? it's really important and _ event this morning? it's really important and a _ event this morning? it's really important and a great - event this morning? it's really important and a great honourl event this morning? it's really - important and a great honour because i important and a great honour because i served _ important and a great honour because i served in_ important and a great honour because i served in afghanistan myself on a couple _ i served in afghanistan myself on a couple of— i served in afghanistan myself on a couple of occasions.— i served in afghanistan myself on a couple of occasions. when you look at this memorial, _ couple of occasions. when you look at this memorial, you _ couple of occasions. when you look at this memorial, you know - couple of occasions. when you look at this memorial, you know the i couple of occasions. when you look i at this memorial, you know the names of some of these people who died, don�*t you? of some of these people who died, don't ou? , �* , of some of these people who died, don't ou? , �*, ., don't you? yes, it's quite an emotional— don't you? yes, it's quite an emotional feeling _ don't you? yes, it's quite an emotional feeling coming i don't you? yes, it's quite an i emotional feeling coming back and seeing _ emotional feeling coming back and seeing the wall as there are people on there _ seeing the wall as there are people on there i_ seeing the wall as there are people on there i knew and people are recognised and it gives me that opportunity to reflect on my time out there — opportunity to reflect on my time out there and also think about the people _ out there and also think about the people who lost their lives but also
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the soldiers who are living with life changing injuries and the families— life changing injuries and the families that are living through the pain and _ families that are living through the pain and hardship out there. your tours in afghanistan, _ pain and hardship out there. gm;- tours in afghanistan, what are your overriding memories of them? mr; tours in afghanistan, what are your overriding memories of them? my most memorable tour — overriding memories of them? my most memorable tour would _ overriding memories of them? my most memorable tour would be _ overriding memories of them? my most memorable tour would be 2011 - overriding memories of them? my most memorable tour would be 2011 when i i memorable tour would be 2011 when i deployed _ memorable tour would be 2011 when i deployed on as a young infantry corporal— deployed on as a young infantry corporal because as a piper, i'm first— corporal because as a piper, i'm first and — corporal because as a piper, i'm first and foremost an infantry soldier— first and foremost an infantry soldier and its memorable because of the things— soldier and its memorable because of the things i_ soldier and its memorable because of the things i went through with different serving men and women and these _ different serving men and women and these emotions and experiences i will remember for the rest of my life. ., . ., ~ will remember for the rest of my life. ., ., ., ~ will remember for the rest of my life. ., ., .,~ ., , life. you have taken part in many ceremonial— life. you have taken part in many ceremonial events _ life. you have taken part in many ceremonial events and _ life. you have taken part in many ceremonial events and you i life. you have taken part in many ceremonial events and you also i life. you have taken part in many i ceremonial events and you also took part in the duke of edinburgh�*s funeral and you were the lone piper at that event. it was in acts — and absolutely extraordinary moments i remember it vividly, what was it like? ., remember it vividly, what was it like? . ., , ., remember it vividly, what was it like? . ., ., ., ., like? that was a great honour and the greatest _ like? that was a great honour and the greatest honour— like? that was a great honour and the greatest honour of _ like? that was a great honour and the greatest honour of my - like? that was a great honour and the greatest honour of my career. j like? that was a great honour and l the greatest honour of my career. i
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am just— the greatest honour of my career. i am just so— the greatest honour of my career. i am just so glad it went well and i played _ am just so glad it went well and i played good, and it was a great sendoff— played good, and it was a great sendoff for the developer. and toda , in sendoff for the developer. and today, in about _ sendoff for the developer. and today, in about an _ sendoff for the developer. fich today, in about an hour's time there today, in about an hour�*s time there will be the ceremony and it will be a small, low—key ceremony and as you lead the procession it will be a very poignant moment. how important is it for people such as yourself who did serve in afghanistan that we have events like this? as i said before it�*s a chance for us to reflect on everything that happened out there and everywhere that served there and how the british forces served with professionalism, courage, sacrifice and pride in afghanistan. peter, thank you for joining us and i look forward to the ceremony at about half past seven. as peter was saying, it�*s usually important for many family members who died that these events to take place and it will be a low—key ceremony, the one here, as will the one in whitehall will be as well. 457 uk military personnel died in
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that conflict and many other coalition forces, 2300 us personnel died and it is also thought more than 45,000 afghan civilians died during the 20 year conflict, so a hugely significant event. last month, we saw the 20th anniversary of the september the 11th attacks and this conflict in afghanistan very much a response to those dreadful events. so a lot to think about and reflect upon this morning. team, we will be back with you and it�*s worth saying that we will be catching up with mark 0rmerod, a former royal marine commander who lost both his legs above the knee, his right arm above the elbow while serving in afghanistan and you might remember and we have shown it a bit here, he�*s doing this amazing challenge on land and sea and now on a bike. mike, you are familiar. we will catch up with him as he does the latest part of his journey, which is incredible.
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the latest part of his “ourney, which is incredible- the latest part of his “ourney, which is incredible. what time is that? we will— which is incredible. what time is that? we will talk— which is incredible. what time is that? we will talk to _ which is incredible. what time is that? we will talk to him - which is incredible. what time is that? we will talk to him at i which is incredible. what time is. that? we will talk to him at about ten to nine _ that? we will talk to him at about ten to nine this _ that? we will talk to him at about ten to nine this morning - that? we will talk to him at about ten to nine this morning and i that? we will talk to him at about ten to nine this morning and he i that? we will talk to him at about i ten to nine this morning and he will bejust about getting ten to nine this morning and he will be just about getting ready to do 99.9 miles on a cycle specially adapted. t 99.9 miles on a cycle specially ada ted. ., ., ~' 99.9 miles on a cycle specially adated. ., ., ., ., adapted. i look forward to that. fans of newcastle _ adapted. i look forward to that. fans of newcastle united i adapted. i look forward to that. fans of newcastle united have | adapted. i look forward to that. i fans of newcastle united have been longing for a takeover to enable them to compete at the top for so long and it might be happening finally and a controversial deal with saudi arabia because of the ethics and rights record and a couple of obstacles, one of which seems to be resolved to do with the tv piracy rights and a middle east rabat tv rights which seems to have gone away, so one of the hurdle seems to have been cleared. i sometimes receive a quizzicalface, but i can explain more. a saudi arabian backed takeover of newcastle united appears to have moved a step closer, after the country resolved a tv piracy dispute. the issue has been part
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of a disagreement between newcastle and the premier league over a 300 million pound takeover which collapsed last summer. there is now a consortium with a public investment fund which is separate to the sate of saudi arabia which provides most of the money for the £300 million takeover deal and all this means the deal can get go—ahead and there was this at the heart of the big disagreement between newcastle and the premier league and whether the new owners would pass the owners and directors test. let speak to greg thomas and of the newcastle supporters trust. how are fans feeling this morning? newcastle — how are fans feeling this morning? newcastle fans are delighted that the disastrous 14 year reign of mike ashley— the disastrous 14 year reign of mike ashley is— the disastrous 14 year reign of mike ashley is nearly over. the majority of our _ ashley is nearly over. the majority of our fan — ashley is nearly over. the majority of our fan base has reacted with overwhelming positivity at that last night, _ overwhelming positivity at that last night, without a doubt. and overwhelming positivity at that last night, without a doubt.— night, without a doubt. and is it 'ust night, without a doubt. and is it just because _ night, without a doubt. and is it just because of _ night, without a doubt. and is it just because of the _ night, without a doubt. and is it just because of the money? i night, without a doubt. and is itj just because of the money? you night, without a doubt. and is it i just because of the money? you think this could take us to challenge manchester city and chelsea in terms of world power?—
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of world power? absolutely not. it's about having _ of world power? absolutely not. it's about having hope _ of world power? absolutely not. it's about having hope and _ of world power? absolutely not. it's about having hope and believe i of world power? absolutely not. it's about having hope and believe in i about having hope and believe in your football club again after it has been — your football club again after it has been driven into the ground and nobody— has been driven into the ground and nobody has — has been driven into the ground and nobody has stood up for you as a football — nobody has stood up for you as a football supporter in a world where football _ football supporter in a world where football clubs are owned by billionaires and sovereign states, football— billionaires and sovereign states, football fans and i newcastle has existed _ football fans and i newcastle has existed to exist for two ten years with no— existed to exist for two ten years with no ambition and newcastle fans have been— with no ambition and newcastle fans have been driven into the ground so there _ have been driven into the ground so there is— have been driven into the ground so there is a _ have been driven into the ground so there is a real hope and positivity that we _ there is a real hope and positivity that we can — there is a real hope and positivity that we can have a football club that we can have a football club that tries — that we can have a football club that tries to be that and puts the money— that tries to be that and puts the money that comes through that join almost _ money that comes through that join almost tv— money that comes through that join almost tv deals back and investment in the _ almost tv deals back and investment in the playing squad and that goes with it _ in the playing squad and that goes with it when there is a lot of hope there _ with it when there is a lot of hope there because we haven't had any it newcastle _ there because we haven't had any it newcastle for so long. how there because we haven't had any it newcastle for so long.— newcastle for so long. how do fans feel about the _
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newcastle for so long. how do fans feel about the ethics _ newcastle for so long. how do fans feel about the ethics given - newcastle for so long. how do fans feel about the ethics given the i feel about the ethics given the human rights record as i know it�*s football and politics, but does the fact that there is this consortium when it seen as separate to the state, does it make it easierfor the fans to think about and justify? as a supporters trust, we have a number— as a supporters trust, we have a number of— as a supporters trust, we have a number of polls of our members and one of— number of polls of our members and one of the _ number of polls of our members and one of the larger supporters trusts in the _ one of the larger supporters trusts in the country and the overwhelming majority, _ in the country and the overwhelming majority, over 95% of members, are in favour— majority, over 95% of members, are in favour of— majority, over 95% of members, are in favour of this takeover going ahead — in favour of this takeover going ahead. like i said before, no doubt, there _ ahead. like i said before, no doubt, there are _ ahead. like i said before, no doubt, there are some issues in terms of saudi _ there are some issues in terms of saudi arabia's human rights record, but, saudi arabia's human rights record, but. and _ saudi arabia's human rights record, but, and other issues, but football fans have — but, and other issues, but football fans have no say in who buys the football — fans have no say in who buys the football club. football clubs at the moment, — football club. football clubs at the moment, transactions at this level are undertaken between billionaires, the wealthiest people in the world and sovereign states, especially in the case _
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and sovereign states, especially in the case of— and sovereign states, especially in the case of manchester city and others, — the case of manchester city and others, so _ the case of manchester city and others, so as football fans, we have no say— others, so as football fans, we have no say who— others, so as football fans, we have no say who comes in to buy our football— no say who comes in to buy our football club so they will be judged on how— football club so they will be judged on how they are as our owners if the takeover— on how they are as our owners if the takeover goes ahead today, as we expect _ takeover goes ahead today, as we expect so. — takeover goes ahead today, as we expect. so, football fans don't get a choice _ expect. so, football fans don't get a choice on — expect. so, football fans don't get a choice on who buys the football club _ a choice on who buys the football club we — a choice on who buys the football club. we have no say. it's been dragging — club. we have no say. it's been dragging on for 18 months. newcastle fans are _ dragging on for 18 months. newcastle fans are just really excited at the prospect — fans are just really excited at the prospect of having a football club to believe in again.— prospect of having a football club to believe in again. greg, thank you ve much to believe in again. greg, thank you very much and _ to believe in again. greg, thank you very much and we _ to believe in again. greg, thank you very much and we will leave - to believe in again. greg, thank you very much and we will leave it i to believe in again. greg, thank youj very much and we will leave it there for now and watch this space in the next 24 hours. for now and watch this space in the next 24 hours-— next 24 hours. italy, the european champions — next 24 hours. italy, the european champions have _ next 24 hours. italy, the european champions have finally _ next 24 hours. italy, the european champions have finally been i next 24 hours. italy, the european l champions have finally been beaten for the first time in 37 matches, losing 2—1 to spain in the semifinals of the nation�*s leak. with manchester city, phone and torrid scoring twice. spain will play france or belgium — fern antares.
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chelsea played out an entertaining 3— 3 draw against wolfsburg in their women�*s champions league opener. sam kerr opened the scoring for chelsea with that wonderful lob beating the onrushing keeper but several defensive mistakes saw chelsea go 31 down early in the second half, beth england pulled one back for the blues before pernille harder found the equaliser in the second minute of injury time to earn emma hayes�* side a point. the england and wales cricket board will decide tomorrow on whether this winters ashes series in australia can go ahead. that�*s after positive talks with cricket australia this week. england�*s players have raised concerns about conditions for the tour, including whether or not their families will be allowed to travel, quarantine arrangements, and any potential �*bubble�* they might have to live in. but discussions between their representaives, cricket australia and the ecb has brought the staging of the series a step closer. disappointment for heather watson as she has been knocked out of the
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opening round by sloane stephens. watson did win the first set but lost the next two in a match that lasted nearly three hours. the build up continues to the big fight in las vegas on saturday. the wbc heavyweight champion tyson fury against the american deontay wilder. the pairfaced off ahead of saturday�*s bout in what will be the third fight between the two, with the first a draw and fury winning the second. but wilder has suggested tyson fury cheated his way to victory in the second fight, something which has got the goat of the defending champion. got the goat of the defending champion-— got the goat of the defending champion. got the goat of the defending chamion. . ., , , ., champion. what it tells me is that he is a weak _ champion. what it tells me is that he is a weak mental _ champion. what it tells me is that he is a weak mental person i champion. what it tells me is that he is a weak mental person who i | champion. what it tells me is that i he is a weak mental person who i am going to knock spark out on saturday night. i beat in the first time after three years out of the ring, quite comfortable, he won two rounds of a 12 round and i obliterated him in the rematch and he did not win any of the rounds and in the third fight, iwill any of the rounds and in the third fight, i will see more of the same. everything has been good. i think we've _ everything has been good. i think we've timed everything out perfectly. i think we have done all
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the right— perfectly. i think we have done all the right things and come saturday night, _ the right things and come saturday night, it— the right things and come saturday night, it will definitely be a different fight for all of the fans. it different fight for all of the fans. it should — different fight for all of the fans. it should be a site. it's rare that we get — it should be a site. it's rare that we get trilogies like this and i think— we get trilogies like this and i think it — we get trilogies like this and i think it will go down in history. the body— think it will go down in history. the body language was interesting, tyson fury standing up. wilder was calm. i think seated, it projects a deep confidence, i don�*t even need to stand up to you. deep confidence, i don't even need to stand up to you.— deep confidence, i don't even need to stand up to you. sport psychology involvement- — to stand up to you. sport psychology involvement. thanks, _ to stand up to you. sport psychology involvement. thanks, mike, - to stand up to you. sport psychology involvement. thanks, mike, will- to stand up to you. sport psychology involvement. thanks, mike, will seej involvement. thanks, mike, will see ou later involvement. thanks, mike, will see you later on- — here�*s carol with a look at this morning�*s weather. good morning, everyone. this morning it�*s a mile start to the day and as we go to the next few days it will remain unseasonably warm by day and also by night and the latest temperatures, you might be interested, are these, belfast, 17, rhyl17, york, 11, and these will be pretty good maximum temperatures in the middle of the afternoon at this time of year, not early in the
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morning. so you can see how the trend is developing. we have this weather frontier, trend is developing. we have this weatherfrontier, a trend is developing. we have this weather frontier, a waving front which means it is producing some rain and will be with us across scotland and northern ireland over the next few days so there will be rain for you, not always in the same place, so we have our first front which went overnight over the north—east and that will move towards the northern isles and then we have the waving weather front to the west of scotland and also northern ireland. a lot of cloud this morning, some thick cloud, particularly in the west and on the coasts and hills there will be drizzle around but as we go through the morning one or two breaks will develop in this cloud and we will start to see a little bit of sunshine but there will be more cloud around than sunshine today. the rain is persisting across northern ireland and western scotland through the day and through the next few days we will see large rainfall across the likes of lochaber, mould, tyree on those kind of areas and it might lead to some flooding issues but as we look at
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the temperatures you can see 13 or “p the temperatures you can see 13 or up to 20 across the board. this evening and overnight we have the waving weather front and it waives a little bit further south into northern england and could clip north west wales and there will be clear skies and with lighter winds further south, clear skies and with lighter winds furthersouth, it clear skies and with lighter winds further south, it means we are going to have some mist and fog patches for me and some low cloud generally, but look at the temperatures, another mild one. we start off tomorrow with far across central and south—east england and some of this will be dense and slow to lift but it will lift into low cloud and through the day it should break up and we will see more sunshine tomorrow. there is a subtle change in wind direction tomorrow so that will break up the cloud and bring in drier air but will break up the cloud and bring in drierair but we will break up the cloud and bring in drier air but we still have a waving weather front across northern ireland and western scotland bringing in some more rain. temperatures ranging from 13 in the north to 21 as we push further south. into saturday, here is the waving weather front, a
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south. into saturday, here is the waving weatherfront, a real mouthful, and it�*s starting to slip further south and it will weaken but it�*s the sign of a change because behind it things morkel — cool down a little bit and ahead of it a bit of sunshine around after early morning fog and then on sunday, the weak weather front eventually makes it down to the south—east and there will still be a lot of dry weather and sunshine and a few showers dotted along the north—west coming in on a north—westerly breeze, but temperatures only 14 in edinburgh and you think that this morning already it is 16 and heading toward 17. quite a change, charlie and nina. bringing a new dog home should be a happy time but the actions of dishonest sellers who don�*t properly care for the animals can mean it becomes a traumatic experience. that�*s what happened to richard ackers his puppy died just days after he bought him. richard found out the animal had been illegally bred, and he set up a campaign to share information on suspected illegal sellers with enforcement agencies.
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richard is here with his new puppy, ralph, and from swansea we�*re joined by serena james from the animal protection service. good morning to you both. and to ralph. and we were saying, he is behaving very well. lip ralph. and we were saying, he is behaving very well.— ralph. and we were saying, he is behaving very well. up to now, yes. the first test _ behaving very well. up to now, yes. the first test is _ behaving very well. up to now, yes. the first test is in _ behaving very well. up to now, yes. the first test is in order _ behaving very well. up to now, yes. the first test is in order we - behaving very well. up to now, yes. the first test is in order we can i the first test is in order we can see ralph properly, can you encourage ralph to look towards camera three. look at that, he almost looked to the cameras. very good performance.— almost looked to the cameras. very good performance. ralph? look over there. oh, sweetheart. _ good performance. ralph? look over there. oh, sweetheart. you - good performance. ralph? look over there. oh, sweetheart. you have i good performance. ralph? look over there. oh, sweetheart. you have a l there. oh, sweetheart. you have a tale to tell- — there. oh, sweetheart. you have a tale to tell. take _ there. oh, sweetheart. you have a tale to tell. take us _ there. oh, sweetheart. you have a tale to tell. take us through - there. oh, sweetheart. you have a tale to tell. take us through the i tale to tell. take us through the sequence of events. you wanted to get a puppy. sequence of events. you wanted to get a punpy- m? sequence of events. you wanted to get a pum— sequence of events. you wanted to a-uetau. ., get a puppy. my son had reached the riaht get a puppy. my son had reached the ri . ht a . e get a puppy. my son had reached the right age and — get a puppy. my son had reached the right age and was — get a puppy. my son had reached the right age and was asking _ get a puppy. my son had reached the right age and was asking for- get a puppy. my son had reached the right age and was asking for a - get a puppy. my son had reached the right age and was asking for a puppy | right age and was asking for a puppy a lot so_ right age and was asking for a puppy a lot so i_ right age and was asking for a puppy a lot so i looked on a well—known website _ a lot so i looked on a well—known website and i developed a little check _ website and i developed a little check list myself that i had stuck to and _ checklist myself that i had stuck to and i— check list myself that i had stuck to and i rung the seller and check list myself that i had stuck to and i rung the sellerand i check list myself that i had stuck to and i rung the seller and i asked on the _ to and i rung the seller and i asked on the question is, like can i see the mother—
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on the question is, like can i see the mother and he said yes and he invited _ the mother and he said yes and he invited me — the mother and he said yes and he invited me down to the property and as i invited me down to the property and as i got— invited me down to the property and as i got to _ invited me down to the property and as i got to the property, things changed — as i got to the property, things changed i_ as i got to the property, things changed. i kind of got puppy eyes and something was in the back of my eyes telling me something wasn't i’ilht eyes telling me something wasn't right but— eyes telling me something wasn't right but i— eyes telling me something wasn't right but i decided to to take reggie — right but i decided to to take reggie and when we got him home, he had diarrhoea, sickness, and he actually— had diarrhoea, sickness, and he actually only lasted 14 hours in our care and _ actually only lasted 14 hours in our care and end up in the vet with a virus— care and end up in the vet with a virus that's — care and end up in the vet with a virus that's a _ care and end up in the vet with a virus that's a bad disease for puppies— virus that's a bad disease for puppies and puts them in a bad way. and it _ puppies and puts them in a bad way. and it was _ puppies and puts them in a bad way. and it was quite horrific, really. it and it was quite horrific, really. it was _ and it was quite horrific, really. it was up — and it was quite horrific, really. it was up and down and a roller—coaster for two days and on the monday the vet advised me to come _ the monday the vet advised me to come in _ the monday the vet advised me to come in to— the monday the vet advised me to come in to look at reggie and they advised _ come in to look at reggie and they advised us — come in to look at reggie and they advised us to put him down and i was adamant _ advised us to put him down and i was adamant he _ advised us to put him down and i was adamant he was not being put down but when _ adamant he was not being put down but when we got there he was in so much _ but when we got there he was in so much pain, — but when we got there he was in so much pain, something i've never seen, _ much pain, something i've never seen. and — much pain, something i've never seen. and it— much pain, something i've never seen, and it was horrific, and we decided — seen, and it was horrific, and we decided to— seen, and it was horrific, and we decided to put him down and i was in the room _ decided to put him down and i was in the room when it happened and it is something _ the room when it happened and it is something that will stay with me for the rest _ something that will stay with me for the rest of— something that will stay with me for the rest of my life. it was horrible _ the rest of my life. it was horrible. i the rest of my life. it was horrible-— the rest of my life. it was horrible. ., , , , ., horrible. i am so sorry because that is traumatic — horrible. i am so sorry because that is traumatic for _ horrible. i am so sorry because that
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is traumatic for you _ horrible. i am so sorry because that is traumatic for you and _ horrible. i am so sorry because that is traumatic for you and your - is traumatic for you and your family. you must have had a lot of questions about how it was that somebody sold you a puppy in that condition. what did you do? ianthem somebody sold you a puppy in that condition. what did you do? when we not out, i condition. what did you do? when we got out. i wasn't _ condition. what did you do? when we got out, i wasn't bothered _ condition. what did you do? when we got out, i wasn't bothered at - condition. what did you do? when we got out, i wasn't bothered at the - got out, i wasn't bothered at the time, _ got out, i wasn't bothered at the time, but — got out, i wasn't bothered at the time, but when reggie was in the vet, time, but when reggie was in the vet. i_ time, but when reggie was in the vet. t rang — time, but when reggie was in the vet, i rang up the seller and said these _ vet, i rang up the seller and said these other poppies will have the virus _ these other poppies will have the virus because this is contagious and he said _ virus because this is contagious and he said they— virus because this is contagious and he said they weren't interested and i he said they weren't interested and twasn't _ he said they weren't interested and i wasn't bothered at the time, and iwasn't bothered at the time, and afterwards— i wasn't bothered at the time, and afterwards i reported it to the local— afterwards i reported it to the local council and animal protection services _ local council and animal protection services to— local council and animal protection services to do a fantasticjob. has services to do a fantastic 'ob. has an hinu services to do a fantasticjob. has anything happened? services to do a fantastic 'ob. has anything happened? up _ services to do a fantastic job. has anything happened? up to - services to do a fantastic job. has anything happened? up to now, | services to do a fantastic job. has i anything happened? up to now, no, but i live in — anything happened? up to now, no, but i live in hope _ anything happened? up to now, no, but i live in hope and _ anything happened? up to now, no, but i live in hope and i _ anything happened? up to now, no, but i live in hope and i know - anything happened? up to now, no, but i live in hope and i know the - but i live in hope and i know the services — but i live in hope and i know the services have spoken to me a lot in the case _ services have spoken to me a lot in the case and — services have spoken to me a lot in the case and there is more that they are doing _ the case and there is more that they are doing so — the case and there is more that they are doing so it's about building intelligence and things like that, and like — intelligence and things like that, and like you say, we live in hope and like you say, we live in hope and we — and like you say, we live in hope and we not— and like you say, we live in hope and i've not given up yet. we will talk about _ and i've not given up yet. we will talk about your _ and i've not given up yet. we will talk about your campaign - and i've not given up yet. we will talk about your campaign in - and i've not given up yet. we will talk about your campaign in the l talk about your campaign in the second because you've done well in the short space of time. i am astonished that this is allowed to happen and so frequently, what is
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the protection at the moment and why are cases like reggie's slipping through? are cases like reggie's slipping throuuh? ., , �* , ., , through? there doesn't seem to be any protection _ through? there doesn't seem to be any protection at — through? there doesn't seem to be any protection at the _ through? there doesn't seem to be any protection at the moment. - through? there doesn't seem to be any protection at the moment. the | any protection at the moment. the wehsites— any protection at the moment. the websites set — any protection at the moment. the websites set their— any protection at the moment. the websites set their own _ any protection at the moment. the websites set their own proceduresl websites set their own procedures and rules— websites set their own procedures and rules for— websites set their own procedures and rules for advertising _ websites set their own procedures and rules for advertising animals i and rules for advertising animals ontine _ and rules for advertising animals online and — and rules for advertising animals online and there _ and rules for advertising animals online and there isn't _ and rules for advertising animals online and there isn't any - and rules for advertising animals online and there isn't any sort i and rules for advertising animals online and there isn't any sort ofi online and there isn't any sort of set guidetine _ online and there isn't any sort of set guideline for— online and there isn't any sort of set guideline for them _ online and there isn't any sort of set guideline for them to - online and there isn't any sort of set guideline for them to followl set guideline for them to follow which _ set guideline for them to follow which means— set guideline for them to follow which means there _ set guideline for them to follow which means there is _ set guideline for them to follow which means there is a - set guideline for them to follow which means there is a lot - set guideline for them to follow which means there is a lot of. which means there is a lot of unscrupulous— which means there is a lot of unscrupulous people - which means there is a lot of unscrupulous people who - which means there is a lot of unscrupulous people who do| which means there is a lot of- unscrupulous people who do advertise puppy— unscrupulous people who do advertise puppy farmed — unscrupulous people who do advertise puppy farmed dogs _ unscrupulous people who do advertise puppy farmed dogs on _ unscrupulous people who do advertise puppy farmed dogs on there _ unscrupulous people who do advertise puppy farmed dogs on there and - puppy farmed dogs on there and unfortunately _ puppy farmed dogs on there and unfortunately there _ puppy farmed dogs on there and unfortunately there is _ puppy farmed dogs on there and unfortunately there is no - puppy farmed dogs on there and i unfortunately there is no protection for those _ unfortunately there is no protection for those animals— unfortunately there is no protection for those animals and _ unfortunately there is no protection for those animals and for— unfortunately there is no protection for those animals and for the - unfortunately there is no protectionl for those animals and for the people who end _ for those animals and for the people who end up — for those animals and for the people who end up buying _ for those animals and for the people who end up buying those _ for those animals and for the people who end up buying those dogs. - for those animals and for the people who end up buying those dogs. so, i who end up buying those dogs. so, unfortunatetv, _ who end up buying those dogs. so, unfortunately, a _ who end up buying those dogs. so, unfortunately, a lot— who end up buying those dogs. so, unfortunately, a lot of— who end up buying those dogs. so, unfortunately, a lot of these - who end up buying those dogs. so, unfortunately, a lot of these cases| unfortunately, a lot of these cases have happened _ unfortunately, a lot of these cases have happened quite _ unfortunately, a lot of these cases have happened quite frequently. unfortunately, a lot of these cases. have happened quite frequently and unfortunately, a lot of these cases i have happened quite frequently and a lot of them _ have happened quite frequently and a lot of them don't _ have happened quite frequently and a lot of them don't get _ have happened quite frequently and a lot of them don't get reported - have happened quite frequently and a lot of them don't get reported but. lot of them don't get reported but however— lot of them don't get reported but however we — lot of them don't get reported but however we have _ lot of them don't get reported but however we have seen— lot of them don't get reported but however we have seen a - lot of them don't get reported but however we have seen a huge - lot of them don't get reported buti however we have seen a huge rise lot of them don't get reported but. however we have seen a huge rise in reports _ however we have seen a huge rise in reports of— however we have seen a huge rise in reports of these _ however we have seen a huge rise in reports of these welfare _ however we have seen a huge rise in reports of these welfare cases - however we have seen a huge rise in reports of these welfare cases with i reports of these welfare cases with new poppies — reports of these welfare cases with new poppies since _ reports of these welfare cases with new poppies since the _ reports of these welfare cases with new poppies since the beginning i reports of these welfare cases with new poppies since the beginning of last year _ new poppies since the beginning of last ear. . ., , .,
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new poppies since the beginning of last ear. . ., ., new poppies since the beginning of last ear. . . ., ., ~ last year. richard, you are working to effect change. _ last year. richard, you are working to effect change. tell— last year. richard, you are working to effect change. tell us _ last year. richard, you are working to effect change. tell us about i to effect change. tell us about that. ~ . to effect change. tell us about that. . ., :: ~ , to effect change. tell us about that. ., :: ~ , , to effect change. tell us about that. . ., :: ~ , , ., that. we have met with 40 mps up and down the country. _ that. we have met with 40 mps up and down the country. i'm _ that. we have met with 40 mps up and down the country. i'm not _ that. we have met with 40 mps up and down the country. i'm not a _ that. we have met with 40 mps up and down the country. i'm not a politics i down the country. i'm not a politics none that i speak to the mps a lot and we have come up with a reggie's law to regulate animal sales and hopefully provide more information about animal protection services and have come out with the outlying group, which is packs for homes, pre—loved through the adverts. dogs and puppies, and they will be working together to share information with aps on the adverts, so when you advertise a dog now. ? can i ask you, you said when you were telling a story that some kind of alarm bell was ringing as you arrived at the place you are going to? ., , ., , arrived at the place you are going to? ., , .,. arrived at the place you are going to? ., , , to? for people watching this, they mi . ht to? for people watching this, they miaht be to? for people watching this, they might be doing — to? for people watching this, they might be doing the _ to? for people watching this, they might be doing the same - to? for people watching this, they might be doing the same thing i to? for people watching this, they i might be doing the same thing today and going to pick a dog up. what was it that made you feel wrong? i and going to pick a dog up. what was it that made you feel wrong?- it that made you feel wrong? i knew what i was looking _ it that made you feel wrong? i knew what i was looking out _ it that made you feel wrong? i knew what i was looking out for _ it that made you feel wrong? i knew what i was looking out for and i it that made you feel wrong? i knew what i was looking out for and it i what i was looking out for and it didn't feel right.— what i was looking out for and it
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didn't feel riht. . ., ., . didn't feel right. what do you mean? the house was _ didn't feel right. what do you mean? the house was a _ didn't feel right. what do you mean? the house was a bit _ didn't feel right. what do you mean? the house was a bit like _ didn't feel right. what do you mean? the house was a bit like a _ didn't feel right. what do you mean? the house was a bit like a sjoholm i the house was a bit like a sjoholm and all the things i was expecting to happen didn't happen and it was quite worrying. quite off—putting but when you have a puppy like ralph jumping up at you, it only clicks afterwards and she knew something wasn't right, but going back to the website that we set up, it is going to change and these adverts, when people post an advert, they will be taken down and when they go to post on a different site, they will be taken down again, so what we set up with the website, the alliance welfare group with all the big websites in the uk, you will make a difference and i took that from a by a's perspective and taken it to the websites and told them what i found is a problem, that they were advertising on multiple sites and now i know that will not happen, and what the websites have done is absolutely amazing, along with us on the animal protection services. richard, thank you for coming in and serena, thank you for your time. find
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serena, thank you for your time. and ralh, serena, thank you for your time. and ralph. who — serena, thank you for your time. and ralph. who is — serena, thank you for your time. and ralph, who is now very happy in the corner. ., ., ., ., corner. leave our porridge alone, ralh. corner. leave our porridge alone, ralph. brilliant _ corner. leave our porridge alone, ralph. brilliant campaign. - corner. leave our porridge alone, ralph. brilliant campaign. thank| ralph. brilliant campaign. thank ou. good morning with your news from london and the south—east, i'm victoria hollins. the first phase of the grenfell tower inquiry recommended that disabled people have personalised emergency evacuation plans. they're common in workplaces but rare in residential properties. the government had stated the plans were �*usually unrealistic�* it has it has now retracted that advice while new guidance is drawn up a move welcomed by campaigners.
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and a difference between life and death and it affects the disabled person and the human dilemma that family members cannot leave theirfamily members behind in a situation like that. in a statement the government said... "we are committed to improving fire safety which is why we are intending shortyl to implement legislation to deliver the majority of the grenfell phase one recommendations and will be providing guidance in due course." detectives are appealing for help locating two teenage girls from kent and london. andrea was last seen at her home in canterbury and isabella was last seen last sunday in harrow. a missing persons investigation has been launched. officers believe they may have been taken outside london. gatwick airport is proposing to cap aircraft noise if its plans to get a second runway into regular use are successful. under its proposals, the northern runway currently used for taxi ing and emergencies would be used routinely. the airport says new quieter planes in the future will replace older noisier ones.
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opponents say the expansion will be environmentally damaging. a petition is launching today calling for a new hospital for northeast london to replace whipps cross. the �*whipps won�*t wait�* campaign wants the government to commit funds pledged by boris johnonson in 2019. the a&e at whipps cross was closed earlier this year after flooding during heavy rain. an invasive stinkbug that causes crop damage has been found at rhs wisley in surrey. the brown marmorated stinkbug was trapped as part of a project to monitor its spread. the pest is native to asia and has recently spread to parts of europe and the us. so far it�*s only spread in southern england. a new range of coins from the royal mint are being unveiled at hampton court palace. they were inspired by king henry viii�*s heraldic beasts from lions and panthers, to a bull, greyhound and a unicorn which he chose to line the moat bridge of the palace. well if you�*re heading out on public
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transport this morning this is how tfl services are looking right now. the metropolitan line has a signal problem. problems with the weather so briefly, a dry start, largely overcast skies at first. as the day goes on the cloud will tend to break up goes on the cloud will tend to break up allowing sunny spells. it should remain dry throughout and a maximum temperature of 16—19. i�*m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. fuel bills predicted to rise even more as gas prices reach a record high. the business secretary is due to face industry bosses for the first time since the start of the crisis. 20 years since the start of uk military operations in afghanistan and this morning there will be commemorative events in london and here at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. we will bring them to you live in about half an hour. rowing for rob. friends of former rugby league star rob burrow take on a marathon challenge in aid of motor neurone disease. newcastle united could have new owners after a controversial saudi arabian back takeover moved a step closer as a major hurdle blocking the deal was removed.
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for many today, cloudy, some breaks will develop. across northern ireland and scotland in weather front will produce rain and windy conditions. but all of us, it will be warm. the details in ten minutes. it�*s thursday, october the 7th. our top story. householders are being warned their energy bills could rise by another £400 early next year after gas prices soared to record levels. that�*s on top on rises caused by the higher energy price cap that came into effect last week. the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, will face industry bosses later today as the sector deals with an unprecedented spike in wholesale costs. kevin peachey reports. just like the season�*s weather, bill payers are being warned the worst is yet to come. a host of energy companies have collapsed in recent weeks. their customers moved to a new supplier are already having to pay hundreds of pounds more a year than they expected.
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a price cap does protect millions of people from extreme rises rises in bills, but, analysts say, next year, they will still face a bill shock. under the price cap, a customer now pays £1277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity. analysts expect that typical bill to rise to £1600 when a revised but as yet undecided cap starts in april. compare that with a year ago, when you could have got a deal costing just over £850 a year. we are competing with the rest of the world, the rest of europe, for gas supplies. unfortunately, it is the reality. price comparison sites, which historically talk about how much we can save you by switching. but the reality is that is not there at the moment, and very few people for the whole of this year, really, have been in a position where they would be able to save, compared to last year.
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still, producers confirmed they halted production at times of high demand, showing that industry, as well as consumers, is feeling the impact of rising costs. some of the heat was drawn from the crisis yesterday when russia said it would increase gas supplies to europe, helping to limit the latest surge in wholesale gas prices. but it hasn�*t ended cause for the uk government to step in. the business secretary will be expected to address concerns of the energy sector today. but then also the worries of businesses and consumers in the weeks to come. we can speak to our political correspondent. this news about gas prices, bearing in mind what boris johnson said about his lack of concern really about how things were going in future with wage rises as he promises, give us a picture of how this is building up.— he promises, give us a picture of how this is building up. there are demands on _
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how this is building up. there are demands on government - how this is building up. there are demands on government to i how this is building up. there are demands on government to do i demands on government to do something to step in and help industry. so far the government focused response on protecting consumers and talked about the energy cap and how it helps to do that. there are calls from industries like the energy intensive users group that represents industries that use a lot of energy, such as chemical and steel manufacturers. they say the government needs to help otherwise you are looking at higher prices or possibly temporary closures of factories or even switching back to more polluting fuel. so far the government response has not indicated it is preparing to do that. it said it has provided extensive support to energy intensive industries and says the way the uk is exposed to gas prices shows the importance of growing a home renewable energy sector. the business secretary said the uk had a serious ambition for the uk to stop
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using fossilfuels by serious ambition for the uk to stop using fossil fuels by 2035. it seems to be in the longer term context the government is framing response to more immediate concerns. the question will be if they dig in on that or if something happens to change that. that or if something happens to change that-— a premier league footballer has been arrested on suspicion of sexually assaulting a woman. the man is in his 20s and plays for brighton and hove albion. he was arrested at a nightclub in brighton early on wednesday. the club said it was helping police with the investigation. prince andrew�*s legal team has been granted permission to review a sealed document they believe will end the sexual abuse lawsuit against him. the document details a settlement between the duke of york�*s accuser, virginia guiffre, and the convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein. the prince has categorically denied ms guiffre�*s claims. research shows that people who have had covid as well as being double
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vaccinated have greater protection from the virus. a study found individual�*s protection can be as much as 94% if they have tested positive in the past and receive both jabs, falling to 65% if the person is not vaccinated. ministers in northern ireland will meet today to formally review the country�*s covid restrictions. people are currently still required to socially distance in pubs and restaurants, and indoor gatherings are limited to fifteen people from four households. the hospitality industry in northern ireland has been calling for remaining restrictions to be scrapped. any decisions made today will come into force in a week�*s time. nine months after it was rolled out, the astrazeneca covid vaccine has finally reached the antarctic. it was flown there this week to immunise the 23 staff members who�*ve been keeping a british research station running through the polar winter. our science correspondent jonathan amos reports. it is literally at the end of the earth.
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this is the antarctic, a place of extremes where you really must avoid getting sick. which is why the arrival this week of the astrazeneca covid vaccine is so important. it will keep those who work on the white continent safe. getting the coronavirus jabs there, however, has been a grand challenge. it is a 10,000—mile flight from england to the rothera station, with stopovers required in africa and the falklands. but the astrazeneca vaccine is now in the arms of the scientists who reside on the antarctic peninsula during its cold, dark winter. they know it helps protect in case covid got to the station, but also they are going to be leaving in the next few months, anyway, so that group is going to do their summer season at rothera and then they are going back, and perhaps one of the scariest parts is when one of the team get back into uk society and covid, there are so many cases per day. so we are protecting that team before they have to get back on the air bridge flights back
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to the uk and back to see their family and friends. this is the furthest south the astrazeneca jab has reached. it means all continents have now received at least some doses. there has been very little covid, so far, in antarctica. just one isolated outbreak at a chilean research station. international science agencies want to keep it that way and anyone going south in the coming months will still have to quarantine. jonathan amos, bbc news. the james bond actor daniel craig has been honoured with a star on the hollywood walk of fame. it was unveiled just yards away from his bond predecessor, sir roger moore. speaking at the event, daniel craig joked that it was an "absolute honour to be walked all over in hollywood". children across much of africa are to be vaccinated against malaria in an historic moment in the fight against the deadly disease. the world health organisation has given its backing to the jab.
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let�*s look at the figures. malaria is a parasitic disease, spread by mosquitoes, which kills mostly babies and infants. there are 229 million cases every year. the vast majority in africa. worldwide, there are 409,000 deaths every year. four doses of the malaria vaccine called the rtss jab need to be given to babies in order for it to work. it�*s thought the rollout will lead to a 30 per cent reduction in severe cases. we�*rejoined now from uganda by drjames tibenderana, who is the technical director for the malaria consortium. and from london, by professor sian clarke, who is co—director of the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine. good morning. how much of a
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gamechanger is this vaccine? good mornin: . gamechanger is this vaccine? good morning- this— gamechanger is this vaccine? good morning. this is _ gamechanger is this vaccine? good morning. this is fantastic- gamechanger is this vaccine? (13mm morning. this is fantastic news for the malaria research community and malaria endemic countries because this will make a difference. it is a new avenue for control we have not had before. new avenue for control we have not had before-— had before. james, what is the situation in _ had before. james, what is the situation in uganda, _ had before. james, what is the situation in uganda, the i had before. james, what is the| situation in uganda, the impact had before. james, what is the i situation in uganda, the impact it has on families?— has on families? good morning. uaanda has on families? good morning. uganda contributes _ has on families? good morning. uganda contributes one - has on families? good morning. uganda contributes one third i has on families? good morning. uganda contributes one third of| has on families? good morning. i uganda contributes one third of the total global malaria cases and, on average. — total global malaria cases and, on average, we have 30 million cases per annum — average, we have 30 million cases per annum and average, we have 30 million cases perannum and about average, we have 30 million cases per annum and about 4000 deaths. —— 13 million _ per annum and about 4000 deaths. —— 13 million. most of the deaths are in children — 13 million. most of the deaths are in children. every single child in uganda. — in children. every single child in uganda. if— in children. every single child in uganda, if they do not use a
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preventive tool, will be likely to be exposed in some parts of the country— be exposed in some parts of the country to— be exposed in some parts of the country to one infected bite per night _ country to one infected bite per night by— country to one infected bite per night by a — country to one infected bite per night by a mosquito so the potential impact _ night by a mosquito so the potential impact of— night by a mosquito so the potential impact of this vaccine as an additional tool in the tool box is critical — additional tool in the tool box is critical. . . additional tool in the tool box is critical. ., , . , critical. that is incredible. families _ critical. that is incredible. families are _ critical. that is incredible. families are living - critical. that is incredible. families are living in i critical. that is incredible. families are living in fear| critical. that is incredible. i families are living in fear every day of losing their children to malaria? . . day of losing their children to malaria? , ., ., , , malaria? yes, and the sad reality is to some extent, _ malaria? yes, and the sad reality is to some extent, the _ malaria? yes, and the sad reality is to some extent, the impact - malaria? yes, and the sad reality is to some extent, the impact of- to some extent, the impact of malaria — to some extent, the impact of malaria has become normalised. having _ malaria has become normalised. having an— malaria has become normalised. having an intervention of this nature — having an intervention of this nature that can galvanise governments and communities around continuing _ governments and communities around continuing to increase coverage with existing _ continuing to increase coverage with existing tools but potentially introducing a new tool, i think it will help— introducing a new tool, i think it will help change the mindset that galvanises also around the aim of malaria _ galvanises also around the aim of malaria elimination. the announcement - malaria elimination. the announcement of i malaria elimination. the announcement of the i malaria elimination. iuez announcement of the vaccine malaria elimination. iie:
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announcement of the vaccine is wonderful and potentially a gamechanger. what about logistics and issues of using the vaccine? how does it get to people and who do you use it on first? that does it get to people and who do you use it on first?— use it on first? that will be the next step- _ use it on first? that will be the next step- we _ use it on first? that will be the next step. we are _ use it on first? that will be the next step. we are waiting i use it on first? that will be the next step. we are waiting to i use it on first? that will be the i next step. we are waiting to see what _ next step. we are waiting to see what gavi — next step. we are waiting to see what gavi says about financial support — what gavi says about financial support and the onus will be our national— support and the onus will be our national governments themselves to liberate _ national governments themselves to liberate new funding, i think. national governments themselves to liberate new funding, ithink. the experience — liberate new funding, ithink. the experience from the vaccine implementation projects have shown it can _ implementation projects have shown it can be _ implementation projects have shown it can be delivered using the expanded programme of elimination which _ expanded programme of elimination which already is reaching most parts of the _ which already is reaching most parts of the country and is quite acceptable to communities. and outreach — acceptable to communities. and outreach programmes. i think it will be an— outreach programmes. i think it will be an issue — outreach programmes. i think it will be an issue of financing and then understanding how we can really get
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this to _ understanding how we can really get this to the _ understanding how we can really get this to the children who need it. my sense _ this to the children who need it. my sense is— this to the children who need it. my sense is there will have to be prioritisation and that is what who and governments will have to work on and governments will have to work on and we _ and governments will have to work on and we can— and governments will have to work on and we can envisage a situation where _ and we can envisage a situation where those currently not protected using _ where those currently not protected using the _ where those currently not protected using the existing tools will probably be prioritised for rtss. there _ probably be prioritised for rtss. there is— probably be prioritised for rtss. there is still quite a bit of work that needs to be done but having the positive _ that needs to be done but having the positive recommendation really opens the door— positive recommendation really opens the door for us to do that work. professor— the door for us to do that work. professor clark, some people might wonder, brilliant the news is, why it took so long, and they might think about what happened with the corona virus vaccine and how quickly it came about. can you tell us how these developments happen? the malaria these developments happen? ii9 malaria parasite these developments happen? "ii9 malaria parasite is these developments happen? ii9 malaria parasite is significantly more complex and organism than a virus, which is simply a strand of
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dna, even rna. and so developing a vaccine against a complex organism will take more time. the malaria parasite is also variable, with variable surface antigens, and in the same way it takes many years of exposure for a child to develop natural immunity, it is challenging to develop immunity using artificial means like a vaccine.— means like a vaccine. efficacy is at 40% means like a vaccine. efficacy is at 4096 which — means like a vaccine. efficacy is at 40x. which will — means like a vaccine. efficacy is at 40% which will be _ means like a vaccine. efficacy is at 40% which will be significant i 40% which will be significant anyway, but also the administering of it, four doses to be effective, the first three a month apart and then a booster at 18 months. it is highly complex. will that reduce the impact of it? the highly complex. will that reduce the impact of it?— impact of it? the importance of the fourth dose — impact of it? the importance of the fourth dose is _ impact of it? the importance of the fourth dose is about _ impact of it? the importance of the fourth dose is about extending i impact of it? the importance of the fourth dose is about extending the | fourth dose is about extending the period of protection into the second year of life and to get the full
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benefits of the vaccine we want the children to get all four doses. children have less contact with health facilities in the second year of life in so that is the most challenging point. this is something that has been evaluated in the pilot studies taking place in places such as ghana and malawi. and the results are looking promising. it will be a challenge but everyone i think is relatively optimistic. and even with low vaccine efficacy, it will make a huge difference in terms of tens of thousands of lives saved every year. doctor, tell me if this is a silly question. has news of the vaccine filtered through to communities who are most likely to benefit? i can only speculate _
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are most likely to benefit? i can only speculate and _ are most likely to benefit? i can only speculate and say - are most likely to benefit? i can only speculate and say i - are most likely to benefit? i can only speculate and say i think. are most likely to benefit? i can only speculate and say i think so, because — only speculate and say i think so, because malaria is high on the agenda. — because malaria is high on the agenda, newspapers as well as communities. like the earlier speaker— communities. like the earlier speaker said, whereas it is complex to develop— speaker said, whereas it is complex to develop a vaccine against malariam _ to develop a vaccine against malaria... this vaccine is 30 years old and _ malaria... this vaccine is 30 years old and what — malaria... this vaccine is 30 years old and what covid has shown, when we put _ old and what covid has shown, when we put the _ old and what covid has shown, when we put the effort and financing, we can surmount some of the obstacles. communities have been asking questions. how do we get a vaccine for covid _ questions. how do we get a vaccine for covid so — questions. how do we get a vaccine for covid so fast when we do not have _ for covid so fast when we do not have one — for covid so fast when we do not have one for malaria? i think the news _ have one for malaria? i think the news will— have one for malaria? i think the news will be received positively. and malaria is a top priority for many— and malaria is a top priority for many governments and communities. a many governments and communities. massive moment but still a long way to go. many thanks for your time. time to catch up with the weather.
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good morning. good morning. what a lovely start in dunbar, with the weather watcher sending in this picture earlier. it is mild where ever you are and in the next few days, by day, unseasonably warm but even by night temperatures higher than they should be at this time of year. starting with cloud, some of it will break and we will see sunshine. we have a weather front in northern ireland and scotland bringing rain. around that brisk winds. the cloud thick enough in western areas and on the coasts and hills to produce drizzle. temperatures, pretty good. 16—20, may be 21 across the board. overnight, we have the weather front bringing in rain in parts of scotland and northern ireland. and showers in north—west england,
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possibly north—west wales. under clearer skies further south, we could see mist and fog forming. tomorrow that will take time to lift and when it does we will see more sunshine. the weather front in parts of northern ireland and scotland and so again here some rain. temperatures up to about 21 degrees tomorrow. not bad for the time of year. we�*ve heard plenty about the soaring cost of gas in recent weeks and how it�*s affecting our household bills, but yesterday prices rose to record levels. let�*s look at this in more detail... for the past two years, uk gas has remained well under 100 pence per therm — that�*s a measurement for natural gas used over time. at the start of this year it was 60 pence per therm, but high global demand,
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and reduced supply have driven prices up over the last 10 months. and those prices rose sharply by 37 percent in just 24 hours to trade at 400 pence per therm yesterday. later in the day, russia said it was boosting supplies to europe, and prices dropped to 257 pence per therm. i hope you got your heads around that! let�*s talk now to ellen fraser, who�*s an energy analyst. why the sudden surge overnight? we are seeing the supply and demand balance happening across the global economy and as various economies switch on post—pandemic consumption is increasing, putting pressure on gas from the supply side. china looking to be importers of gas which pushes prices quite high. with russia are intervening and looking to export more particularly to europe, the uk price came from the peak ofjust over £4 per firm, which
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is an unprecedented peak, but dropping quite rapidly with a bit of ease in the market in terms of seeing supply flows coming back from russia which is helpful. iterate seeing supply flows coming back from russia which is helpful.— russia which is helpful. we have seen prices _ russia which is helpful. we have seen prices go — russia which is helpful. we have seen prices go up. _ russia which is helpful. we have seen prices go up. £139 - russia which is helpful. we have seen prices go up. £139 for i russia which is helpful. we have seen prices go up. £139 for the l seen prices go up. £139 for the average consumer and the prediction is it will happen in the spring for households.— households. that is right, unfortunately. _ households. that is right, unfortunately. the - households. that is right, unfortunately. the price l households. that is right, i unfortunately. the price cap at households. that is right, - unfortunately. the price cap at the moment has jumped unfortunately. the price cap at the moment hasjumped up for an unfortunately. the price cap at the moment has jumped up for an average dualfuel moment has jumped up for an average dual fuel customer of around £139 per year, which is a significant iump per year, which is a significant jump already. ofgem review the price cap every six months. we expect the next increase in april. that will be an increase, because we are seeing upwards pressure in terms of wholesale price. the price cap is not currently cost reflective so two
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dynamics will happen, and first the wholesale price will push into the price cap, and we will see some of the cost of supplier of failures picked up in customer bills. two dynamics playing into bills next year which will increase bills unfortunately for consumers. it is volatile and _ unfortunately for consumers. it is volatile and tricky _ unfortunately for consumers. it is volatile and tricky to predict, but will we look at another rise of £139 again? will we look at another rise of £139 auain? :, ., , ., ., ,,, again? unfortunately, the analysis beinu again? unfortunately, the analysis being published _ again? unfortunately, the analysis being published suggests - again? unfortunately, the analysis being published suggests it - again? unfortunately, the analysis being published suggests it might| again? unfortunately, the analysis i being published suggests it might be significantly higher than that. we are looking at somewhere like a 30% increase on the increased price. prices mightjump in the region of £400 for an average customer. it is hard to forecast accurately. customers should be making sure they are looking at household finances and be prepared for higher bills in spring. and be prepared for higher bills in s..rin_ :, and be prepared for higher bills in siirin_ .,, and be prepared for higher bills in srin. :,, , ,
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spring. good to be prepared but if it is supply _ spring. good to be prepared but if it is supply and — spring. good to be prepared but if it is supply and demand _ spring. good to be prepared but if it is supply and demand and i spring. good to be prepared but if. it is supply and demand and demand has increased as we come out of lockdown globally, as we normalise again, implicit is the flow will be more steady and eventually prices would come down next summer. doers. would come down next summer. does that loic would come down next summer. does that logic were? _ would come down next summer. does that logic were? it _ would come down next summer. does that logic were? it does _ would come down next summer. ive" that logic were? it does typically work. in the northern hemisphere we see prices typically coming down through the summer period. as demand drops off. people are notjust using power for heating, there drops off. people are notjust using powerfor heating, there is drops off. people are notjust using power for heating, there is a drops off. people are notjust using powerfor heating, there is a lot drops off. people are notjust using power for heating, there is a lot of industrial context in terms of consumption. there is still pressure on the supply price. but the dynamic looks like the forward prices suggest it starts to drop off in late spring next year. it is somewhat dependent on what is happening in the global economy and extent to which other economies are waking up from the pandemic and increasing demand. i5 waking up from the pandemic and increasing demand. is it waking up from the pandemic and increasing demand.— increasing demand. is it time to think again _ increasing demand. is it time to think again about _ increasing demand. is it time to think again about the _ increasing demand. is it time to think again about the price i increasing demand. is it time to} think again about the price cap? increasing demand. is it time to i think again about the price cap? it does protect consumers but it has
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meant some businesses cannot cope because they cannot ask for more from customers. does there need to be more government support for businesses? we be more government support for businesses?— be more government support for businesses? ~ ., , u, businesses? we need to be careful in terms of energy _ businesses? we need to be careful in terms of energy suppliers. _ businesses? we need to be careful in terms of energy suppliers. there - businesses? we need to be careful in terms of energy suppliers. there is l terms of energy suppliers. there is a range in the market from some who entered the market opportunistically and have not hedged well, versus organisations who are seasoned professionals who forecast accurately in terms of consumption customers need and buy and hedge accurately. therefore they are in a more robust situation in the winter period. the challenge is it is it is hard to forecast exactly what customers will need overwinter. we do not know what the weather will be like. if we have a hard winter, we will see even the most professional organisation struggle, because they will be exposed to the spot price on the open market. from a government
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standpoint we need to make sure it is not being invested in organisations that have not set themselves up properly. some small suppliers have this is about customer price protection, making sure suppliers can still operate, but customers do not necessarily see the price spikes. if the government was to intervene as we have seen in europe, the key thing is to protect customer price is not necessarily the suppliers that sit behind them. thank you very much. time for the knees where you are. good morning with your news from london and the south—east, i'm victoria hollins. the family of a disabled woman who died attracting grenfell tower says it's vital that people in tower blocks have their own personalised evacuation plan. they are common in
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workplaces but rare in residential properties. the first phase of the enquiry into the fire at granville recommended it should change. the government stated the plans were unrealistic and has retracted the advice while new guidance is drawn up. personal evacuation plans are not a luxury but a necessity but a matter of life and death and it affects the disabled person and the human dilemma that family members cannot leave their family members behind in a situation like that. in a statement the government said, "we are committed to improving fire safety which is why we are intending shortyl to implement legislation to deliver the majority of the grenfell phase one recommendations and will be providing guidance in due course." a cross party, cross borough petition is launching today calling for a new hospital for north east london to replace whipps cross. police believe they are at risk of harm. 15—year—old andrea was last seen on friday the 1st of october at
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her home in canterbury. her cousin, 16—year—old isabella was last seen on sunday in harrow and officers believe they might have been taken outside of london. gatwick airport is proposing to cap aircraft noise if its plans to get a second runway into regular use are successful. under its proposals the northern runway currently used for taxi ing and emergencies would be used routinely. the airport says new quieter planes in the future will replace older noisier ones. opponents though say the expansion will be environmentally damaging. a cross party, cross borough petition is launching today calling for a new hospital for north east london to replace whipps cross. police believe they are at risk of the �*whipps won't wait�* campaign wants the government to commit funds pledged by borisjohnonson in 2019 for a new hospital. the a and e at whipps cross was closed earlier this year afterflooding during heavy rain. an invasive �*stink bug' that causes crop damage has been found at rhs wisley in surrey. the brown marmorated stink bug
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was trapped as part of a project to monitor its spread. the pest is native to asia and has recently spread to parts of europe and the us. so far it's only spread in southern england but its feared it could spread further north because of climate change. �*expanded', an immersive art exhibition in partnership with the national theatre starts today. the works featured are brought to life through cutting edge, immersive technologies, including interactive virtual reality, 360 films, and live performances. it runs until 17th october in leake street. well if you're heading out on public transport this morning this is how tfl services are looking right now. the metropolitan line is part suspended between our mission and chalfont and latimer because of single problems. the hammersmith and city as minor delays. and today will see a dry start, over christ skies and as the day breaks up, there will be top temperatures of 20 degrees. i'm back with the latest news and an hour, join us if you can.
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hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt today marks the 20th anniversary of us airstrikes against al qaeda in afghanistan following the 9/11 attacks the start of two decades of operations in the region for us and allied forces. we can go now to the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire, where a service is being held to remember the uk soldiers who served and died in the conflict. and you can hear sergeant grant, the pipe major, playing as they lead the procession to the memorial and a couple of minutes' time there will be a minutes silence to mark those who lost their lives. and some wreaths will be laid by gerald
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strickland and shortly we will hear the last post being played by raf trumpeter sergeant matt peck. you are watching the scene at the national arboretum in staffordshire. the ceremony this morning to mark the lives lost in afghanistan. and in the moment we will have a minute's silence to mark the a57
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british personnel who were killed during the conflict. last post
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reveille
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reefs now being laid — reeves
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bagpipes play that was live coverage of the service at the national memorial
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arboretum, marking 20 years of operations in afghanistan. it is worth saying as we come out of those pictures at the national arboretum that later this morning we will be speaking to the former royal marine commander, mark 0rmerod, who lost three of his limbs in an iud explosion in helmand province in 2007 and he is now raising money for a veterans charity and we will hear from him about his ambitions and you might remember you saw him emerging from the water, three challenges, two on land and one in the water and it would be no exaggeration to say that mark is quite a character and extremely determined and we will be catching up with him a little later on. it is amazing. in his speech to the conservative party conference, borisjohnson promised some teachers a three thousand pound salary boost from the "levelling up premium". it's a move labour have branded
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�*the less generous recycling' of a previous funding policy. we're joined now by the education secretary, nadhim zahawi. it's the first time we've had an opportunity to speak to you in your new role as education secretary, so welcome. . we will come onto the pay welcome. v we will come onto the pay issues but welcome. . we will come onto the pay issues but first of all, the number of children currently absent from school because of covid, what is that number? it school because of covid, what is that number?— school because of covid, what is that number? ., , ~ ., ~ that number? it varies week on week and last week — that number? it varies week on week and last week we _ that number? it varies week on week and last week we had _ that number? it varies week on week and last week we had 9196 _ that number? it varies week on week and last week we had 9196 of - that number? it varies week on week and last week we had 9196 of children j and last week we had 91% of children across both primary and secondary school attending and depending on infection rates, the data will move up infection rates, the data will move up or down depending on where the infection rate is at. so is up or down depending on where the infection rate is at.— infection rate is at. so is that 200,000 — infection rate is at. so is that 200,000 children, _ infection rate is at. so is that 200,000 children, is - infection rate is at. so is that 200,000 children, is that i infection rate is at. so is that | 200,000 children, is that the infection rate is at. so is that - 200,000 children, is that the number approximately? the
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200,000 children, is that the number approximately?— approximately? the total number of children is nine _ approximately? the total number of children is nine million _ approximately? the total number of children is nine million and - approximately? the total number of children is nine million and if- approximately? the total number of children is nine million and if 9196 i children is nine million and if 91% are at school, although pre—covid, ascendance was at 95%, so there were always 5% that were persistent absenteeism which i'm looking at and i have asked my team to do a deep dive work with teachers and local government with ofsted to see if there are any themes emerging from some of the inspections as to what good attendance in schools looks like and what the schools are doing and what the head teachers are doing compared to school struggling with attendance and how we can help them. can i ask you how many co2 monitors have been delivered to school question at the announcement was made by the government, these were measures made to preclude people catching coronavirus and how many have been delivered since august? we have been delivered since august? 7 have been delivered since august? 7 have had several thousand delivered and by the end of the month we will be touching 90,000 and then through november we scale up to 300,000. mimi;
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november we scale up to 300,000. why is it taking so long? i've _ november we scale up to 300,000. why is it taking so long? i've only _ november we scale up to 300,000. why is it taking so long? i've only been - is it taking so long? i've only been in the department _ is it taking so long? i've only been in the department for— is it taking so long? i've only been in the department for two - is it taking so long? i've only been in the department for two weeks l is it taking so long? i've only been i in the department for two weeks but this combination and then we have to work with schools to see how many they need in each school, but we are ramping up through this month and next month. i5 ramping up through this month and next month-— next month. is that satisfactory riven the next month. is that satisfactory given the pressure _ next month. is that satisfactory given the pressure on _ next month. is that satisfactory given the pressure on schools? | next month. is that satisfactory . given the pressure on schools? did you say 91,000 is what is needed, so that's 95,000 delivered?— that's 95,000 delivered? there have been 75.000 — that's 95,000 delivered? there have been 75,000 delivered. _ that's 95,000 delivered? there have been 75,000 delivered. you - that's 95,000 delivered? there have been 75,000 delivered. you know. that's 95,000 delivered? there have i been 75,000 delivered. you know how man . b been 75,000 delivered. you know how many- by the — been 75,000 delivered. you know how many- by the end _ been 75,000 delivered. you know how many. by the end of _ been 75,000 delivered. you know how many. by the end of the _ been 75,000 delivered. you know how many. by the end of the month - been 75,000 delivered. you know how many. by the end of the month there i many. by the end of the month there will be 90.000 _ many. by the end of the month there will be 90.000 by — many. by the end of the month there will be 90,000 by the _ many. by the end of the month there will be 90,000 by the first _ many. by the end of the month there will be 90,000 by the first week - many. by the end of the month there will be 90,000 by the first week of l will be 90,000 by the first week of november but the important thing is to get 300,000 in schools to help schools and make sure they monitor the c02 schools and make sure they monitor the co2 in the classroom. it schools and make sure they monitor the c02 in the classroom.— the c02 in the classroom. it sounds varue, the c02 in the classroom. it sounds vague. several _ the c02 in the classroom. it sounds vague, severalthousand. _ the c02 in the classroom. it sounds vague, severalthousand. how- the c02 in the classroom. it sounds| vague, severalthousand. how many vague, several thousand. how many have been delivered? the vague, severalthousand. how many have been delivered?— vague, severalthousand. how many have been delivered? the last number i saw was 6000 _
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have been delivered? the last number i saw was 6000 or _ have been delivered? the last number i saw was 6000 or 7000 _ have been delivered? the last number i saw was 6000 or 7000 and - have been delivered? the last number i saw was 6000 or 7000 and then - i saw was 6000 or 7000 and then every week that changes and increases. every week that changes and imenses-— every week that changes and increases. ., ., ~ ., increases. can we talk about teacher -a . you increases. can we talk about teacher pay- you made _ increases. can we talk about teacher pay- you made an — increases. can we talk about teacher pay. you made an announcement. increases. can we talk about teacher i pay. you made an announcement about not live to certain teachers. can you explain it? not live to certain teachers. can you exolain it?— not live to certain teachers. can you explain it? what we are trying to do is retain _ you explain it? what we are trying to do is retain teachers _ you explain it? what we are trying to do is retain teachers in - you explain it? what we are trying to do is retain teachers in maths l to do is retain teachers in maths and chemistry in computing and physics, especially in those schools and those disadvantaged areas that really need them because those kids are talented but need that opportunity as well and this scheme will allow teachers up to the first five years to take additional up to £3000 five years to take additional up to e3000 and we know it works and seen elsewhere that retention that retention and this is what i wanted to do this and the prime minister announced it in his party conference
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speech. it's an important part of the tools that i want to make sure we have two back teachers, including starting salaries up to £30,000 a year. starting salaries up to £30,000 a ear. ., , , ., , starting salaries up to £30,000 a ear. , , year. people might be a bit confused because this — year. people might be a bit confused because this is _ year. people might be a bit confused because this is the _ year. people might be a bit confused because this is the second _ year. people might be a bit confused because this is the second time - year. people might be a bit confused because this is the second time that | because this is the second time that this particular policy has been announced by the government and recently just ditched announced by the government and recentlyjust ditched stopping to schools, so why was it dumped? i’zre schools, so why was it dumped? i've been in the — schools, so why was it dumped? i�*e: been in the department for schools, so why was it dumped? i"2 been in the department forjust over two weeks and when a particular policy works and i see the evidence in the uk and england but also other countries, you look at it and improve it on this one is a different policy and it has an eligibility criteria up to five years and i think that is the right thing to do to make sure that we retain as many teachers in maths, chemistry, physics and computing. i'm not sure that answers the
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question as to why it was ditched? that was quite recently. this was in place and something your government was in favour of and it was ditched and now it has been rehashed. look, i want to make _ and now it has been rehashed. look, i want to make sure _ and now it has been rehashed. look, i want to make sure that _ and now it has been rehashed. look, i want to make sure that we - and now it has been rehashed. look, i want to make sure that we deal - i want to make sure that we deal with some of the gaps that we have, especially in the most disadvantaged areas, those schools that really need them and when i see a piece of policy that has worked and there is evidence from other countries it does work, i am a pragmatic secretary of state. i don't have a problem saying i will bring something back and improving which is why this is a different policy and i think it's a good one for teachers, especially those starting out in the early years of education between years one to five. and it's a good thing and a 10% uplift or bonus for retention and that is a great thing and i think it is the right thing to do. i'm pretty pragmatic about these things. that is aood pragmatic about these things. that
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is good news _ pragmatic about these things. that is good news for a handful of teachers, but the rest of them are now involved in a pay freeze which, as you will know well, if you have a pay freeze and inflation is going up, you are effectively worse off. so given that the teachers have a pay freeze, how are they going to gain from the prime minister's mantra of higher wages? number one, teachers have — mantra of higher wages? number one, teachers have done _ mantra of higher wages? number one, teachers have done a _ mantra of higher wages? number one, teachers have done a phenomenal - mantra of higher wages? number one, teachers have done a phenomenaljobl teachers have done a phenomenaljob and they have gone above and beyond and they have gone above and beyond and i want to thank them for that and i want to thank them for that and starting salaries will touch 30,000 on the average salary ? when is that? we are pretty much almost there now but we will make sure we get there. i there now but we will make sure we aet there. . . r' there now but we will make sure we aet there. ., ., ,~ ., get there. i am asking for specifics- _ get there. i am asking for specifics. my _ get there. i am asking for l specifics. my understanding get there. i am asking for - specifics. my understanding is that teachers will get £30,000 in 202a. is that correct? we teachers will get £30,000 in 2024. is that correct?— is that correct? we are in the middle of _ is that correct? we are in the middle of a — is that correct? we are in the middle of a spending - is that correct? we are in the middle of a spending review. middle of a spending review negotiation with the treasury and we will say more about this in a couple of weeks' time on the spending review is completed. all i would say
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is that the average salary of a teacher is now £ai,800 and the increase, and it's notjust because of inflation, because there has been a pay freeze by teachers from 2020, back to 2020, the increase is about 7% because teachers have a path to increase their salary as they improve and extend their experience. if i may, i willjump in because i don't really understand what you're saying, if i'm honest with you. the manifesto promise you made in 2019 was that they would be up to the 30,000 mark by 2023. i was wrong, i said 202a, but it was 2023. is that going to happen? we said 2024, but it was 2023. is that going to happen?— going to happen? we made that romise going to happen? we made that promise and _ going to happen? we made that promise and it _ going to happen? we made that promise and it will _ going to happen? we made that promise and it will happen. - going to happen? we made that promise and it will happen. i'ml
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going to happen? we made that. promise and it will happen. i'm in the middle of a spending review negotiation and we will be able to say more on all of that and of course the teachers pay review body looks at all of this stuff and i will look at the recommendation as well. 50 will look at the recommendation as well. , will look at the recommendation as well, , .., will look at the recommendation as well. , u, ., will look at the recommendation as well. , ., , well. so they could get a pay rise soon? because _ well. so they could get a pay rise soon? because they _ well. so they could get a pay rise soon? because they are - well. so they could get a pay rise j soon? because they are currently subject to a pay freeze. how long does the pay freeze go for? and if there is a pay freeze, what are you discussing in relation to their pay? it's a manifesto pledge that starting salaries will go to 30,000 in the pledge we will deliver on. there is a pay freeze at the moment but i have a pay review body that looks at pay in the same way the health service on the whole sophie has a pay review body that looks at pay and when they make a revelation i will look at that. that is what i'm saying to you.— i will look at that. that is what i'm saying to you. can i ask you about universal _ i'm saying to you. can i ask you about universal credit? - i'm saying to you. can i ask you about universal credit? i - i'm saying to you. can i ask you about universal credit? i think| about universal credit? i think there are around 3.a million children who live in households that receive universal credit. how concerned, alarmed, worried are you
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for the welfare of those children who go to school, on the impact of universal credit? all of these things are linked up under you will well know that the lead story is everyone talking about energy price rises, that will be real for people's homes?- rises, that will be real for --eole's homes? ., ., ., , , people's homes? you are absolutely riaht people's homes? you are absolutely ri . ht and people's homes? you are absolutely right and one _ people's homes? you are absolutely right and one of _ people's homes? you are absolutely right and one of the _ people's homes? you are absolutely right and one of the things _ people's homes? you are absolutely right and one of the things we - right and one of the things we announced as we arrived in manchester was half £1 billion for those families and individuals who need that additional help both in terms of food and utility bills. but ou will terms of food and utility bills. but you will know very well that's after the event. what is happening with the event. what is happening with the lump sum is that people will have to go cap in hand to the local authority and say i haven't got enough food this week. that's a very different thing from routinely being able to budget your household, maybe you have a couple of children in the house, and budgeting your household. you are talking about a different thing. first of all, local councils
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are best placed to know their communities and have been working with their communities and helping them throughout the pandemic and the £20 uplift was £9 billion of the a00 billion we have put in the economy to protectjobs and we had something like 11.6 million people on furlough and the work we've done in my department on things like increasing breakfast clubs and free school meals makes a huge difference to those children. the half a billion is very much targeted to make sure that people who are in the most need get that additional help. the other piece of positive news is the jobs market is incredibly vibrant and the chancellor has put in to kick—start and restart, 2.9 point 9,000,000,002 restart and that helps people and the national living wage has brought £a000 into peoples pockets because of that national living wage. thank
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ou ve of that national living wage. thank you very much _ of that national living wage. thank you very much for _ of that national living wage. thank you very much for your— of that national living wage. thank you very much for your time - of that national living wage. thank you very much for your time this i you very much for your time this morning and no doubt we will speak again in your new role as education secretary. thank you. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, both. today will be a cloudy day but for the next few days for all of us it will be unseasonably warm, notjust by day but also by night as well. what we have at the moment is a weather front draped across parts of scotland and northern ireland in this weather front is waving and will be here for the next few days bringing rain to different parts of scotland and northern ireland, and again notjust by day but also by night. we have the remnants of last night's rent clear in the far north—east and a lot of cloud across the rest of scotland and then persistent rain across the west extending into northern ireland as well. for england and wales, a lot of cloud this morning but there are
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some breaks but the cloud in the west in particular on the coast and the hills is thick enough to be producing some drizzle or sunlight spots of rain here and there. through the day, we continue with the waving weather front bringing more rain across northern ireland and western scotland and in western scotland in particular we can see those totals mounting up. and there will be brisk winds around this weather front as well. and it might cease on your brakes and we widely look at highs up to 20 degrees. through the evening and overnight he was the waving front which is going a bit further south and taking the rain with it in some clearer skies in the far north of scotland and some clear skies further south and where we have the light breezes and clear skies in the south is where we are likely to see mist and fog patches for me, some of which will be dense by tomorrow morning but it's not going to be a cold night with temperatures across the board staying in double figures. tomorrow we start with fog, particularly across central and southern england
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and that will be slow to live but when it lifts it will break up and we will see more sunshine coming through. meanwhile we have the waving weather front across northern ireland and western scotland and you will notice how it is pushed back towards the west with temperatures between 15 and 21 degrees. in two saturday we started on my old mate with mist and fog in the south but it will brighten up with sunshine coming through here is the waving weather front which has decided to sink south is a weakening feature so will bring some cloud and rain across northern england and north wales. for northern ireland some brighter skies but also showers and coming in on a north—westerly breeze and temperatures a bit lower behind the weather front but still very mild for the time of year in the south. by the time we get to sunday the weather front continues to move southwards and more or less just a narrow band of cloud and there will be dry and bright weather behind and some sunshine but still showers
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peppering the north and north—west of scotland and on that breeze temperatures are that bit lower than we will see in the next couple of days. could be a lot worse. after being diagnosed with motor neurone disease in december 2019, rob burrow has been an inspirational figure in his fight against the incurable illness and his determination to raise awareness about it. earlier this week, a group of rugby league legends left leeds on a 100 mile rowing expedition across the pennines in rob's name and to raise money for the mnd association. here's a look at their journey so far. music we are all close—knit and everyone is doing so much for them and rob especially, and as soon as the call comes in, a lot of people put your
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hands up straightaway. you don't need to know what the challenges, you are just doing it for a great cause. you are 'ust doing it for a great cause. �*, you are 'ust doing it for a great cause. �* , ., you are 'ust doing it for a great cause. �*, . ~ you are 'ust doing it for a great cause. �* , ., ~ ~ cause. it's overwhelming. we knew he was fairly well — cause. it's overwhelming. we knew he was fairly well liked, _ cause. it's overwhelming. we knew he was fairly well liked, but _ cause. it's overwhelming. we knew he was fairly well liked, but we _ cause. it's overwhelming. we knew he was fairly well liked, but we did - was fairly well liked, but we did not know— was fairly well liked, but we did not know this and it's about raising awareness — not know this and it's about raising awareness. that is what it is all about — awareness. that is what it is all about but _ awareness. that is what it is all about. but we are overwhelmed by the kindness _ about. but we are overwhelmed by the kindness. it�*s about. but we are overwhelmed by the kindness. �* , . about. but we are overwhelmed by the kindness. �*, ., , about. but we are overwhelmed by the kindness. �*, ., ., ., , , ., kindness. it's a reasonably tough challenge. _ kindness. it's a reasonably tough challenge. a _ kindness. it's a reasonably tough challenge, a marathon _ kindness. it's a reasonably tough challenge, a marathon a - kindness. it's a reasonably tough challenge, a marathon a day, - challenge, a marathon a day, paddling _ challenge, a marathon a day, paddling a _ challenge, a marathon a day, paddling a canoe, _ challenge, a marathon a day, paddling a canoe, using - challenge, a marathon a day, i paddling a canoe, using muscles challenge, a marathon a day, - paddling a canoe, using muscles for most _ paddling a canoe, using muscles for most people — paddling a canoe, using muscles for most people that _ paddling a canoe, using muscles for most people that will _ paddling a canoe, using muscles for most people that will be _ paddling a canoe, using muscles for most people that will be unusual, i paddling a canoe, using muscles for| most people that will be unusual, so it we quite _ most people that will be unusual, so it we quite top— most people that will be unusual, so it we quite top on— most people that will be unusual, so it we quite top on the _ most people that will be unusual, so it we quite top on the shoulders. - most people that will be unusual, so it we quite top on the shoulders. i. it we quite top on the shoulders. i am it we quite top on the shoulders. am loving the image we have it we quite top on the shoulders]. am loving the image we have behind us. and we're joined now by some of the rugby league legends doing this canoe challenge joe lydon and kevin sinfield. good morning to you, gentlemen. good morninr. good morning to you, gentlemen. good morning- good — good morning to you, gentlemen. good morning. good morning. so, _ good morning to you, gentlemen. good morning. good morning. so, kevin, - good morning to you, gentlemen. good morning. good morning. so, kevin, we| morning. good morning. so, kevin, we were watching — morning. good morning. so, kevin, we were watching the _ morning. good morning. so, kevin, we were watching the picture _ morning. good morning. so, kevin, we were watching the picture is _ morning. good morning. so, kevin, we were watching the picture is a - were watching the picture is a moment ago and i have to say you
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don't look full of the day and i'm looking at the green algae behind you and the journey you have a head. how are you feeling? yes. you and the journey you have a head. how are you feeling?— how are you feeling? yes, feeling re how are you feeling? yes, feeling pretty good. _ how are you feeling? yes, feeling pretty good, actually. _ how are you feeling? yes, feeling pretty good, actually. what - how are you feeling? yes, feeling pretty good, actually. what joe i how are you feeling? yes, feeling l pretty good, actually. what joe and pretty good, actually. whatjoe and the team have done this week is remarkable and to come and support todayis remarkable and to come and support today is great. obviously in rob's name, but for the mnd association, i feel a bit like shrek, but it's all part of the fun.— feel a bit like shrek, but it's all part of the fun. joe, you are doing at the whole _ part of the fun. joe, you are doing at the whole time _ part of the fun. joe, you are doing at the whole time so _ part of the fun. joe, you are doing at the whole time so what - part of the fun. joe, you are doing at the whole time so what do i part of the fun. joe, you are doing at the whole time so what do you | at the whole time so what do you think about these part bobbing in for the glory at the end? it’s think about these part bobbing in for the glory at the end? it's been a team effort _ for the glory at the end? it's been a team effort from _ for the glory at the end? it's been a team effort from the _ for the glory at the end? it's been a team effort from the start i for the glory at the end? it's been a team effort from the start and l a team effort from the start and we've _ a team effort from the start and we've been really into it and as long _ we've been really into it and as long as — we've been really into it and as long as the distance continues. the one dominator is the ball we are transporting to the grand final, so trying _ transporting to the grand final, so trying to— transporting to the grand final, so trying to keep the theme going and we've _ trying to keep the theme going and we've had _ trying to keep the theme going and we've had fantastic support from former— we've had fantastic support from former players across the sport to raise _ former players across the sport to raise awareness and some funding and support—
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raise awareness and some funding and support rob in the fight against mnd~ _ support rob in the fight against mnd. we support rob in the fight against mnd. ~ support rob in the fight against mnd. . ., , mnd. we saw a little bit in the footare, mnd. we saw a little bit in the footage. people _ mnd. we saw a little bit in the footage, people having - mnd. we saw a little bit in the footage, people having an i footage, people having an appreciation and recognition of what you are doing on the cause? absolutely. i think that has been the standout point for me, the fact is keith— the standout point for me, the fact is keith senior mentioned on the video— is keith senior mentioned on the video before, as soon as you put the question— video before, as soon as you put the question and — video before, as soon as you put the question and people put their hand up, question and people put their hand up. and _ question and people put their hand up. and it's— question and people put their hand up, and it's the same the people we have met _ up, and it's the same the people we have met along the canal side, the support— have met along the canal side, the support is— have met along the canal side, the support is there. individually we can all— support is there. individually we can all make a small difference but when _ can all make a small difference but when you _ can all make a small difference but when you get a team with a common purpose. _ when you get a team with a common purpose, which we have, you can do huge _ purpose, which we have, you can do huge things— purpose, which we have, you can do huge things and if we can raise the awareness — huge things and if we can raise the awareness and funding than in the future _ awareness and funding than in the future anything is possible. kevin, this is not your _ future anything is possible. kevin, this is not your first _ future anything is possible. kevin, this is not your first challenge i future anything is possible. kevin, this is not your first challenge for| this is not your first challenge for mnd research. have you noticed the profile of awareness raising and who you are and why this is happening? yes, definitely. over the last 18
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months, 20 months, there's been so many wonderful things that people have done for the mnd association and in rob burrow�*s name and the awareness is out there now and the funds raised so far have been incredible but unfortunately they are not enough so we have to keep banging the drum to find a cure. the generosity of people, the awareness created now, but also for the people who have been fighting this horrible disease for such a long time, they are not ashamed anymore, not ashamed to come out and they have got some hope and we have to keep going. you have had a number of fellow paddlers along the way. would you like to give us an assessment of who has been the best so far? any complaints about your fellow paddlers? you have about your fellow paddlers? you have a bit of banter as you go along? again, that's been a good thing, nothing — again, that's been a good thing, nothing short of banter with former
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rugby— nothing short of banter with former rugby players, and a little bit brutal — rugby players, and a little bit brutal at _ rugby players, and a little bit brutal at times. one of them, i won't _ brutal at times. one of them, i won't name _ brutal at times. one of them, i won't name in one of my rowers said it was— won't name in one of my rowers said it was like _ won't name in one of my rowers said it was like towing a caravan with me at the _ it was like towing a caravan with me at the back — it was like towing a caravan with me at the back. it's been good banter and its— at the back. it's been good banter and it's not— at the back. it's been good banter and it's not always been easy but the challenge is nothing in comparison for those facing motor neurone _ comparison for those facing motor neurone disease, so it's been great for us _ neurone disease, so it's been great for us to— neurone disease, so it's been great for us to come together in one common— for us to come together in one common purpose, so i have no objections _ common purpose, so i have no objections. everyone has been fantastic _ objections. everyone has been fantastic. �* , . objections. everyone has been fantastic. �*, ., , fantastic. it's a point very well made because _ fantastic. it's a point very well made because the _ fantastic. it's a point very well made because the cause i fantastic. it's a point very well i made because the cause matter so much. do you sometimes sit back and even yourselves feel amazed at what your own sport has done for this campaign?— campaign? yes, i'm delighted, actually because _ campaign? yes, i'm delighted, actually because people - campaign? yes, i'm delighted, actually because people have i campaign? yes, i'm delighted, i actually because people have come together~ _ actually because people have come together. cabin in the boat this morning — together. cabin in the boat this morning and he ran a marathon at the weekend _ morning and he ran a marathon at the weekend. you put your hand up and you think— weekend. you put your hand up and you think what you do after we've
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said yes. — you think what you do after we've said yes, which is a nice thing and if we _ said yes, which is a nice thing and if we can— said yes, which is a nice thing and if we can raise awareness of it, it's not— if we can raise awareness of it, it's not selective, this disease. it doesn't _ it's not selective, this disease. it doesn't matter if you are a sportsperson or you are working in normal— sportsperson or you are working in normal life — sportsperson or you are working in normal life. it's not selective and fax to _ normal life. it's not selective and fax to many — normal life. it's not selective and fax to many people and if we can raise _ fax to many people and if we can raise the — fax to many people and if we can raise the awareness and get the funding — raise the awareness and get the funding to make a difference, hopefully in the future we can find some _ hopefully in the future we can find some kind — hopefully in the future we can find some kind of cure for this, that would — some kind of cure for this, that would be — some kind of cure for this, that would be the biggest thing, so kevin, — would be the biggest thing, so kevin, rob, massive inspirations to have— kevin, rob, massive inspirations to have that— kevin, rob, massive inspirations to have that bit but it's to collect a bit of _ have that bit but it's to collect a bit of making sure we can move things— bit of making sure we can move things forward. the bit of making sure we can move things forward.— bit of making sure we can move things forward. the green slime is lookin: things forward. the green slime is looking beautiful— things forward. the green slime is looking beautiful as _ things forward. the green slime is looking beautiful as the _ things forward. the green slime is looking beautiful as the sun i things forward. the green slime is i looking beautiful as the sun emerges over the canal. i'm not sure how this is working. are we going to watch you set off? i know you have your microphones off — microphones on, so i don't know how this will work? �* �* , , ., ., work? the bbc equipment is too exensive work? the bbc equipment is too expensive for — work? the bbc equipment is too expensive for us _ work? the bbc equipment is too expensive for us to _ work? the bbc equipment is too expensive for us to set - work? the bbc equipment is too expensive for us to set up i work? the bbc equipment is too l expensive for us to set up without work? the bbc equipment is too i expensive for us to set up without - expensive for us to set up without — with it _ expensive for us to set up without — with it and — expensive for us to set up without — with it and hopefully we will put on the side _ with it and hopefully we will put on the side and stay dry.— with it and hopefully we will put on the side and stay dry. don't be sure about the bbc— the side and stay dry. don't be sure about the bbc equipment _ the side and stay dry. don't be sure about the bbc equipment being i about the bbc equipment being expensive but i think the rope might
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get in the way. thank you so much on the best of luck today, fellas and i'm sure rob will be keeping a keen eye. i'm sure rob will be keeping a keen e e. , ., , , ., , ., eye. yes, all the best to everyone. thank you — eye. yes, all the best to everyone. thank you very _ eye. yes, all the best to everyone. thank you very much. _ eye. yes, all the best to everyone. thank you very much. you - eye. yes, all the best to everyone. thank you very much. you didn't i eye. yes, all the best to everyone. | thank you very much. you didn't get your dramatic shot. we will see them take off, and the green slime, i think it looks rather magnificent in the end. the sun is sort of moved across it. such a fantastic cause so we will follow their progress on the last leg today. stay with us. headlines coming shortly.
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time for the knees where you are. good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. fuel bills predicted to rise even more as gas prices reach a record high. the business secretary is due to face industry bosses for the first time since the start of the crisis. it the start of the crisis. is 20 years since the start 0�*
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military it is 20 years since the start of uk military operations in afghanistan and this— military operations in afghanistan and this morning commemorative events— and this morning commemorative events took place in london and here at the _ events took place in london and here at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. in half an hour we will speak— in staffordshire. in half an hour we will speak to some of those who have been taking _ will speak to some of those who have been taking part. will speak to some of those who have been taking part-— been taking part. plenty of people settin: off been taking part. plenty of people setting off on _ been taking part. plenty of people setting off on holiday _ been taking part. plenty of people setting off on holiday from - been taking part. plenty of people| setting off on holiday from gatwick this morning as changes to uk foreign travel rules kick in this week. we look at the rules, what further changes there might be and what it means for your half term holiday and winter getaway plans. after last yea r�*s covid hit celebrations, we'll look at what's being done to make this festive season a success. breaking news from andy murray's camp. my physio said to me where is your wedding ring? and camp. my physio said to me where is yourwedding ring? and i camp. my physio said to me where is your wedding ring? and i was like, oh, no. , , ., . , oh, no. yes, he is in indian wells and his wedding _ oh, no. yes, he is in indian wells and his wedding ring _ oh, no. yes, he is in indian wells and his wedding ring is _ oh, no. yes, he is in indian wells and his wedding ring is tied i oh, no. yes, he is in indian wells and his wedding ring is tied to i oh, no. yes, he is in indian wellsj and his wedding ring is tied to his ten issues that he left under his car to dry out but they were then
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taken. he has appealed for their return. good morning, a fairly cloudy but mild start and that cloud breaking with sunshine coming through. in parts of scotland and northern ireland, rain and gusty wind. where ever you are, feeling mild. more details later. it's thursday, october the 7th. our top story. householders are being warned their energy bills could rise by another £a00 on average early next year after gas prices soared to record levels. that's on top on rises caused by the higher energy price cap that came into effect last week. the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, will face industry bosses later today as the sector deals with an unprecedented spike in wholesale costs. kevin peachey reports. just like the season's weather, bill payers are being warned the worst is yet to come. a host of energy companies have collapsed in recent weeks. their customers moved
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to a new supplier are already having to pay hundreds of pounds more a year than they expected. a price cap does protect millions of people from extreme rises in bills, but, analysts say, next year, they will still face a bill shock. under the price cap, a customer now pays £1277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity. analysts expect that typical bill to rise to £1600 when a revised but as yet undecided cap starts in april. compare that with a year ago, when you could have got a deal costing just over £850 a year. we are competing with the rest of the world, the rest of europe, for gas supplies. unfortunately, it is the reality. price comparison sites would historically talk about how much we can save you by switching. but the reality is that is not there at the moment, and very few people for the whole
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of this year, really, have been in a position where they would be able to save, compared to last year. still, producers confirmed they halted production at times of high demand, showing that industry, as well as consumers, is feeling the impact of rising costs. some of the heat was drawn from the crisis yesterday when russia said it would increase gas supplies to europe, helping to limit the latest surge in wholesale gas prices. but it hasn't ended cause for the uk government to step in. the business secretary will be expected to address concerns of the energy sector today. but then also the worries of businesses and consumers in the weeks to come. we can speak now to our political correspondent helen catt. prices are going up and a fear in april they could go up substantially and a lot of questions about how the government can react. so and a lot of questions about how the government can react.— government can react. so far,
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ministers — government can react. so far, ministers have _ government can react. so far, ministers have said _ government can react. so far, ministers have said they i government can react. so far, ministers have said they have | ministers have said they have focused on trying to protect consumers and point to the price cap. they point to things like the half billion pounds fund they have announced to help the poorest people notjust announced to help the poorest people not just with energy announced to help the poorest people notjust with energy bills but all sorts of costs. but there is concern at westminster about things like rising energy bills under pressure from industry for the government to step in. the intensive users energy group that represents those who use a heavy amount of energy to make things like steel and chemicals. they call for the government to step in and say if they don't they might look a temporary factory closures and some suggesting they could return to using fuels more polluting. the government has not sounded like it will step in to do this. it said it has provided extensive support to energy intensive industries and the way the
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uk is exposed to volatile gas prices shows the importance of building a home grown renewable energy sector. you would expect the energy secretary to talk about that at the conference when he talks to energy leaders. he confirmed that the government has a serious ambition for the uk to stop using fossil fuels by 2035. it seems to be in that context the government is framing its response. whether it will change, we will have to wait and see what develops. a premier league footballer has been arrested on suspicion of sexually assaulting a woman. the man is in his 20s and plays for brighton and hove albion. he was arrested at a nightclub in brighton early on wednesday. the club said it was helping police with the investigation. prince andrew's legal team has been granted permission to review a sealed document they believe will end the sexual abuse lawsuit against him. the document details a settlement between the duke of york's accuser, virginia guiffre, and the convicted
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sex offenderjeffrey epstein. the prince has categorically denied ms guiffre's claims. people who have had covid, as well as being double vaccinated, have greater protection from the virus, according to new research. a study run in collaboration with king's college london researchers found that an individual�*s protection against the virus can be as much as 9a per cent if they have tested positive in the past and received both jabs. that falls to 65 per cent if a person is unvaccinated. nine months after it was rolled out, the astrazeneca covid vaccine has finally reached the antarctic. it was flown there this week to immunise the 23 staff members who've been keeping a british research station running through the polar winter. our science correspondent jonathan amos reports. it is literally at the end of the earth. this is the antarctic, a place of extremes where you really must avoid getting sick. which is why the arrival this week of the astrazeneca covid vaccine is so important.
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it will keep those who work on the white continent safe. getting the coronavirus jabs there, however, has been a grand challenge. it is a 10,000—mile flight from england to the rothera station, with stopovers required in africa and the falklands. but the astrazeneca vaccine is now in the arms of the scientists who reside on the antarctic peninsula during its cold, dark winter. they know it helps protect in case covid got to the station, but also they are going to be leaving in the next few months, anyway, so that group is going to do their summer season at rothera and then they are going back, and perhaps one of the scariest parts is when one of the team get back into uk society and covid, there are so many cases per day. so we are protecting that team before they have to get back on the air bridge flights back to the uk and back to see their family and friends. this is the furthest south the astrazeneca jab has reached. it means all continents have now received at least some doses. there has been very little covid,
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so far, in antarctica. just one isolated outbreak at a chilean research station. international science agencies want to keep it that way and anyone going south in the coming months will still have to quarantine. jonathan amos, bbc news. the james bond actor daniel craig has been honoured with a star on the hollywood walk of fame. it was unveiled just yards away from his bond predecessor, sir roger moore. speaking at the event, daniel craig joked that it was an "absolute honour to be walked all over in hollywood". see what he did there, charlie? well done, very good. we can check the morning's weather. good morning. good morning. overthe next days and nights the weather will be unseasonably warm. dragging in milder air
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will be unseasonably warm. dragging in milderairfrom will be unseasonably warm. dragging in milder airfrom the azores. despite the fact some have a waving weather from despite the fact some have a waving weatherfrom producing rain in scotland and northern ireland, here you will also feel the warmth. cloudy today. some sunshine coming through. brisk winds around the rain. temperatures this afternoon, between 16—20. through the evening and overnight, more rain in northern ireland and scotland, and some clear skies in the far north and further south. that will allow mist and fog patches to form. not a cold night. temperatures in double figures. fog will clear from central and southern england in the morning. it should lift into cloud and break up so more sunshine tomorrow than today. a weather front across northern ireland and scotland brings rain and brisk winds around it. temperatures
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on friday range from 15 in stornoway up on friday range from 15 in stornoway up to 21. but somewhere we might squeeze out 22. 22 degrees in october! it is unusual. 5—7 above average but on tuesday, it is very much like temperatures will be below average so this is short lived. it is a weather roller—coaster. former england footballer turned television presenterjermaine jenas is a high profile name and as such, attracts online abuse on social media much of it racist. jermaine has now made a documentary, looking at the rise in abuse against black footballers after the euros, and is urging the government to force social media companies to stop the trolling. let's take a look.
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you watched a team, i'm sure that were brothers, who go through quite possibly the toughest moment in their careers. did you know what was coming after that? yes, of course. i think it would make it a lot easier for other people to say what they wanted to say. with the emojis they wanted to put in. because it was three young black players. for me, i take my hat off to them. 1,000,000%. because to step up in a european final for your country and to take a penalty, it takes a strong man to do that. they are heroes to me. you are somebody who has received online racism. have you ever thought about reporting it or is your first thought more on the lines of, i will delete and block that because i can't be bothered to go through the process? exactly what you said. just delete it. i think notjust me, other players, definitely in this team,
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other players that play for england, everyone has tried. everybody has tried to report it. jermainejenasjoins us now from west london. good morning, what does it feel like to receive abuse based on the colour of your skin? it is to receive abuse based on the colour of your skin?— of your skin? it is disheartening, to say the _ of your skin? it is disheartening, to say the least. _ of your skin? it is disheartening, to say the least. i _ of your skin? it is disheartening, to say the least. i can _ of your skin? it is disheartening, to say the least. i can only i of your skin? it is disheartening, to say the least. i can only talk l of your skin? it is disheartening, | to say the least. i can only talk of myself and how it makes me feel. i have different emotions on different days. some days i feel extremely confident and feel great. i receive the abuse and go to my phone and think i will block them. get rid of everyone. and other days, i am not feeling great and is confident. it has a bigger impact on me and it might work its way to my household. my might work its way to my household. my wife might ask what is going on.
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it depends on how i feel on any given day. the reality is it is not nice and something i should not have to deal with. i nice and something i should not have to deal with-— to deal with. i imagine it will make ou feel to deal with. i imagine it will make you feel angry _ to deal with. i imagine it will make you feel angry because _ to deal with. i imagine it will make you feel angry because it _ to deal with. i imagine it will make you feel angry because it is - to deal with. i imagine it will make you feel angry because it is not i you feel angry because it is not your responsibility to do the blocking. that behaviour should not be allowed. you face frustration in making sure that doesn't happen. that was almost the inspiration to do the documentary. it was weird because he came —— it came from people doing positive things, that period when people talked about a social media block out, to block the post, this feeling on social media, and take part in a campaign, which was great. but for me it was one else what will happen on monday morning, on tuesday, when the blocking out of social media that weekend is finished? i thought i want to go out and find out what can be done and if social media
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companies are doing anything to make sure people who are online and causing abuse can be prosecuted. some of the stats channel a came up with, commissioning data and found raheem sterling was subjected to twice as much abuse than harry kane in the euros. much of it being racist. and when you look at where it was coming from and from whom, what did you find was being done about it? ~ ., ., ., , , about it? what i found was being done is not _ about it? what i found was being done is not enough. _ about it? what i found was being done is not enough. from - about it? what i found was being i done is not enough. from twitter's point of view and working with the uk football policing unit, they went through tens of thousands of messages received by footballers that were racist. from twitter's point of view those they deemed racist were 19 and a deleted two. instagram deleted three of 8a accounts. it was a clear indication
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to me that what they were talking about after the euros and removing accounts was not happening. instagram, another platform saying they have a tool where you can block offensive words. that puts the onus on you as the victim of abuse to deal with it rather than the perpetrator. it does not seem to make sense. it perpetrator. it does not seem to make sense-— perpetrator. it does not seem to make sense. , , ., , make sense. it is exactly that, spot on. if! make sense. it is exactly that, spot on- if i am — make sense. it is exactly that, spot on- if i am the _ make sense. it is exactly that, spot on. if i am the one _ make sense. it is exactly that, spot on. if i am the one receiving - make sense. it is exactly that, spot on. if i am the one receiving abuse | on. if i am the one receiving abuse and being targeted, that they are given a platform to grow and get some kind of pile on headed towards me and any other footballer. why do i have to change and adapt? i suppose there is an element where you feel at least they are doing something but it is not the right direction they are going in. they should head towards the perpetrators, those having an impact on everyone else online and deleting
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their accounts and making them accountable. they seem to shy away and do not want to take responsibility when it comes to what they really have to do which is why they really have to do which is why the government is getting involved and the online safety belt is starting to be knocked in the right direction, but there is work to do with that as well. its, direction, but there is work to do with that as well.— direction, but there is work to do with that as well. a west brom fan was sent to — with that as well. a west brom fan was sent to prison _ with that as well. a west brom fan was sent to prison for _ with that as well. a west brom fan was sent to prison for abusing i with that as well. a west brom fan was sent to prison for abusing a i was sent to prison for abusing a player and yesterday a suspended sentence for those who targeted the euros penalty takers. but it is not happening quick enough in your view? there are a number of factors regarding that. the police are doing the best they can and working as quick as they can and can only work with what they get back regarding data from the clubs and can only act if the players get in touch and give statements. when they come together they can act quicker but they are reliant on social media companies and how quickly they get the data
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back to them. what they do is a greatjob. it is great to hear people are being prosecuted. but it is something i think once it happens it needs to be bigger, the message needs to be out there and we need to create a deterrent. so if anybody is sitting there and picks up their phone and sends abusive messages, they need to know they will be caught and that is not what the social media spaces like at the minute. it is a free space for anyone to act how they want and that needs to change.— needs to change. there is something about social — needs to change. there is something about social media _ needs to change. there is something about social media that _ needs to change. there is something about social media that people i needs to change. there is something about social media that people feel l about social media that people feel empowered to say things that they would no way say to somebody�*s face. 100%. a good example is football stadiums. if you go back to the 70s and 80s and there were black football players receiving racial
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abuse from the stands, the stadiums, and we have gone from bananas thrown onto the pitch to banana emojis being thrown into player dms. this is the racism we deal with online. watch the football community has done, within stadiums, people started policing people. if somebody was stood next to someone chanting racist abuse, it is not accepted. they are looked upon and it is get this person removed, i do not want them to be part of it any more. that is a positive step which is why it is a positive step which is why it is far less in the stadiums. we need to create that environment online. people are leaving stadiums and thinking i will message marcus rashford, raheem sterling, these people and send them racist abuse because no one will do anything, nothing will happen and i can get away with it. nothing will happen and i can get away with it— nothing will happen and i can get away with it. mike will not forgive me if i do not _
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away with it. mike will not forgive me if i do not ask. _ away with it. mike will not forgive me if i do not ask. thoughts i away with it. mike will not forgive me if i do not ask. thoughts on i away with it. mike will not forgive l me if i do not ask. thoughts on the potential takeover at newcastle, which looks like it is moving forward. how important is that for fans? . , forward. how important is that for fans? ., , ., , ., fans? the fans of newcastle have been through _ fans? the fans of newcastle have been through an _ fans? the fans of newcastle have been through an awful— fans? the fans of newcastle have been through an awful lot. - fans? the fans of newcastle have been through an awful lot. the i fans? the fans of newcastle have l been through an awful lot. the club is unrecognisable to the club i played for under bobby robson when we had amazing champions league nights at stjames' park. we had amazing champions league nights at st james' park. that is a special place for football. it has been a long, tough road. we will see if we can get this takeover over the line and if we can definitely exciting times for the fans to look forward to. exciting times for the fans to look forward ta— exciting times for the fans to look forward to— exciting times for the fans to look forward to. ., ~' ,, , . �* forward to. thank you very much. and our forward to. thank you very much. and your documentary _ forward to. thank you very much. and your documentary is _ forward to. thank you very much. and your documentary is on _ forward to. thank you very much. and your documentary is on channel- forward to. thank you very much. and your documentary is on channel four l your documentary is on channel four tonight at 10pm. let's hope it raises the prominence of the conversation and effects change. it is not acceptable the experiences he was talking about.
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and horribly familiar, that tale that was told. it's early october, but you may well have spotted those christmas displays popping up in the shops. from turkeys, to fake christmas trees, jayne mccubbin has been looking at how some people have started preparing for the festive season early and how businesses will cope. brace yourself. it is only 78 sleeps to christmas. have you gone early, girls? we have. have you gone early? we have. in case anything sells out. there is a real excitement about the prospect of a real christmas this year. have you ever been this early? no. i am normally— a christmas eve person. because last year was so sad, i think everybody is _ excited for this year. but there is also concern.
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the shortage of drivers for food, things like that. people do panic buy with the food and i don't think they should. but here you are panic buying toys. step insidejed's world. ho, ho, ho! and through the medium ofjust one bauble he will talk us through the pressures putting prices up and supply down. we have had covid and still have it. we have had just recently typhoons in the south china seas that has put 4000, 5000 ships into seeking refuge in different ports. we have port congestion in the world. reduced tonnage on the water, not as many ships on the water. no empty containers — a massive shortage of empty containers. shipping costs have gone from something like $4000 to £20,000, which makes something like that, normally worth a dollar,
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is worth a fiver now, because of shipping costs. it is causing massive problems. there is a worldwide shortage of artificial christmas trees. global forces are at play, but also the b word — and we are notjust talking baubles. in 2019, a government brexit briefing warned this could happen. operation yellowhammer warned of supply chain shortages, disruption, panic buying and price increases that could disproportionately hit those who could least afford them. this week on this programme, the prime minister gave his thoughts. you say christmas will be better | this year and people will thinkl it is not going to be worse - because last christmas was awful. i think christmas this year will be very onsiderably better than last year. that is a low base. how normal will it be? i think we have
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reliable supply chains. you are not worried i about supply chains? we have fantastic logistics... are you worried about supply chain issues? i there are obviously issues we have to address. the chancellor has said there is no magic wand to make disruption disappear overnight. and christmas is ten weeks away. sally's traditional christmas turkey farm on the wirral is doing a roaring trade. orders have gone through the roof. half the birds are already sold. they are so excited to order. they want to get organised and they are looking forward to having a normal christmas. a big family christmas. that we could not have last year. they are ordering slightly larger birds with the anticipation of having everyone round,
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i think. the other force at play is people are aware in the wider industry, there is a supply and demand problem. there is and that applies to larger producers. because these turkeys are produced, slaughtered, dressed by local people on site, sally is not affected by the shortage of hgv drivers, co2 or seasonal european staff, but other factors are pushing turkey prices up. prices on the whole have gone up. there are fuel implications, the price of chicks was up this year. the price of feed is up enormously. how many for dinner last year? six, tops, including youngsters. this year, hopefully twice as many. a handful of towns have decided to cancel the christmas lights switch—on this year but others like blackpool will go big on festivities and go early.
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brilliant. salt and vinegar. lots of it. last christmas was rubbish for tam and for uk theatreland. his performance of elf was cancelled as rehearsals finished, a casualty of covid. you have definitely gone early. i have. what makes you say that? just my usual outfit! the town really needs it. absolutely. i think the country needs it. we have been through so much. theatres have been dark, hospitality has taken a knock, so we are coming back with a force. in october. christmas comes early. there is a fuel crisis so i set off
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from the north pole. there's an angle! this year, we will enjoy christmas, but not yet, not quite christmas as we know it. i think what last year proved is how special christmas is and people making the best of it in any way you can you do not need all the tinsel. and that was one happy l. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning with your news from london and the south—east, i'm victoria hollins. the family of a disabled woman who died trapped and grateful tower says it's vital that all disabled people in tower blocks have their own
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personalised evacuation plans. they are common in workplaces but rare in residential properties but the first phase of the enquiry into grenfell tower said it should change. the government said the plans were unusually unrealistic and has retracted the advice since new guidance has been drawn up. personal evacuation plans are not a luxury but a necessity but a matter of life and death and it affects the disabled person and the human dilemma that family members cannot leave their family members behind in a situation like that. in a statement the government said, "we are committed to improving fire safety which is why we are intending shortyl to implement legislation to deliver the majority of the grenfell phase one recommendations and will be providing guidance in due course." detectives are appealing for help to locate two teenage girls who are missing from the homes in kent and london and who police believe to be at risk of harm. 15—year—old andrea
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was last seen at her home in canterbury and her cousin, 16—year—old isabella was last seen in harrow on sunday and officers believe they might have been taken outside london. gatwick airport is proposing to cap aircraft noise if its plans to get a second runway into regular use are successful. under its proposals the northern runway currently used for taxi ing and emergencies would be used routinely. the airport says new quieter planes in the future will replace older noisier ones. opponents though say the expansion will be environmentally damaging. well if you're heading out on public transport this morning this is how tfl services are looking right now. most lines running well but minor delays on the metropolitan line and the hammersmith and city. it isa it is a mild start this morning and we have had some warm air moving up from the south overnight but it's
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fairly moist and it's an overcast start on the front you can see is blocked by the high—pressure and moving away to the north and west, so some may stand murkiness this morning that it should lift on the cloud perhaps a little more stubborn and down in the south—east in kent you might get a spot of light rain and drizzle but largely dry elsewhere and that will clear in the cloud is breaking through the afternoon and temperatures potentially in london at 20 celsius and down the coast, around 18. overnight we will see clear spells and mist and fog in the wind is very light and we will see drier air feeding in from the continent as we head into friday so the mist and fog should lift and that drier air means cloud will start to disappear a little quicker so more chance of sunshine on friday and temperatures warm, between 18 and 20 celsius. i will be back in half an hour. and there's always more on the website. see you soon. goodbye.
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hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt today marks the 20th anniversary of us airstrikes against al qaeda in afghanistan following the 9/11 attacks the start of two decades of operations in the region for us and allied forces. this summer, troops finally pulled out of the country, as it fell back under taliban rule. our defence correspondentjonathan beale has been speaking to some of those involved in the conflict. a57 british military personnel lost their lives in afghanistan. one of them was brian hill's only son, james. it never leaves us. we don't have a son any more. we don't have any other children. there is an emptiness. there is a whole that nothing can fill. remembrance day for most people is november the 11th, but for the likes of us,
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remembrance day is everyday. it's nearly 12 years to the day that james hill was killed by an improvised explosive device in helmand province. he was just 23 and about to get married. his parents are proud of his service and his sacrifice. though the recent return of afghanistan to taliban control has been hard for them to bear. if we were to say now, yes, james's life was wasted, then that would hurt us all over again because we have to believe that what he did made a difference. and what they all did, and they gave so much, notjust the ones who died, but the ones who carry on with injuries. one hand says, what the heck did we go there for, and the other hand says, we stopped any terrorist atrocities on our streets.
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and as claire said, another n9/11. it's very, very difficult. when you balance that, do you think the sacrifice you have made of your only son has been worth it? no. nothing is worth it. that's not worth anything. i mean, with a piece of equipment. over a patch of ground that had been walked on 30 or 40 people already and then a massive explosion, - and i stepped on a pressure plate ied and thankfully it was - only me who got hurt, - but thankfully it was only me. luke is one of one of more than 300 british troops who lost limbs in afghanistan but has battled through his severe injuries with the help of sport. he was due to take part in the tokyo paralympics this summer but because of an injury he had to stay home and witness the collapse of the country in which he once fought. and the desperate scenes of those trying to leave.
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getting injured are not going to tokyo and then the afghanistan withdrawal, it's been a rough a mentally rough period for the summer. from my point of view, we were on the ground, removing the ieds and giving people safety on the kids ability to go to school and i will never regret that i can hold my head high with what we did out there. if i could make a deal to get my legs back, i would. my idea of afghanistan is that the intent of what we were trying to do was right, but the content was flawed. too little, too late and we quit way too soon. and that is the great tragedy of afghanistan. stuart led the first british troops into helmand province in 2006. he commanded the 3rd battalion, the parachute regiment and suffered the first serious casualties
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of the war. with dozens injured and 15 killed. what was then supposed to have been a simple, peace support operation turned into a bloody counterinsurgency conflict. if you want to pick the positives out, you can turn around and say we gave the afghans 20 years of an opportunity about how life might be different. that is true. the trouble is, that opportunity never realised itself fully because they are back in control, but i don't think we can be proud of the outcome. we can be proud of what we tried to do as soldiers. but in terms of those responsible for the strategic decisions, i don't think there is a great deal to crow about in terms of there being a particular victory, there is no victory here. we did not win that conflict. there was little fanfare when the last british troops left afghanistan earlier this year.
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this, the low—key ceremony in kabul before the chaotic exit. wars without victory are often forgotten. but the hopes of all of those who served their and who lost loved ones is that they sacrifice will never be forgotten. our reporter tim muffett is at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire, where a small remembrance service has been held this morning. good morning to you. it's interesting hearing from the families on the veterans themselves on what is an important day. and it's a combination of pride in amongst a sense of loss. absolutely. there have been _ amongst a sense of loss. absolutely. there have been two _ amongst a sense of loss. absolutely. | there have been two commemorative events this morning, one in whitehall in london and another at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire and this is the bastian memorial where it took place and is based on the bastian memorial
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wall in helmand province in afghanistan and there are materials from that wall in this memorial here, wreaths were laid as you can see and there's a really thought—provoking moment that took place about 730 this morning. it's a lovely day at the arboretum and i will swing round and have a chat to the royal artillery band, and you took part in the ceremony, and how important was it for you to do so? it's of paramount importance. the last post _ it's of paramount importance. the last post as— it's of paramount importance. the last post as humble origins as a timekeeping call and it focuses people — timekeeping call and it focuses people on the minute's silence and to be _ people on the minute's silence and to be asked to do this here is the last remaining trumpeter in the air force _ last remaining trumpeter in the air force who— last remaining trumpeter in the air force who served in afghanistan, it's a _ force who served in afghanistan, it's a great— force who served in afghanistan, it's a great honour. you mentioned our it's a great honour. you mentioned your service _
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it's a great honour. you mentioned your service in _ it's a great honour. you mentioned your service in afghanistan, - it's a great honour. you mentioned your service in afghanistan, so - it's a great honour. you mentioned your service in afghanistan, so tell| your service in afghanistan, so tell us about that. what was it like? figs us about that. what was it like? as a military musician you tend to be deployed — a military musician you tend to be deployed as an individual rather than _ deployed as an individual rather than a _ deployed as an individual rather than a unit so i took a trade post at the _ than a unit so i took a trade post at the time — than a unit so i took a trade post at the time at helmand province serving — at the time at helmand province serving with the reconstruction team who were _ serving with the reconstruction team who were a — serving with the reconstruction team who were a combination of us military. — who were a combination of us military, marine corps, british mititary— military, marine corps, british military and they were tasked with rebuilding a lot of the country infrastructure, schools and hospitals to provide support to afghan— hospitals to provide support to afghan police and military and my 'ob afghan police and military and my job was_ afghan police and military and my job was to — afghan police and military and my job was to fly them around the theatre — job was to fly them around the theatre to the various operating bases _ theatre to the various operating bases on — theatre to the various operating bases on the rotary wing or the fixed _ bases on the rotary wing or the fixed wing _ bases on the rotary wing or the fixed wing and book them on off on flights— fixed wing and book them on off on flights and — fixed wing and book them on off on flights and get them where they needed — flights and get them where they needed to be and i occasionally hooked — needed to be and i occasionally booked them on flights to the uk but
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yes, it _ booked them on flights to the uk but yes, it was _ booked them on flights to the uk but yes, it was a busy time. how important — yes, it was a busy time. how important is _ yes, it was a busy time. how important is it _ yes, it was a busy time. how important is it that _ yes, it was a busy time. how important is it that events i yes, it was a busy time. him" important is it that events like this take place. ? it important is it that events like this take place. ?_ this take place. ? it means everything _ this take place. ? it means everything to _ this take place. ? it means everything to the _ this take place. ? it means everything to the people i this take place. ? it means - everything to the people whose this take place. ? it means _ everything to the people whose names are on— everything to the people whose names are on the _ everything to the people whose names are on the wall and their families, this is— are on the wall and their families, this is their— are on the wall and their families, this is their point of focus and it means— this is their point of focus and it means absolutely the world to me to play the _ means absolutely the world to me to play the last post here today. yes. the national memorial arboretum has become such a focus and you can see the memorial behind you and it's a hugely significant place. it is. the memorial behind you and it's a hugely significant place.— hugely significant place. it is. i remember— hugely significant place. it is. i remember coming _ hugely significant place. it is. i remember coming here - hugely significant place. it is. i remember coming here to - hugely significant place. it is. i remember coming here to the | hugely significant place. it is. i- remember coming here to the opening and now— remember coming here to the opening and now it's _ remember coming here to the opening and now it's a well established war memoriat— and now it's a well established war memorial and there are various one is going _ memorial and there are various one is going up— memorial and there are various one is going up to the armed forces and it's worth _ is going up to the armed forces and it's worth a — is going up to the armed forces and it's worth a visit. it�*s is going up to the armed forces and it's worth a visit.— it's worth a visit. it's a lovely sot. it's worth a visit. it's a lovely spot- thank _ it's worth a visit. it's a lovely spot. thank you _ it's worth a visit. it's a lovely spot. thank you for - it's worth a visit. it's a lovely spot. thank you for talking l it's worth a visit. it's a lovely| spot. thank you for talking us it's worth a visit. it's a lovely - spot. thank you for talking us this morning and beautifully played. and as matt was saying, this has become as matt was saying, this has become a focus of remembrance and it opened
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in 2001, the same year as the uk military involvement in afghanistan began and of course, it wasn'tjust uk military personnel who died, the us forces from 2003, as well as 45,000 us forces from 2003, as well as 115,000 afghan civilians during a 20 year conflict so many things to reflect upon here this morning in the ceremony and at the ceremony in whitehall in london.— whitehall in london. thank you very much, whitehall in london. thank you very much. tim. — we're expecting to hear that more countries are to be removed from the government's so called red list later today that's the list of countries from which travellers currently have to stay in a government approved quarantine hotel. (so what does this mean for holidaymakers? ben boulod is at gatwick airport for us. you have the trolleys at the ready, so what will change today? it
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you have the trolleys at the ready, so what will change today? it might be awhile since _ so what will change today? it might be awhile since you _ so what will change today? it might be awhile since you last _ so what will change today? it might be awhile since you last pushed - so what will change today? it might j be awhile since you last pushed one of these around an airport loaded with suitcases ready to go on holiday but this is a crucial week for anybody running foreign travel whether that's a half term holiday or a getaway for some winter sun in the coming weeks. as you said the system that has dictated foreign travel since may when pandemic restrictions began to be lifted was changed at the start of this week. let me explain the new rules... the green, red, amber list has been simplified. there is simply a red list of countries and the rest of the world. fully vaccinated residents and unvaccinated under 18s from countries not on the red list can enter the uk without a pre departure test. they do not have to take a pcr
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test eight days after their arrival or isolate at home. but what you have to do is take a day to covid test back in the uk but at the moment it is a pcr test but the government hopes it can change it to the cheaper lateral flow test this month but did not give an exact date. you also have to fill in a passenger locator form. date. you also have to fill in a passenger locatorform. if date. you also have to fill in a passenger locator form. if you date. you also have to fill in a passenger locatorform. if you go date. you also have to fill in a passenger locator form. if you go to a red list country, things get expensive and you have to pave £2285 for an 11 night stay at a government approved quarantine hotel in the uk and at the moment there are about 50 countries on that red list including mexico, tunisia, south africa and various others. we expect to lead countries to be taken off the list this week but we will have to wait and see whether that opens up many more long haul destinations. let's find out what the changes mean for
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us as holiday—makers and also the travel industry and with me isjulia from advantage travel partnership and you represent a lot of independent travel agents, so what has the difference? it independent travel agents, so what has the difference?— has the difference? it has simplify the difference _ has the difference? it has simplify the difference and _ has the difference? it has simplify the difference and giving - has the difference? it has simplify l the difference and giving consumers a lot more _ the difference and giving consumers a lot more confidence to think about travel— a lot more confidence to think about travel and _ a lot more confidence to think about travel and book their holidays, which — travel and book their holidays, which is — travel and book their holidays, which is fantastic. are travel and book their holidays, which is fantastic.— travel and book their holidays, which is fantastic. are you seeing more bookings — which is fantastic. are you seeing more bookings or _ which is fantastic. are you seeing more bookings or are _ which is fantastic. are you seeing more bookings or are these - which is fantastic. are you seeing i more bookings or are these holidays that people have postponed? aha, lat more bookings or are these holidays that people have postponed? a lot of what has been _ that people have postponed? a lot of what has been booked _ that people have postponed? a lot of what has been booked already - that people have postponed? a lot of what has been booked already have l what has been booked already have been bookings delayed or postponed for the _ been bookings delayed or postponed for the last couple of years and they— for the last couple of years and they have — for the last couple of years and they have rebooked those for later in the _ they have rebooked those for later in the year — they have rebooked those for later in the year and for next year but we are seeing — in the year and for next year but we are seeing new bookings as well and the industry is still pretty bruised and we _ the industry is still pretty bruised and we are trading significantly down _ and we are trading significantly down but — and we are trading significantly down but the good news is we are starting _ down but the good news is we are starting to— down but the good news is we are starting to see confidence building and more — starting to see confidence building and more new bookings coming through — and more new bookings coming throuuh. �* ., , through. and the important point is that 'ust through. and the important point is that just because _ through. and the important point is thatjust because the _ through. and the important point is thatjust because the uk _ through. and the important point is thatjust because the uk has - through. and the important point is| thatjust because the uk has relaxed the rules, they still need to check
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the rules, they still need to check the rules, they still need to check the rules for the destinations they are going through. it’s the rules for the destinations they are going through.— the rules for the destinations they are going through. it's very complex and ou are going through. it's very complex and you have _ are going through. it's very complex and you have to _ are going through. it's very complex and you have to look— are going through. it's very complex and you have to look at _ are going through. it's very complex and you have to look at the - are going through. it's very complex and you have to look at the rules - and you have to look at the rules for coming — and you have to look at the rules for coming back in the uk and separately you need to check the destination rulesjust because the uk government enable us to travel back from — uk government enable us to travel back from a — uk government enable us to travel back from a destination, do mean the host country— back from a destination, do mean the host country is accepting us so lots of different — host country is accepting us so lots of different rules we need to double—check. of different rules we need to double-check.— of different rules we need to double-check. and this possible chan . e double-check. and this possible change from _ double-check. and this possible change from pcr _ double-check. and this possible change from pcr to _ double-check. and this possible change from pcr to lateral- double-check. and this possible change from pcr to lateral flow| change from pcr to lateral flow tests, will it make much difference? i don't think you make a huge difference nowadays. we have seen the pricing — difference nowadays. we have seen the pricing between lateral flying pcr ridges inside the gap is about and it— pcr ridges inside the gap is about and it all— pcr ridges inside the gap is about and it all makes a difference but i don't _ and it all makes a difference but i don't think— and it all makes a difference but i don't think it'll be a game changers like we _ don't think it'll be a game changers like we saw— don't think it'll be a game changers like we saw with the relaxing of the test. like we saw with the relaxing of the test that's — like we saw with the relaxing of the test. that's been a big difference. thank— test. that's been a big difference. thank you — test. that's been a big difference. thank you very much indeed. i was coming to gatwick and i put out a tweet and people said where are you flying too, have a safe journey and as you can see i have no suitcase and i'm not going anywhere but if some of those long haul destinations
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come off the red list i will gladly report for breakfast, so let me know if you need to do it. than? if you need to do it. any destination _ if you need to do it. any destination in _ if you need to do it. any destination in mind? - if you need to do it. any| destination in mind? it's if you need to do it. any destination in mind? it's not going to happen, butjust out of interest? south africa, mexico, you pick. surprise me. it's not going to happen. can i make that clear? it's not happening. one way ticket is what the boss just said. sorry about that. i’ll what the boss 'ust said. sorry about that. �* ., ~ what the boss 'ust said. sorry about thati knowing — what the boss 'ust said. sorry about thati knowing ben, - that. i'll take it. knowing ben, there are _ that. i'll take it. knowing ben, there are probably _ that. i'll take it. knowing ben, there are probably suitcases . that. i'll take it. knowing ben, - there are probably suitcases behind there are probably suitcases behind the camera and he is hopping on a flight. what have you got for us, mike? b, flight. what have you got for us, mike? �* , ., .. , mike? a little trip to newcastle because they — mike? a little trip to newcastle because they could _ mike? a little trip to newcastle because they could be - mike? a little trip to newcastle because they could be happy i mike? a little trip to newcastle i because they could be happy vans later and they've been waiting so long for brighter days to be challenging at the top and it's all about money and your owners now, whoever they are and sometimes its controversial and they have to get past the owners test and it's this latest development what could be a big investment in newcastle which is why the fans are happy and it seems
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the controversial takeover from saudi arabia is being close to be agreed may be in the next 2a hours in the hurdles was the piracy dispute in the middle east. and the other key point is a consortium which is seen as separate to the state of saudi arabia so distant from the human rights issues which is providing most of the money for the takeover deal and newcastle hoping that the saudi owners will be getting through the lease owners and directors test and as for the fans, they are happy and so are former players, including one who spoke to us earlier. the players, including one who spoke to us earlier. ., , ., .. , us earlier. the fans of newcastle have been _ us earlier. the fans of newcastle have been through _ us earlier. the fans of newcastle have been through an _ us earlier. the fans of newcastle have been through an awful - us earlier. the fans of newcastle have been through an awful lot. | us earlier. the fans of newcastle i have been through an awful lot. the club is _ have been through an awful lot. the club is unrecognisable to the club i used _ club is unrecognisable to the club i used to— club is unrecognisable to the club i used to play for under bobby robson when we _ used to play for under bobby robson when we had some amazing champions league _ when we had some amazing champions league nights at saint james park. that place — league nights at saint james park. that place is a really special place for football and it'sjust been a
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long _ for football and it'sjust been a long top, — for football and it'sjust been a long top, road. we will see if they can get— long top, road. we will see if they can get the — long top, road. we will see if they can get the takeover over the line and if_ can get the takeover over the line and if they— can get the takeover over the line and if they can, there is deftly some — and if they can, there is deftly some exciting time for the geordie fans to _ some exciting time for the geordie fans to look forward to.— fans to look forward to. there is the build-up _ fans to look forward to. there is the build-up to _ fans to look forward to. there is the build-up to the _ fans to look forward to. there is the build-up to the big - fans to look forward to. there is the build-up to the big fight i fans to look forward to. there is the build-up to the big fight in l fans to look forward to. there is i the build-up to the big fight in las the build—up to the big fight in las vegas which has got rather heated between tyson fury and deon taylor wilde. the pairfaced off ahead of the bout in what would be there first — third fight. wilder suggested fuhry cheated his way to victory, something that has angered the defending champion. i victory, something that has angered the defending champion.— victory, something that has angered the defending champion. i don't want to hurt you. — the defending champion. i don't want to hurt you. i — the defending champion. i don't want to hurt you. liust _ the defending champion. i don't want to hurt you, i just want _ the defending champion. i don't want to hurt you, i just want to _ the defending champion. i don't want to hurt you, i just want to beat i the defending champion. i don't want to hurt you, ijust want to beat him i to hurt you, ijust want to beat him in a fight _ to hurt you, ijust want to beat him ina fightand— to hurt you, ijust want to beat him in a fight and he knows what he is saying _ in a fight and he knows what he is saying is— in a fight and he knows what he is saying is lies and deep down in his soul he _ saying is lies and deep down in his soul he knows that he lost and he will lose _ soul he knows that he lost and he will lose again and he lost the first time, he lost the second time and he _ first time, he lost the second time and he will— first time, he lost the second time and he will lose the third time, and guess— and he will lose the third time, and guess what. — and he will lose the third time, and guess what, after this fight, you will be _ guess what, after this fight, you will be back working the fast food chain _ will be back working the fast food chain you — will be back working the fast food chain you will working out.- chain you will working out. never mind his anger, _ chain you will working out. never mind his anger, you _ chain you will working out. never mind his anger, you are - chain you will working out. never mind his anger, you are admiring chain you will working out. never i mind his anger, you are admiring his suit. on your christmas list? he
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alwa s suit. on your christmas list? he always dresses up. part of the theatre. b. always dresses up. part of the theatre. �* ., , always dresses up. part of the theatre._ you i always dresses up. part of the j theatre._ you are theatre. a safari suit? you are auoin to theatre. a safari suit? you are going to talk _ theatre. a safari suit? you are going to talk to _ theatre. a safari suit? you are going to talk to us _ theatre. a safari suit? you are going to talk to us about i theatre. a safari suit? you are going to talk to us about andy | going to talk to us about andy murray. going to talk to us about andy murra . �* , going to talk to us about andy murra .�* , ~ going to talk to us about andy murra .�* y~ , ., murray. andy murray is in a spot of bother. in indian _ murray. andy murray is in a spot of bother. in indian wells _ murray. andy murray is in a spot of bother. in indian wells where i murray. andy murray is in a spot of bother. in indian wells where he i murray. andy murray is in a spot of bother. in indian wells where he is| bother. in indian wells where he is competing in california because anyone who is married, one of the big nightmares is if you lose your reading — wedding ring. and he has to take off when his plane so he ties them to his tennis shoes and it's hot in indian wells so to dry them out he put them under his car. without realising they were still tied to the shoes but the shoes and ring have gone missing and he's taken to social media to explain his predicament and ask for help. mr; predicament and ask for help. my physio said to me, where is your reading — physio said to me, where is your reading ring — wedding ring? and i was like. _ reading ring — wedding ring? and i was like, oh, no. and i basically tie my— was like, oh, no. and i basically tie my wedding ring to my tennis shoes— tie my wedding ring to my tennis shoes because i cannot play with it on my—
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shoes because i cannot play with it on my hand, so, yeah, my wedding rin- on my hand, so, yeah, my wedding ring has— on my hand, so, yeah, my wedding ring has been stolen, so needless to say, i'm _ ring has been stolen, so needless to say, i'm in_ ring has been stolen, so needless to say, i'm in the bad books at home, so i want _ say, i'm in the bad books at home, so i want to— say, i'm in the bad books at home, so i want to try and find it. if anyone — so i want to try and find it. if anyone can _ so i want to try and find it. if anyone can share this or might have anyone can share this or might have any clue _ anyone can share this or might have any clue where they may be, it would be very— any clue where they may be, it would be very helpful, so i can try and -et be very helpful, so i can try and get it— be very helpful, so i can try and get it back— be very helpful, so i can try and get it back and get to the bottom of it. it get it back and get to the bottom of it it would — get it back and get to the bottom of it. it would be much appreciated. thank— it. it would be much appreciated. thank you — it. it would be much appreciated. thank you-— thank you. oh, no. go to social media and _ thank you. oh, no. go to social media and if— thank you. oh, no. go to social media and if you _ thank you. oh, no. go to social media and if you know - thank you. oh, no. go to social media and if you know anyone i media and if you know anyone in california or indian wells ? it sounds like they've been stolen? they were under the car and they have gone missing. maybe somebody has handed them into a lost property department. has handed them into a lost property de artment. , has handed them into a lost property department-— department. they wouldn't necessarily _ department. they wouldn't necessarily know _ department. they wouldn't necessarily know the i department. they wouldn't necessarily know the ring l department. they wouldn't i necessarily know the ring was in there. you might not see those at first. hopefully that will happen in some more fine the shoes and realise there is a ring and think those are no value but have the ring back.
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it's fingers crossed, andy. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it is looking mixed for the next few days. the next few days we have a weather front draped across parts of scotland and northern ireland and that will produce rain and brisk winds, but for all of us it will be unseasonably warm and that doesn't really change until we get towards the end of the weekend when temperatures return to where they should be, but as we head into the early part of the new working week it looks like temperatures could fall below average. some are really topsy—turvy week. to give you an idea what we should be expected, in inverness the average amateur is 1a and tomorrow is 15 but by tomorrow we are looking at 18 or 21 respectively, so quite a jump in those temperatures. today we still have a lot of warm air coming our way from the azores and representing by the amber colours and despite the
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fact we have the weather front in the middle it won't make much difference because it will still be warm even where we have the cloud and rain across scotland and northern ireland and this is where we will also have brisk winds. we started off on a cloudy note and some of us have seen blue skies develop and more of us will see it through the course of the afternoon but tomorrow will be sunnier than today. so temperature wise we are looking at 16 degrees in stornoway and 21 in the whole and 21 in the london area. and overnight we still have the weather from producing rain across northern ireland and scotland and sinking into north—west england and sinking into north—west england and north—west wales at times as well but behind it we see clear skies develop across the far north—east and in the south, clear skies and light winds, we will see mist and fog patches forming. but look at the temperatures overnight, certainly not a cold one. we start with the fog in the south—east tomorrow, centraland with the fog in the south—east tomorrow, central and southern england and that will lift into low
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cloud and will break up and more of us will see sunshine but we still have the same weather front affecting parts of scotland and northern ireland and introducing more rain and fairly persistent rain at times across the west of scotland, especially around lochaber and argyll and bute. we will be watching the rainfall totals climb and temperature wise tomorrow, we are looking at 15 in stornoway on 20 newcastle and 21 in whole and we could see 22. into the weekend that we — where the front sinks southwards and eventually it will clear in the far south of england so watch what happens to our temperatures. here is the weather front represented by the amber, which clears and returns that the yellows but as we head into the early part of next week it will turn colder. saturday starts in a mild note with fog that will live but the weather front slowly sinks itself and temperature wise it will turn pressure from the north but still relatively warm in the south. eight
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minutes to — relatively warm in the south. eight minutes to nine. _ it all started with a beard shave to raise one thousand pounds for charity but the challenges soon escalated for the triple amputee and war veteran, mark 0rmrod and he's now raised nearly half a million pounds through swimming and running. we've been following hisjourney from the start, and he's about to embark on his final feat of endurance cycling 99.9 miles using a special hand bike. let's take a look at his journey so far. come on!
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just completely unstoppable. mark 0rmrod and his trainer, ben wadham, join us now ahead of the final challenge. 99.9 miles, just explain to us because it took awhile for the penny to drop the office. i because it took awhile for the penny to drop the office.— to drop the office. i thought i was bein: to drop the office. i thought i was being clever- _ to drop the office. i thought i was being clever. the _ to drop the office. i thought i was being clever. the charity - to drop the office. i thought i was being clever. the charity we i to drop the office. i thought i was being clever. the charity we are l being clever. the charity we are raising money for road — work with the serving military and the veteran community and emergency services so
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99.9, i thought i was being clever but apparently i'm the only one who thought it was funny but it's worked so far. ~ ., , thought it was funny but it's worked so far. . ., ., ., thought it was funny but it's worked so far. . . thought it was funny but it's worked so far. ~ .,, ., ., . ., thought it was funny but it's worked so far. ~ .,, . ., , thought it was funny but it's worked so far. ~ . ., , ., so far. was too clever for us and we missed it until— so far. was too clever for us and we missed it until it _ so far. was too clever for us and we missed it until it was _ so far. was too clever for us and we missed it until it was pointed i so far. was too clever for us and we missed it until it was pointed out i missed it until it was pointed out to us. what have you been doing to prepare for this? we to us. what have you been doing to prepare for this?— prepare for this? we have been trainin: prepare for this? we have been training in _ prepare for this? we have been training in the _ prepare for this? we have been training in the gym _ prepare for this? we have been training in the gym in _ prepare for this? we have been training in the gym in plymouthj prepare for this? we have been i training in the gym in plymouth and we have _ training in the gym in plymouth and we have been getting some serious miles— we have been getting some serious miles on— we have been getting some serious miles on the bike, doing for our stints _ miles on the bike, doing for our stints around the local area of dartmoor— stints around the local area of dartmoor to get mark doing some hill climbs— dartmoor to get mark doing some hill climbs on— dartmoor to get mark doing some hill climbs on the route we are doing is quite _ climbs on the route we are doing is quite challenging.— climbs on the route we are doing is quite challenging. good morning, by the wa , quite challenging. good morning, by the way. and — quite challenging. good morning, by the way. and we _ quite challenging. good morning, by the way, and we are _ quite challenging. good morning, by the way, and we are looking - quite challenging. good morning, by the way, and we are looking at i quite challenging. good morning, by the way, and we are looking at this i the way, and we are looking at this and we can see, can you go through the basics? you have lost both legs and you effectively have only one arm that you can use to push because your arm, arm that you can use to push because yourarm, peddling, so arm that you can use to push because your arm, peddling, so tell us how
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it can possibly work. ? i your arm, peddling, so tell us how it can possibly work. ?_ it can possibly work. ? i think ou've it can possibly work. ? i think you've pretty _ it can possibly work. ? i think you've pretty much - it can possibly work. ? i think| you've pretty much explained it can possibly work. ? i think. you've pretty much explained it perfectly — you've pretty much explained it perfectly. i have one arm and it would _ perfectly. i have one arm and it would be — perfectly. i have one arm and it would be a _ perfectly. i have one arm and it would be a lot easier if i have an elbow. _ would be a lot easier if i have an elbow. but — would be a lot easier if i have an elbow, but i don't, so the majority of the _ elbow, but i don't, so the majority of the power will come from the left arm, _ of the power will come from the left arm, properly 80% this side, maybe 20% ear— arm, properly 80% this side, maybe 20% ear and — arm, properly 80% this side, maybe 20% ear and nothing from the legs and the _ 20% ear and nothing from the legs and the entire bike is powered by the prosthetic when i start riding, powered — the prosthetic when i start riding, powered by this kind of motion. all i can— powered by this kind of motion. all i can say— powered by this kind of motion. all i can say is— powered by this kind of motion. all i can say is it — powered by this kind of motion. all i can say is it isjust unbelievably difficult — i can say is it isjust unbelievably difficult. but i've got an incredible team around me and i know will happen— incredible team around me and i know will happen when we do this and that will happen when we do this and that will get _ will happen when we do this and that will get through the hard times and ultimately, thinking about why we are doing — ultimately, thinking about why we are doing is what will get us over the finish — are doing is what will get us over the finish line. do are doing is what will get us over the finish line.— are doing is what will get us over the finish line. do you want to pick u . the finish line. do you want to pick u- on the finish line. do you want to pick up on some _ the finish line. do you want to pick up on some of— the finish line. do you want to pick up on some of that _ the finish line. do you want to pick up on some of that because - the finish line. do you want to pick up on some of that because you i the finish line. do you want to pick i up on some of that because you have the bike in front of you there and mark was talking about how practically difficult it is. you see people will be familiar with these kind of bikes for people who have
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disabilities in the past, butjust propelling yourself effectively with one limb, that really is pushing the limits. , , , . ., , one limb, that really is pushing the limits. , ,, , ., "' limits. yes, especially for 99.9 miles, limits. yes, especially for 99.9 miles. that _ limits. yes, especially for 99.9 miles, that will _ limits. yes, especially for 99.9 miles, that will be _ limits. yes, especially for 99.9j miles, that will be challenging, limits. yes, especially for 99.9 i miles, that will be challenging, but we have had a rigorous gymnasium training programme and worked on the left arm weekly, monthly and properly for the last five years we have been developing the power and strength, so mark's one arm is as strong as most human beings to arms, if i'm honest.— arms, if i'm honest. how will it compare. _ arms, if i'm honest. how will it compare. and _ arms, if i'm honest. how will it compare, and the _ arms, if i'm honest. how will it compare, and the swimming i arms, if i'm honest. how will it- compare, and the swimming looked really hard. as did the running. none of it is easy. but will this be the hardest hit, do you think? yes. the hardest bit, do you think? yes, the hardest bit, do you think? yes, the challenge _ the hardest bit, do you think? yes, the challenge is _ the hardest bit, do you think? yes, the challenge is no _ the hardest bit, do you think? yes, the challenge is no joke. _ the hardest hit, do you think? yes the challenge is nojoke. it will the hardest hit, do you think? ie: the challenge is nojoke. it will be between 15 and 16 hours of continuous work and we will have a force west along the way, but yes, it's the simplest in terms of
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balance and coordination and you are not out at sea, but in terms of the length and the challenge itself, it will be by far the hardest. find will be by far the hardest. and alon: will be by far the hardest. and along the _ will be by far the hardest. and along the way _ will be by far the hardest. and along the way i _ will be by far the hardest. and along the way i think we have seen you with family, once or twice, as you with family, once or twice, as you come out of the water on those occasions. how are they feeling about this next epic bit of adventure? i about this next epic bit of adventure?— about this next epic bit of adventure? .. , ~ , adventure? i think they are very used to it _ adventure? i think they are very used to it now, _ adventure? i think they are very used to it now, use _ adventure? i think they are very used to it now, use to _ adventure? i think they are very used to it now, use to all- adventure? i think they are very used to it now, use to all of- adventure? i think they are very i used to it now, use to all of these crazy— used to it now, use to all of these crazy challenges and the nbn and the team going up and seeing what we can do, team going up and seeing what we can do. but— team going up and seeing what we can do. but as— team going up and seeing what we can do, but as always, they are very supportive — do, but as always, they are very supportive of everything i do and we try to _ supportive of everything i do and we try to do _ supportive of everything i do and we try to do everything as much as we can together around school and my wife's _ can together around school and my wife's work. — can together around school and my wife's work, but it's been a great journey— wife's work, but it's been a great journey this— wife's work, but it's been a great journey this year. i've met a lot of great _ journey this year. i've met a lot of great people and it's really helped cement— great people and it's really helped cement my relationships and friendships, and i've been able to look around and see who is there for me when— look around and see who is there for me when i_ look around and see who is there for me when i need it. you look around and see who is there for me when i need it.— me when i need it. you know what, it's been a —
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me when i need it. you know what, it's been a pleasure, _ me when i need it. you know what, it's been a pleasure, from - me when i need it. you know what, it's been a pleasure, from a - it's been a pleasure, from a distance, to be watching what you are doing this i think it's truly inspirational and all the best with what lies ahead. good luck to you. and we will catch up with mark tomorrow to see how he got on. and the best of luck for when you set off. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire. here are your headlines. energy bills could increase by hundreds of pounds next year, as more suppliers are expected to collapse. and because of another big rise in wholesale prices. tell us what your energy bills are like. how much they've gone up by and how that is affecting you at work. or if you run a business, what it might mean for you in the coming months. get in touch with me on twitter @vicderbyshire or email victoria@bbc.co.uk. more countries are to be removed from the government's red list later today — which requires travellers to stay in a quarantine hotel upon their return to the uk. prince andrew is granted access to a sealed document which his lawyers believe could help end the sexual abuse case brought against him by virginia giuffre.

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