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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 6, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm maryam moshiri. the headlines at eight. a historic medical milestone millions of children in africa will be given a vaccine against malaria which kills hundreds of thousands every year. this long—awaited vaccine is a breakthrough for science, child health. levelling up and a high wage economy borisjohnson promises opportunity for everyone in the country at the conservative party conference. that is the direction in which this country is going now. towards a high wage, high skill, high productivity and yes thereby a low tax economy. also tonight, gas prices hit a record high rising by almost 40% in a day as industry leaders call on the government for help.
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the ruler of dubai ordered the hacking of his ex wife's phone in a bitter custody battle over their children says the high court. scientists have discovered a 200,000,000 year old dinosaurfossil in a filing cabinet in the national history museum. correct good evening and welcome to bbc news. millions of children in africa are set to be vaccinated against malaria for the first time when the vaccine is rolled out across the continent. hundreds of thousand of children under the age of 5 die in africa every year from malaria a disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes. 0ur medical editor fergus walsh has more.
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this is a milestone in public health. after decades of research and trials, this one in kenya, at last a vaccine against one of the world's deadliest infections — malaria. the disease is spread by mosquitoes, which are infected with the malaria parasite. this triggers fever, and in severe cases, organ failure. the world health organization said the vaccine would now be widely rolled out across africa. this long awaited malaria vaccine is a breakthrough for science, child health and malaria control. using this vaccine in addition to existing tools to prevent malaria could save tens of thousands of young lives each year. malaria is a global threat, but around 95% of deaths are in sub—saharan africa.
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every year, more than a quarter of a million african children under the age of five die from malaria. that is one child every two minutes. for more than 30 years, the british pharma giant gsk has been working on a vaccine. and since 2019, more than 800,000 children in ghana, kenya and malawi have been immunised. trials have shown that it cuts cases of malaria by a0%, and those of severe malaria by 30%. but it requires four doses, and further booster shots may be required as immunity wanes over time. so it's much less effective than other childhood vaccines, up but should have huge impact.
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it isa it is a game changer arriving at the right— it is a game changer arriving at the right time — it is a game changer arriving at the right time. reducing the malaria burden_ right time. reducing the malaria burden in— right time. reducing the malaria burden in africa has doubled in recent— burden in africa has doubled in recent years and with tools and new approaches — recent years and with tools and new approaches are urgently needed to -et approaches are urgently needed to get the _ approaches are urgently needed to get the control efforts back on track — more effective malaria vaccines are in the pipeline, including one developed by oxford university. bed nets, insecticides and antimalarial treatments will also continue to play a crucial role in tackling this ancient scourge which, despite today's positive news, is farfrom being defeated. fergus walsh, bbc news. tell me first of all, how important and exciting is this? it is and exciting is this? it is fantastic. _ and exciting is this? it is fantastic. for _ and exciting is this? it is fantastic. for many - and exciting is this? it 3 fantastic. for many different reasons. first, is vaccine against a
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very complicated organism, malaria is a parasite, not a virus and so, is a parasite, not a virus and so, is a parasite, not a virus and so, is a testament to numerous areas in which we pushed it forward both of the technological front. which we pushed it forward both of the technologicalfront. huge numbers of trials have been done and many minds, global partnerships have led to this. it is really encouraging. fantastic news. iwas the malaria — encouraging. fantastic news. iwas the malaria hits _ encouraging. fantastic news. iwas the malaria hits children _ encouraging. fantastic news. i was the malaria hits children harder? their smaller and they have no immunity essentially. and they have a smaller blood volume and the malaria parasite invades and eats the part of the haemoglobin in your blood cells and they have smaller volumes and are more susceptible to anaemia, which is a principal cause of more ability and sometimes mortality and some of the other causes which are in the article. what is it hoped the ruling of this
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vaccine among the under fives is going to achieve in the african continent, which is been hit so hard by the disease by malaria? the main ho -e is by the disease by malaria? the main hope is reduction _ by the disease by malaria? the main hope is reduction in _ by the disease by malaria? the main hope is reduction in mortality - by the disease by malaria? the main hope is reduction in mortality and i hope is reduction in mortality and so, that his illness and death. much of the doctors and children under five in africa. there's a lot more infection but the death is really concentrated in that particular age group and is what we really have to help to prevent and in certain countries, where there is a really high burden, that is of the vaccine is to do. as the article said, i think the main thing is that we should not take our eyes off the ball here. there are constant threats of drug resistance and other people, other members of society, including pregnant women still get malaria and can suffer quite badly and with the use of mosquito nets and with the use of mosquito nets and availability of drugs many tools are still going to be needed after
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nearl 100 are still going to be needed after nearly 100 years _ are still going to be needed after nearly 100 years of _ are still going to be needed after nearly 100 years of trying to get a vaccine against malaria, it is on the greatest medical achievements of all time. do you agree with that? absolutely. it'sjust all time. do you agree with that? absolutely. it's just been a massive pool from all areas of life, including farmers, mainly, research and government teams in africa have really push this forward to get it to this level.— really push this forward to get it to this level. there's been issues administering — to this level. there's been issues administering the _ to this level. there's been issues administering the covid-19 - to this level. there's been issues. administering the covid-19 vaccine administering the covid—i9 vaccine and some of the african continent, is there a plan for this vaccine? we know it has the go—ahead to be rolled out, is going to guarantee this vaccine will get to those who needed and get them fast? that is the bit that as _ needed and get them fast? that is the bit that as we _ needed and get them fast? that is the bit that as we worked - needed and get them fast? that is the bit that as we worked on, - needed and get them fast? that is the bit that as we worked on, the l the bit that as we worked on, the momentum and this announcement today really gives that huge push to enable that. we have to see how it can be best delivered through the programme of immunisation. how we can reach the unreachable and those
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distant. a vaccine means i can offer some protection from a prolonged period unlike the repeated dosing of drugs. it has the potential to reach some of the poorest areas. borisjohnson has closed the conservative party conference in manchester, with a promise to remodel the economy and "promote opportunity" across the uk. let's take you through some of the key moments. first what wasn't in the speech, no mention that this is a hugely significant day for millions of households in this country 4.4 million of those on lowest incomes, losing a thousand pounds a year in universal credit payments. instead the speech was bombastic and some would say witty full of optimism and humour. and it all went down very well with those listening in the hall. it was light on policy but it would be wrong to dismiss it as saying nothing. there was the hailing of things
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the government has done. this can—do government, discover the god brexit done and getting the covid—i9 vaccine roll—out done is going to get social care done and we will deal with the underlying issues of our economy and society. the problem that no government is at the guts to tackle before. the long—term structural weaknesses in uk economy. the prime minister made the case for levelling up and above all for changing the uk's economic model. and improving our ability to produce. were not going to the same old broken mode with low wages, low skills and low productivity, all of it enabled and assisted by uncontrolled immigration. and the answer, to the present stresses and strains, which are mainly a function of economic revival, is not to reach for that same old lever. 0f for that same old lever. of uncontrolled immigration. to keep
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wages low. the answer is to control immigration, to allow people of talent to come to this country, but not to use immigration as an excuse forfailure to not to use immigration as an excuse for failure to invest in not to use immigration as an excuse forfailure to invest in people, in skills and that is the direction in which this country is going now. towards a high wage, high skilled, high productivity and yes, there a low tax economy. it was 45 minutes long. much shorter than the labour leader, keir starmer�*s speech last week in duration, but actually, not that much shorter than keir�*s in words. but a lot more joking. here's one 0n the new military alliance with the us and australia aukus. if you want a demonstration of something that is daring and brilliant that would simply not of happened if we have remained in the eu, i give you an idea so transparently right, aukus. an idea
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so transparently right, that they voted overwhelmingly against that the labour party. there's been a certain ruckus from the anti— aukus caucus, but this is a recognition of the reality that the world is tilting on its axis, on its economic axis and our trades in the in the pacific are becoming more vital than ever before. lets talk to the conservative mp. thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us. did you find borisjohnson's speech time to talk to us. did you find boris johnson's speech funny today? the prime minister is the natural of this, so you would expect there to be some flair and what he saying but throughout that, it really talks about where we now want to go. we have had our plans on the back burner with the pandemic and i want to move forward and make some big changes to the contrary and there is a people voted for.— a people voted for. some say it lacked substance _ a people voted for. some say it lacked substance and _ a people voted for. some say it lacked substance and there - a people voted for. some say itj
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lacked substance and there was a people voted for. some say it - lacked substance and there was not a lot of talk about policy. are you worried about that. do you think people want to see more up might want to see change?— want to see change? people do want to see change. _ want to see change? people do want to see change, but _ want to see change? people do want to see change, but we _ want to see change? people do want to see change, but we do not - want to see change? people do want to see change, but we do not expect| to see change, but we do not expect to see change, but we do not expect to see change, but we do not expect to see a lot of policy because we have a budget coming up. and there will be lots, lots more to come but the prime minister talked about infrastructure, about skills, by jobs, that is exactly what we need in places like grimsby. ihla jobs, that is exactly what we need in places like grimsby. no mention at all about— in places like grimsby. no mention at all about the _ in places like grimsby. no mention at all about the cut _ in places like grimsby. no mention at all about the cut universal- at all about the cut universal credit which a lot of people are going to be seen from today. do you think that it's setting the right tone, did not mention that it all in market in some way? this tone, did not mention that it all in market in some way?— market in some way? this with the rh me to market in some way? this with the rhyme to go _ market in some way? this with the rhyme to go before _ market in some way? this with the rhyme to go before the _ market in some way? this with the | rhyme to go before the conference, not with decisions of already been made and are already being implemented. the reality is that the vision for the country, the choice we have to make is, do we start looking forward instead try to get people out of universal credit positively with new skills, with new jobs and higher wages was made or do
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we do with labour was to do which is tojust keep we do with labour was to do which is to just keep everybody reliant on the state come on very low wages for? we have a new post brexit world and we need to take advantage of it now. w' , and we need to take advantage of it now. w , ., , now. new skills, new wages, those thins now. new skills, new wages, those things take — now. new skills, new wages, those things take time _ now. new skills, new wages, those things take time and _ now. new skills, new wages, those things take time and we _ now. new skills, new wages, those things take time and we have - now. new skills, new wages, those things take time and we have seen| now. new skills, new wages, those l things take time and we have seen a report from the trustjust last month being the three quarters people on universal credit already struggling now to keep up with bills. they are struggling now to buy essentials. having high skills in high wages, i was i going to help people today and tomorrow? we in high wages, i was i going to help people today and tomorrow? we are he said there will — people today and tomorrow? we are he said there will be _ people today and tomorrow? we are he said there will be a _ people today and tomorrow? we are he said there will be a 500,000,000 - said there will be a 500,000,000 budget for those people who are struggling and need some means to get them through and obviously, the energy crisis is going to get worse over the winter period and i'm sure the government would do more to make sure those and hardship or getting help. but we need people to start thinking about what they want to do. those working on universal credit are in universal credit because they're not working full time. we
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need people working full time. we need people working full time. we need people working full—time in places like grimsby there are already talking about businesses were already realising that they don't want to move ahead with lots of low—paid people. they want fewer people with higher skills and which is a going up because of that. because our companies want to employ uk citizens. they don't want to keep importing people cheaply. you uk citizens. they don't want to keep importing people cheaply.— importing people cheaply. you said esterda importing people cheaply. you said yesterday that _ importing people cheaply. you said yesterday that we _ importing people cheaply. you said yesterday that we do _ importing people cheaply. you said yesterday that we do not _ importing people cheaply. you said yesterday that we do not see - yesterday that we do not see physical changes and my town, i am highly likely not to keep my seat. but are these changes that they want to see, given that there's been a tory government for ii to see, given that there's been a tory government for 11 years? the first town, — tory government for 11 years? the first town, what _ tory government for 11 years? tue: first town, what that tory government for 11 years? the: first town, what that is done tory government for 11 years? tue: first town, what that is done is bring it over £50,000,000 worth of government funding and that is already started, boyd is happening with three to make things like this is private investment as well. and there is more than in our town in recent history and that is creating
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more jobs. recent history and that is creating morejobs. 0f recent history and that is creating morejobs. of god recent history and that is creating more jobs. of god to recent history and that is creating morejobs. of god to do now is support people locally and across towns like grimsby to get them — of course we were trying to do now. the things i kick—start are programmes, and players are realising that they need to take employees with them. so you cannotjust expect an oven ready employee employees want to take that extra mile on programmes, un— apprenticeships that is really starting to grow now. ids, apprenticeships that is really starting to grow now. a devey in the programme- — starting to grow now. a devey in the programme- - _ starting to grow now. a devey in the programme- - good _ starting to grow now. a devey in the programme. - good to _ starting to grow now. a devey in the programme. - good to have - starting to grow now. a devey in the programme. - good to have you. - starting to grow now. a devey in the i programme. - good to have you. more programme. — good to have you. more coming with the papers. it isa it is a quarter past eight in these the very latest headlines. millions of children in africa are said to be vaccinated against malaria for the
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first time when the vaccine is rolled out across the continent. the prime minister has warned there will be difficulties as the uk transitions towards what he calls a high wage, high skill economy and he told the conservative party conference that it was part of his plans to level up the country. gas prices have hit another record high, rising by about 40% in a day as the industry leaders call on the government for help. sport now — and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good evening to everyone watching. a saudi arabian—backed takeover of newcastle united appears to have moved a step closer this evening, after the country resolved a tv piracy dispute. the issue has been part of a disagreement between newcastle and the premier league over a £300 million takeover which collapsed last summer. that centred on whether the saudi owners would pass the league's owners�* and directors' test, which measures the suitability of owners at a club.
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chelsea have begun their women's champions league campaign in the last few minutes. emma hayes�* side reached the final last season. they're playing the german side wolfsburg this evening, who they knocked out at the quarterfinals stage in the last campaign. 16 minutes played in 1— nothing up. the build—up continues to the big fight in las vegas on saturday, the british wbc heavyweight champion tyson fury against the american deontay wilder. it's the third fight between the pair, who are about to give a press conference. 0ur reporter ade adedoyin is there. these are still two of the biggest names in boxing. and there's been a lot of bad blood since that second fight here in las vegas deontay has made a lot of accusations as to why he lost the fight, accusing the fury of cheating, blame the city were to the ring and said except the energy in his legs, and his trainer come the former 0lympic in his legs, and his trainer come
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the former olympic champion who said, he threw the towel maturely according to deontay. there's a lot of bad blood between the parent, it's going to be interesting to see the approach this because last time they came for this was the publicise they came for this was the publicise the spout, he would not engage with the spout, he would not engage with the media. he answered one question and left it to his trainer to deal with the press and as for tyson fury, he was loud and jovial as he always is and expect the same today and i'm just wondering whether fury will try to poke and prod him today for the sake of reaction. the england and wales cricket board will decide on friday whether this winter's ashes series in australia can go ahead. that's after positive talks with cricket australia this week. england's players have raised concerns about conditions for the tour, including whether or not their families will be allowed to travel, quarantine arrangements, and any potential bubble they might have to live in. but discussions between their representaives, cricket australia and the ecb has brought the staging of the series a step closer. emma raducanu says she's in no hurry to appoint a new coach
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as she prepares for her first tournament since winning the us open. she's in indian wells ahead of the biggest women's event outside of the four grand slams, which is beginning this evening. the 17th seed, though, won't play until friday. not playing the first for five months and barely at all because of the pandemic also because she was studying for her a—levels, a run of tournaments and she plays well here, she may not have a lot of time for all of these because of the plague in moscow and romania and austria before the end of the season to train further increase that ranking, and get used a life as a us champion. people want to beat you and perhaps have a trial, she was talking about for the coach at the end of the season. with the view that she can get someone in place for the start of the new year and that australian open in particular. she is in no rush, it's important to get the right person the former
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british number one and a coach of katie and also british nationals are helping her out here in the desert. the way for nations league is up against spain and they are giving them the lead, there are half into that one. the ruler of dubai authorised the hacking of his former wife's phone as well as her lawyers' phones as part of a "sustained campaign of intimidation and threat" during a custody battle over their children. a highjudgejudge ruled that sheikh mohammed al maktoum a high courtjudge ruled that sheikh mohammed al maktoum gave his "express or implied authority" for the phone of his sixth wife princess haya to be infiltrated. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner reports. together no longer. dubai's ruler and his ex—wife, jordan's princess haya now fighting a custody battle in the high court. it's been revealed today that
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sheikh mohammed ordered illegal phone hacking during a crucial phase of the hearings. princess haya's phone was hacked, so were those of her personal assistant, her security and legal team — and even that of baroness shackleton, her barrister and a member of the house of lords. princess haya, in white, fled dubai two years ago after learning of her husband's abduction and mistreatment of two of his daughters. she applied for court orders to prevent her children from being returned to dubai. thejudgments published here today reveal the extraordinary lengths that one middle eastern ruler — and a close ally of britain — has gone to to exercise total control over the women in his family. the measures had been described as an abuse of power and a serial breach of criminal law here in britain. the court heard how agents of the dubai ruler used intrusive spyware called pegasus, sold by isreal�*s nso group to the united arab emirates to infect the mobile phones
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of the sheikh's opposing legal team. what is remarkable about this case is that it shows starkly that autocrats will take this technology, which is allegedly for fighting crime and terror, and use it to do exactly what you would expect. they target people they find to be problematic. and of course, it is not a surprise that yet again a partner is targeted with this kind of spy ware. sheikh mohammed has now issued the following statement... mobile phone hacking, the court heard, was also used to track and abduct one of sheikh mohammed's daughters, when she tried unsuccessfully
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to flee divide by boat in 2018. i am making this video because it could be the last video i make. in this smuggled video, she said she was imprisoned in a villa. recent photographs posted online appear to show her at liberty, but human rights campaigners still question whether she is free. sheik mohammed's global reputation will have taken a hit on these allegations. a billionaire racehorse owner, he remains a giant figure in the equestrian world. but with the court having found that uk law has been broken here, this case poses extremely awkward questions about one of britain's closest friends in the middle east. frank gardner, bbc news. gas prices have soared to a record high up almost 40% in the past 2a hours as concerns grow about the winter ahead. prices fell back slightly again from those highs this afternoon after russia promised to increase supplies. 0ur economics editor faisal islam explains why this isn'tjust a uk
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problem and outlined the serious concerns about the widespread impact it could have. when you're trying to raise living standards, it's about getting wages rising faster than prices. and as the prime minister was speaking, the markets were conjuring up an iceberg for him in terms of the wholesale gas prices. i am going to show a chart here and there are the prices is big energy companies pay for the gas that they sell on to you, and you can see it going up and away, and 2.72 per therm — typically, it is 50p or 60p, 1p is seen to be a crisis. it fell back a bit because of vladimir putin trying to soothe the market, saying that the russians would supply more. what does this mean in practice? for now, because of the energy price cap until april, consumers will be protected from that extraordinary rise in wholesale markets, even though the prices have gone
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up this month. but from april, what economists, analysts and industry insiders are suggesting is that that chart would mean a rise in domestic energy prices of 30% to 50%, £1i00, £500, if it was sustained untiljanuary. now, that is a significant amount, the sort of amount that i think the government would have to think about whether they wanted to intervene in some way. that poses a dilemma in terms of the cost, it poses a dilemma in terms spending money to subsidise energy at a time when they're trying to deal with climate change, but itjust shows, given the government's agenda, and immediate test of those words and those promises on living standards coming from the gas markets. the highest daily number for a month. 0n
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the highest daily number for a month. on average, just over 3a,000 new cases were reported per day in the last week. 6,000 energy 36 people were in hospital with coronavirus across the uk yesterday. row 143 deaths of people who died within 28 days of positive covid—19 test. hundred ten deaths were announced on average every day in the past week. the latest depths for people who have been vaccinated have not been made available. 0n on tuesday, a panel of experts called for a public inquiry into institutions for unmarried mothers. police have not said officers from the historical child abuse team will be investigating the institutions.
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the decision is being bills approved by msps were beyond holyrood's powers. the bills will now go back to holyrood to be reconsidered and amended, with the scottish government saying it is committed to bringing them into law "at the earliest possible opportunity". let's get more on this from professor aileen mcharg from durham university. she's an expert in uk and scottish constitutional law. if you can, just explain as simply as can to viewers around the world, what is this about? the as can to viewers around the world, what is this about?— what is this about? the two bills incorporated _ what is this about? the two bills incorporated into _ what is this about? the two bills incorporated into scott's - what is this about? the two bills incorporated into scott's law- what is this about? the two bills incorporated into scott's law to l incorporated into scott's law to separate international treaties. the rights of the child and the european government. these treaties on the model of the human rights act so, in other words, obligations on public
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authorities to comply with the obligations in the treaties and the court to interpret the legislation compatibly with the treaties whenever possible. uk government took exception, not to the principle of the corporation of these provisions, but to the fact that they sought to apply to uk legislation as well as scottish parliament legislation and to both areas and in the case of the un, also to uk public authority acting in scotland. also to uk public authority acting in scotland-— also to uk public authority acting in scotland. . , ., in scotland. sourcing the impinge on sovereiun in scotland. sourcing the impinge on sovereignty for _ in scotland. sourcing the impinge on sovereignty for stubble _ in scotland. sourcing the impinge on sovereignty for stubble is _ in scotland. sourcing the impinge on sovereignty for stubble is that - in scotland. sourcing the impinge on sovereignty for stubble is that the i sovereignty for stubble is that the key thing? sovereignty being impinged upon. key thing? sovereignty being impinged upon-— key thing? sovereignty being impinged upon. key thing? sovereignty being iminaed uon. ., ., impinged upon. following the ruling three ears impinged upon. following the ruling three years ago _ impinged upon. following the ruling three years ago on _ impinged upon. following the ruling three years ago on the _ impinged upon. following the ruling three years ago on the scottish -
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three years ago on the scottish bill, and the scotland act, which declares the continuing sovereignty of the uk parliament. that cannot be by the scottish parliament. any attempts to condition the exercise of the uk parliamentary legislative competence first scotland announced to that provision. any attempt to influence the interpretation of the uk legislation, even if and devolved areas, according to the court is beyond their competence. tbshd areas, according to the court is beyond their competence. and the reason they _ beyond their competence. and the reason they are _ beyond their competence. and the reason they are talking _ beyond their competence. and the reason they are talking about - beyond their competence. and the reason they are talking about this| reason they are talking about this more so is the key thing is independence in the referendum being called. how does this affect that potential? tt called. how does this affect that otential? ., , �* . ., potential? it doesn't affect in a direct sense — potential? it doesn't affect in a direct sense because _ potential? it doesn't affect in a direct sense because the? - potential? it doesn't affect in a direct sense because the? of. potential? it doesn't affect in a l direct sense because the? of the legality of a referendum bill raises different kinds of legal issues, the issues of this case, what it does do
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issues of this case, what it does do is give an indication perhaps of the general attitudes of the court. the court took a very restrictive view of the scope of their competence and the implication of other developments in that perhaps is an indication of how it might decide other high—profile cases in this area and there is also a challenge by the welsh government to the uk internal market act, which is worth looking out for as well.— looking out for as well. summer callin: looking out for as well. summer calling this _ looking out for as well. summer calling this a _ looking out for as well. summer calling this a blow— looking out for as well. summer calling this a blow to _ looking out for as well. summer calling this a blow to nicola - calling this a blow to nicola sturgeon. calling this a blow to nicola sturgeon-— calling this a blow to nicola sturueon. ~ . ., , , ., calling this a blow to nicola sturieon, . ., ., , , ., , sturgeon. what it means is that this le . islation sturgeon. what it means is that this legislation will _ sturgeon. what it means is that this legislation will have _ sturgeon. what it means is that this legislation will have to _ sturgeon. what it means is that this legislation will have to go back - sturgeon. what it means is that this legislation will have to go back to i legislation will have to go back to the scottish parliament and they will have to be amended to remove the offending provisions. they will be enacted, but they will be rather narrow were in their application than was originally intended. it's
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worth pointing out that the european charter of the government bill was not a scottish governor bill, was actually a members bill created by the former msp and these are also, the former msp and these are also, the bill is part of a package of human rights propose human rights bill reform in scotland and so it might be regarded as problematic in suggesting that any future bills incorporating other human rights treaties, which are planned, will also have to be narrowed in their scope. the ability of the scottish parliament to secure the maximum protection for human rights in scotland, which is its preferred aim is going to be much more difficult to achieve. is going to be much more difficult to achieve-— is going to be much more difficult to achieve. ., ,, i. . ., to achieve. thank you so much for explaining — to achieve. thank you so much for explaining all— to achieve. thank you so much for explaining all of— to achieve. thank you so much for explaining all of that _ to achieve. thank you so much for explaining all of that to _ to achieve. thank you so much for explaining all of that to us - to achieve. thank you so much for explaining all of that to us and - to achieve. thank you so much for explaining all of that to us and to | explaining all of that to us and to viewers at home. thank you once again. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. hello there.
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it's been a slightly quieter day today with less wind and rain around and a little more in the way of sunshine, as you can see quite clearly from east sussex earlier on this afternoon. now, it does look likely that we will continue to see those clear skies across east anglia and the southeast for a time, but clouding over from the west, a little bit of patchy drizzle through the night across west wales and northwest england, and some more persistent rain arrives with a weather front into northern ireland and western scotland. but it is this weather front that's allowing the wind direction to swing round to a south—westerly and to drive in much milder air over the next few days. it means that early morning cloud should start to thin and break in some places and the temperatures will continue to climb above the average for the time of year. some of that rain into northern ireland and western scotland fairly persistent throughout the day, but even here, it will be on the warm side, top temperatures through thursday afternoon of 20 celsius. warmer still with a little more sunshine for one or two of us with temperatures a good four or five degrees above the average for the time of year.
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it is nearly a 30 3pm. —— 833 pm. it is nearly a 30 3pm. —— 833 p.m.. this is bbc news. i'm maryam moshiri. the headlines: millions of children in africa will be given a vaccine against malaria which kills hundreds of thousands every year. forcejohnson has a plan to level up the country in his conference speech. gas prices are to hit another record high, as industry leaders: the government to help —— borisjohnson. the high court finds the ruler of dubai secretly hacked the ruler of dubai secretly hacked the phones of his ex—wife, princess haya ofjordan.
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more now on borisjohnson closing the conservative party conference in manchester with a promise to build on his commitment to level up and to tackle inequalties across the uk. so how will the prime minister promises resonate with voters and businesses? 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth has been to the marginal seat of hastings to find out. hastings is a tone of contrasts. affluent areas sit alongside some of the country's most deprived. this community group offers practical support to local parents. here are upbeat messages can fill a world away when higher here, upbeat messages can feel a world away when higher bills are beckoning. as you go, you are checking prices, you get to the till, and it is £15, £20 more a week. here, there is worry about how struggling families will cope with the loss of £20 a week on universal credit. i fully understand people
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should be aware it was going to be taken away, it would not be here forever, but there are a lot of parents that have relied on that very small amount of money. do you think the government gets it? it is hard to get up in the morning for a lot of people. it is rough, but it is good to see things are getting better. for some small businesses, it feels tough. this space supports local start—ups and many are managing shortages and disruption. rory, who runs this burger restaurant, has always paid above the minimum wage and recently increased salaries but says the onus cannot all be on business. the high wage economy, it's a good idea to aim for that, but you have to be realistic about things like service industry. not everybody has the ability to pay that kind of wages. what you might find at the end of all this is price rises. jess says brexit and supply chain issues have proved that real problem. she is trying to shift production here but says it is not easy.
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you can only do so much. we are taking on one person to help us with the production. how are we supposed to ramp up without any support or advice? it is not that we do not have the skills, we are taking time to figure things out. this coastal community can feel overlooked, so the promise of attention in borisjohnson's speech was cautiously welcomed. i think he has the right idea because this does need regenerating. it all comes down to money. doing a lot of talking but not much action. for this conservative councillor, investment must focus on local needs. we've got inflation on the horizon, so i just feel that to detail on local issues is what central government has to do. the root cause of a lot of deprivation in hastings is our lack of educational achievement. big promises have been made about the long—term. the first worry for some here, though, is the prospect of a choppy few months.
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alex forsyth, bbc news, hastings. let's discuss the prime minister's speech in more detail. with me is daniel pryor, who is the head of programmes at the adam smith insitute. also, i'm joined by seena shah, a conservative campaigner who stood for the brentford and isleworth parliamentary seat in the 2019 general election. thank you to both of you forjoining me. let me start by asking you, seena, what did you make of this beach today? tt seena, what did you make of this beach today?— beach today? it did not really surrise beach today? it did not really surprise me. _ beach today? it did not really surprise me, i— beach today? it did not really surprise me, i did _ beach today? it did not really surprise me, i did not - beach today? it did not really surprise me, i did not think. beach today? it did not really i surprise me, i did not think this would be on levelling up and how he would be on levelling up and how he would actually plan to do that, and i think the reception that he received from the conference delegates was exactly as i thought. it was a bit muted around all the vaccine stuff but definitely a lot of support for the agenda that everyone campaigned on for 2019. d0 everyone campaigned on for 2019. do you agree with that assessment, daniel? ., ., ._ ., , , daniel? no, i would say it was very disappointing _ daniel? no, i would say it was very disappointing for— daniel? no, i would say it was very disappointing for my _ daniel? no, i would say it was very disappointing for my effective, - disappointing for my effective, largely— disappointing for my effective, largely bits of blustar. it was well
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delivered — largely bits of blustar. it was well delivered and engaging as is the manner— delivered and engaging as is the manner of the prime minister, but it is concerning — manner of the prime minister, but it is concerning to see the conservative party champion a high tax, conservative party champion a high tax. low— conservative party champion a high tax, low productivity economy, he seemed _ tax, low productivity economy, he seemed to — tax, low productivity economy, he seemed to be the making the right noises, but it comes— making the right noises, but it comes to _ making the right noises, but it comes to labour shortages... i think that the _ comes to labour shortages... i think that the devil is in the detail in the detail— that the devil is in the detail in the detail was inspiring any confidence.— the detail was inspiring any confidence. ~ , ., ~' the detail was inspiring any confidence. ~ , ., ,, ., confidence. why do you think that he underlined that _ confidence. why do you think that he underlined that above _ confidence. why do you think that he underlined that above everything - underlined that above everything else? ., , ., , underlined that above everything else? ., , , underlined that above everything else? ., ,, ., underlined that above everything else? ., , , underlined that above everything else? ., , ., , , ., ., else? conservatives used to point to endless lines — else? conservatives used to point to endless lines in _ else? conservatives used to point to endless lines in their _ else? conservatives used to point to endless lines in their campaign - endless lines in their campaign literature — endless lines in their campaign literature as a suggestion the economy— literature as a suggestion the economy is not working, and now... suggestion— economy is not working, and now... suggestion from ministers, lowered migration, _ suggestion from ministers, lowered migration, high wages story over the past few days, you'd be forgiven in thinking it— past few days, you'd be forgiven in thinking it is a pretty hastily put together— thinking it is a pretty hastily put together excuse for some of the issues _ together excuse for some of the issues that the country is facing
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with supply chain disruptions, shortages and whatnot, but more than anything _ shortages and whatnot, but more than anything it— shortages and whatnot, but more than anything it comes across as... and a level— anything it comes across as... and a level student — anything it comes across as... and a level student would tell you why, the evidence that free moving with the european union had impact. a firm that— the european union had impact. a firm that used to rely on cheap migrant— firm that used to rely on cheap migrant labour now invest in productivity and boost wages. this is not _ productivity and boost wages. this is not easy— productivity and boost wages. this is not easy in many sectors, it is very— is not easy in many sectors, it is very hard — is not easy in many sectors, it is very hard to _ is not easy in many sectors, it is very hard to boost productivity if you're _ very hard to boost productivity if you're picking fruit, and it is quite — you're picking fruit, and it is quite likely that many firms will respond — quite likely that many firms will respond to the sort of thing by passing — respond to the sort of thing by passing on these higher wage costs by raising _ passing on these higher wage costs by raising their prices. i know this is something that the chancellor hasm _ is something that the chancellor has... ,, . . is something that the chancellor has... ,, ., ., is something that the chancellor has... ,, . ., ., is something that the chancellor has... ,, ., ., ., .,
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has... seena, are you worried about that side has. .. seena, are you worried about that side of— has... seena, are you worried about that side of the _ has... seena, are you worried about that side of the economic _ has... seena, are you worried about that side of the economic plan - that side of the economic plan coachella absolutely. absolutely. we are seeing rising costs, whether it is the energy costs, whether it is the energy costs going up, fuel costs going up, and at the same time, you are not necessarily seeing wages go up in line with that for everybody, so you are seeing some industries where wages are rising and it has been a long time coming, they have had to rise. i think it is important that some of those people that were not a valued in our economy as much before, we are starting to reckon is how important they are, and their conditions are going up, and i think we now need to recognise that that is not happening everywhere and there are going to be some people and some families that really struggle this winter. shire and some families that really struggle this winter.- struggle this winter. are you worried, seena, _ struggle this winter. are you worried, seena, about - struggle this winter. are you worried, seena, about the l struggle this winter. are you l worried, seena, about the fact struggle this winter. are you - worried, seena, about the fact that given was in the manifesto, things like the promise not to raise national insurance, a promise about the triple attention, to keep that in place, a promise about getting
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about getting basically done —— brexit completely done— do you think people you campaigned to are looking to the conservative party and thinking, look, these men faster promises you made, you've gone back on —— triple lock on pension. t on —— triple lock on pension. i really do believe that we on —— triple lock on pension. t really do believe that we should be living on the manifesto that we stood for, and, yes, there has been covid and there have been supply chain issues and so on, but effectively people of not voted in the labour party, they have not voted in a parties wants to increase taxes, and ifeel that we have to deliver on admin festive the people voted for, so i have been really disappointed with that kind of activity we have seen and that real step away from what conservatism really should be. t step away from what conservatism really should be.— step away from what conservatism really should be. i see you nodding there. likewise _ really should be. i see you nodding there. likewise on _ really should be. i see you nodding there. likewise on the _ really should be. i see you nodding there. likewise on the tax - really should be. i see you nodding there. likewise on the tax hikes, i there. likewise on the tax hikes, especially- _ there. likewise on the tax hikes, especially. echoing _ there. likewise on the tax hikes, especially. echoing the _ there. likewise on the tax hikes, especially. echoing the words - there. likewise on the tax hikes, especially. echoing the words of| there. likewise on the tax hikes, i especially. echoing the words of the chancellor— especially. echoing the words of the
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chancellor this week, boris brought up chancellor this week, boris brought up thatcher in a way to justify the tax hikes — up thatcher in a way to justify the tax hikes that are now essential to a room _ tax hikes that are now essential to a room full— tax hikes that are now essential to a room full of conservatives, and it seemed _ a room full of conservatives, and it seemed to — a room full of conservatives, and it seemed to work 0k a room full of conservatives, and it seemed to work ok for that room, but the idea _ seemed to work ok for that room, but the idea of— seemed to work ok for that room, but the idea of raising taxes at a very critical— the idea of raising taxes at a very critical time in a pre—fragile economic— critical time in a pre—fragile economic recovery, post—pandemic, is not a _ economic recovery, post—pandemic, is not a particular good one. borrowing costs— not a particular good one. borrowing costs are _ not a particular good one. borrowing costs are at — not a particular good one. borrowing costs are at historic close intelligence from a political spectre _ intelligence from a political spectre of, it risks labour replacing the tories as the party of low tax _ replacing the tories as the party of low tax in — replacing the tories as the party of low tax in the minds of many voters. there _ low tax in the minds of many voters. there is— low tax in the minds of many voters. there is already pulling suggesting this may— there is already pulling suggesting this may have started happening. whether— this may have started happening. whether that remains to be seen, whether— whether that remains to be seen, whether that is going to stick around, _ whether that is going to stick around, it— whether that is going to stick around, it is my money the tory should _ around, it is my money the tory should be — around, it is my money the tory should be focusing more on growth here, _ should be focusing more on growth here, and _ should be focusing more on growth here, and just hearing attempts to justify— here, and just hearing attempts to justify tax — here, and just hearing attempts to justify tax hikes at a conservative conference — justify tax hikes at a conservative conference is worrying news for anyone — conference is worrying news for anyone that is an advocate of smaller— anyone that is an advocate of smaller state and a more free market economy _ smaller state and a more free market econom . , ., ., economy. 0k, daniel pryor from the adam smith — economy. 0k, daniel pryor from the
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adam smith institute _ economy. 0k, daniel pryor from the adam smith institute and _ economy. 0k, daniel pryor from the adam smith institute and seena i economy. 0k, daniel pryor from the i adam smith institute and seena shah, conservative campaigner, it has been really good to have you on to have your point of view. before we go on, let us bring you some breaking news coming to us about the case against prince andrew. hejust coming to us about the case against prince andrew. he just has read for the duke of york's lawyers to get a copy of the settlement which is lawyers believe will nullify the civil sexual assault case against prince andrew, so the representative of prince andrew had argued at a previous hearing that the virginia guiffre... the lawyer of virginia guiffre... the lawyer of virginia guiffre... the lawyer of virginia guiffre was... her attorney believes this is irrelevant to the case of prince andrew. this all happened during the first pretrial hearing of the case last month, when
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previously prince andrew's lawyers said there had been a settlement agreement that the plaintiff had entered into in a prior action that releases the duke and others from any and all potential liability, so clearly his side believing that this sealed document is hugely important to the civil lawsuit which would in fact and it, but missed guiffre's side saying it does not make a difference. just to remind you, miss guiffre is suing prince andrew for elijah lee sexually assaulting her when she was a teenager, and she is currently seeking unspecified damages and their speculation the sum could potentially be millions of dollars, but the latest on this is both legal parties are continuing —— for allegedly sexually assaulting her. more on this story on our website and as and when we get here on the bbc news. it is just it isjust coming it is just coming onto a quarter to
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9pm. let's move on. the prime minister has been accused of not taking the prospect of a national pig cull seriously, according to a vet who is working with the government to tackle problems caused by the overcrowding. the national pig association say that 600 pigs have already been shot and a mass cull is "the next stage". we'll speak to that vet, duncan berkshire, in a moment. first, let's listen to what the prime minister had to say about a possible cull speaking on the andrew marr programme on sunday. 120,000 pigs are going to have to be killed and incinerated if there is no answer to the shortage of abattoir and butchery workers in the next ten days. that would be the single biggest cull of healthy animals ever to happen in the history of british agriculture. yeah. you have ten days to deal with that. what are you going to do? yeah, well, i hate to break it to you, andrew, but i'm afraid ourfood processing industry does involve the killing of a lot of animals, and that is... butchering and then selling them for food, and that's not what we're talking about. that is the reality.
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joining me now is duncan berkshire, who is a veterinary practitioner. duncan, thank you first of all for joining us on bbc news. can you respond to viewers at home what is the crux of the problem here? good evenin: , the crux of the problem here? good evening. and _ the crux of the problem here? good evening, and thank— the crux of the problem here? good evening, and thank you _ the crux of the problem here? (limp. evening, and thank you for having me on this evening. i suppose the main crux is that we have a bit of a blockage, a bottleneck, in moving pigs from pig farms through to the point where they can be sold as food for british consumers to eat, and that bottleneck is in the butchery side of things and the processing side, and a lot of that is of the base—level people who are uk pig farmers, working to produce quality assured and high welfare pork products, and because it is out of their control, there is very little we can do from our end, but yet we are the people left with all of the extra picks, the backlog of pics, and the discussions that are now happening between uk pig farmers and their vents are notjust win but how
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we would have to try and enact a cull of these animals, which is such a great amount of food wasted —— and their vets is notjust win. a great amount of food wasted -- and their vets is not just win.— their vets is not 'ust win. you're lookin: their vets is not 'ust win. you're looking at _ their vets is not 'ust win. you're looking at a — their vets is not just win. you're looking at a lack— their vets is not just win. you're looking at a lack of— their vets is not just win. you're looking at a lack of butchery i their vets is not just win. you're i looking at a lack of butchery staff, am i correct? why is there a lack of butchery staff? what is behind that like? irate butchery staff? what is behind that like? ~ ., butchery staff? what is behind that like? ~ . ., , butchery staff? what is behind that like? . . ., , ., ., butchery staff? what is behind that like? . . ., ., ., ., like? we have always allied to an element on _ like? we have always allied to an element on foreign _ like? we have always allied to an element on foreign labour- like? we have always allied to an element on foreign labour as i like? we have always allied to an| element on foreign labour as part like? we have always allied to an i element on foreign labour as part of that, particularfrom the european union, and it is a highly skilled process, butchery, and it is well—paid. however, amongst all the him it's of brexit and then, located by the covid pandemic, a lot of them have gone home. they have not been home to the families for a long period of time and as they have gone home, there is but a number of them deciding not to come back or have been able to come back, due to some of the immigration laws which have changed for them to move back, and so we are now short of staff at a really important part of our food
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chain from farm to... without that bottleneck being released, we are good have severe problems on farms. what is the answer? as you mentioned, this is a highly skilled job. it will take years to get people to that level of skill in this country. what is the answer right now for those pigs?- this country. what is the answer right now for those pigs? sure. we are askin: right now for those pigs? sure. we are asking for— right now for those pigs? sure. we are asking for a _ right now for those pigs? sure. we are asking for a temporary - are asking for a temporary relaxation or temporary covid type recovery visa which would allow these workers either backing from these workers either backing from the eu or we have skilled butchery staff prepared to come for the rest of the road as well, and if we can get that in 12 to 18 months, that gives that bit of breathing room to help train uk butchers up to that kind of level and also put in elements of automation, prime minister and his cabinet have been talking about introducing other ways of helping this process and that is what we are looking at, but we need some time. there have been a lot of delays around the whole covid pandemic and challenges, and so that
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has made it really challenging to get things in place for now. istethozit has made it really challenging to get things in place for now. what do ou think get things in place for now. what do you think of — get things in place for now. what do you think of the _ get things in place for now. what do you think of the government? i get things in place for now. what do you think of the government? some get things in place for now. what do i you think of the government? some of argue the government is proving itself to be unsupportive of agriculture. is that something you agree with? t agriculture. is that something you agree with?— agree with? i think some of the comments _ agree with? i think some of the comments which _ agree with? i think some of the comments which have - agree with? i think some of the comments which have come i agree with? i think some of the i comments which have come from some of the senior ministers and apprenticed her himself has shown there is a fundamental misunderstanding of uk agriculture —— the prime minister himself. we have some of the highest welfare standards and legal standards, and yet as we look to see that disappear without the support of the government, that is effectively exporting all of the control we have over the welfare, so the products we then end up importing are done to lower standards, they are not assured, we have no control over what is going on with that, and the crux of this is also about cheap labour, which is what the prime minister keeps talking about. we would have no control over that either, that would be exported from the uk and we will be importing an
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inferior product onto the shelves for british consumers to consume. 0k, duncan berkshire, it has been really good having you on the programme and it has been really good talking to you this evening. thank you. the video streaming service twitch has confirmed it has been the victim of a data breach. twitch, founded in 2011, is predominately used by creators to live stream themselves playing video games. the leaked information is said to include the exact earnings of the network's biggest streamers. the platform is estimated to have more than 140 million monthly active users. 0nline safety experts have urged anyone with a twitch account to change their password as a precaution. here with me now is jake moore, who is a cyber security specialist at eset. jake, thank you very much for joining us on bbc news. can you explain to me first of all what has happened here? because a data breach — who exactly has access this data? this data includes the full source
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code, the programming data behind the website. this is the secret information that no company ever wants to be released into the wild, and someone has collected it all up, including, like you say, the user pay—out information and relisted to anyone who has access to these sites to be able to have a look at it, which is extremely damaging for twitch. ~ , ,., . which is extremely damaging for twitch. ~ , twitch. absolutel e. and people watchino twitch. absolutel e. and people watching this — twitch. absolutel e. and people watching this who _ twitch. absolutel e. and people watching this who have - twitch. absolutel e. and people watching this who have a - twitch. absolutel e. and people watching this who have a twitch | watching this who have a twitch account or who potentially have accounts with similar setups, what are the steps you can take to mitigate against this? this are the steps you can take to mitigate against this? this has been termed art mitigate against this? this has been termed part one. — mitigate against this? this has been termed part one, so _ mitigate against this? this has been termed part one, so that _ mitigate against this? this has been termed part one, so that would i termed part one, so that would suggest more data is going to be released in sometime, but the first thing i would suggest is to look at your passwords that connect you to twitch and make sure that you go and change that one up and if you use that password on any other site on your online accounts, go and change that password as well, and the best
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thing you can use for that system is to use a password manager, and that look after all of your complex, unique passwords for you, but they also suggest you go and use two factor authentication for all of your online accounts as well. istethozit your online accounts as well. what does that mean, _ your online accounts as well. what does that mean, for _ your online accounts as well. what does that mean, for viewers i your online accounts as well. what does that mean, for viewers who may not understand the kind ofjargon? extra layer of security. 0nce not understand the kind ofjargon? extra layer of security. once you've put in your password, verify it is actually you that owns that account, they will send you a code, usually by sms. you can go in download enough to decatur app and you can get that code in your phone which is encrypted, and with that code, you just type it into the account of it knows it is you, so no one gets into that account even if they've got your password. that account even if they've got your password-— that account even if they've got your password. that account even if they've got our oassword. ., . ., ., , ., your password. how much damage you think this has — your password. how much damage you think this has done _ your password. how much damage you think this has done to _ your password. how much damage you think this has done to twitch's - think this has done to twitch's reputation? t think this has done to twitch's reputation?— think this has done to twitch's reputation? i think it is usually damaging. _ reputation? i think it is usually damaging. but _ reputation? i think it is usually damaging, but it _ reputation? i think it is usually damaging, but it is _ reputation? i think it is usually damaging, but it is not - reputation? i think it is usually damaging, but it is notjust i reputation? i think it is usually| damaging, but it is notjust the only thing that is gone on. recently they had a big backlash with even a boycott last month, due to racial
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abuse that is been seen on the site, so there was already quite a difficult place for them right now, so this is just adding to the confusion and disruption in the site. it could affect them hugely in the future, so it is an interesting time for them to see what they're gonna do for themselves right now. jake moore, cyber security specialist at eset, it has been really good to get your insights. the riba stirling prize, for britain's best new building, will be announced next week in a live programme here on the bbc news channel. the shortlist includes an eco—friendly mosque in cambridge, a boat museum in the lake district and a university building in south west london. over the coming few days, we'll be looking at each of the six buildings on the shortlist. today is the turn of 15 clerkenwell close, a mixed use office and residential building in central london. 0n construction, its limestone facade proved controversial, with the local council initially calling for the building's demolition — a decision
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later overturned on appeal. people might look at this building and think it is completely modern and contemporary, i have never seen anything like it, but actually the building methodology is as old as the megalithic architects and builders. i am chairman of groupwork, a firm of architects. we are in 15 clerkenwell close. it is a mixed use building that has office space in it and residential. this building is in many ways differentiated from others by the stone exoskeleton. the whole building is held up by stone alone. at the same time, it will be the externalfinish. what is it going to look like, what is the actual appearance of it? as we were visiting the quarries, to decide what tone of limestone we might choose, the quarry master had erected a column for us as a sample of
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what this might look like. next to that was what is called the master block that is extracted from the quarry. it had fossils, ammonite shells, fossilised coral all over the surface. that is the expression not only of the material itself but also the process, the skill of the quarry master and the stonemason expressed in the material and therefore the architecture. the advantages of an exoskeleton are no internal structure. that flexibility at the moment is a series of moving walls and doors. those doors can slide across and subdivide a large room into smaller ones, which essentially means that whatever you lay out internally, for today, can be removed tomorrow. i think one of the beauties of the apartments as a whole is the scale of the reception space, the way the sound works, the relationship to the outside, you can stand on the balcony and have a drink of a summer's evening. every modern building in the uk that has a flat roof needs what is called a biodiverse roof today.
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you plant some flowers, wild flowers, place some logs, in the hope of attracting some insects. there are two beehives up there as well as bird boxes. we didn't expect it to flourish so vigorously. it meant a lot to us to be able to investigate these ideas and see them through, to prove these things do work. i wouldn't call them innovations, rediscovery of how to build simpler, cheaper, quicker, greener. you can put a 30 story equivalent of this building up and be carbon negative. the construction industry, if we could do it overnight, could go from carbon emitter to carbon absorber. the riba stirling prize there. it was a relative of the t rex, but it was the size of a chicken. researchers at the natural history museum have identified fossils of what they believe is the oldest meat—eating dinosaur in the uk. the fragments were found in a welsh quarry more than half a century ago, but they've onlyjust come to light again, as our wales correspondent hywel griffith explains.
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it's the closest wales has ever had to a real life dragon — the metre—long, meat—eating theropod christened pendraig, or chief dragon. and this is what remains. a hip and thigh bone lost for years in the natural history museum's collection until they were recovered from the wrong drawer and everything fell into place. this is one of the oldest dinosaurs from the uk and the oldest known meat—eating dinosaurfrom the uk. this period was when dinosaurs first started evolving. so, dinosaurs are very famous from later days, in thejurassic and the cretaceous, when they really dominated the world, but in this time period, at the end of the triassic, they were only one of several reptile groups. the fossils were found over 60 years ago at this site in south wales, not by palaeontologists but by quarrymen as they blasted off the limestone wall behind me. it has taken decades to realise just how significant their find was.
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they were all quite small, only about 50 centimetres tall or so. cindy's documented discoveries around the vale of glamorgan. there were dinosaurs here 200 million years ago. we do have footprints from a few larger ones, so we know there were a few larger dinosaurs, but we have very few remains of those. most of what we are finding are these very tiny dinosaurs. small in scale but huge in significance. pendraig's relatives could also be hidden in these rocks, waiting to be unearthed. hywel griffith, bbc news, in the vale of glamorgan. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. hello there. it's been a slightly quieter day today with less wind and rain around and a little more in the way of sunshine, as you can see quite clearly from east sussex earlier on this afternoon. now, it does look likely that we will continue to see those clear skies across east anglia and the southeast for a time, but clouding over from the west, a little bit of patchy drizzle through the night across west wales and northwest england,
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and some more persistent rain arrives with a weather front into northern ireland and western scotland. but it is this weather front that's allowing the wind direction to swing round to a south—westerly and to drive in much milder air over the next few days. it means that early morning cloud should start to thin and break in some places and the temperatures will continue to climb above the average for the time of year. some of that rain into northern ireland and western scotland fairly persistent throughout the day, but even here, it will be on the warm side, top temperatures through thursday afternoon of 20 celsius. warmer still with a little more sunshine for one or two of us with temperatures a good four or five degrees above the average for the time of year.
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this is bbc news with me kristen fraser. borisjohnson tells his party he has the guts to force the change is his predecessors have docked. in a closing speech to the conference, the prime minister said we will be weaned from their addiction to low—paid migration. that is the direction in which this country is going now. it was a high wage, high skilled, high productivity and thereby a low tax economy. productivity and thereby a low tax econom . ., ., ., economy. the high court in london answered the _ economy. the high court in london answered the devise _ economy. the high court in london answered the devise rule _ economy. the high court in london answered the devise rule or- answered the devise rule or authorise the hacking of his ex—wife's phone and legal team in the bitter custody battle over their children. the us senate is deadlocked over crucial decision to raise the debt limit which expires in 12 days' time. failure to find
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compromise will be disastrous

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