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tv   Newsday  BBC News  October 6, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm mariko oi. the headlines. the world health organisation approves a vaccine against malaria which could save hundreds of thousands of lives across the globe each year. the vaccine is a game changer. and it's arriving at the right time. the battle to avoid a shutdown of the us government remains in a stalemate with no vote imminent to raise the debt ceiling. uk prime minister borisjohnson tells his party conference that britain has to change its economy
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away from low skills, low wages and high immigration. it got to deal with the biggest underlying issues in our economy and society. the problem that no government is that the dots to tackle before. the government is that the dots to tackle before.— government is that the dots to tackle before. the high court in london finds _ tackle before. the high court in london finds that _ tackle before. the high court in london finds that the _ tackle before. the high court in london finds that the ruler - tackle before. the high court in london finds that the ruler in i tackle before. the high court in - london finds that the ruler in dubai shake secretly hacked the phones of his ex—wife. he denies any involvement. and with natural gas prices hitting a record high we will look at how russia is using its huge supplies to control the market. live from our studio in singapore. this is bbc news, it's news day. it's six in the morning
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in singapore, and late on wednesday evening across sub saharan africa where millions of children are to be offered vaccinations against one of the world's deadliest diseases malaria. the world health organisation has given its backing to a jab which if the trials are to be believed could be a game change in tackling the mosquito borne illness which kills hundreds of thousands of people across the continent every year. our medical editor fergus walsh has the story. this is a milestone in public health. after decades of research and trials, this one in kenya, at last a vaccine against one of the world's deadliest infections — malaria. the disease is spread by mosquitoes, which are infected with the malaria parasite. this triggers fever, and in severe cases, organ failure. the world health organization said
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the vaccine would now be widely rolled out across africa. this long awaited malaria vaccine is a breakthrough for science, child health and malaria control. using this vaccine in addition to existing tools to prevent malaria could save tens of thousands of young lives each year. malaria is a global threat, but around 95% of deaths are in sub—saharan africa. every year, more than a quarter of a million african children under the age of five die from malaria. that is one child every two minutes. for more than 30 years, the british pharma giant gsk has been working on a vaccine. and since 2019, more than 800,000 children in ghana, kenya and malawi have been immunised. trials have shown that it cuts cases of malaria by a0%,
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and those of severe malaria by 30%. but it requires four doses, and further booster shots may be required as immunity wanes over time. so it's much less effective than other childhood vaccines, up but should have huge impact. the vaccine is a game changer and it's arriving at the right time. progress has stalled in recent use to years. and end tools and approaches are urgently needed to get the global effort back on track. more effective malaria vaccines are in the pipeline, including one developed by oxford university. bed nets, insecticides and antimalarial treatments will also continue to play a crucial role in tackling this ancient scourge which,
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despite today's positive news, is farfrom being defeated. fergus walsh, bbc news. much more on this story on our website, ncluding this look at where malaria is at its worst and the way the new vaccine could prevent 40% of the cases. just log on to bbc.com/news or use the bbc app. let's take a look at the story in the headlines in the uk.... and it's all been about this man — prime minister borisjohnson who made his big set piece speech to the annual conference of his governing conservative party. his biggest message was the promise to "get on with the job" of uniting and levelling up the uk. you'll find telling, genius, imagination, enthusiasm in this country. all of them evenly
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distributed, evenly distributed. but opportunity is not. and it is our mission as conservatives to promote opportunity with every tool we have. will announce today a levelling out premium of up to £3000 to send the best we not best maths and science teachers to the places that need them most. mrjohnson�*s 45 minute long speech was his first to a conference since the pandemic began. he defended his government's plans for tax increases, which he said were needed to keep funding the national health service, and said britain would prosper after brexit by moving away from an economy based on bringing cheaper workers in from overseas. here's how our uk political correspondent, rob watson, summed up what mr johnson had to say. it is of course a message that goes down considerably well with his conservative party but also beyond that with people who voted be on 2016 and he did in 2019 who are
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uncomfortable about the levels of net migration from the late 1990s onwards. and also blame immigration for suppressing wages. the problem that the prime minister faces for suppressing wages. the problem that the prime ministerfaces is that the prime ministerfaces is that the prime ministerfaces is that the evidence suggests that there isn't very much of a connexion if any at all between high levels of immigration and keeping wages down. still to come a bit later in the programme a special report on how russia is using its huge reserves of gas to increase its power in europe. but first. . .. the high court in london has the strict former phone as well as her lawyers phone as part of a sustained campaign of intimidation and threat in a custody battle over their children. ajudge ruled that the shake gave his express or implied
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authority for the phone of his sixth wife to be access. our security correspondent reports. together no longer. dubai's ruler and his ex—wife, jordan's princess haya now fighting a custody battle in the high court. it's been revealed today that sheikh mohammed ordered illegal phone hacking during a crucial phase of the hearings. princess haya's phone was hacked, so were those of her personal assistant, her security and legal team — and even that of baroness shackleton, her barrister and a member of the house of lords. princess haya, in white, fled dubai two years ago after learning of her husband's abduction and mistreatment of two of his daughters. she applied for court orders to prevent her children from being returned to dubai. thejudgments published here today reveal the extraordinary lengths that one middle eastern ruler — and a close ally of britain — has gone to to exercise total control over the women
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in his family. the measures had been described as an abuse of power and a serial breach of criminal law here in britain. the court heard how agents of the dubai ruler used intrusive spyware called pegasus, sold by isreal�*s nso group to the united arab emirates to infect the mobile phones of the sheikh's opposing legal team. what is remarkable about this case is that it shows starkly that autocrats will take this technology, which is allegedly for fighting crime and terror, and use it to do exactly what you would expect. they target people they find to be problematic. and of course, it is not a surprise that yet again a partner is targeted with this kind of spy ware. sheikh mohammed has now issued the following statement...
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shake mom its reputation would've taken a hit on these allegations. with the court having found that uk law has been broken here this case poses extremely awkward questions about one of britain's closes trends in the middle east. ajudge in the us has given permission for prince andrew's legal team to get access to a confidential settlement agreement which they believe will negate a civil claim being pursued against him. the claim was based on allegations of sexual assault made by virginia giuffre. prince andrew, who's ninth in line to the british throne has always denied those allegations.
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our correspondent nada tawfik is in new york with the latest. now with thejudges now with the judges sign off prince sanders legal team will soon get their hands on this confidential — andrews was up that they believe will end the civil lawsuit against him. in a previous court hearing the princes lawyer said that a settlement agreement reached between virginia and the six offender jeffrey epstein essentially absolved anyone associated with epstein from anyone associated with epstein from any and all potential liability. virginia and her legal team and epstein�*s estate have all consented to handing over that document and now they have the judges sign off to do that. but her lawyer has said that he believes this settlement is irrelevant to prince andrews case. he says that essentially they have the right to review and to make whatever arguments they want based on it but he does not believe that the characterisation is accurate. there will be arguments in this
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case, another hearing on early next month. this is newsday on the bbc in singapore. we meet the artist photographer who wants his pictures a mixture of fantasy and reality to encourage us to think about our relationship with the environment. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. they believe everything's going to be different from now on. they think their country will be respected in the world once more, as it used to be before slobodan milosevic took power. the dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. as the parade was reaching its climax, two grenades exploded and a group of soldiersjumped from a military truck taking part in the parade and ran towards the president firing from kalashnikov automatic rifles.
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after 437 years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's _ tragic warship emerged, i but even as divers worked to buoy her up, the mary rose went through another heart—stopping - drama. i want to be the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of california. this is newsday on the bbc in singapore. the world health organisation approves a vaccine against malaria which could save the lives of hundreds of thousands of lives across the globe each year. the price of natural gas
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which is used widely in europe to provide heating and power has been rising sharply in recent months. at one point on wednesday, they went up by 37 percent in the uk. but they then fell, after president putin indicated that russia might boost its supplies. our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg has more on russia's contribution to the volatile price of gas. europe is facing an energy crisis. spiking gas prices, soaring electricity bills. it is a perfect storm. low gas stocks after a cold winter, a shortfall in wind power, and a surging demand as countries emerge from the pandemic. but is part of the problem russia? critics say russia is not supplying europe with as much gas as it could for geopolitical reasons, to pressure the eu into using this. russia's new pipeline,
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nord stream two. it bypasses ukraine and opponents say it will give russia's gazprom more power over europe's energy market. gazprom can supply more gas to europe. but refuses to do that, saying that we will do that if you accept gazprom's terms of handling nord stream two. it's very simple. this is pure blackmail. today, president putin hit back. it was europe's fault, he said, that prices were ten times higher than last year, because the eu didn't want to sign long—term energy contracts. no wonder the russians are smiling at their annual gas forum. they know the eu relies heavily on russian gas exports. britain imports very little natural
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gas from russia but the uk has been hit too by the skyrocketing prices on the energy markets. russia's position is very simple. we've got the gas you need, we've got a brand—new pipeline to deliver it, so let's do the deal. and considering how acute the energy crisis is becoming in europe, that puts russia in a very strong position. and since europe has committed to a greenerfuture, it may, for a time, need more gas as coal—fired plants are phased out. so long as europe is using as much energy as it is, so long as it is determined to reach the climate reduction targets that it has set, it is hard to see a future where europe is not more dependent on russian energy, particularly russian gas, over the next one to two decades. like gazprom's headquarters, europe's tallest building,
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russia's dominance of the energy market is set to continue. steve rosenberg, bbc news, st petersburg. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines... france says its ambassador to australia will return to his post nearly three weeks after he was recalled when canberra pulled out of a contract to buy french submarines. that deal was part of a new military and intelligence alliance between the us, australia and the uk. france also withdrew its ambassador to washington, although they have already returned. anti corruption prosecutors in austria have placed chancellor sebastian kurz under investigation for alleged bribery. nine other people are also under investigation. reports in austria suggest the inquiry relates to claims mr kurz�*s austrian people's party tried to bribe media outlets to publish favourable opinion polls. a spokesman for mr kurz�*s party says it is the victim of a politically motivated campaign.
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the live streaming platform, twitch which is owned by amazon has reported being hit by a data breach. a spokesman said it was working with urgency to understand the extent of claims that a hacker had leaked details of its source code and earnings of some clients. the twitch website appears to be functioning as normal. now to an exciting discovery in wales. researchers have identified fossils of a chicken size dinosaur that was related to t rex. the fragments are believed to be from the oldest meat eating dinosaur in the oldest meat eating dinosaur in the uk and they were found in a welsh quarry more than half a century ago but they've only just come to light. as a wealth correspondent explains. it's the closest wells have ever had to a lit
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to enact real the meat eating chief dragon. and this is what remains hip and thigh bone loss for years and the natural history museums collection until they were recovered from the wrong drawer then everything fell into place. this is one of the _ everything fell into place. this is one of the oldest _ everything fell into place. this is one of the oldest dinosaurs - everything fell into place. this isj one of the oldest dinosaurs from everything fell into place. this is - one of the oldest dinosaurs from the uk and oldest known meat eating dinosaur from the uk and oldest known meat eating dinosaurfrom the uk. this period was when done for two dinosaurs start for started evolving. dinosaurs were very famous from later days in thejurassic dinosaurs were very famous from later days in the jurassic when dinosaurs were very famous from later days in thejurassic when they really dominate the world but at this time. at the end of the triadic there was only one of several reptile groups. there was only one of several reptile grom— there was only one of several reptile groups. the fossils were found over _ reptile groups. the fossils were found over 60 _ reptile groups. the fossils were found over 60 years _ reptile groups. the fossils were found over 60 years ago - reptile groups. the fossils were found over 60 years ago at - reptile groups. the fossils were found over 60 years ago at this | reptile groups. the fossils were - found over 60 years ago at this site in south wales. not by palaeontologist but by quarry men as they blasted off the limestone wall behind me. it's taken decades to realisejust behind me. it's taken decades to realise just how significant their find was. , .,
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find was. they were all quite small, onl about find was. they were all quite small, only about 50 _ find was. they were all quite small, only about 50 cm _ find was. they were all quite small, only about 50 cm tall— find was. they were all quite small, only about 50 cm tall or _ find was. they were all quite small, only about 50 cm tall or so. - find was. they were all quite small, only about 50 cm tall or so. cindy . only about 50 cm tall or so. cindy has documented _ only about 50 cm tall or so. cindy has documented findings. - only about 50 cm tall or so. (1 “icy has documented findings. there were dinosaurs here 200 million years ago. dinosaurs here 200 million years auo. ~ ., ., dinosaurs here 200 million years auo.~ ., ., , , dinosaurs here 200 million years ago. we do have footprints from a few laru er ago. we do have footprints from a few larger ones. _ ago. we do have footprints from a few larger ones. so _ ago. we do have footprints from a few larger ones. so we _ ago. we do have footprints from a few larger ones. so we know- ago. we do have footprints from a| few larger ones. so we know there were _ few larger ones. so we know there were a _ few larger ones. so we know there were a few— few larger ones. so we know there were a few larger dinosaurs but we have very — were a few larger dinosaurs but we have very few remains of those. most of what _ have very few remains of those. most of what we _ have very few remains of those. most of what we are finding are these very tiny— of what we are finding are these very tiny dinosaurs.— of what we are finding are these very tiny dinosaurs. small in scale but hue very tiny dinosaurs. small in scale but huge and _ very tiny dinosaurs. small in scale but huge and significant. - very tiny dinosaurs. small in scale but huge and significant. the - but huge and significant. the relatives could also be hidden in the rocks waiting to be on earth. we are weeks away from the un climate change summit, which begins in glasgow on october 31. many species of animals are being placed at risk by climate change, as their habitats are damaged, or disappear. jim naughten is a artist photographer based in london, and he's created an exhibition to illustrate the dangers of biodiversity loss. these are some of his images...
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he says his wants his mixture of fantasy and reality to encourage us to think about our relationship with the environment. andjim joins me now... thank you forjoining us. we were just showing some of the pictures, you use the method used as digital painting. talk us through that and what that is and what inspired you to use this method. i what that is and what inspired you to use this method.— to use this method. i think digital aintin: to use this method. i think digital painting allows _ to use this method. i think digital painting allows me _ to use this method. i think digital painting allows me to _ to use this method. i think digital painting allows me to alter - painting allows me to alter photographs so much so i can create fantasy worlds. i started off as an oil painter and when i became a photographer i realise i could do a very similar thing but by using post production methods like photoshop. the idea for the project came from a visit to the field museum in chicago. it's a beautiful museum, it was completely full to capacity but
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there was an exhibition on extinction which was completely empty, there wasn't a soul in there. so i went in and i saw about 30,000 species are going extinct every year because of human activity. and my first thought was well, i have to do something about this. but also how do we show, how do we get people to look at this? is such a difficult thing, people want to look the other way. i thought if i make work it can be bleak, i can't be dead animals or anything like that so it's got to be beautiful. so i use these natural history specimens and then i've colour them to make them... i'm questioning our actual interview or our idealised view of the natural world. figs our idealised view of the natural world. �* , , ., our idealised view of the natural world. �* , ,, our idealised view of the natural world. a ., , world. as you said, your images look fictional. what _ world. as you said, your images look fictional. what kind _ world. as you said, your images look fictional. what kind of— world. as you said, your images look fictional. what kind of reaction - fictional. what kind of reaction have you been getting? are you getting the reaction that you had expected and hoped? absolutely. it's
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been phenomenal. _ expected and hoped? absolutely. it's been phenomenal. i— expected and hoped? absolutely. it's been phenomenal. i got _ expected and hoped? absolutely. it's been phenomenal. i got an _ expected and hoped? absolutely. it's been phenomenal. i got an exhibition in opening tomorrow in london, it's been sensational. we've had loads of press already was a people are actually really interested in the pictures and engaging with them. which is a great things are not senses been working fantastically. i'm very pleased. the senses been working fantastically. i'm very pleased-— senses been working fantastically. i'm very pleased. the cop 26 begins shortl , i'm very pleased. the cop 26 begins shortly. are — i'm very pleased. the cop 26 begins shortly. are you _ i'm very pleased. the cop 26 begins shortly, are you encouraged - i'm very pleased. the cop 26 begins shortly, are you encouraged by - i'm very pleased. the cop 26 beginsl shortly, are you encouraged by some of the changes that we are seeing in the leadership of some of the worlds biggest economies? it the leadership of some of the worlds biggest economies?— the leadership of some of the worlds biggest economies? it seems to be a groundswell — biggest economies? it seems to be a groundswell of _ biggest economies? it seems to be a groundswell of change _ biggest economies? it seems to be a groundswell of change and _ biggest economies? it seems to be a groundswell of change and people i biggest economies? it seems to be a | groundswell of change and people are beginning to engage with it. they're talking about it. i really hope there's some action behind it. i've known about this dire situation for the natural world and wildlife and climate change for the last decade. but in the recent years it's
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gathering pace and people are finding out about it. i think my project is about raising awareness so i think that's really important and it does feel like with greta and all... particularly with the user feels like people are beginning to take notice and wake up. that's really going to be critical i for action. ., , ., action. indeed. some of your ictures action. indeed. some of your pictures that _ action. indeed. some of your pictures that we _ action. indeed. some of your pictures that we just - action. indeed. some of your pictures that we just showed | action. indeed. some of your i pictures that we just showed our viewers they are, amazing. good luck with the exhibition and thank you so much forjoining us on newsday today. much for “oining us on newsday toda . . ~ much for “oining us on newsday toda . ., ,, i. much for “oining us on newsday toda . . ~' ,, , much for “oining us on newsday toda. ., , . the bridge which inspired the winnie the pooh author a a milne to create the game of pooh sticks has been put up for auction here in the uk. here it is newly restored, and once again crossing posingford river in a woods in southern england. it was dismantled more
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than twenty years ago, after it started deteriorating but a local carpenter has put it back together and now it's up for sale, with a price tag of at least*0 thousand dollars. if you're still wondering what a game of pooh sticks looks like then let evie, with herfriends hugo and freddie, be your guide. when you drop your stick no throwing and you of all get to do it at the same height stop and also the other rules, we all do it at the same time. one, two, three, go! ithink hugo one or it might�*ve been friday's one. my might�*ve drowned again. friday's one. my might've drowned aaain. ., ., ., .,,
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you can reach me on twitter i'm @bbcmarikooi. that's all for now stay with bbc world news. hello there. tuesday's wind and rain was a distant memory by wednesday. in fact, some areas where we'd seen the heavy, persistent rain across north east england had a beautiful day, with some sunny spells, a dry story and feeling pleasantly warm. now, it's going to get warmer still over the next couple of days. average temperatures at this time of year around the mid—teens. by friday, we're likely to see temperatures peaking at around 21 celsius, 70 fahrenheit, so at least a good five degrees above where they should be for the time of year. and one of the reasons is because of this weather front that, yes, is going to bring some cloud and rain into the north and west, but it's driving in warm air with a south—westerly feed of wind direction. and you really will notice the difference when you step outside
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first thing in the morning. may well be a cloudy start to thursday with a little bit of drizzle around, and, yes, that persistent rain from that weather front affecting parts of southern and western scotland, along with northern ireland as well. but elsewhere the cloud should break up, we should see some glimpses of sunshine and a pleasant afternoon for many, particularly in comparison to the weather earlier on in the week, with temperatures peaking at 20 degrees. that's 68 fahrenheit. now, fog could be an issue first thing on friday morning across central and southern areas. that will slowly lift into low cloud, and hopefully that cloud should again start to break up for some sunshine to come through on friday. our weather front not moving very far very fast, still producing some relentless rain across northern ireland and western scotland, but still a relatively warm feel. the east of scotland, 19—20 degrees. we're likely to see 21 somewhere. that's 70 fahrenheit. as we move into the weekend, though, that weather front gradually meanders its way steadily south and east, so it will start to bring a change, but it's a slow process. ahead of it, again dry,
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settled with some sunshine and once again some warmth. behind it, starting to show the first signs of a change. a slightly fresher feel, mid—teens maybe in the far north west of scotland. but we could still see those temperatures, 19—20 degrees not out of the question. the weather front will take its time to clear away. once it does so, it's then going to allow for a cooler air source as the winds swing round to more of a north—westerly, and so you really will notice the difference with the feel of the weather as we go through the week ahead. starting off quite promising, but getting noticeably cooler, but still fairly dry.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines — a breakthrough in the global fight against malaria — the world health organization has approved a vaccine after trials which could save the lives of hundreds of thousands of children in africa. the battle to avoid a shutdown of the us government remains in a stalemate with no vote imminent in the us congress to raise the debt ceiling and keep the money flowing. survivors of an islamist attack on the bataclan concert venue in paris nearly six years ago have been recounting their ordeal in court for the first time. some told how they pretended to be dead. ajudgement from the high court in london has found that the ruler of dubai, sheikh mohammed al maktoum, secretly hacked the phones of his ex—wife, princess haya ofjordan. he denies any involvement.

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