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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 6, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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the headlines — a breakthrough in the global fight against malaria — the world health organization has approved a vaccine after trials which could save the lives of hundreds of thousands of children in africa. the battle to avoid a shutdown of the us government remains in a stalemate with no vote imminent in the us congress to raise the debt ceiling and keep the money flowing. survivors of an islamist attack on the bataclan concert venue in paris nearly six years ago have been recounting their ordeal in court for the first time. some told how they pretended to be dead. ajudgement from the high court in london has found that the ruler of dubai, sheikh mohammed al maktoum, secretly hacked the phones of his ex—wife, princess haya ofjordan. he denies any involvement.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are jane merrick, who is the policy editor at the i, and kieran andrews, who is the political editor at the times scotland. hello to you both. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the telegraph leads with boris johnson's party conference speech. it highlights his pledge to protect green spaces which, it says, comes after a tory voter backlash which saw the party lose the safe seat of chesham and amersham. vacuous and bombastic — that's the damning verdict from the business community on borisjohnson�*s speech, according to the guardian. it says they've reacted angrily to his failure to deliver an economic plan or address the supply chain crisis which has seen many petrol stations run out of petrol. the mirror leads with pig farming staff crisis. it says up to 100,000 healthy pigs
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could face a mass slaughter. the mail leads with a story we've covered here — the high court ruling that the ruler of dubai ordered the hacking of his ex—wife�*s phone in a bitter custody battle over their children. the times also leads with the court ruling on the ruler of dubai. it shows his ex—wife, princess haya, with her lawyer baroness fiona shackleton, who the court says also had her phone hacked. the ft leads with the volatility of the gas market. it reports vladimir putin offered to stabilise the market, which has seen prices increase dramatically recently. both of you once again. let's start the times and first off, jane, the prime minister hit by a business backlash and with the times basically is saying is that boris
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johnson faces a backlash from those businesses who supported brexit who now accuse him of treating them like the boogie man over labour shortages. is there a feeling that the tory party has moved away from being the party of business at least for now? is being the party of business at least for now? , . , , for now? is really interesting. toda 's for now? is really interesting. today's speech _ for now? is really interesting. today's speech was _ for now? is really interesting. today's speech was very - for now? is really interesting. today's speech was very big l for now? is really interesting. | today's speech was very big on bluster and banter and jokes and not much policy but he did have some big themes there. but it seems that his major theme on shifting away from what he called a low skilled, low—wage economy and diversity migration, to high skill, high wage, using british workers is actually going down very badly among businesses, even business leaders who voted for brexit. as a time says tomorrow, they are very critical of the fact that they feel like they are being used as a sponge. the head of one centre said. to basically soak up the rising cost it will be inevitable when you restrict migration on the one hand, you were
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going to get the cost passed on to consumers and businesses are going to have to account for that and it's a really interesting response from this sector. d0 a really interesting response from this sector-— a really interesting response from this sector. ., ., this sector. do you agree with that? it's really interesting _ this sector. do you agree with that? it's really interesting the _ this sector. do you agree with that? it's really interesting the kind - this sector. do you agree with that? it's really interesting the kind of- it's really interesting the kind of coalition— it's really interesting the kind of coalition of critics of boris johnson's speech are businesses, both those — johnson's speech are businesses, both those that supported brexit and wanted _ both those that supported brexit and wanted the uk to remain in the eu, and farmers— wanted the uk to remain in the eu, and farmers in traditional conservative supporting sectors or industries — conservative supporting sectors or industries. and as some of the criticism — industries. and as some of the criticism that we have seen from businesses — criticism that we have seen from businesses this week has been just as bitter— businesses this week has been just as hitter or— businesses this week has been just as bitter orjust as pointed about boris _ as bitter orjust as pointed about borisjohnson about the as bitter orjust as pointed about boris johnson about the approach he sticking _ boris johnson about the approach he sticking to _ boris johnson about the approach he sticking to government in the uk as anything _ sticking to government in the uk as anything we saw about jeremy corhyn's — anything we saw about jeremy corbyn's plans when he was bidding to he _ corbyn's plans when he was bidding to be prime minister. and when he think— to be prime minister. and when he think about — to be prime minister. and when he think about that, you think about that in— think about that, you think about that in context, it's really, really striking — that in context, it's really, really striking most of the prime minister
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clearly— striking most of the prime minister clearly has — striking most of the prime minister clearly has a lot of work to do now to win _ clearly has a lot of work to do now to win around businesses, and they are worried — to win around businesses, and they are worried about inflation and they are worried about inflation and they are worried — are worried about inflation and they are worried about inflation and they are worried about having to pass on the cost _ are worried about having to pass on the cost of — are worried about having to pass on the cost of increased inflation to consumers, customers and they are also worried — consumers, customers and they are also worried about a prospective planned — also worried about a prospective planned increase in the national minimum — planned increase in the national minimum wage. so there's a lot of things— minimum wage. so there's a lot of things that — minimum wage. so there's a lot of things that are nagging at the back of mind _ things that are nagging at the back of mind to — things that are nagging at the back of mind to businesses and boris johnson — of mind to businesses and boris johnson and the chancellor are going to have _ johnson and the chancellor are going to have to— johnson and the chancellor are going to have to work hard to erase all those _ to have to work hard to erase all those fears. to have to work hard to erase all those fears-— to have to work hard to erase all those fears. ~ ., ., ,, ., those fears. what do you think about the tone that — those fears. what do you think about the tone that jane _ those fears. what do you think about the tone that jane alluded _ those fears. what do you think about the tone that jane alluded to - those fears. what do you think about the tone that jane alluded to there? | the tone that jane alluded to there? it was quite jovial. there were jokes and some may have and some may not. did you think it was the right tone to set given what is happening right now in the uk? it tone to set given what is happening right now in the uk?— right now in the uk? it was largely the one thing _ right now in the uk? it was largely the one thing boris _ right now in the uk? it was largely the one thing boris johnson - right now in the uk? it was largely the one thing boris johnson can i the one thing borisjohnson can do, which _ the one thing borisjohnson can do, which is _ the one thing borisjohnson can do, which is to— the one thing borisjohnson can do, which is to play to the gallery, to try and _ which is to play to the gallery, to try and entertain. there is no doubt it worked _ try and entertain. there is no doubt it worked very well in the hall. the
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conservative party members there who treated _ conservative party members there who treated the _ conservative party members there who treated the whole conference large like a _ treated the whole conference large like a celebration and first time being _ like a celebration and first time being iti— like a celebration and first time being i'll back together since that general— being i'll back together since that general election victory in 2019 and it had _ general election victory in 2019 and it had that — general election victory in 2019 and it had that kind of feel about it. but again— it had that kind of feel about it. but again looking at whiter than 'ust but again looking at whiter than just the — but again looking at whiter than just the audience in the room, there was an— just the audience in the room, there was an opinion poll this evening which _ was an opinion poll this evening which shows that although largely people _ which shows that although largely people were pretty positive in their snap reaction to borisjohnson, actually— snap reaction to borisjohnson, actually keir starmer's speech at the labour party conference went better _ the labour party conference went better. there were notes of positivity in their obviously for boris — positivity in their obviously for borisjohnson and his positivity in their obviously for boris johnson and his team and positivity in their obviously for borisjohnson and his team and if they can — borisjohnson and his team and if they can in — borisjohnson and his team and if they can in the midst of or start of they can in the midst of or start of the potential crisis of fuel shortages and warnings of shortages at christmas that they can still be seen _ at christmas that they can still be seen to— at christmas that they can still be seen to do— at christmas that they can still be seen to do well on the back of the speech, _ seen to do well on the back of the speech, that's positive for the prime — speech, that's positive for the prime minister, but there should be
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a bit prime minister, but there should be a hit of— prime minister, but there should be a hit of a _ prime minister, but there should be a bit of a nag at the back of their mind _ a bit of a nag at the back of their mind that — a bit of a nag at the back of their mind that keir starmer, no matter what _ mind that keir starmer, no matter what colourful comparison boris johnson — what colourful comparison boris johnson wants to make about him, it was actually — johnson wants to make about him, it was actually is doing better in his lengthy. — was actually is doing better in his lengthy, not as exciting speech to the lahour— lengthy, not as exciting speech to the labour party conference. let�*s the labour party conference. let's move on to _ the labour party conference. let's move on to talk _ the labour party conference. let's move on to talk about _ the labour party conference. let's move on to talk about the - the labour party conference. let�*s move on to talk about the front page of the eye and may be trouble ahead. lots of different bullet points here about issues that are facing the uk right now that we have touched on already to some degree and the petrol crisis, energy bills, global shipping, industry fears. there is a lot to think about, and yet the front page of the i saying the prime minister shrugs off britain's cost—of—living crisis. is there a feeling he has shrugged it off and it does not matter because it was not really mentioned to that extent in his speech? it not really mentioned to that extent in his speech?— in his speech? it was not at all. he did not in his speech? it was not at all. he did rrot refer _ in his speech? it was not at all. he did not refer to _ in his speech? it was not at all. he did not refer to the _ in his speech? it was not at all. he did not refer to the fuel _ in his speech? it was not at all. he did not refer to the fuel crisis - in his speech? it was not at all. he did not refer to the fuel crisis and l did not refer to the fuel crisis and did not refer to the fuel crisis and did not refer to the fuel crisis and did not mention the universal credit cut. i think what is really interesting actually and we have
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many layers of the supply chain issue. there are many different sectors that are affected and it's been bubbling along for a few weeks and few months. i think in terms of cost—of—living people are going to start feeling it in their pockets, especially those who were affected by the universal credit couples that we have artie had motorist affected due to the use of petrol stations and this is a really structural labour market issue. there are shortages in the market that relate frankly should have been addressed over the last five years. the country voted for brexit five years ago and it's only now seen is of the government, the same government, has come to terms with the fact that once you stop freedom of movement there is going to be a problem with labour. and i think with the prime minister affect speech today did not get in the heart of is what the the italks get in the heart of is what the the i talks about is actually you've got a huge problem here with how you are going to tackle it. you cannotjust have a sort of short—term let's lay out a few visas for drivers. what is
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your long—term strategy? how do you get from meeting that very short—term urgency in the crisis now into that long—term strategy that you are setting out? where is the bridge between that. we have actually got these problems now and they are really crunching into the economy. and i think this isjust going to continue until there is actually a bit more substance from the prime minister. d0 actually a bit more substance from the prime minister.— actually a bit more substance from the prime minister. do you think the --eole the prime minister. do you think the people once — the prime minister. do you think the people once they — the prime minister. do you think the people once they start _ the prime minister. do you think the people once they start feeling - people once they start feeling really the economic impact of all of these things that we see on the front page of the — the i, do you think their attitudes will change towards the government? i think their attitudes will change towards the government? i think is really striking _ towards the government? i think is really striking front _ towards the government? i think is really striking front page _ towards the government? i think is really striking front page bite - towards the government? i think is really striking front page bite the l really striking front page bite the i for tomorrow and the front page did really— i for tomorrow and the front page did really well but one of the most impactful— did really well but one of the most impactful things i thought was important for boris johnson was where _ important for boris johnson was where he — important for boris johnson was where he says it will take time and be difficult — where he says it will take time and be difficult but that was the change we voted _ be difficult but that was the change we voted for. i think many people
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will think— we voted for. i think many people will think they did not actually vote _ will think they did not actually vote for— will think they did not actually vote for petrol shortages and increased inflation and supermarket shortages — increased inflation and supermarket shortages. but borisjohnson slightly— shortages. but borisjohnson slightly surprisingly in some ways seem _ slightly surprisingly in some ways seem to — slightly surprisingly in some ways seem to agree with jane's previous point _ seem to agree with jane's previous point actually about the record of the conservative machen government over the _ the conservative machen government over the last ten years, say no one had tried _ over the last ten years, say no one had tried to — over the last ten years, say no one had tried to tackle the key problems but he _ had tried to tackle the key problems but he was _ had tried to tackle the key problems but he was going to. it was very a new conservatism he was trying to lay out _ new conservatism he was trying to lay out today, albeit with not much until other— lay out today, albeit with not much until other than the big picture, the big — until other than the big picture, the big vision. and that is what was lacking _ the big vision. and that is what was lacking and — the big vision. and that is what was lacking and what we need to see. for boris _ lacking and what we need to see. for borisjohnson and his lacking and what we need to see. for boris johnson and his cabinet colleagues, can they now be able to -et colleagues, can they now be able to get that— colleagues, can they now be able to get that and do the hard graft and actually— get that and do the hard graft and actually affect change and push forward — actually affect change and push forward this revolution he is planning _ forward this revolution he is
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planning without causing a proper cost—of—living crisis in the uk? what _ cost—of—living crisis in the uk? what you — cost—of—living crisis in the uk? what you think about what he just about people not knowing what they voted for because some of these things, high petrol prices and problems in the supply chain, cost—of—living coming up to him of the things were all part of the mornings by economists around the country about what would happen if we did it at leaving the eu? yeah and after this _ we did it at leaving the eu? yeah and after this kind _ we did it at leaving the eu? yeah and after this kind of _ we did it at leaving the eu? yeah and after this kind of thing - we did it at leaving the eu? jééltl and after this kind of thing was dismissed as project fear by boris johnson and brexit supporting ministers and i think actually there been a lot of people in the media and in politics who have basically stayed pretty quiet for the last two years since borisjohnson won his landslide. kind of basically saying you have now delivered brexit and let's see what you can do with it. and there is not been much apart from the sort of very ardent remained supporters and what is a referendum, there is not been much criticism of we told you so. this would happen. but actually it is an
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end to come to pass and i think those fears, they were very well—founded fears are now coming to fruition and i think is actually quite extraordinary that comment that we had picked up on the boris johnson has said this is what you voted for. people did not vote for petrol stations and i they voted for uncertainty about the food chain. it is true that there has been a pandemic and i think obviously a lot of that has compounded it, but the government will talk about the supply chain is a problem globally and yes of course it is but when you can shut down a port in asia or there is a backlog of ships in los angeles, yes, that is a problem but the issue for the uk is that we have brexit as an extra layer of complexity on top of that and that is what i think is putting us in a more difficult position.- is what i think is putting us in a more difficult position. let's go to the daily mirror— more difficult position. let's go to the daily mirror now _ more difficult position. let's go to the daily mirror now because - more difficult position. let's go to the daily mirror now because i - more difficult position. let's go to i the daily mirror now because i spoke earlier on to you about a person who is in the midst of the hopi crisis
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and he was talking to me about the issue of what he said to me earlier was we have a problem with staff in the butchery service and basically specialist staff who used to come from europe and it's a mixture mainly of brexit compounded by covid—i9 and this is causing the issues with pig farming and the front page of the daily mail — daily mirror sorry carrying the story with a picture of a cute of cute pics to bless forget these pigs are actually supposed be butchered for the abattoir but they're not able to do that because of the lack of staff and what is happening now but is there is a fear that many thousands of them could be cold.— of them could be cold. absolutely, and this was _ of them could be cold. absolutely, and this was something _ of them could be cold. absolutely, and this was something that - of them could be cold. absolutely, and this was something that was i and this was something that was warned — and this was something that was warned about again pre—referendum. in warned about again pre—referendum. in the _ warned about again pre—referendum. in the northeast of scotland, i work for a local— in the northeast of scotland, i work for a local pig farmer appears a time _ for a local pig farmer appears a time of— for a local pig farmer appears a time of that and there were plenty of warnings farmers and meat processors and abattoirs that this is exam _ processors and abattoirs that this
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is exam of— processors and abattoirs that this is exam of the sort of problem that could _ is exam of the sort of problem that could come — is exam of the sort of problem that could come down the tracks and the pandemic— could come down the tracks and the pandemic has compounded it but it was entirely foreseeable that there would _ was entirely foreseeable that there would be _ was entirely foreseeable that there would be these potential issues. boris _ would be these potential issues. borisjohnson has been quite flippant— borisjohnson has been quite flippant about this problem this building. he was in the conservative party— building. he was in the conservative party conference when pressed on this bob _ party conference when pressed on this bob colleague said that if he is ever— this bob colleague said that if he is ever eaten to make a sandwich and if so he _ is ever eaten to make a sandwich and if so he cannot sit of them because that's— if so he cannot sit of them because that's ultimately what happens to the pigs. — that's ultimately what happens to the pigs, as you say, they are there to be _ the pigs, as you say, they are there to be slaughtered. but that is not the problem that been highlighted here _ the problem that been highlighted here. the disorder in the daily mirror— here. the disorder in the daily mirror saying these peace will ultimately be slaughtered and burned and the _ ultimately be slaughtered and burned and the mirror links this to the ending — and the mirror links this to the ending the uplift of universal credit— ending the uplift of universal credit and the potential cost—of—living crisis that we've been _ cost—of—living crisis that we've
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been talking about to contrast what will be _ been talking about to contrast what will be a _ been talking about to contrast what will be a waste of food with families— will be a waste of food with families that are now going to potentially struggle to buy all the necessities they need. why potentially struggle to buy all the necessities they need.— potentially struggle to buy all the necessities they need. why do you think five years _ necessities they need. why do you think five years down _ necessities they need. why do you think five years down the - necessities they need. why do you think five years down the line - necessities they need. why do you | think five years down the line there are these problems that are emerging that ultimately there have been five years to flip for equipment you think it was never quite clear what breaks we were going to get until quite late on?— breaks we were going to get until uuite late on? ., , ., ,, ., quite late on? that is one issue and i su ose quite late on? that is one issue and i suppose another _ quite late on? that is one issue and i suppose another issue _ quite late on? that is one issue and i suppose another issue is - quite late on? that is one issue and i suppose another issue is the - i suppose another issue is the pandemic but i think that sort of southern every other aspect of trying to work out policy and so on. but actually boris johnson what say today that he is plenty past governments but he has been in power for two years. he has had ministers working on brexit as well as the pandemic and really this labour market issue that they admit that they have done about for years and they have done about for years and they could've had plans in place and deal with this. the pig industry is
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really angry about this. there are as many as 130,000 pigs who are on farms right now that should've entered the food chain and as karen mentioned, this is a shrewd a waste of food at a time when people are basically struggling definitive cells because of the universal credit cuts and the contrast there is quite extra ordinary. boris johnson's top has been pretty flippant talking about bacon sandwiches and is notjust a problem for a waste of food but is really going to impact on the farming industry on top of everything else that they have to deal with. and i think this issue could actually and i was speaking to somebody from the biggest today who said it actually could be solved really easily, that butchers are actually on the skilled worker list so they could get into the uk. there is an issue with speaking english—language of being able to be educated to an a level or equivalent and they could just tweet that slightly to allow butchers to
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come in and not necessarily have a qualification because you don't need an a—level if you are still the butchery coming up to prove that you have an a—level is on the else. so this can be solved really easily and is such a waste of food and enormous pressure on the industry and it's just another problem the government don't seem to have really got a grip on. �* , ., ., ., don't seem to have really got a grip on. h ., ., ., ., ., ~ ., on. let's move on now and talk about our final story — on. let's move on now and talk about our final story of _ on. let's move on now and talk about our final story of the _ on. let's move on now and talk about our final story of the evening - our final story of the evening and it's from the times and we go back to that paper but this this time at the top of the front page leaped look at the headline british malaria vaccine approved in historic breakthrough. talking about this on bbc news this evening quite a bit. exciting good news in terms of the fight against malaria. the vaccine which is now hope will be able to be rolled out and help the millions of children in the continent of africa between the ages of zero to five and malaria is a scourge in africa for many skilled with. and this was developed in the uk. absolutely. it
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is really positive _ developed in the uk. absolutely. it is really positive news _ developed in the uk. absolutely. it is really positive news and - developed in the uk. absolutely. it is really positive news and when i developed in the uk. absolutely. it| is really positive news and when you consider _ is really positive news and when you consider thatjust now is really positive news and when you consider that just now more is really positive news and when you consider thatjust now more than 150,000 children under the age of five who— 150,000 children under the age of five who die in the worship parts of africa _ five who die in the worship parts of africa every— five who die in the worship parts of africa every year from malaria and this vaccine — africa every year from malaria and this vaccine they are rolling out, it could — this vaccine they are rolling out, it could reduce the hospital admissions by 70% when combined with other treatment with talk about try to roll _ other treatment with talk about try to roll out — other treatment with talk about try to roll out vaccines and the developers are saying they can roll out 50 _ developers are saying they can roll out 50 million doses a year. they are going — out 50 million doses a year. they are going to sell them no more 5% overproduction production costs — hopefully— overproduction production costs — hopefully make them affordable as well and _ hopefully make them affordable as well and aargh to find local partners _ well and aargh to find local partners and there is hope from somebody perhaps 40 people could the jensen— somebody perhaps 40 people could the jensen and _ somebody perhaps 40 people could the jensen and this could be like a flu vaccine _ jensen and this could be like a flu vaccine. has potential to be absolutely transformational. the
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thin . absolutely transformational. the thin that absolutely transformational. the: thing that strikes absolutely transformational. ti9: thing that strikes me absolutely transformational. ti9 thing that strikes me is nearly 100 years to get a vaccine against malaria and i know it is different as it is a parasite but if you think about that mrs i quickly the vaccine for covid—19, science is truly incredible. it for covid-19, science is truly incredible.— for covid-19, science is truly incredible. , . ., ~ ., incredible. it is amazing. another . reat incredible. it is amazing. another great historic— incredible. it is amazing. another great historic moment _ incredible. it is amazing. another great historic moment for - incredible. it is amazing. another great historic moment for the - great historic moment for the british scientific and research community. but also the amount of children and the amount of children in africa who would die every year to much of a thousand every single year, i think if this was sort of a pandemic, on the scale of covert 19, exactly 100 years to find a vaccine for this, there would actually have been much more quickly and it was one of those things that seem to be exited by western governments that malaria is a problem that you can have anti—malarial medicine if you go to africa and other countries but obviously that's a huge coffee for
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people who actually live in these countries. soap is an extraordinary breakthrough and really a good news story. breakthrough and really a good news sto . : ,., ~' breakthrough and really a good news sto : ~' ._ story. also i think many people asked themselves _ story. also i think many people asked themselves if _ story. also i think many people asked themselves if difficult i story. also i think many people i asked themselves if difficult with the cover nothing vaccine but i think a small percentage of countries in africa are really starting to relate their vaccine programme properly but the hope is at malaria vaccine it will be far more efficient in terms of getting it out there and getting it out there quickly.— it out there and getting it out there quickly. absolutely. it's tar: eted there quickly. absolutely. it's targeted at — there quickly. absolutely. it's targeted at children _ there quickly. absolutely. it's targeted at children and i there quickly. absolutely. it's targeted at children and as i there quickly. absolutely. it's| targeted at children and as he there quickly. absolutely. it's i targeted at children and as he said i think they can reach 40 million children each year. it's a really good progress but as you allude to, i think there is a sort of separate issues to deal with covid—19 vaccines that the worst is vaccinating its own nations and we are also in our booster programme now, but i think as sarah gilbert and the creator of the oxford magnate said, none of us, the world is not safe until everybody is from covenant teams that has to be kept
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in mind it may be this story on the malaria vaccine can remind people that actually the covid—19 vaccine coverage and countries in africa is very low and needs to be addressed. thank you so much, both of you is been really interesting to have you “p been really interesting to have you up on the programme and it's been great to talk to you. thank you both. and thank you for your company. spore is next followed by the headlines at midnight. from me in the team here, bye—bye. good evening. i'm tulsen tollett with your sports news, where we start with football, and chelsea managed to snatch a late draw against wolfsburg in their opening champions league match of the campaign. sam kerr scored the opener for the blues less than a quarter of an hour into the contest,
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but three goals from the visitors, including this second of the evening to german international tabea wassmuth, looked to have secured the win. bethany england gave emma hayes�* side hope, but it took a late goal in the second minute of stoppage time from pernille harder to rescue something for the londoners. italy's world—record run of 37 matches unbeaten has come to an end after spain beat them 2—1 in the uefa nations league semifinal. two goals from manchester city's ferran torres proved enough on the evening in milan, as roberto mancini's side were beaten for the first time since october 2018. luis enrique's side will now play the winner of tomorrow's other semifinal in turin between world champions france and fifa's number—one—ranked side belgium. a saudi arabian—backed takeover of newcastle united appears to have moved a step closer this evening after the country resolved a tv piracy dispute. the issue has been part of a disagreement between newcastle and the premier league over a £300 million takeover which collapsed last summer. that centred on whether the saudi owners would pass the league owners�*
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and directors' test, which measures the suitability of owners at a club. the build—up continues to the big fight in las vegas on saturday. the british wbc heavyweight champion tyson fury against the american deontay wilder. the pairfaced off ahead of saturday's bout in what will be the third fight between the two, with the first a draw and fury winning the second. what it tells me is that he's a weak level mental person who i'm going to knock out on saturday night. i beat him the first time after three years out of the ring. quite comfortable actually, he won two rounds of a 12—rounder. i absolutely obliterated him in the rematch. he didn't even win any of the rounds. and then this third fight, ijust see much more the same. everything has been good. i think we've timed everything out perfectly. i think we've done all the right things, and come saturday night,
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it's going to be definitely a different fight for all the fans. they should be excited. it's rare that we get trilogies like this, and i think it's going to go down in history. the england and wales cricket board will decide on friday whether this winter's ashes series in australia can go ahead. that's after positive talks with cricket australia this week. england's players have raised concerns about conditions for the tour, including whether or not their families will be allowed to travel, quarantine arrangements, and any potential bubble they might have to live in. but discussions between their representatives, cricket australia and the ecb has brought the staging of the series a step closer. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. the issues surrounding the ashes, those complications and negotiations appear to be reaching a resolution. positive dialogue is not the same as getting on a plane, but ifjoe root seems happier with the arrangements, he clearly carries significant influence. in australia, tickets for the ashes are being promoted online,
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and there's a spirit of understanding, at least when it comes to the players, it appears. the need for families to be accommodated in australia is a big consideration. they've played a lot of test cricket, so, yeah, i can understand where they're coming from, having family around, especially in a pandemic. guys are on the road for a lot longer than two years ago when you're adding on quarantine at the start and potentially the end depending where you're coming or going. so i sympathise for them. that is difficult. but it's great to joe supported that. well, they're not there yet. if you are an ashes family member travelling out for christmas, imagine doing quarantine in the state of victoria somewhere like this. the prospect of a more relaxed isolation is likely to be a key concession. australia's captain has been clear the ashes will start as scheduled in december. england officially are yet to agree. but no—one doubts the importance. after all, if the ashes stop, then in effect, so does the entire
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momentum for test cricket. joe wilson, bbc news. emma raducanu says she's in no hurry to appoint a new coach as she prepares for her first tournament since winning the us open. she's in indian wells ahead of the biggest women's event outside of the four grand slams, which is beginning this evening. the 17th seed, though, won't play until friday. she didn't play much in the first four or five months of this year, barely at all because of the pandemic and also because she was studying for her a—levels, so i think to schedule a run of tournaments early in the year... and if she plays well at indian wells, she probably won't have time for all of these but she could be playing in moscow and romania and austria before the end of the season to train further increase that ranking, and get used a life as a us open champion. people want to beat you and perhaps have a trial, she was talking about with a coach at the end of the season. with a view if she can get someone
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in place for the start of the new year and that australian open in particular. she says she's in no rush. it's important to get the right person. jeremy bates, the former british number one and a coach of katie and also british national is helping her out here in the desert. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. hello there. it was a quieter story on wednesday with some decent spells of sunshine coming through. largely fine and dry for many through the course of the day on thursday, but this weather front introducing some cloud and rain. more importantly, it's changing the wind direction to a south—westerly, and that is going to drive up some pretty warm air across the country. it will be a cloudy start for many on thursday, the cloud thick enough for a spot or two of drizzle. some nuisance rain into northern ireland and western scotland in particular, but where the cloud breaks up,
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it will be pleasantly warm with temperatures peaking at 20 degrees. that's 68 fahrenheit. and that is above the average for the time of year. this unseasonable warmth is set to continue actually for the next few days, so little in the way of change on friday. 0ur weather front stubbornly sitting across southern and western scotland and northern ireland. to the south of that weather front, after maybe a foggy start first thing, the cloud will thin and break, and temperatures may well peak at 21 degrees, 70 fahrenheit.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm mariko 0i. the headlines. the world health organisation approves a vaccine against malaria which could save hundreds of thousands of lives across the globe each year. the vaccine is a game changer. and it's arriving at the right time. the battle to avoid a shutdown of the us government remains in a stalemate with no vote imminent to raise the debt ceiling. uk prime minister borisjohnson tells his party conference that britain has to change its economy away from low skills, low wages and high immigration.

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