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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  October 6, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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at six: levelling up and a high—wage economy — borisjohnson's message to the conservative party conference. but the prime minister promised to promote opportunity across the uk. that is the direction in which this country is going now. towards a high wage, high skill, high productivity and, yes, thereby a low—tax economy. gas prices hit a record high — rising by almost 40% in a day — as industry leaders call on the government for help. millions of children in africa will be given a vaccine against malaria, which kills hundreds of thousands every year.
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the care worker who died in the manchester arena bombing after waiting for an hour to be treated — the inquiry hears he could have been saved. the ruler of dubai art the hacking of his ex—wife�*s phone in a better custody battle, says the high court. and found in a welsh quarry — scientists identify fossils of what's thought to be the oldest meat—eating dinosaur in the uk. coming up in the hour on the bbc news channel: the ashes tour should get the green light by the end of the week — but how strong a team will england have? good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. borisjohnson has closed the conservative
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party conference in manchester. with a promise to remodel the economy and "promote opportunity" across the uk. in a speech peppered with jokes, he spoke of building a high—wage economy, with high productivity and low taxes and said he is committed to his levelling up agenda. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports from manchester. they waited from early. the yawn worth it for the faithful. the first self—described super fan there before dawn. as one cabinet minister said, it is all about him. five and a half hours later, the moment borisjohnson has been waiting forfor later, the moment borisjohnson has been waiting for for more than two years. been waiting for for more than two ears. , �* . ., ., been waiting for for more than two ears. , �* ., ., ., , been waiting for for more than two ears. n ., ., years. isn't it amazing to be back here in person? _ years. isn't it amazing to be back here in person? the _ years. isn't it amazing to be back here in person? the first - years. isn't it amazing to be back here in person? the first time i here in person? the first time conservatives _ here in person? the first time conservatives have _ here in person? the first time conservatives have been - here in person? the first time i conservatives have been checked here in person? the first time - conservatives have been checked by gel since beating jeremy corden. we gel since beating jeremy corden. - finally said that cosmonaut into orbit where he belongs. jokes
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alen , orbit where he belongs. jokes aplenty. he — orbit where he belongs. jokes aplenty, he used _ orbit where he belongs. jokes aplenty, he used the - orbit where he belongs. jokes aplenty, he used the spotlight to entertain as much as set out his ambition to change the country in which he claims his predecessors were not brave enough to do. after were not brave enough to do. after decades of— were not brave enough to do. after decades of drift _ were not brave enough to do. after decades of drift and _ were not brave enough to do. till? decades of drift and the other, others can do government that got brexit done, that is getting the —— vaccine roll—out done, we are going to deal with the biggest issues of our economy that no government has had the guts to tackle before. there is discomfort _ had the guts to tackle before. there is discomfort about _ had the guts to tackle before. there is discomfort about what _ had the guts to tackle before. there is discomfort about what the - had the guts to tackle before. there is discomfort about what the front row is doing as families and firms face different pressures this autumn but borisjohnson is promising a new way for the country to do business, using the moment to remake an old argument. the using the moment to remake an old ara ument. ., , using the moment to remake an old ara ument. . , , using the moment to remake an old aruument. . , , ., _, ., argument. the answer is to control immigration. _ argument. the answer is to control immigration. to — argument. the answer is to control immigration, to allow— argument. the answer is to control immigration, to allow talent - argument. the answer is to control immigration, to allow talent to - argument. the answer is to control. immigration, to allow talent to come to this country but not to give as aggression as an excuse for failure to invest in people, skills, equipment, facilities, machinery.
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taxing, borrowing and spending are high. he has tried to cast himself as an economic radical. memories of margaret thatcher. she as an economic radical. memories of margaret thatcher.— margaret thatcher. she would have liked her finger _ margaret thatcher. she would have liked her finger and _ margaret thatcher. she would have liked her finger and said _ margaret thatcher. she would have liked her finger and said more - liked herfinger and said more borrowing now is higher interest rates and higher taxes later. he was cheered for— rates and higher taxes later. he was cheered for low _ rates and higher taxes later. he was cheered for low taxes _ rates and higher taxes later. he was cheered for low taxes one _ rates and higher taxes later. he was cheered for low taxes one day - rates and higher taxes later. he was cheered for low taxes one day but i cheered for low taxes one day but the mission for now, levelling up to make life just as good in every post code. with extra cash for new science teachers and less well—off areas to help. then he reminded his home crowd by his personal and the public�*s experience means more cash for the nhs. the public's experience means more cash for the nhs-— for the nhs. the nhs saved me and our wonderful— for the nhs. the nhs saved me and our wonderful nurses _ for the nhs. the nhs saved me and our wonderful nurses pulled - for the nhs. the nhs saved me and our wonderful nurses pulled me - for the nhs. the nhs saved me and our wonderful nurses pulled me out| our wonderful nurses pulled me out of that pet and front line care workers battled against a new disease selflessly sacrificing their lives and it is right that this party that has looked after the nhs for most of its history should be the one to rise to the challenge.
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there were pleasers for this crowd as well. a crackdown on protesters. a confounded nuisance blocking ambulances, stopping people going about their daily lives, we are taking new powers to incinerate them snugly in prison where they belong. calls to the country for all of us to reassess how we see ourselves. and so we conservatives will defend our history and cultural inheritance not because we are proud of everything but because trying to edit it now is as dishonest as a celebrity trying to change his entry in wikipedia. it is a betrayal of her children's education.- her children's education. boris johnson might— her children's education. boris johnson might have _ her children's education. boris johnson might have waited - her children's education. boris johnson might have waited a long time to give the speech but seemed in a rush to make it. aha, time to give the speech but seemed in a rush to make it.— in a rush to make it. a country that is roud in a rush to make it. a country that is proud to — in a rush to make it. a country that is proud to be _ in a rush to make it. a country that is proud to be a — in a rush to make it. a country that is proud to be a trailblazer, - is proud to be a trailblazer, to judge people not by where they come from but by their spirit and by what is inside them. that is the spirit thatis is inside them. that is the spirit that is the same across this country
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and every town and village and city in the hearts and minds of kids growing up everywhere and that is the spirit we are going to unleash. his wife's verdict? you have a really good. the ultimate judgment is yours. after brexit and the perils of the pandemic borisjohnson wanted figures this week to turn to what is next. there could be hard times ahead but his political dominance here is unchallenged. his party casting his energy. this party believes it is marching to a fifth term office. fantastic. a leader in command. positive. nevershort on ambition. but as the cabinet turns towards westminster they are speeding towards the country's problems. optimism here is one thing, looming political dangers
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weight at journey�*s thing, looming political dangers weight atjourney�*s end. laura kuenssberg, bbc news. so how will borisjohnson's promise of levelling up the economy resonate with voters and businesses? our political correspondent, alex forsyth, has been to the marginal seat of hastings to find out. hastings is a tone of contrasts. affluent areas sit alongside some of the country's most deprived. this community group offers practical support to local parents. here are upbeat messages can fill a world away when higher bills are beckoning. this away when higher bills are beckoning-— away when higher bills are beckoninu. r ., ., beckoning. as you go you are checkin: beckoning. as you go you are checking prices, _ beckoning. as you go you are checking prices, get - beckoning. as you go you are checking prices, get to - beckoning. as you go you are checking prices, get to the i beckoning. as you go you are| checking prices, get to the till beckoning. as you go you are - checking prices, get to the till and it is £15 or £20 more a week. there is worry about _ it is £15 or £20 more a week. there is worry about how— it is £15 or £20 more a week. there is worry about how struggling - is worry about how struggling families will cope with the loss of £20 a week on universal credit. i understand people should be aware it was going to be taken away and it would not be here forever but there are a lot of parents that have relied on that very small amount of money. d0 relied on that very small amount of mone . y ., relied on that very small amount of mone . ,, ~ money. do you think the government nets it? it money. do you think the government gets it? it is — money. do you think the government gets it? it is hard _ money. do you think the government gets it? it is hard to _ money. do you think the government gets it? it is hard to get _
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money. do you think the government gets it? it is hard to get up _ money. do you think the government gets it? it is hard to get up in - money. do you think the government gets it? it is hard to get up in the - gets it? it is hard to get up in the mornin: gets it? it is hard to get up in the morning for— gets it? it is hard to get up in the morning for a _ gets it? it is hard to get up in the morning for a lot _ gets it? it is hard to get up in the morning for a lot of _ gets it? it is hard to get up in the morning for a lot of people. - gets it? it is hard to get up in the morning for a lot of people. it - gets it? it is hard to get up in the morning for a lot of people. it is l morning for a lot of people. it is in hard but _ morning for a lot of people. it is in hard but it— morning for a lot of people. it is in hard but it is— morning for a lot of people. it is in hard but it is good to see things getting _ in hard but it is good to see things getting better. for in hard but it is good to see things getting better-— getting better. for some small businesses _ getting better. for some small businesses it _ getting better. for some small businesses it feels _ getting better. for some small businesses it feels tough. - getting better. for some small businesses it feels tough. this| businesses it feels tough. this businesses it feels tough. this business supports local start—ups and many are managing shortages and disruption. rory runs this burger restaurant and has always paid above the minimum wage had recently increased salaries but says the onus cannot all be on business. the increased salaries but says the onus cannot all be on business.— cannot all be on business. the high wane cannot all be on business. the high wage economy _ cannot all be on business. the high wage economy is — cannot all be on business. the high wage economy is a _ cannot all be on business. the high wage economy is a good _ cannot all be on business. the high wage economy is a good idea - cannot all be on business. the high wage economy is a good idea to - wage economy is a good idea to that but you have to be realistic about things like service industry. not everybody has the ability to pay those kind of wages. what you might find its price rises. jeff says brexit and _ find its price rises. jeff says brexit and supply _ find its price rises. jeff says brexit and supply chain - find its price rises. jeff says i brexit and supply chain issues find its price rises. jeff says - brexit and supply chain issues have proved that real problem. she is trying to shift production here but says it is not easy. you trying to shift production here but says it is not easy.— trying to shift production here but says it is not easy. you can only do so much- — says it is not easy. you can only do so much- we _ says it is not easy. you can only do so much. we are _ says it is not easy. you can only do so much. we are taking _ says it is not easy. you can only do so much. we are taking on - says it is not easy. you can only do so much. we are taking on one - says it is not easy. you can only do . so much. we are taking on one person to help us with the production. how are we supposed to ramp up without any support or advice? it is not that we do not have the skills, we
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are taking time to figure things out. , ., . are taking time to figure things out. , ., , are taking time to figure things out. , . , out. this coastal community can feel overlooked so _ out. this coastal community can feel overlooked so the _ out. this coastal community can feel overlooked so the promise _ out. this coastal community can feel overlooked so the promise of - overlooked so the promise of attention in borisjohnson's speech was cautiously welcomed. i attention in boris johnson's speech was cautiously welcomed.- attention in boris johnson's speech was cautiously welcomed. i think he has the right — was cautiously welcomed. i think he has the right idea _ was cautiously welcomed. i think he has the right idea because - was cautiously welcomed. i think he has the right idea because there - was cautiously welcomed. i think he has the right idea because there is i has the right idea because there is need it all comes down to money. doing a lot of talking but not much action _ doing a lot of talking but not much action. . , . , . action. for this conservative councillor — action. for this conservative councillor investment - action. for this conservative councillor investment must l action. for this conservative - councillor investment must focus on local needs. councillor investment must focus on local needs-— local needs. inflation on the horizon so — local needs. inflation on the horizon so i _ local needs. inflation on the horizon so i just _ local needs. inflation on the horizon so i just feel- local needs. inflation on the horizon so i just feel that i horizon so i just feel that attention to detail and local edges is what central government has today. the root cause of a lot of deprivation in hastings is our lack of educational achievement. big promises to been made about the long—term. the first worry for some here is the prospect of a few months. alex forsyth, bbc news. gas prices have soared to a record high — up almost 40% in the past 2a hours — as concerns grow about the winter ahead. our economics editor faisal islam is here. this is notjust a uk problem —
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it's europe wide — but there are serious concerns about the widespread impact it could have? yes, when you're trying to raise living standards it is about getting wages rising faster than prices and as the minister was speaking markets were conjuring up an iceberg for him in terms of the wholesale gas prices. i am going to show a chart which is the price is big energy companies pay for the gas that they sell on to you and you can see it going up and away and 2.72 pair firm, typically it is 50p or 60p, ip is seen to be a crisis, it fell back a bit of vladimir putin trying to soothe the market. what does this mean in practice? for now, because of the energy price cap until april consumers will be protected from that extraordinary rise in the wholesale market even though the prices have gone up this month but
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from april but industry insiders are suggesting is that that chart would mean a rise in domestic energy prices of 30% to 50%, £400 or 500 p, if it was sustained untiljanuary. that is a significant amount, the sort of amount that the government would have to think about whether they wanted to intervene in some way, which puts us into a dilemma in terms of the cost and spending money to subsidise energy at a time when they are trying to tackle climate change, but it shows given the government's agenda the immediate test of those words and those promises on living standards coming from the gas market.— millions of children in africa are set to be vaccinated against malaria for the first time when the vaccine is rolled out across the continent. hundreds of thousand of children under the age of five die in africa every yearfrom malaria — a disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes. our medical editor fergus walsh has more.
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this is a milestone in public health. after decades of research and trials, this one in kenya, at last a vaccine against one of the world's deadliest infections — malaria. the disease is spread by mosquitoes, which are infected with the malaria parasite. this triggers fever, and in severe cases, organ failure. the world health organization said the vaccine would now be widely rolled out across africa. this long awaited malaria vaccine is a breakthrough for science, child health and malaria control. using this vaccine in addition to existing tools to prevent malaria could save tens of thousands of young lives each year. malaria is a global threat, but around 95% of deaths are in sub—saharan africa.
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every year, more than a quarter of a million african children under the age of five die from malaria. that is one child every two minutes. for more than 30 years, the british pharma giant gsk has been working on a vaccine. and since 2019, more than 800,000 children in ghana, kenya and malawi have been immunised. trials have shown that it cuts cases of malaria by 40%, and those of severe malaria by 30%. but it requires four doses, and further booster shots may be required as immunity wanes over time. so it's much less effective than other childhood vaccines, up but should have huge impact.
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progress has stalled in recent years and end tools and approaches are urgently needed to get the global effort back on track. more effective malaria vaccines are in the pipeline, including one developed by oxford university. bed nets, insecticides and antimalarial treatments will also continue to play a crucial role in tackling this ancient scourge which, despite today's positive news, is farfrom being defeated. fergus walsh, bbc news. a trial has heard that 15 year old keon lincoln was murdered outside his home in a "short and brutal" attack. birmingham crown court was told the teenager died after being repeatedly stabbed by a group of youths who got out of a stolen car and chased him, before being shot in the stomach as he lay on the ground. the five defendants aged between 14 and 18 all deny murder.
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the public inquiry into the manchester arena bombing has heard that one of the victims may have survived if he'd been given medical treatment more quickly. john atkinson, who was a 28—year—old healthcare assistant, asked lay injured in the foyer where the bomb exploded. judith moritz has been at today's hearing. you may find details in her report distressing. john atkinson was a care assistant who helped autistic children and was a big music fan. he had been to watch ariana grande at manchester arena and walked into the foyeryear 12 seconds before it was bombed. as the smoke cleared, john crawled across the floor on his hands and knees. a member of the public, ronald blake, went to his side and called 999. police emergency. hello, can you hear me? there's been an explosion at manchester arena. is anybody injured ? yes, loads. i'm with a man that is really injured.
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his leg is pumping. you need to put pressure on it. 0k? have you got anything on you? in court today, it emerged that ronald blake helped john despite being injured himself and with his own daughter missing. he had had no first aid training. had you ever seen a tourniquet used by anybody? just like everybody else, on telly. ronald blake held onto the tourniquet for nearly an hour during which time no paramedics came to help. others were coming and going and trying to do their bit but the real substantive help tojohn was being given by you and you alone, is that right? at the time, yeah. those injured by the bomb were being carried out of the room to medics who were waiting downstairs at the train station next door.
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there were no stretchers, sojohn atkinson was moved on to a merchandise display board, but it broke as he was being dragged out of the room. he was then put onto a metal barrier. john atkinson's family thanked ronald blake for his heroism but it was an extremely difficult day for them in court, hearing harrowing detail about the wayjohn gripped onto the metal barrier as he was being carried to stop himself sliding off, and heartbreakingly that several times he asked those with him if he was going to die. the public inquiry will consider whetherjohn atkinson could have survived. the court has been told that experts believe that quicker medical intervention could have made a real difference to him. judith moritz, bbc news, manchester. our top stories this evening. boris johnson closes the conservative party conference in manchester with a speech focusing on levelling up the country. and coming up.
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coming up in sportsday in the next 15 minutes on the bbc news channel — we'll have the latest from las vegas with the wilder—fury fight week bubbling up nicely ahead of saturday's world heavyweight clash. the ruler of dubai organise the hacking of his former wife's phone as well as her lawyer's phones. as part of a "sustained campaign of intimidation and threat" during a custody battle over their children. a judge ruled that sheikh mohammed bin rashid al maktoum gave his "express or implied authority" for the phone of his sixth wife princess haya bint al hussein to be infiltrated. our security correspondent frank gardner reports. together no longer. divide's ruler and his ex—wife, jordan's princess
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haya. it's been revealed today that sheikh mohammed ordered illegal phone hacking during a crucial phase of the hearings. princess haya's phone was hacked, her personal assistants, and her security team. and even that of baroness shackleton, her barrister and a member of the house of lords. princess haya, invite, fled to by two years ago after hearing of her husband's abduction and mistreatment of two of his daughters. she applied for a court order to prevent children returning to dubai. the judge heard that one middle eastern ruler and a close ally of britain has gone to to exercise total control over the women in his family. the measures had been described as an abuse of power and the serial breach of criminal law here in britain. the court heard how agents of the dubai ruler used an intrusive spyware kyl pegasus car
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sold to the united emirates to infect their mobile phones of the sheikh's opposing legal team. iloathed sheikh's opposing legal team. what is remarkable _ sheikh's opposing legal team. what is remarkable about _ sheikh's opposing legal team. twat is remarkable about this case sheikh's opposing legal team. wusgt is remarkable about this case is that it shows starkly that autocrats will take this technology which is allegedly for fighting will take this technology which is allegedly forfighting crime will take this technology which is allegedly for fighting crime and terror and use it to do exactly what you would expect. they target people they find to be problematic. it is not a surprise that yet again a partner is targeted with the spy ware. . ~ partner is targeted with the spy ware. ,, ~ . . ,, ware. sheikh mohammed has now issued the followin: ware. sheikh mohammed has now issued the following statement. _ ware. sheikh mohammed has now issued the following statement. i _ ware. sheikh mohammed has now issued the following statement. i have - the following statement. i have always denied the allegations made against me, he said. i continue to do so. mobile phone hacking, the court heard was also used to track and abduct one of sheikh mohammed's
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daughters, when she tried unsuccessfully to flee divide by boatin unsuccessfully to flee divide by boat in 2018. i unsuccessfully to flee divide by boat in 2018.— unsuccessfully to flee divide by boat in 2018. . . ~ , ., boat in 2018. i am making this video because it could _ boat in 2018. i am making this video because it could be _ boat in 2018. i am making this video because it could be the _ boat in 2018. i am making this video because it could be the last - boat in 2018. i am making this video because it could be the last video i l because it could be the last video i make. ih because it could be the last video i make. , . , , make. in this video, she said she was imprisoned _ make. in this video, she said she was imprisoned in _ make. in this video, she said she was imprisoned in a _ make. in this video, she said she was imprisoned in a villa. - was imprisoned in a villa. recent photographs posted online appear to show her at liberty, but human rights campaign are still question whether she is free. sheik mohammed's global reputation will have taken a hit on these allegations. a billionaire racehorse owner, he remains a giant figure in the equestrian world. the court having found that uk law has been broken here, this case poses extremely awkward questions about one briton's closest friends in the middle east. gardner, bbc news. 20 years ago tomorrow the united states began launching airstrikes on al qaeda and the taliban in afghanistan in response to the 9/11 attacks. it marked the start of the western military mission in afghanistan. and for military families who have lost loved ones in the conflict it will be a moment for reflection.
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private conrad lewis was killed in helmand in 2011. fergal keane has been to meet his parents to hear their thoughts on the taliban takeover in afghanistan. that other country, the place that took their son is always with them. and they were watching when the end came. gunshots. in panic stricken, humiliating defeat. the shambles that happened at the end is incredible, i don't know how western powers with ourjoint pedigree and history and military might could actually let that happen. all those poor people who were hoping to get out,
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get to the west somewere just snatched away at the last minute. just terribly sad, terribly sad. conrad was sandy and tony's oldest child. at the age of 22 he was the 353rd british soldier to be killed in afghanistan. what would conrad have thought of it, do you think? he would have been quite angry at the situation. i think he and quite a few of the other soldiers that i know from that time, they are sort of contemplating what what they actually achieved as oppose to what they didn't achieve. you know, they achieved 20 years of hopeful people out there. it's for others who have destroyed that at the end. seven years ago, we went with tony lewis to afghanistan. for him, a journey in search of meaning and everyday a reminder of loss. didn't know it was here. bloody hell, son.
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tony visited the school. back then, girls of all ages could attend. there were 4000 here, many with big ambitions. i want to be a really good doctor in the future. how utterly brilliant was she? her english skills, her ambitions. she just wants to live, become a doctor. back in warwickshire, we had news of the school back in warwickshire, we had news of the school for the lewises. when a bbc reporter visited this week he found only girls up to the age of 12 are allowed to attend. and numbers going to school there have halved. it's a ludicrous state of affairs. again, you are taking people up to a certain age and then snatching that opportunity away from them. how are they going to rebuild the country when all the girls are educated to just one level. that word, afghanistan,
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what does it mean to you? waste comes to mind, doesn't it? waste of lives, waste of money, waste of time. but you just have to hope that somewhere in all that is the the afghan people are strong enough to get over it somehow. how much longer that will take, who knows? the lewises say conrad died fighting for what he believed in. but they also know now what it is to raise a child, to see them through the joy and challenge of life and then to see them changed by war, lost to war. fergal keane, bbc news. let's take a look at the uk's latest coronavirus figures. the government data shows there were 39,851 new infections
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recorded in the latest 24—hour period, so just over new cases were reported on average per day, in the last week. people were in hospital with coronavirus across the uk yesterday. there were 143 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—i9 test. that means, on average, 110 deaths were announced every day in the past week. the latest figures on people who've been vaccinated haven't yet been made available. it was a relative of the t rex, but it was the size of a chicken. researchers at the natural history museum have identified fossils of what they believe is the oldest meat—eating dinosaur in the uk. the fragments were found in a welsh quarry more than half a century ago, but they have onlyjust come to light again. it's the closest wales has ever had to a real life dragon — the metre—long, meat—eating theropod christened pendraig, or chief dragon.
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and this is what remains. a hip and thigh bone lost for years in the natural history museum's collection until they were recovered from the wrong drawer and everything fell into place. this is one of the oldest dinosaurs from the uk and it the oldest known meat—eating dinosaurfrom the uk. this period was when dinosaurs first started evolving. so, dinosaurs are very famous from later days, in thejurassic and the cretaceous, when they really dominated the world, but in this time period, at the end of the triassic, they were only one of several reptile groups. the fossils were found over 60 years ago at this site in south wales, not by palaeontologists but by quarrymen as they blasted off the limestone wall behind me. it has taken decades to realise just how significant their find was. they were all quite small, only about 50 centimetres tall or so. cindy's documented discoveries around the vale of glamorgan. there were dinosaurs here 200 million years ago.
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we do have footprints from a few larger ones, so we know there were a few larger dinosaurs, but we have very few remains of those. most of what we are finding are these very tiny dinosaurs. small in scale but huge in significance. pendraig's relatives could also be hidden in these rocks, waiting to be unearthed. hywel griffith, bbc news, in the vale of glamorgan. time for a look at the weather. i'm a i'm a bit confused by this weather, isn't it supposed to be summer temperatures again? it is the transition from summer into autumn and we are seeing all flavours this week. we had heavy rain and it was windy but today has been glorious and in those places it was miserable yesterday. the satellite picture shows how glorious it has been right across the country. it has been clouding over in the last few hours out of the west and there is a weather front on its way. it will bring rain but more
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importantly with the south—westerly wind it will drive up this warm air from the south, hence the reason the change. at this time of year, temperatures are on average should be in the mid teens, but we are likely to see temperatures around 20 to 21 degrees so five degrees above where they should be. it may come with some cloudy conditions and you can see the cloud arriving. the eastern half of the country may be clearer skies in single figures. but the cloud of thick enough for drizzle and more persistent rain into northern ireland and western scotland. relatively mild start here to the day. it may be a grey, dull start for many on thursday but fingers crossed the cloud will thin and break and we will see glimpses of sunshine coming through into the afternoon. rain persistent through northern ireland and western scotland for a couple of days, but those temperatures probably peaking at around 20 degrees, 68 fahrenheit. as we move into friday, first thing in the morning there could be some
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dense fog in central and southern areas. that will lift and break but hopefully it will lift into low cloud and then sent a break—up and allow the sunshine to come through. we have still got the rain in the far north—west but temperatures may peak on friday 21 degrees, 70 fahrenheit. the weather front meanders its way out of scotland and into the north of england for the weekend. there will be outbreaks of rain around and sunday looks likely to be the better day. that's all from the bbc news at six. so it's goodbye from me, and, on bbc one, we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are. hello and welcome to sportsday. i'm olly foster. everything is pointing towards the ashes tour going ahead, but how strong will the england team be?

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