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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  October 7, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm sally bundock with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. millions and around the world. of children across africa millions of children across africa are set to be vaccinated against malaria for the first time. the battle to avoid a shutdown of the us government remains in a stalemate, with no load imminent to raise the ceiling. ajudge blocks a judge blocks and a total ban on abortion in the us state of texas following a challenge by the barden administration. an champion of south africa was the anti—apartheid struggle, archbishop desmond tutu, celebrates his 90th birthday.
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a very warm welcome to the programme. the head of the world health organization has described it as an historic moment. millions of children in africa are said to be vaccinated against malaria for the first time after the endorsement of the widespread use of a vaccine. malaria kills more than 400 thousand people a year, many of them young children. our medical editor fergus walsh reports on the who's fergus walsh reports on the who's plans to roll out the vaccine across the continent. this is a milestone in public health. after decades of research and trials, this one in kenya, at last a vaccine against one of the world's deadliest infections — malaria. the disease is spread by mosquitoes, which are infected with the malaria parasite. this triggers fever, and in severe cases, organ failure. the world health organization said the vaccine would now be widely
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rolled out across africa. this long awaited malaria vaccine is a breakthrough for science, child health and malaria control. using this vaccine in addition to existing tools to prevent malaria could save tens of thousands of young lives each year. malaria is a global threat, but around 95% of deaths are in sub—saharan africa. every year, more than a quarter of a million african children under the age of five die from malaria. that is one child every two minutes. for more than 30 years, the british pharma giant gsk has been working on a vaccine. and since 2019, more than 800,000 children in ghana, kenya and malawi
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have been immunised. trials have shown that it cuts cases of malaria by 40%, and those of severe malaria by 30%. but it requires four doses, and further booster shots may be required as immunity wanes over time. so it's much less effective than other childhood vaccines, but even so, the vaccine, known as rts,s, should have huge impact. the rts,s vaccine is a game changer, and it's arriving at the right time. progress has stalled in recent years and end tools and approaches are urgently needed to get the global effort back on track. more effective malaria vaccines are in the pipeline, including one developed by oxford university. bed nets, insecticides and antimalarial treatments
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will also continue to play a crucial role in tackling this ancient scourge which, despite today's positive news, is farfrom being defeated. fergus walsh, bbc news. let's talk this through with doctor ashley burkett, at the vaccine coming back centre a innovation and access. thank you for being on the programme. this is a real breakthrough in the fight against malaria? absolutely, this is an historic moment in the fight against malaria and we saw who recommend the broad deployment of the first malaria vaccine to reduce illness and deaths from malaria in sub—saharan africa and other regions with moderate to high transition so we need new tools, we seen a quarter of a million children die per year and we need to do something about it, the vaccine is an important step in reducing those numbers.—
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important step in reducing those numbers. ., ., , those numbers. from a practical oint of those numbers. from a practical point of view. — those numbers. from a practical point of view, as _ those numbers. from a practical point of view, as fergus - those numbers. from a practical point of view, as fergus walsh l point of view, as fergus walsh pointed out, you have to have forjabs before 18 months old and i'm just thinking about the pressure on parents, and mums in particular, will the uptake take place, do you think? the onauoin take place, do you think? the ongoing pilot _ take place, do you think? tue: ongoing pilot introduction take place, do you think? tte: ongoing pilot introduction of the programme in three countries, through routine childhood, has shown a good uptake of the vaccine, at least through the first three doses which are in the first year of life and reaffirm the favourable safety profile that we've seen previously vaccine so when the vaccine is deployed, we think it is going to significantly reduce life—threatening malaria but getting those photos is not going to bt epics make it —— easier more data to come which will come after the second birthday of the child, it won't be easy but immunisation programmes, it's very robust and typically reach about 80%
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of the children so we are hopeful we can get the in terms of the time it's taken, to get to this point, your thoughts? this is one of the tragedies really, but it's taken so long, and there are several reasons for this, and there are several reasons forthis, it's and there are several reasons for this, it's a parasite, we don't have vaccines in broad use against parasites, fortunately we have other tools and that's going to continue to be important, we continue to use other tools, this is not a magic bullet for malaria by any means, but most importantly, the beneficiaries of this vaccine are young african children are now one of the most impoverished groups on earth and there is not really a financial incentive to develop a vaccine. so i'm really hoping some of the political will that we've seen apply to deployment of covid vaccines malaria can apply to it because it really is malaria that strikes the fear into the hearts of parents in sub—saharan africa and
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continues to do so. in sub-saharan africa and continues to do so.- in sub-saharan africa and continues to do so. thank you for our continues to do so. thank you for your time. _ continues to do so. thank you for your time, good _ continues to do so. thank you for your time, good to - continues to do so. thank you for your time, good to talk . continues to do so. thank you for your time, good to talk to | for your time, good to talk to you and there is so much more detail on that story on our website. in less than two weeks, the biggest economy on earth will run out of money unless the us congress votes to raise the debt ceiling. that will allow the us treasury to increase its borrowing and keep paying its bills at the republicans are at loggerheads with the democrats about how much money president biden can pump into his reconstruction plans and the debt ceiling vote has become caught up in an argument. our north america correspondent has the story. i think the fact that the us has never defaulted in its history means that there is optimism that it's not going to happen again and i think the fact that place as you can imagine, you have the republicans and democrats at loggerheads even more than they ever
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were before. the democratic party can't push the debt ceiling on their own. in the senate it's 50—50, they need 60 votes. the republican party has for weeks been refusing to move anywhere on this but today mitch mcconnell, the senate minority leader, did indicate that the republican senators were willing to suspend the debt ceiling to a fixed dollar amount which would cover spending until december. so that is what they are offering, we do not know for sure yet if the democratic party will take up that offer, they are probably likely to, but all that means is that it just kicks it down the road and the democratic party will find itself in the same nightmare i guess in december. nomia iqbal that he was in washington for us, we will have more in about 20 minutes. in the us, judges blocked in a total ban on abortion in the state of texas following a challenge by the biden and
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restoration. judge robert pitman issued a temporary injunction, saying his court wouldn't sanction one more day of what he described as the offensive deprivation of an important right. with me now the studios are reporter courtney bembridge has been looking into all of this for us. courtney, first of all tell us. courtney, first of all tell us how we got here, give us the background. us how we got here, give us the background-— us how we got here, give us the background. this is all stemmed from a near _ background. this is all stemmed from a near total— background. this is all stemmed from a near total ban _ background. this is all stemmed from a near total ban on - from a near total ban on abortion which was recently introduced in texas which prohibits a woman from the training on abortion up to six weeks which is of course when before many women know they are pregnant. the biden administration launched a challenge against that and that is what this judge was considering and he's ruled that the law should be temporarily halted. so what did the judge actually say? we can talk through what he actually said and bring it up for you. through what he actually said and bring it upforyou. he wasn't mincing words. he said this court will not sanction one more day this offensive deprivation of such an important right, and he also called out texas officials for
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crafting what he said was an unprecedented and aggressive scheme because this more work to be differently to other laws and put the onus on individuals to sue people who were accused of trying to help someone terminate a pregnancy rather than with law enforcement agencies. attempts to have this thrown out had failed so all eyes are on this because if there is a precedent in this way, it could undermined roe the wade which the last 50 years has allowed women in the us to get legal abortions. the white house press secretaryjen psaki mentioned roe the wade and she said: she said the ruling was important step to restoring constitutional rights of women in texas. so what happens next? this will no doubt end up
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before the supreme court. an appeal is very likely to be lodged against this but in the meantime, abortion clinics and providers in texas are preparing to start up again and to allow women to go back to open their doors again, so in the meantime, while this temporary hold is in place, women will be able to access those services quite soon. interesting, courtney, thank you. let's get some of the day's other news. an agreement between senior chinese and us officials in switzerland lasted two hours, and agreed to reopen channels between the leaders. tensions have been acrimonious since biden took office over several issues including taiwan. an earthquake in pakistan has killed at least 20 people, about 200 others have been hurt. the quake centred near
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the town of harnai struck in the town of harnai struck in the early hours of the morning with a number of homes collapsing. the un security council has been told increasingly alarming recounts of hunger related deaths are emerging from the tigray region of nayacalevu. the secretary general said life—saving humanitarian efforts are being crippled, appealing to humanitarian efforts are being ci’ippled, appealing to the humanitarian efforts are being crippled, appealing to the epo pin government to allow the unhindered movement of supplies after a year of conflict. —— ethiopian. stay with us on bbc news, so much more to come including we will hear the story of three children detained in a kurdish run camp in syria after their mother took them to live in islamic state group territory. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. they believe everything's going to be different from now on. they think their country
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will be respected in the world once more, as it used to be before slobodan milosevic took power. the dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. as the parade was reaching its climax, two grenades exploded and a group of soldiersjumped from a military truck taking part in the parade and ran towards the president, firing from kalashnikov automatic rifles. after 437 years, the - skeletal ribs of henry viii's tragic warship emerged. but even as divers worked - to buoy her up, the mary rose went through another. heart—stopping drama. i want to be the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of california.
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you are with bbc news. the top stories. the world health organization approves a vaccine against malaria which could save the lives of hundreds of thousands of people across the globe every year. the battle to avoid a shutdown of the us government remains in a stalemate with no vote imminent to raise the debt ceiling. it wasn't us adults recruited from dozens of countries to join islamic state group. thousands of children were taken tojoin thousands of children were taken to join the self proclaimed qualified by their parents. many of those survived are now detained in kurdish run camps in syria. among them, three british children. for an exclusive interview, the bbc travelled to the camp where she met the children and their mother. this is no place for children
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to live but doesn't do. children of islamic state groups fallen caliphate. shall i fix our groups fallen caliphate. shall i fix your slippery? _ groups fallen caliphate. shall i fix your slippery? amongst | i fix your slippery? amongst them are three british sisters. they live here with their mother, nicole. are you, as a mother, nicole. are you, as a mother, decided to take your children to islamic state group territory to live under their regime, it was brutal, there were beheadings, murders, massacres. why did you do that? how do you explain that to anyone? t how do you explain that to anyone?— how do you explain that to an one? ., �* ~' anyone? i don't think even if i exlain anyone? i don't think even if i exolain it _ anyone? i don't think even if i explain it anyone _ anyone? i don't think even if i explain it anyone would - explain it anyone would understand, but from my point of view where i stand, firstly, it was about my family being together. do you understand? honestly, secondly, what may have happened, we have never been witness to it, my children and i come honestly. i haven't seen a beheading in my life.
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but her children have suffered trauma and loss. theirfather was killed fighting for iis as the group persecuted minorities and enslaved women. find the group persecuted minorities and enslaved women.— and enslaved women. and their ten-year-old — and enslaved women. and their ten-year-old brother _ and enslaved women. and their ten-year-old brother isaac- and enslaved women. and their ten-year-old brother isaac died ten—year—old brother isaac died in an airstrike ten—year—old brother isaac died in an air strike in front of them. t in an air strike in front of them. , , , ., , in an air strike in front of them. , , , . , , , them. i miss my family, i miss my grandmother— them. i miss my family, i miss my grandmother and _ them. i miss my family, i miss my grandmother and my - them. i miss my family, i miss my grandmother and my other| my grandmother and my other grandmother. camp is run by the kurdish authorities. they want countries to take their citizens back. only a few like sweden, belgium and germany have. uk is reluctant to allow the wives of islamic state groups foreign fighters to return to britain. they are viewed as a threat to national security. however, they are winning to repatriate reddish or thumbs and unaccompanied children. —— orphans. can you
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ever see an option where you would send your children to britain to safety on their own without you? for britain to safety on their own without you?— without you? for us as a family. _ without you? for us as a family. we _ without you? for us as a family, we cook- without you? for us as a | family, we cook together, without you? for us as a i family, we cook together, i know for sure if my kids were separated from me they will not be in a stable situation because we are a unit. and so her daughters _ because we are a unit. and so her daughters remain - because we are a unit. and so. her daughters remain prisoners here. a makeshift school offers a few hours of escape. t here. a makeshift school offers a few hours of escape.- a few hours of escape. i think it is really _ a few hours of escape. i think it is really funny _ a few hours of escape. i think it is really funny learning - a few hours of escape. i think it is really funny learning to l it is really funny learning to make different things. i like learning, different languages and when you learn more things, your brain feels better. i want to be smart when i grow up. but there is little _ to be smart when i grow up. but there is little hope of that as long as she is in this camp. separated from her family in the uk. she records this message for her grandmother. hope you guys are fine. he and my sisters are fine. love you
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guys, you guys. hopefully come back soon to see you guys. i would love to spend time with you when we come back. tt is you when we come back. it is difficult to — you when we come back. it is difficult to watch _ you when we come back. it is difficult to watch for - you when we come back. it is difficult to watch for the grandmother, charlene jack henry. thousands of miles away in london. she wants the grandchildren back home with their mother, her daughter. let her come _ their mother, her daughter. let her come and face the consequences, but it is not fair and it is not right for these children to be languishing in this place. enough is enough. they have already served the six year sentence. without even having the benefit of being taken to court and tried by the peers. the british government wouldn't comment on nicole jack was the case. they say those remaining in syria include dangerous individuals are not two security governments based on gender and age. but charlene says while her daughter should facejustice, her grandchildren are innocent.
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now let's bring you all the latest sport news. hello. this is your sports news. we start with foot pole and spain have ended italy by the world record unbeaten run over 37 matters. in a semifinal in milan, magister city's scoring both goals in the first half which also saw leonardo bellucci sent off for a second bookable offence. pellegrini gave the host hope with seven minutes remaining. bain held on to infect a first defeat on italy in more than three years —— spain. spain will face the winner of the second semifinal between france and belgium which will be played later on thursday. this is a rematch of the 2018 world cup semifinal which the french one en route to claim the torah when in russia. the belgians are currently the top of the fifa rankings. as the game is as
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good as it gets, notjust for ourfans and good as it gets, notjust for our fans and ourselves, good as it gets, notjust for ourfans and ourselves, it good as it gets, notjust for our fans and ourselves, it is for the neutral fan and this is a competition we want to be and it is not a friendly game with no significance. tt it is not a friendly game with no significance.— no significance. it is great and the — no significance. it is great and the right _ no significance. it is great and the right thing - no significance. it is great and the right thing to - no significance. it is great and the right thing to do i no significance. it is greatl and the right thing to do to face this french team in a very, very meaningful competition. chelsea scored a late equaliser in the opening match of the season's women's champions league. last season finalists trade after they look to approve the difference in london, but they secured a point for the blues in the second minute of stoppage time while juventus second minute of stoppage time whilejuventus won their much 3-0 whilejuventus won their much 3—0 in the same group. slovenian cyclist has one the race to claim his first victory in the oldest of europe wasn't one—day classic. in the closing stages, the main rival adam yates raced clear of the pack after being members of a
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star—studded breakaway group. rutledge took the lead in the final kilometre. he held on to claim his third one—day victory of the year, and includes the elliptic time trial in tokyo. —— the olympic time trial. tt -- the olympic time trial. it is —— the olympic time trial. tt is hard and you never really know what you have in the last leg for the final kick. sometimes it goes, sometimes it doesn't go. today i had it so i managed to follow and passed him. , , . ., , ., him. the build-up continues to the big game — him. the build-up continues to the big game in _ him. the build-up continues to the big game in las— him. the build-up continues to the big game in las vegas - the big game in las vegas on saturday. tyson fury goes up against the american welder. the pairfaced off ahead of saturday by the heavyweight bout. it will be the third fight between the two and the first with theory winning the second. ~ ., , , second. what it tells me is that it is — second. what it tells me is that it is a _ second. what it tells me is that it is a week, _ second. what it tells me is that it is a week, mental. that it is a week, mental little person who i am going to knock out on saturday night. i
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beat him the first time after three years out of the ring. quite comfortable, actually. quite comfortable, actually. quite comfortable. absolutely obliterated him in the rematch. he didn't any rounds. in the third fight, i see much more the same. third fight, i see much more the same-— the same. all your latest s - orts the same. all your latest sports news _ the same. all your latest sports news on - the same. all your latest sports news on our - the same. all your latest. sports news on our website, the same. all your latest - sports news on our website, but from me on the rest of the team thatis from me on the rest of the team that is your sports news for now. thank you. let's document archbishop desmond tutu who is celebrating his 90th birthday today —— let's talk about. he was at the forefront of south africa public anti—apartheid struggle and over the decades since democracy has continued his work as a human rights activist. what does his legacy main to south africans today?
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this artist has come to remove a racist slur that was written on this mural last month. the writing of many in the country but it is still not known who did it or why. but for the artist the restoration is a small token of appreciation for a man who has spent most of his life serving the people of south africa.— south africa. for me, he represents _ south africa. for me, he represents somebody i south africa. for me, he l represents somebody who south africa. for me, he - represents somebody who spoke his mind, fought for human rights, but at the same time he isjust this rights, but at the same time he is just this absolutely bubbly, happy person when he communicates, he has this amazing sense of humour. he is amazing sense of humour. he is a person who really celebrates life. ., , life. here outside johannesburg, i life. here outside| johannesburg, his life. here outside i johannesburg, his role life. here outside - johannesburg, his role in life. here outside _ johannesburg, his role in the fight against apartheid has not been forgotten. during late 19805, been forgotten. during late 1980s, like many communities across south africa, he was —— it was a hotbed of violence and
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deadly process. desmond tutu frequently visited such townships to offer comfort and guidance to grieving families. it was during a family —— funeral service of this sports feel that he came across a man attack. the crowd accused him of being a spy for the apartheid government and they wanted to kill him. this had become the normalfor wanted to kill him. this had become the normal for people seen as traitors. seeing what was about to happen, he stepped in, using his own body as a shield and pleaded for the crowd to show mercy. eventually they did. it is discouraged that he is still celebrated for. translation: , �* ., , translation: doesn't really hard on that _ translation: doesn't really hard on that day. _ translation: doesn't really hard on that day. if— translation: doesn't really hard on that day. if you i hard on that day. if you haven't been there, things would have been much worse. desmond tutu. fist would have been much worse. desmond tutu.— desmond tutu. at an anglican church in _ desmond tutu. at an anglican church in cape _ desmond tutu. at an anglican church in cape town, - desmond tutu. at an anglican church in cape town, his i desmond tutu. at an anglican church in cape town, his but l church in cape town, his but thatis church in cape town, his but that is a chance to reflect on his legacy. that is a chance to reflect on his legacy-— that is a chance to reflect on his lea . ., , ., , his legacy. he has endowed this country with _ his legacy. he has endowed this country with a — his legacy. he has endowed this country with a gift _ his legacy. he has endowed this country with a gift of _ his legacy. he has endowed this
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country with a gift of courage, l country with a gift of courage, speaking truth to power, speaking truth to power, speaking up, speaking out for those were downtrodden, the marginalised. the those were downtrodden, the marginalised.— marginalised. the life of desmond _ marginalised. the life of desmond tutu _ marginalised. the life of desmond tutu is - marginalised. the life of desmond tutu is a i marginalised. the life of- desmond tutu is a reminder of how civil society can help to bring change. it is a celebration of how one man stepped out from behind a church pulpit, at times risking his life and made a difference in the lives of ordinary south africans. now, before we move on to business, let's talk you through the latest with regards to tina turner, because she has sold the rights to her music catalogue to the record publishing company bmg. it has also acquired the rights to the 81—year—old star's name, image and likeness of future sponsorship and merchandising deals. it is not the company paid more than $50 million for the rights. that is a lot of money. now, we have all our
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business coverage coming up next. we will unpack in more detail the gas crisis that is currently under way. yesterday we saw prices rocket in europe, so what will that mean? i will see you in a moment. hello there. tuesday's wind and rain was a distant memory by wednesday. in fact, some areas where we'd seen the heavy, persistent rain across north—east england had a beautiful day, with some sunny spells, a dry story and feeling pleasantly warm. now, it's going to get warmer still over the next couple of days. average temperatures at this time of year around the mid—teens. by friday, we're likely to see temperatures peaking at around 21 celsius, 70 fahrenheit, so at least a good five degrees above where they should be for the time of year. and one of the reasons is because of this weather front that, yes, is going to bring some cloud and rain into the north and west, but it's driving in warm air with a south—westerly feed of wind direction. and you really will notice the difference when you step outside first thing in the morning. may well be a cloudy start
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to thursday with a little bit of drizzle around, and, yes, that persistent rain from that weather front affecting parts of southern and western scotland, along with northern ireland as well. but elsewhere, the cloud should break up, we should see some glimpses of sunshine and a pleasant afternoon for many, particularly in comparison to the weather earlier on in the week, with temperatures peaking at 20 degrees. that's 68 fahrenheit. now, fog could be an issue first thing on friday morning across central and southern areas. that will slowly lift into low cloud, and hopefully that cloud should again start to break up for some sunshine to come through on friday. our weather front not moving very far very fast, still producing some relentless rain across northern ireland and western scotland, but still a relatively warm feel. the east of scotland, 19—20 degrees. we're likely to see 21 somewhere. that's 70 fahrenheit. as we move into the weekend, though, that weather front gradually meanders its way steadily south and east, so it will start to bring a change, but it's a slow process. ahead of it, again dry,
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settled with some sunshine and once again some warmth. behind it, starting to show the first signs of a change. a slightly fresher feel, mid—teens maybe in the far north—west of scotland. but we could still see those temperatures, 19 or 20 degrees not out of the question. the weather front will take its time to clear away. once it does so, it's then going to allow for a cooler air source as the winds swing round to more of a north—westerly, and so you really will notice the difference with the feel of the weather as we go through the week ahead. starting off quite promising, but getting noticeably cooler, but still fairly dry.
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hello again, this is bbc news, time for the top business stories, i am sally bundock. russia promises more gas to europe as prices surged to a new record. when a $20 trillion overdraft is never enough. no pain, no gain, british business must kick its addiction to foreign labour �*s as boris johnson but does this theory add up? plus the chips are down but can intel plug the global shortage of semiconductor waisea nayacalevu we go inside the new multibillion dollar plant in arizona.

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