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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 6, 2021 4:00am-4:30am BST

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welcome to bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: a former facebook employee tells the us congress the social media giant is harming children, stroking division, and weakening democracy. i saw facebook repeatedly encounter conflicts between its own profits and our safety. facebook consistently resolve these conflicts in favour of its own profits. victims demand action after an enquiry shows over 200,000 children were assaulted by priests in the catholic church. an economical disaster after a pipeline burst spilling thousands of barrels of oil is
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in the ocean.— thousands of barrels of oil is in the ocean. ,, , ., in the ocean. klim shipenko and yulia peresild... _ in the ocean. klim shipenko and yulia peresild. .. and _ in the ocean. klim shipenko and yulia peresild... and boldly- in the ocean. klim shipenko and yulia peresild. .. and boldly go l yulia peresild... and boldly go where no _ yulia peresild... and boldly go where no film _ yulia peresild... and boldly go where no film crew _ yulia peresild... and boldly go where no film crew has - yulia peresild... and boldly go where no film crew has gone l where no film crew has gone before. a russian film crew arrive at the international space station to shoot the first film in orbit. hello and welcome to our viewers around the globe. a facebook employee turned whistleblower has given a damning critique at a us senate committee. she said she believed facebook put profits first while executives knew its platform could harm children, stoke division and harm democracy. mark zuckerberg
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logged that it was disheartening to see company research taken out of context. it's ringing. eleanor and freya are both 14 and, like many teenagers, they're both on instagram. as a teenager, you're looking at these people, all these models, and, you know, influencers, they all are very skinny and they have, like, a perfect body. and when you're looking at that and then kind of comparing yourself to it, it's very...i think it could be really damaging. when you're feeling at your worst and then you go on instagram and you see things that are, like, targeted at you because you have looked at these kinds of things before, you see them, like, models, influencers, celebrities, things like that, and you are just like, "oh, i will never be like that." eleanor and freya's concerns are in fact shared by one
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rather important company — facebook, which owns instagram. in fact, leaked internal research found that teens who struggle with mental health say that instagram makes it worse. the woman who leaked that report is called frances haugen, and she gave evidence in washington. the documents that i have provided to congress prove that facebook has repeatedly misled the public about what its own research reveals about the safety of children. she also said that facebook�*s motives were driven by money, rather than the mental health of its users. i saw facebook repeatedly encounter conflicts between its own profits and our safety. facebook consistently resolved these conflicts in favour of its own profits. here in silicon valley, facebook has pushed back, saying that some of the research presented is misleading, and despite the fact that instagram concluded that it could be damaging for children's mental health, it also says that it can have a positive impact. facebook has said it's postponed a controversial project to create instagram for kids. but we now know that two very important politicians in washington believe the company has put profit over the mental health of teenage girls.
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james clayton, bbc news, san francisco. my my colleague christian fraser spoke to the vice president of content policy and asked about the allegation that facebook cares more about profit and the well—being of children. we are not and we have not and i want to clear up some of the mischaracterisations that we have seen today and also be clear that this was an employee who did not work on these issues and has mischaracterised a lot of these stolen documents. i do work on these issues. i've been with the company for nine years. my background is in child safety and as a criminal prosecutor. and the amount of thought and resources that this company has put into safety, including doing research to understand these issues, just underscores how much we do
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care about getting these very difficult issues right. so if your business is child safety, you will be concerned by your own research, your own research that she has leaked, that shows 32% of teenage girls surveyed said that when they felt bad about their bodies and they looked at photos of other people on instagram it made them feel worse. i'm concerned when any teen has a bad experience on instagram. and i know that i speak for the hundreds of people who work on child safety policies and enforcement and resources at our company, but want to be clear that that is not what these stolen documents say. what they say, instead, is that the small number, it is a small survey, but of the a0 instagram users who were teens who say that they do struggle with mental health issues, everything from anxiety to body image to self—harm, both boys and girls, on all 12 issues, the majority of boys and girls said that instagram either made things betterfor them or didn't have a material impact. that was monika bickert there.
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the �*washington post�* technical report says this will be damaging to the platform and it has a ready been compared to other historical hearings. this looks bad _ other historical hearings. this looks bad for _ other historical hearings. ti 3 looks bad for facebook. they were comparing it to the tobacco hearings, in 1980 fork, the egos of tobacco companies testified before congress and he also said he did not believe whether that was addictive and it became infamous, saying that he did not believe nicotine was addictive and it led to damaging regulations on the tobacco industry. there are parallels. instagram, a facebook property, stands accused of harming the mental health of teen girls, cigarettes were obviously accused of harming the physical
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use of users. and this hearing was based on research that came out of facebook, that they did not choose to share, it was leaked, so there were parallels to the cigarette companies allegedly covering up their own research on the harms of the products. if research on the harms of the products-_ products. if it follows then that they _ products. if it follows then that they do _ products. if it follows then that they do decide - products. if it follows then that they do decide to - that they do decide to intervene, regulate more, what kind of regulation with this be? how would you sell some of the problems raised? that be? how would you sell some of the problems raised?— the problems raised? that is the problems raised? that is the really — the problems raised? that is the really hard _ the problems raised? that is the really hard question. - the really hard question. people, for years, have been pointing to some of the problems of social media, not just facebook, many problems are common to other platforms but facebook is by far the world's largest set of social media platforms. ithink world's largest set of social media platforms. i think we finally reach the point where there finally seems to be fairly broad consensus that there is a real problem here and some kind of regulatory intervention is needed, and what that will look like in the united states and elsewhere is an open question. there
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whistleblower from facebook, frances haugen, had her own ideas which he laid out today and she believes on of the biggest issues is the algorithm, the software, that decides what you see every time you open facebook and instagram. the software gets to know you, what you are like and what you are interested in and it recognises that a teenage girl may have liked a post that had to do with an extreme diet and then it feeds her more and more posts about eating disorders that make you feel worse about her body. her proposal was that social platform should be required to offer all the posts in reverse chronological order, like they did in the old days, before they had these sophisticated algorithms. you would see everything that everyone posted and they would not be learning about you all the time, tapping into yourfears and about you all the time, tapping into your fears and vices and playing on those. there are others who think that is the wrong approach and they want to expose the tech companies for liability for harm and content posted and others want to break
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them up, anti—trust enforcement, many ideas on the table. figuring out which ones to pursue is the big question now. let's take a look at some of the other stories in the headlines today. the democrats say the us senate will vote on wednesday on their proposals to suspend america's debt ceiling. the borrowing limit will expire in a fortnight, which would mean parts of the government having to close down. at least ten republicans will need to vote with the democrats for it to pass. so far they have indicated they won't support it as long as the democrats plan huge increases in social spending. chinese officials are reported to have told the organisers of the 620 summit, which is due to be held in rome at the end of this month, that president xi jinping will not attend in person. mr xi has not left china since january 2020. it's being reported that the reason for him staying away from the rome gathering is china's covid quarantine requirements for returning travellers. the son of the philippines' former dictator, ferdinand marcos, has announced
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that he will run for president in next year's election. ferdinand marcosjunior, who is known as bongbong, has been a supporter of the outgoing president, rodrigo duterte. he said that if elected he would bring unifying leadership to the country. a representative of the british government has held a face—to—face meeting with the taliban's foreign minister. —— pictures were released and british forces fought against the taliban in afghanistan for nearly two decades. pope francis says he felt pain when he heard of the findings of an independent report into abuse carried out by members of the catholic church in france. the scale of the abuse was staggering, dating back to 1950. the investigators found more than 200,000 children had become victims. lucy williamson reports. 70 years of horror, hundreds
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of thousands of victims, laid bare in one explosive report. its language stark, itsjudgement grim. for a long very time, it says, the french catholic church showed complete — even cruel — indifference to those who suffered abuse. the report estimates the number of child victims 0f sexual abuse at the hands of priests, deacons, monks, or nuns at 216,000. if non—clergy are included, that figure rises to 330,000 — a third of a million children. translation: there was, above all, a catalogue - of negligence, failures, silence. an institutional cover—up which appeared systematic and on which the commission came to a unanimous conclusion — the church did not see, did not hear, did not know how to pick up weak signals. the investigators analysed decades of church archives,
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court records, and testimony from victims. most abuses happened in the 1950s and 1960s, too long ago for anyone to be prosecuted now. one of those who testified was this priest. he told the panel how, in the year he turned 18, during clerical training, he was repeatedly raped by a seniorfigure in the seminary. translation: it destroys people. there is a physical violence, but there is also a whole context of control which destroys not only the body but the heart and the mind. that's why these sexual assaults are so serious. this report has shattered public perceptions and public trust in an institution that still has a strong presence in france. the sheer number of victims estimated by the enquiry has dwarfed previous scandals here and exploded the idea
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that they're just isolated events. at churches across france today, a test of faith as clergy and congregations absorbed the news. translation: it's a catastrophe. - it's a betrayal. there are predators everywhere. translation: i was raised in a religious institution. i among 20 priests there was one we were warned about. i think the report probably underestimates the number of victims. at many services today, priests spoke about the challenges laid out by the enquiry. this dark corner of church history makes painful reading, but the report is also, for many, a light at the end of a very long road. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. miles of beaches in the us remain closed after an oil spill poured millions of
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barrels of oil in the ocean. questions are asked on tuesday after that was a 12 hour delay between the siting of and the response. i spoke to the huntington beach conservancy and he told me about how it has impacted on the wetlands. we not only look over and are the stewards for those, we actually own them. we are a nonprofit that has acquired the money to buy the property, restore it back and maintain it. it was devastating for us. we have spent a lot of time, money and actually sweat out there to restore our wetlands, so to see the oil coming in to our wetlands was just devastating. the good thing for us, the agencies worked really fast once everybody was notified, and we had just conducted a drill nine
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months ago on how to shore up our wetlands and we did that within six hours of being notified. and then the second thing we did the following day, we actually closed our inlet to stop contaminated saltwater from coming into the marshes, so it is now contained in a locked environment of 127 acres, it makes it a lot easier for us to clean because we are not getting contaminated water on a daily basis. i see, so there's an element of containment here. what about the cleanup operation more widely? the cleanup operation has started as of saturday evening and continued on on a daily basis. we have crews out there in hazmat uniforms, picking up the oil off of the wetlands themselves. the next step is to start working on the surrounding islands and shorelines around our marshes, and also the large rocks you see at the jetty, in the us we call it reef wrath, because the oil has clung onto that and we have to clean at. have you ever experienced anything like this before? 1990, american trader ship off of huntington beach still 250,000 gallons of crude oil. the good thing at the time was we only had one march at the time, the talbot march, and that is the one that is heavily affected in this one and this time it's only 116,000 gallons of crude oil, so we have had this happen before and not the recent past but our past.
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does this change your thoughts now on oil generally, its transportation, how we move it around the world ? does this change your thoughts now on oil generally, its transportation, how we move it around the world ? i'd been in contact with our city mayor, yes, i'd been in contact with our city mayor, when it happened in 1991 of the things that was outlawed was single hold ships carrying crude oil. know it's only double hold or larger out there. now we're looking at, how do we either regrout the pipelines or do something more to protect it, that is the next bit of legislature we are working on today to go to our state and also the federal government. to protect it, that is the next bit of legislature we are working on today to go to our state and also the federal government. we wish you the best with the operations there. thank you. do stay with us on bbc news. still to come: this year's nobel prize for physics is awarded to three sciences for their work predicting global warming and helping to explain our climate. this was a celebration by people who were relishing
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their freedom. they believe everything's going to be different from now on. they think their country will be respected in the world once more, as it used to be before slobodan milosevic took power. the dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. as the parade was reaching its climax, two grenades i exploded and a group of- soldiersjumped from a military truck taking part in the paradel and ran towards the president, firing from kalashnikov automatic rifles. - truck taking part in the paradel and ran towards the president, firing from kalashnikov automatic rifles. - after 437 years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's tragic warship emerged. but even as divers worked to buoy her up, the mary rose went through another heart—stopping drama. i want to be the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of california.
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this of california. is bbc news, i'm lewis vaughan—jones. this is bbc news, i'm lewis vaughan-jones.— this is bbc news, i'm lewis vaughan-jones. the headlines. facebook has _ vaughan-jones. the headlines. facebook has told _ vaughan-jones. the headlines. facebook has told the - vaughan-jones. the headlines. facebook has told the bbc - vaughan-jones. the headlines. | facebook has told the bbc does protects its users after a whistleblower said it put its profits first.— profits first. and victims demand _ profits first. and victims demand action - profits first. and victims demand action after- profits first. and victims demand action after a i profits first. and victims - demand action after a shocking enquiry finds at least 200 children in france were assaulted by priests and monks in the catholic church over the past 70 years. this year �*s nobel prize in physics have been awarded to scientists who urged governments to act to combat global warming. 0ur planet is in peril in a way thatis 0ur planet is in peril in a way that is total unprecedented.
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the ice caps are melting, coral reefs are dying in the air is often thick with pollution. the scale and seriousness of this crisis reflected in this year �*s winners of the nobel prize for physics. the swedish academy of sciences are awarding it into parts. firstly, to shakuro munadi and klaus hassellman for predicting global warming and to giorgio parisi who discuss who discovered now. thanks. all three men, it's recognition of life �*s work it's more to it than that. i think it was important, not only for me but also for the other two because climate change is a huge threat to humanity and it's extremely important that governments act resolutely as quickly as possible. resolutely as quickly as possible-— resolutely as quickly as ossible. , ,. , , ., possible. these scientists have s - ent possible. these scientists have spent decades _ possible. these scientists have spent decades in _ possible. these scientists have spent decades in research - spent decades in research trying to grasp complex structures and to decipher the
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way the earth is changing. their work, way the earth is changing. theirwork, giving way the earth is changing. their work, giving all the misinformation we need everyone to combat global warming. i think the most important thing is, i try to help understanding why climate has changed. and how it is going to change. heat how it is going to change. next month, world _ how it is going to change. next month, world leaders - how it is going to change. next month, world leaders will - month, world leaders will gather in glasgow for cop26, what's been described as the last chance to avert climate disaster. if they are to succeed, three nobel prize winners will have helped appoint them in the right direction. european union leaders in slovenia having tough discussions. is the first gathering since june discussions. is the first gathering sincejune and the celtic withdrawal from
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afghanistan was also on the agenda. 0ur still smarting from a secret submarine deal between the us, australia and the uk, emmanuel macron told reporters europe needs to consider its independence. technologically, economically. _ independence. technologically, economically, industrially, - economically, industrially, financially and militarily we must build a stronger europe. you know that is what i deeply believe in, europe which takes its share for itself which can choose its partners and work closely with historical allies. the biggest of those historical allies is the us, but in sabine frosty since it signed a military pact which meant australia backed out of a lucrative submarine deal with france. 0n lucrative submarine deal with france. on tuesday, the us secretary of state, anthony blank, was in paris, the first american official to meet the french resident since the row and he spoke to french tv.
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translation: we could have and should have done better in terms of communication. this is what president biden and president macron said two weeks ago but we tend to take for granted such an important relationship, a relationship as deep as the one between lance and the us. deep as the one between lance and the us-_ and the us. president macron was less enthusiastic. - and the us. president macron was less enthusiastic. i - and the us. president macron was less enthusiastic. i do - was less enthusiastic. i do think it is _ was less enthusiastic. i do think it is physical, - was less enthusiastic. i do think it is physical, i- was less enthusiastic. i do think it is physical, i do i think it is physical, i do think it is physical, i do think it is more productive for both of us and i think we can discuss together in mid—october, we will catch it mid—0ctober, we will catch it during the g20 and i think it will be right to see how we can re—engage. will be right to see how we can re-engage-_ will be right to see how we can re-engage. the president of the euro ean re-engage. the president of the european council _ re-engage. the president of the european council also _ re-engage. the president of the european council also stressed l european council also stressed the need for europe to act in a more autonomous way.- the need for europe to act in a more autonomous way. after the recent development _ more autonomous way. after the recent development in _ recent development in afghanistan with china, it's important to develop the
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intelligence of the eu, burst with others, we listen to different arguments around the table and we try to drop it and again, the unity is a european asset. ., , again, the unity is a european asset. . , ., , ., asset. that unity has often roved asset. that unity has often proved elusive _ asset. that unity has often proved elusive and - asset. that unity has often i proved elusive and disagreement within the block on how to deal within the block on how to deal with china in previous failures in co—ordinating common foreign and military policies. there will be plenty to talk about around the table. angola's largest opposition party unita hasjoined angola's largest opposition party unita has joined forces with other groups to defeat the mpla. it will be known as the united patriotic front, whose aim is to unseat the mpla which has been in power since avid independence from kolinisau in
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1975. a russian actress has arrived on board of the international space station. the filming scenes for the movie the challenge which is about a doctor going to space to help a astronaut. their mission is to eat a similar hollywood project planned by tom cruise and nasa. arriving in the international space station earlier today, a very unusual team of cosmonauts. russian actress yulia peresild and her producer—director klim shipenko. they blasted off from the baikonur cosmodrome in kazakhstan earlier today on a unique mission — to become the first to make a feature film in space. the film's called the challenge, about an emergency inside the international space station. the actor and director both had what was described as a crash course in space travel
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before heading off. translation: we have been working really hard. - although we look all happy and smiles, we are very tired. it has been very difficult, both mentally and physically. but the russians have beaten the americans, this who wanted to make a film in space with tom cruise. they are now spending 12 days flying above the earth making theirfilm. richard galpin, bbc news, moscow. just before i go, hundreds of hot air balloons took to the sky over new mexico as the albuquerque international balloon fiesta entered its fourth day. over 500 balloons painted the sky in the world's largest hot—air balloon festival. nearly1 million people from around the globe will visit the event. it's the 49th running
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of the fiesta which brings in millions of dollars for the local economy. that's it. i'm lewis vaughan—jones, this is bbc news. hello there. wednesday looks like it's going to be a drier, brighter day for many parts of the uk. a vast improvement over what we saw on tuesday. the northeast of england was particularly badly affected by the rain. it was about a month's worth of rain falling in 2a hours. throughout the day, it was a pretty wet too across eastern parts of scotland. the low pressure that brought the rain and the strong winds is moving out of the way. we've got the next atlantic weather system coming in to the west and in between the two, a small window of drier weather and some sunshine. with clearer skies to start the day across large parts of scotland and northern ireland, pretty chilly out there. for eastern parts of england, there's more rain around still and it's lighter by the morning, the rain
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should move away. those northerly winds will gradually ease and the cloud eventually break up. we've got this slice of dry weather and sunshine, but western areas are going to be clouding over steadily and we've got some rain in the afternoon particularly across northern ireland. ahead of that, something a bit warmer than today across much of england and wales. it could be quite chilly in the evening with the clearer skies in eastern england and out to the west though, the cloud is coming in, thickening up to bring some rain into western scotland and that will tend to lift the temperatures, as well. as we head into the end of the week, it is a complete turnaround really because there is much warmer weather on the way and that is because the winds are going to be coming in all the way around the tropics and bringing in those higher temperatures, bringing in the moisture in the form of cloud and we've still got the weather front just draped across the northwestern part of the uk to bring some rain. that is mainly affecting northern and western scotland during thursday, some heavier rain for argyle and highland. some rain threatens northern ireland could be a bit of damp, drizzly weather across western parts of england and wales. brighter skies further east. but despite a lot of cloud on thursday, look at these temperatures. 19 in belfast, could make 20 in newcastle, much, much warmer than it
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was on tuesday. the winds will be lighter for england and wales on friday, could be some fog in the morning through the midlands towards the southeast the winds will be lighter for england and wales on friday, could be some fog in the morning through the midlands towards the southeast of england and lifting to bring some sunny spells, still a threat of rain in the northwest parts of the uk with some sunshine at times. and those temperatures again widely 18 to 21 c. the next question is how long will it last? saturday looks quite warm for many. some rain in scotland and northern ireland. as the weekend goes on, it will gradually cool down from the north.
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welcome to bbc news. our top stories: a former facebook employee tells the us congress the social media giant is harming children, stoking division, and weakening democracy. frances haugen said the company chose profits over its users. the government of california has called for an end to offshore drilling following an oil spill. a spokesperson says it needs to and reliance on fossil fuels and it's thought it was resulted from a rupture in the pipeline. a russian actress has gone to the international space station to fill in space. actress yulia peresild and filmmaker klim shipenko will be filming.

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