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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 5, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. the headlines at 8pm: the government orders an inquiry into the failures that allowed a serving police officer to rape and murder sarah everard. the public have a right to know what systematic failures enabled his continued employment as a police officer. we need answers as to why this was allowed to happen. a former facebook employee turned whistle—blower tells us law makers that the social media giant is harming children, stoking division and weakening democracy. it is great, how shall i say, surprise. three scientists win nobel prize in physics for their ground—breaking work to understand complex systems,
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such as the earth's climate. more than 200,000 pupils were off school in england last week over covid. and adele confirms her latest single. clara amfo will be with us just after 8:30pm. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the home secretary has announced an independent inquiry into the "systematic failures" that allowed a serving police officer to kidnap, rape and murder sarah everard. in her speech to the conservative party conference, priti patel said the public needs answers to ensure "something like this can never happen again". last week, wayne couzens
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was sentenced to a whole life term in prison. our special correspondent lucy manning has this report. so many questions after sarah everard's murder. how could wayne couzens be a police officer? why wasn't he stopped earlier? why are women still not safe? nearly a week after, we learned the full distressing details of what a police officer did to sarah everard, there will now be a wide—ranging inquiry. the public have a right to know what systematic failures enabled his continued employment as a police officer. we need answers as to why this was allowed to happen. applause i can confirm today that there will be an inquiry to give the independent oversight needed to ensure that something like this can never happen again. the first part will look at couzens, his previous behaviour and any opportunities missed
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to stop him. the second part will examine policing, looking at vetting, how police investigate themselves and their behaviour, but the inquiry won't have the power to demand witnesses and evidence. but ministers promise that will change if needed. it's not statutory, it's notjudge—led, both of which we think it needs to be. and it can'tjust be about wayne couzens, it's got to be about the entire aspect of the case and also about women's treatment by the met. hello, good morning. 0nly yesterday, the met police commissioner announced a review into her own force by an independent person working alongside her. there's also the police regulator investigation into whether the met and kent police properly looked into three indecent exposure allegations against couzens. the home office can't say if any of the inquiry will be held in public. but the conclusions will be published. and just last month, the police inspectorate said
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there was an epidemic of violence against women and it needed to be treated as seriously as terrorism is. so it's not as if the government and the forces have not been aware of many of these issues. sabina nessa, one of more than 80 women killed by men since sarah everard, but this morning, the prime minister refused to back calls for misogyny to be classified as a hate crime because he believes current laws are sufficient. this new inquiry must notjust highlight the problems but make the changes, so that all women can be safe. lucy manning, bbc news. let's talk to the shadow home secretary. hejoins me now live for. hello to you, thanks for being with us. do you welcome priti patel�*s call for inquiry? us. do you welcome priti patel's call for inquiry?— us. do you welcome priti patel's call for inquiry? hello, and good evenina. call for inquiry? hello, and good evening. labour _ call for inquiry? hello, and good evening. labour has _ call for inquiry? hello, and good evening. labour has been - call for inquiry? hello, and good| evening. labour has been calling call for inquiry? hello, and good - evening. labour has been calling for a full transparent and comprehensive independent inquiry for days, prime
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ministers not appear to want to grant one. i'm pleased the home secretary has now accepted that one is necessary, but i'm actually concerned that what is been announced so far is not sufficient. the inquiry is not on a statutory footing, which means it is going to be unable to compel witnesses to appear before it up it is going to be unable to demand the evidence that it needs. and i'm also worried it does not seem to be looking into the wider culture and whether women within policing feel they have that confidence to come forward with concerns. ~ , , ., ., concerns. why is it important to look at that _ concerns. why is it important to look at that wider _ concerns. why is it important to look at that wider culture - concerns. why is it important to look at that wider culture in - concerns. why is it important to| look at that wider culture in your view? i look at that wider culture in your view? ~ , , look at that wider culture in your view? ~' , , ,., ., view? i think it is very important, because of— view? i think it is very important, because of what _ view? i think it is very important, because of what we _ view? i think it is very important, because of what we have - view? i think it is very important, because of what we have seen i view? i think it is very important, i because of what we have seen with the sarah everard case. what we have seen is a situation with a perpetrator — i am not going to name the perpetrator — but we have seen a
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situation where it appears there were concerns when that person was at the civil nuclear can salary, further concerns at kent police, concerns at the metropolitan police. it was notjust ones that he slipped the net, it seems to have happen on a number of occasions, so we need to first of all to be considering that, but also considering the absolute imperative of restoring confidence and trust, and that is why i believe the inquiry has to be both comprehensive and transparent. but there is a met police inquiry into its own conduct, the police regulator has also launched an inquiry as well. the three together might reveal, including priti patel puzzling announcement today, exactly what went on. —— priti patel's announcement. what went on. -- priti patel's announcement.— what went on. -- priti patel's announcement. ~ , ., what went on. -- priti patel's announcement. ~' , ., , announcement. the key word there is miuht, announcement. the key word there is might. because _ announcement. the key word there is might, because the _ announcement. the key word there is might, because the concern - announcement. the key word there is might, because the concern is - announcement. the key word there is might, because the concern is on - announcement. the key word there is might, because the concern is on the | might, because the concern is on the proposals so far i have seen, i have
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yet to see the total remit of this independent inquiry. but nonetheless, we have to consider the fact, as i say, that there is not that power to compel witnesses to come forward, to compel evidence, and it does look narrow in scope thanit and it does look narrow in scope than it needs to be, and my advice to the home secretary is to make this as wide as possible, because of the absolute priority there has to be to restore trust and confidence. why, in your opinion, do you think the scope is so narrow? in why, in your opinion, do you think the scope is so narrow?— the scope is so narrow? in some wa s, it the scope is so narrow? in some ways. it is _ the scope is so narrow? in some ways. it is a _ the scope is so narrow? in some ways. it is a real— the scope is so narrow? in some ways, it is a real puzzle - the scope is so narrow? in some ways, it is a real puzzle and - the scope is so narrow? in some ways, it is a real puzzle and a i ways, it is a real puzzle and a concern about the government's priorities, because earlier this year, we had a report of the daniel morgan independent panel. the daniel morgan independent panel. the daniel morgan case, an awful case about the murder with an axe in a car park of daniel morgan back in the late 19805, daniel morgan back in the late 1980s, the morgan family have been searching for justice for
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1980s, the morgan family have been searching forjustice for decades — that independent panel was not on a statutory footing, it took from 2013 until this year to report, and independent panel itself in its report said it was a problem that it did not have those statutory powers and was not able to compel people before it and get the evidence needed, so why on earth, having seen that reportjust needed, so why on earth, having seen that report just a needed, so why on earth, having seen that reportjust a few months ago by highlighting those problems, the home secretary looks to be making the same mistake with this particular inquiry, it really is a puzzle and a worry. i5 particular inquiry, it really is a puzzle and a worry. is misogyny a hate crime _ puzzle and a worry. is misogyny a hate crime in _ puzzle and a worry. is misogyny a hate crime in your— puzzle and a worry. is misogyny a hate crime in your view? - puzzle and a worry. is misogyny a hate crime in your view? it - puzzle and a worry. is misogyny a| hate crime in your view? it should absolutely be _ hate crime in your view? it should absolutely be a _ hate crime in your view? it should absolutely be a hate _ hate crime in your view? it should absolutely be a hate crime, - hate crime in your view? it should l absolutely be a hate crime, and we should be looking at the laws that we have on street harassment and toughening them up. we live in a society where if you drop litter in the street, you would be more glade to be held to account and if you are abusing women and girls in our
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streets, so we absolutely need those tougher laws on street harassment, together with, tougher laws on street harassment, togetherwith, by tougher laws on street harassment, together with, by the way, tougher sentences for stalking, tougher minimum sentence for rape. it should be an absolute priority for this government. be an absolute priority for this government-— be an absolute priority for this government. 0k, shadow home secretary nick _ government. 0k, shadow home i secretary nick thomas-symonds, secretary nick thomas—symonds, thanks so much forjoining us. thank you. borisjohnson has said he's not "worried" about rising prices and the disruption to food and some fuel supplies, saying the country can't go back to what he called the "failed model of the uk economy". the prime minister says the government can't "magic up" solutions and argued supply chains would "sort themselves out". he was speaking to our political editor laura kuenssberg at the conservative party conference in manchester, and her report contains some flash photography. this is fantastic. he doesn't hide how much he's enjoying himself. ahead in the polls with a plump cushion of a huge majority back at parliament. but carefree? the country is not, with rising prices, some empty shelves. prime minister, why wasn't the government prepared
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for what you describe as very real stresses and strains on the country right now? this is a function of a global recovery. and you're seeing stresses and strains caused by the world economy sucking in demand for everything from gas to hgv drivers across the planet. rather than government stepping in to mend and patch and mend every bit of our supply chains, what you've got is, in this country, fantastic expertise, fantastic skill in logistics. you listen to some of the supermarkets, they will manage this. but it's real—world problems that people are facing. you were warned back in april about the shortage of hgv drivers, you were warned about fuel costs back in july. there was a letter to you from the meat industry back injune. isn't the point that you were warned about every single one of these issues, and you're basically still sitting, saying, "well, the government might be able to help around the edges,
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but basically business has got to sort it out"? well, on all of those issues, and certainly there are issues in all of those sectors, but what you can't do and must not do, laura, is simply go back to the old, tired, failed model of the uk economy that has led to relative under—productivity by comparison with all our major competitors for decades and has held wages down. the government can't magic up changes to their systems overnight. british farmers... those farmers may have to cull healthy animals they can't process and sell. and drivers haven't been able to fill up at the pump. yet the prime minister seems happy for the government to take a back—seat. people are experiencing real problems with all of these things, and it sounds like what you're basically saying is, "it's not my problem." in terms of the consumer, we're giving all the protections that we can.
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some of the people who have been writing to me may be worried about this, but i'm not worried about this, because, actually, i think it will be good for their businesses to invest in people and to invest in capital... so you're not worried about inflation? i believe that supply will match demand, and that is what we want to encourage. what you've got to do as a government is look at the long—term and look at how you can make the investments now that will bear down on costs. that's the way to deal with the cost of living, and the supply chains will start to sort themselves out very, very rapidly. for the prime minister, changing the economy is part of a deliberately different tory look. afternoon, carrie. you looking forward to conference? very much so. carriejohnson striding in to take her own place on stage at an event supporting lgbt rights tonight. but who's supporting her? one last thing. there's a special guest coming to conference later — you looking forward to that? i'm always looking forward to all guests coming to conference. well, your wife's coming to speak. are you going to go and watch? i'm sure it's going to be great. this week's a show of confidence
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from teamjohnson, but that could tip into complacency, a risk some tories fear the prime minister is too ready to take. laura kuenssberg there in manchester. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticas is also in manchester. this idea that the government does not particularly have a role to play in dealing with what at the moment our rising costs, fuel shortages, energy prices going up and so on, it is there a sense of an ease amongst some conservative where you are that this an idea that has been pulled forward, that could cause problems down the line? i forward, that could cause problems down the line?— down the line? i think there is a little of that, — down the line? i think there is a little of that, clive, _ down the line? i think there is a little of that, clive, but - down the line? i think there is a little of that, clive, but there i down the line? i think there is a little of that, clive, but there is| little of that, clive, but there is more of a sense of what you're hearing prime ministers say there, and this idea that, talking about moving to a new model, that it has to be investment in businesses, in
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staff and in technology and in supply chains. and this is part of a process. but, that said, yes, there is concern. you hear it in some of the meetings here on the fringes. people say, is this going to lead to inflation? are there going to be problems over the coming months, over the winter, people talk about the fact that the pressure on wages and prices has to be matched by productivity increases, they say it. otherwise there will be inflation. they say that will mean those wage increases don't actually amount to anything in real terms. so there is concern about that. there is concern that over time, people need to see increases in their spending power or that could hurt the party. but i think also, a sense that there is unease about the short—term, about what coming this winter — because the universal credit and the ending of the furlough scheme. —— the cuts. they
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like the message from borisjohnson here in the tory party because they like his to -- his —— his approach, but the reality is their doubts out there about people this winter. �* .. , , , this winter. because is putting forward a radical _ this winter. because is putting forward a radical shift - this winter. because is putting forward a radical shift in - this winter. because is putting forward a radical shift in the i this winter. because is putting l forward a radical shift in the way that this country plasma gdp is produced in lots of ways —— because he is. brexit was the begin of that process. how much of the reddick we are seeing from a succession of seniorfigures within are seeing from a succession of senior figures within the government culminating with the prime minster today in these interviews, before his speech tomorrow, how much of thatis his speech tomorrow, how much of that is the defence of brexit and the idea that britain can now has its own destiny in his hands? you certainly hear _ its own destiny in his hands? you certainly hear this _ its own destiny in his hands? wi. certainly hear this here around the conference, clive, that... and this
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may be a response what we are seeing, the supply chain problems, the charges on supermarket shelves, to then say, this is the growing pains of brexit, if you like. i was in a session in little earlier, jacob rees—mogg was saying, now is the moment, we arejust jacob rees—mogg was saying, now is the moment, we are just getting jacob rees—mogg was saying, now is the moment, we arejust getting out of the pandemic, we can seize our freedom and make the most of this opportunity, what he was saying. but then again, i think also, other events, you hear there are business people here, people from the logistic industry, people from the freight industries, and they are really concerned, concerned about the shortage of labour, concerned that the prime minister talking about they need to change, they need to invest and they say, they are investing, they have been raising wages, they simply cannot get enough people to do those jobs, and so they are really concerned about the long—term, that this will be a long—term, that this will be a
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long—term difficulty to overcome, so, again, yes, there is that sort of message, but concerns about what lies behind it. of message, but concerns about what lies behind it— lies behind it. sure, 0k, very interesting. _ lies behind it. sure, 0k, very interesting. damian - lies behind it. sure, 0k, very - interesting. damian grammaticas there. the headlines on bbc news: the government orders an inquiry into the failures that allowed a serving police officer to rape and kill sarah everard. a former facebook employee turned whistle—blower tells us lawmakers that the social media giant is harming children, stoking division and weakening democracy. more than 200,000 pupils were off school in england last week for covid related reasons. sport — and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's tolsen. hello to you, clive, hello to everyone watching. arsenal women begin their champions league group stage campaign tonight
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and have one of the toughest possible opponents in their opening fixture, the holders barcelona. both sides are dominating their respective domestic leagues, with barcelona having scored 35 goals in just five games. the group c match kicked off at 8pm and, i6 the group c match kicked off at 8pm and, 16 minutes played on the clock, it is currently goalless. james ward—prowse has been called up to gareth southgate's england squad for the matches against andorra and hungary. the southampton captain replaces the injured leeds midfielder kalvin phillips. 26—year—old ward—prowse will be hoping to win his ninth england cap. he was included in the initial england squad for euro 2020 this summer but missed the cut for the final 26. amid concerns over the rate of vaccination among footballers, rochdale's team doctor says their rate is lower than 50% of players who are double—jabbed. it follows news that the premier league were considering rewarding clubs whose vaccination rates were high. an email revealed last week that only seven top—flight teams had rates of 50% fully vaccinated. dr wesley tanner says there are many reasons for the low rates.
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i have spoken to some of the senior players, just to get their points of view, as to why they think it is low, and some of the responses are they don't want to feel unwell if they don't want to feel unwell if they get the jab but which may affect their performance. it also the other hand, if they were to get covid, which quite a lot of the players have had over the last year, they have been out ten days, they have felt really unwell, so i don't think that argument really stacks up. india will not be sending their hockey teams to the commonwealth games in birmingham next year, because of concerns over what they call "biased" covid restrictions. the uk government recently clarified that the indian—made version of the astrazeneca vaccine is now an approved jab, but it's unclear whether people can travel from india without having to self—isolate. president of hockey india said the uk's quarantine rules are "biased against india" and added that "such discriminatory restrictions were not imposed on indian athletes during the tokyo 0lympics". the men's team are currently ranked third in the world,
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while the women were beaten by great britain in the third place playoff at the olympics. the british 5,000—metre record—holder, elish mccolgan, has told the bbc how she feels wary about training and running outside after dark. speaking after the abduction and murder of sarah everard, fellow distance athlete charlotte purdue said she'd changed her training routines to avoid being on the streets at night. mccolgan said it would apply for women all over the world. definitely for my own personal experience, i would be very hesitant to run late at night or in the dark. i'm very fortunate that i'm an athlete, a professional athlete that can train 2a hours a day, so i can choose when i go and train. but other women aren't fortunately in that position. i can't imagine how difficult it is to head out in the dark and feel safe. certainly for me, i would be training during the day as much as i can. i'm very fortunate that my partner actually cycles
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along with me most days, so i never really feel unsafe, but we travel all over the world, so you're always going to be put in places that you've never been before. running after dark would certainly not be something i would be comfortable doing, and i imagine there's women all across the world in a similar opinion to that. england all rounder sam curran has been ruled out of the t20 world cup with a lower back injury and has been replaced by his brother tom. curran was in pain after his chennai super kings ipl game on saturday. he will fly back to the uk for further scans and be assesed by the ecb's medical team. along with the addition of his brother tom, reece topley has also been added as a travelling reserve. england's campaign gets under way against west indies on october 23. very much looking for to that, clive, and hopefully the ashes later in the year, but that is all the sport for now. thank you, tolsen.
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more now on the announcement of an inquiry into the rape and murder of sarah everard. we can speak now to peterjones, who's the author of the practical guide to public inquiries. hejoins us now from cardiff. hello to you, thanks very much indeed for being with us, it is good to see you. first of all, -- priti —— priti patel says this will be a wide—ranging inquiry that will look at the particular circumstances surrounding the employment of the men involved in sarah everard's death and the wider policing, the vetting of officers coming to the force — does that feel like that is a wide—ranging enough look at this issue? i a wide-ranging enough look at this issue? ., a wide-ranging enough look at this issue? ~' ,., a wide-ranging enough look at this issue? ~ ,., , ., a wide-ranging enough look at this issue? ~ , ., , .,, issue? i think so. it is what people were half expecting. _ issue? i think so. it is what people were half expecting. one - issue? i think so. it is what people were half expecting. one of the i were half expecting. one of the comic looking factors here is that it bears a remarkable resemblance to
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what cressida dick has announced the met police already going to look at. those are issues, of discipline, vetting, of standards, of culture, where article to be done by the police but of the offices of an independent chair. when the curious questions is how the two independent inquiries are actually going to relate to each other and whether one has primacy, because my understanding is that the government announced want to do is go to be a non—statutory inquiry with no powers of compulsion, which is very much like the cressida dick establishment already, so we have at the moment two inquiries announced looking at very similar things and neither with statutory powers. fiifi very similar things and neither with statutory powers.— statutory powers. ok, so the fact that neither _ statutory powers. ok, so the fact that neither have _ statutory powers. ok, so the fact that neither have statutory - statutory powers. ok, so the fact l that neither have statutory powers, does that mean they are inherently
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flawed? ., , ., , ., ., flawed? no, just means that the two flawed? no, 'ust means that the two --eole are flawed? no, just means that the two people are going _ flawed? no, just means that the two people are going to _ flawed? no, just means that the two people are going to be _ flawed? no, just means that the two people are going to be looking at - people are going to be looking at the same thing and that is a curious place to be at. the same thing and that is a curious place to be at— place to be at. sorry to interrupt, peter, but _ place to be at. sorry to interrupt, peter. but can — place to be at. sorry to interrupt, peter, but can they _ place to be at. sorry to interrupt, peter, but can they compel- place to be at. sorry to interrupt, | peter, but can they compel people place to be at. sorry to interrupt, - peter, but can they compel people to come forward and give evidence? neither of them will be able to compel people and give evidence, as i understand it...— i understand it... labour are angry about that- — i understand it... labour are angry about that. yes, _ i understand it. .. labour are angry about that. yes, i _ i understand it... labour are angry about that. yes, i am _ i understand it... labour are angry about that. yes, i am sure, - i understand it... labour are angry about that. yes, i am sure, there l about that. yes, i am sure, there will be plenty _ about that. yes, i am sure, there will be plenty of _ about that. yes, i am sure, there will be plenty of people _ about that. yes, i am sure, there will be plenty of people angry - about that. yes, i am sure, there i will be plenty of people angry about that, but i think with the government has said is they want to start off with a non—statutory basis without powers of compulsion, but if it is not up at a later stage of this power of compulsion would be good, they would consider it. it can make people turn up, it can make people deliver documents and it has greater powers, and that certainly would be an inquiry with primacy. but i think a lot of people were wondering, why notjust do that from the beginning? and if there is stuff you don't need to get, then you don't need to ask for it, but if you have to ask for it, then you can get
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it quickly and did it in a timely manner. i think there's a sense of the border —— a sense of the water meant that given the publicity could give the awfulness of what happened in this case, that witnesses are not being compelled from the off. yes. case, that witnesses are not being compelled from the off.— case, that witnesses are not being compelled from the off. yes, and i can understand _ compelled from the off. yes, and i can understand that _ compelled from the off. yes, and i can understand that critique - compelled from the off. yes, and i can understand that critique also l can understand that critique also the reason i think the government gave, as i understand it, is it was much quicker to set up a non—statutory inquiry than to set up a sagittal inquiry. i am not sure i was obstructed at point of view. you can set up either equally quickly. the only difference is onceit once it is up and running, certain procedural requirements kick in and certain regulations kick in that can mean a statutory inquiry, with all his powers, will run a little bit slower. , , ., ., ,, ., slower. very interesting to talk to ou, slower. very interesting to talk to you. peter- _ slower. very interesting to talk to
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you, peter. peter— slower. very interesting to talk to you, peter. peterjones, - slower. very interesting to talk to you, peter. peterjones, an - slower. very interesting to talk to | you, peter. peterjones, an expert in public inquiries. thank you. a former facebook employee turned whistle—blower has told a us senate committee that she believes the company's products have harmed children, stoked division and weakened democracy. frances haugen told lawmakers the social media giant knew its apps were harming the mental health of some young users. facebook said the company sees protecting its community as more important than maximising profits. 0ur correspondent james clayton has this report. it's ringing. eleanor and freya are both ia, and like many teenagers, they're both on instagram. as a teenager, you're looking at these people, all these models, and, you know, influencers, they all are very skinny and they have, like, a perfect body. and when you're looking at that and then kind of comparing yourself to it, it's very...i think it could be really damaging. when you're feeling at your worst and then you go on instagram and you see things that are, like, targeted at you because you have looked at these
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kinds of things before, you see them, like, models, influencers, celebrities, things like that, and you are just like, "oh, i will never be like that." eleanor and freya's concerns are in fact shared by one rather important company — facebook, which owns instagram. in fact, leaked internal research found that teens who struggle with mental health say that instagram makes it worse. the woman who leaked that report is called frances haugen, and today she gave evidence in washington. the documents that i have provided to congress prove that facebook has repeatedly misled the public about what its own research reveals about the safety of children. she concluded with a devastating message that facebook will continue to cause harm around the world. my fear is that without action, divisive and extremist behaviours we see today are only the beginning. what we saw in myanmar and are now seeing in ethiopia are only the opening chapters of a story so terrifying no—one wants to read the end of it. here in silicon valley,
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facebook has pushed back, saying that some of the research presented is misleading, and despite the fact that instagram concluded that it could be damaging for children's mental health, it also says that it can have a positive impact. both eleanor and freya say instagram is fun, that's why they're on it, but it can cause anxiety too. it's stressful because let's say you see someone post a photo and they're, like, with all your friends and you feel left out, but it's also fun to post a photo of you with your friends and you sometimes don't know someone is getting left out. facebook has said it has postponed a controversial project to create instagram for kids. but we now know that people within the company and some very important politicians in washington believe the company has put profit over the mental health of teenage girls. james clayton, bbc news, san francisco. and just after 9pm, my colleague christian fraser will be speaking to monica bikert, vice president of
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content policy at facebook. stay with us for that. more news coming up on the half hour. stay with us for that. now, though, time for look at the weather. here is darren bett. hello there. it is going to be turning drier overnight, especially across the western side of the uk, and the winds becoming lighter as well. further east, we do eventually see most of that rain moving away from scotland. still some rain overnight for eastern parts of england. and it's going to be very windy around some of those north sea coasts as well. further west, where skies clear and the winds are lighter, it could turn quite chilly overnight across parts of scotland and northern ireland. now, tomorrow, we start windy for eastern england and we've still got some rain around too. that'll move away, the cloud more reluctant to break up, the winds will ease. and then many other parts of the uk will see some sunshine for a while. but in the west, it's going to cloud over more and more. we'll see some rain coming in, mainly affecting northern ireland during the afternoon. ahead of that, something a little bit warmer across parts
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of england and wales. but there's warmer weather on the way during thursday and friday, some unusually warm weather for the time of year. temperatures widely going up to around 19 or 20 celsius. hello this is bbc news with clive myrie. the headlines... the government orders an inquiry into the failures that allowed a serving police officer to kill sarah everard. the public have a right to know what systematic failures enabled his continued employment as a police officer. we need answers as to why this was allowed to happen. a former facebook employee turned whistleblower tells us law makers that the social media giant is harming children, stoking division and weakening democracy.
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it isa it is a great surprise... three scientists win the nobel prize in physics for their groundbreaking work to understand complex systems, such as the earth's climate. more than 200,000 pupils were off school in england last week for covid—related reasons. this year's nobel prize for physics has been awarded to three scientists for their work to understand complex systems, such as the earth's climate. the swedish academy of sciences praised the work of syukuro manabe and klaus hasselmann for their work that helped predict the impact of global warming on the earth's climate. giorgio parisi was recognised for his work on fluctuations in physical systems. let's find out more from dr mark richards from the department of physics at imperial college, london.
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hello to you. thanks for being with us. deserve it winners? absolutely. i think us. deserve it winners? absolutely. i think they — us. deserve it winners? absolutely. i think they laid — us. deserve it winners? absolutely. i think they laid the _ us. deserve it winners? absolutely. i think they laid the foundations - i think they laid the foundations for understanding, as he sat, complex systems, particularly allowing many scientists to start to model the atmosphere and the climate system, which is, of course, quite complex and full of many components. so for the laymen and not very bright people, like me, explain roughly what they did.- roughly what they did. well, essentially, _ roughly what they did. well, essentially, as _ roughly what they did. well, essentially, as you - roughly what they did. well, essentially, as you know, i roughly what they did. well, | essentially, as you know, you roughly what they did. well, - essentially, as you know, you cannot measure everywhere all of the time. if we did, then we would know exactly what was happening. in fact, what they did is they laid the foundations, for example, so we can understand the link between c02 production and increase in surface temperature is, for example, or the link between surface temperature and atmospheric temperature and human activity. these are all interconnected complex systems which affect all of us in some way as well
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as the entire ecosystem, so to lay the foundations that allow you to model these things so that you can barely get an insight, notjust to the problems and the interconnectivity between them, but also hopefully towards a collective act to find solutions. haifa also hopefully towards a collective act to find solutions.— act to find solutions. how reliable do ou act to find solutions. how reliable do you think _ act to find solutions. how reliable do you think these _ act to find solutions. how reliable do you think these models - act to find solutions. how reliable do you think these models are i act to find solutions. how reliable l do you think these models are that they came up with? i do you think these models are that they came up with?— they came up with? i think like anything. _ they came up with? i think like anything, models _ they came up with? i think like anything, models or— they came up with? i think like | anything, models or something they came up with? i think like i anything, models or something that we can always improve, and that is what has happened over the years, they become more and more reliable, there's more and more data available, especially with the evolution with things like machine learning and so on, we are starting to learn more and more, we can model it more actively. it starts from the fact that had they not made those foundations, we might have perhaps collectively continued but the way that we were industrialising on a global scale without really paying much regard to how that can impact on things which seemed quite distant on things which seemed quite distant on the face of it. so on things which seemed quite distant on the face of it.— on the face of it. so the practical applications _ on the face of it. so the practical
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applications can _ on the face of it. so the practical applications can be _ on the face of it. so the practical applications can be used - on the face of it. so the practical applications can be used now? . applications can be used now? absolutely. and they are being used now. in fact, you know, we have got the climate summit happening very shortly, and in many ways, many of the decision—making, in fact, the ip pc report which helped galvanise governments and leaders globally some time ago is very much underpinned by much of the research and work that was built from the foundations that were laid by the nobel prize winners.— nobel prize winners. that's interesting, _ nobel prize winners. that's interesting, a _ nobel prize winners. that's interesting, a lot _ nobel prize winners. that's interesting, a lot of- nobel prize winners. that's interesting, a lot of the i nobel prize winners. that's| interesting, a lot of the talk nobel prize winners. that's i interesting, a lot of the talk and the analysis and science and what we are going to see in glasgow next month, that stems from what these three chaps have come up with. yes. three chaps have come up with. yes, because had — three chaps have come up with. yes, because had that _ three chaps have come up with. yes, because had that not _ three chaps have come up with. ya: because had that not happen, then there wouldn't have been, essentially, we would not have known about the issues that have risen, the alarm would not have been raised from and we would not have culminated to this point, so i think it's only fair to recognise the company — contribution they have made, notjust for identifying the issues, but hopefully i human
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endeavour which will help to find those solutions. aha, endeavour which will help to find those solutions.— endeavour which will help to find those solutions. �* ., , , , , those solutions. a nobel prize seems a small change _ those solutions. a nobel prize seems a small change for— those solutions. a nobel prize seems a small change for people _ those solutions. a nobel prize seems a small change for people who - a small change for people who managed to save the world. well, we haven't quite — managed to save the world. well, we haven't quite saved _ managed to save the world. well, we haven't quite saved the _ managed to save the world. well, we haven't quite saved the world - managed to save the world. well, we haven't quite saved the world yet, i haven't quite saved the world yet, that takes everybody, also, it's not scientists alone who can save the world, they can perhaps provide the data and give us more insight, but this is something that collectively we all have some, if you like, individual responsibility and collective accountability, so in many ways, no one really escapes that, but they certainly should be recognised, and in many ways, on a large scale, it's like a small change, but let's not forget the nobel prize is almost like the oscars of the scientific world, so 0scars of the scientific world, so i'm certainly very pleased for them. almost like? they are the oscars of the scientific world.— the scientific world. absolutely. chairs, doctor. _ the scientific world. absolutely. chairs, doctor. thank— the scientific world. absolutely. chairs, doctor. thank you i the scientific world. absolutely. chairs, doctor. thank you for i chairs, doctor. thank you for joining us. yum! i think you, you are welcome. adele has announced the release of new music for the first time since 2015 and shared the first few bars on twitter. her comeback single, easy on me, will be released friday the 15th of october.
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her comeback single, easy on me, will be released friday the 15th of october. i'm joined by the host of radio 1's future sounds, clara amfo. you where swaying there. that was probably three bars. you make at this point, that's all we need from her, is it not? is that all they need? i her, is it not? is that all they need? ., , , her, is it not? is that all they need? . , , ., need? i mean, she is for the people, is she not because _ need? i mean, she is for the people, is she not because neck _ need? i mean, she is for the people, is she not because neck she - need? i mean, she is for the people, is she not because neck she is - need? i mean, she is for the people, is she not because neck she is a i is she not because neck she is a national treasure. is she not because neck she is a nationaltreasure. i is she not because neck she is a national treasure. i am so, so excited that she is coming back. writes, 0k. whati excited that she is coming back. writes, 0k. what i am interested in, how important this album release is to the whole industry. we have come through co. that and we saw how important how daniel craginjames important how daniel cragin james bond important how daniel craginjames bond has been to that movie industry it. i am interested to know if i dallas in the same category in terms
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of trying to regenerate an industry that has had its problems because of coalbed and not being able to go out live so on and so forth. as she got important to the industry? i believe so, not important to the industry? i believe so. not to. — important to the industry? i believe so. not to. no _ important to the industry? i believe so, not to, no pressure, _ important to the industry? i believe so, not to, no pressure, a - important to the industry? i believe so, not to, no pressure, a doubt, . important to the industry? i believe so, not to, no pressure, a doubt, if| so, not to, no pressure, a doubt, if you are watching. she is the other artist that other artists move their record releases around because her success is so, there is a trust that their music and what she gives us that it their music and what she gives us thatitis their music and what she gives us that it is going to be successful, because, you know, her craft of songwriting, so special, it's classic, you know? the thing about a dalke may think the reason why she is so successful is she lets us miss her in an age where, you know, the line between fans and singers is so thin, and everybody is so instantly accessible. she lets us miss her and she really takes her time. i can't wait to hear this record. she leaves lona ta -s wait to hear this record. she leaves long gaps between _ wait to hear this record. she leaves long gaps between each _ wait to hear this record. she leaves long gaps between each recording. | long gaps between each recording. she's not out on the red carpet
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every night and that kind of stuff. she forces us to miss her. the thing is if she wanted _ she forces us to miss her. the thing is if she wanted to _ she forces us to miss her. the thing is if she wanted to be _ she forces us to miss her. the thing is if she wanted to be more visible, | is if she wanted to be more visible, she could. ~ �* , , ., is if she wanted to be more visible, she could-_ we i she could. when adele speaks we alwa s she could. when adele speaks we always laughed. _ she could. when adele speaks we always laughed, she _ she could. when adele speaks we always laughed, she could - she could. when adele speaks we always laughed, she could have . always laughed, she could have easily had her career as a standup comedian, likely she is a singer as well, but i think to answer your question, this album will be really important because adele was then that really sweet and special spot where people still really care about her work and whole bodies, you know? we are in an area where a lot of artists will put out singles constantly artists will put out singles co nsta ntly just artists will put out singles constantly just to stay relevant, but she will happily take her time and make a body of work that she is really proud of. is it and make a body of work that she is really proud of-_ really proud of. is it significant that she will _ really proud of. is it significant that she will support _ really proud of. is it significant that she will support the i really proud of. is it significant| that she will support the album really proud of. is it significant i that she will support the album as well? �* ., . . that she will support the album as well? �* ., ., ., ., ., , that she will support the album as well? �* ., . . ., . , ., that she will support the album as well? �* ., ., ., ., ., , ., ., well? i'm not aware of any two or. lesson, well? i'm not aware of any two or. lesson. i--- _ well? i'm not aware of any two or. lesson. i--- i— well? i'm not aware of any two or. lesson, i... iwill— well? i'm not aware of any two or. lesson, i... iwill not— well? i'm not aware of any two or. lesson, i... i will not be _ well? i'm not aware of any two or. lesson, i... i will not be checked i lesson, i... i will not be checked into it. lesson, i... i will not be checked into it- you _ lesson, i... i will not be checked into it. you are _ lesson, i... i will not be checked into it. you are supposed - lesson, i... i will not be checked into it. you are supposed to i lesson, i... i will not be checked| into it. you are supposed to know all of this stuff. _ into it. you are supposed to know all of this stuff. she _ into it. you are supposed to know all of this stuff. she is going i all of this stuff. she is going to tear, listen to me. i all of this stuff. she is going to tear, listen to me.— all of this stuff. she is going to tear, listen to me. i cannot comment on behalf of— tear, listen to me. i cannot comment on behalf of her, _ tear, listen to me. i cannot comment on behalf of her, but _ tear, listen to me. i cannot comment on behalf of her, but if _ tear, listen to me. i cannot comment on behalf of her, but if she _ tear, listen to me. i cannot comment on behalf of her, but if she chooses i on behalf of her, but if she chooses to talk and i would — to her, i
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would be shocked if it wasn't completely sold out within minutes. and i think that would be encouraging and would boost, you know, to music fans and industry. people still care, people want to get out there and appreciate their favourites. imilli get out there and appreciate their favourites. ~ , ., favourites. will there be more introspection? _ favourites. will there be more introspection? i— favourites. will there be more introspection? i believe i favourites. will there be more introspection? i believe so. i favourites. will there be more i introspection? i believe so. she did 'oke a introspection? i believe so. she did joke a little — introspection? i believe so. she did joke a little while _ introspection? i believe so. she did joke a little while ago _ introspection? i believe so. she did joke a little while ago that - introspection? i believe so. she did joke a little while ago that she i introspection? i believe so. she did joke a little while ago that she was| joke a little while ago that she was going to make a drum and bass record just to spite people.— just to spite people. something a little bit, just to spite people. something a little bit. you _ just to spite people. something a little bit, you know, _ just to spite people. something a little bit, you know, you - just to spite people. something a little bit, you know, you can i just to spite people. something a| little bit, you know, you can dance to. ,, , little bit, you know, you can dance to, ,, , ., , little bit, you know, you can dance to. ,, i, ., , to. she is a very private person, obviously. _ to. she is a very private person, obviously. as — to. she is a very private person, obviously, as you _ to. she is a very private person, obviously, as you say, - to. she is a very private person, obviously, as you say, you i to. she is a very private person, obviously, as you say, you are i to. she is a very private person, obviously, as you say, you are a hack, her private life has been made public whether she likes it or not, and i am sure that will be reflected in this record whether it is going to be that record, who's to say, but we know her boys will be consistent. we liked a bit of drum and bass here on bbc news i'll stop get we liked a bit of drum and bass here on bbc news i'll stop— on bbc news i'll stop get to know have ou on bbc news i'll stop get to know have you heard _ on bbc news i'll stop get to know have you heard it _ on bbc news i'll stop get to know have you heard it because - on bbc news i'll stop get to know have you heard it because you i have you heard it because you are not a lot of people have done viral dances to it. so that's right,
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because it's drum and bass. it's great to have you on. thanks for joining a. great to have you on. thanks for 'oinin: a. .,, great to have you on. thanks for 'oinin: a. ., , , ., ~ great to have you on. thanks for 'oinin: a. ,, .,~ ., joining a. pleasure speaking about adele and her _ joining a. pleasure speaking about adele and her new— joining a. pleasure speaking about adele and her new album. - covered passports are said to become mandatory from october. the labour government when a tied vote by 28 votes 227. it came despite opposition parties uniting to reject the plans. members of the public will be expected to show evidence of being fully vaccinated or having a recent negative covid test. the scottish government has announced that £300,000,000 package of investment in the nhs and social care ahead of the winter ——of investment in the nhs and social care ahead of a winter described as likely to be the most challenging ever faced. the plan includes the hiring of extra support workers, cash for care at home services and a pay rise for care staff. 0pposition parties claimed the plans were a "sticking plaster" for a health service facing crisis.
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let's take a look at the uk's latest coronavirus figures. the government data shows there were 33,869 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, so just over 3a,000 new cases were reported on average per day, in the last week. 6,747 people were in hospital with coronavirus across the uk yesterday. there were 166 deaths — that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid 19 test. that means on average, 111 deaths were announced every day in the past week. the latest figures on people who've been vaccinated haven't yet been made available. for much of the last century, thousands of unmarried mothers spent time in institutions in northern ireland. many say they were detained against their will, used as unpaid labour and forced to give their babies up for adoption. now a panel of experts has recommended the establishment of a public inquiry to investigate what happened, as our ireland correspondent chris page reports.
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the secrets of these institutions are being shattered by the stories of those who were once shamed. more than 10,000 unmarried women were sent to mother and baby homes in northern ireland. they are and their sons and daughters were the victims of a harsh morality. my brother didn't have a voice at the time either, but i certainly will be his voice now. fionnuala was adopted from a home in belfast. she discovered her brother had died as a baby and searched for his burial place. i wouldn't call it a grave. it was more of a pit. there's over 30 babies in the spot where he's buried. they were all just thrown in together, like they didn't matter, in unconsecrated ground in a bog at the bottom of a cemetary. she recently had a headstone put up to mark her siblings 50th birthday. finally has had his name emblazoned in marble. that's what he always
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should have had. ultimately, this inquiry has been brought about by the bravery of survivors who have spoken out to break the stigma. now they want answers and accountability for what happened in these institutions and for the suffering of women and their children. the experts who have devised the investigation say it should fully uncover an appalling scandal. we can't put back the clock on those who have suffered so much throughout this period. but one of the things we can do is to recognise their truth. one of the many issues to be examined is the unpaid and exhausting labour in these institutions — magdalene laundries. there were four in northern ireland, over 3,000 women spent time in one. caroline was sent to a laundry in londonderry during her early teens. it was very frightening. very steamy, very warm. the constant machines, you could hear the machines always going.
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at a very young age, one of the women taught me how to use a big presser. and, i mean, it was a presser as big as this table. there were many women in there who had been there for many years? a long, long time. some of the women were in there from when they were young girls and died in it. there's a lasting legacy of trauma. survivors hope the inquiry will expose wrongdoing and bring healing. women was ashamed. they shouldn't have been ashamed. the headlines on bbc news: under government orders, and inquiry into failures that allowed a serving police officer to rape and murder sarah everard. a former facebook employee turned whistle—blower tells us lawmakers that the social media giant is harming children, stoking division and weakening democracy. more than 200,000 pupils were off school in england last week for cobit related reasons. — covid.
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the inquests have opened into the deaths of four young gay men who were all murdered by the serial killer stephen port. the jury was told the inquests will focus on whether police "missed opportunities" to stop him sooner. the victims were all given fatal overdoses of the drug, ghb by port who was jailed for life in 2016. the jury was told his trial had not answered the question of whether any of the deaths "might have been prevented" had the police investigated differently. here's our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford. four young gay men all found dead within 15 months of each other in the london suburb of barking. two were found in this churchyard and onejust outside it, all four were in their 20s with the date rape drug ghb. their killer, stephen port, will die in prison as a result of his crimes.
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today the men's families came to their inquests to make statements commemorating their relatives and to look for an answer to a key question — could some of the deaths have been prevented? anthony walgate's mother, sarah, told thejury he had moved from hull to london to study fashion. she said they spoke several times a week until he was murdered. in her statement, daniel whitworth's grandmother barbara said... gabriel kovari was from slovakia. his brother told the court he was a smart, talented, kind person who made the mistake of trusting people too much, and that cost him his life. jack taylor was a forklift driver who was hoping to become a police officer. his sisterjenny taylor said... the body of the first young man,
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anthony walgate, was found here outside stephen port�*s flat. it was port who'd called the ambulance and port admitted lying to police about not knowing anthony. but it wasn't until weeks after the fourth body was found that any of the deaths was considered as a possible murder. the coroner sarah munro qc told thejury... the jury heard about this fake suicide note that was actually written by the serial killer, and we're told they would be looking at the competence and adequacy of the metropolitan police investigations. daniel sandford, bbc news, barking. the number of pupils absent from state schools in england for covid—related reasons rose by two thirds at the end of last month. latest figures from the department for education showed over 200,000
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children were off school on the last day of september. but numbers are much lower than the end of last term, when bubble systems were still in place, and more than a million children were absent. 0ur education correspondent elaine dunkley has been to a high school in west yorkshire to see how they are coping with ongoing challenges posed by coronavirus. hi, it's adele webster, the student welfare officer calling from honley high school. another phone call to parents, another pupil with symptoms. complaining of headache and a cough, and it could possibly be covid. covid is still causing disruption. we need to just isolate from the other students, so if you just come with me we will sit at the back of the hall. is that 0k? it's a busy week for adele, the welfare officer. if you can phone dad for me... since the start of term, an increasing number of children are missing school. yesterday, we sent four home. two of those have come back confirmed as positive. i'd say it's probably the busiest we have been in terms of cases in school.
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we have spent a week at honley high in west yorkshire. like other schools in england, restrictions have been lifted by the government. it's been absolutely amazing to have what feels much more like a normal school again. are you all right, girls? all of the children going to their lessons in the subject specialist teachers' rooms, science experiments happening. but at the same time, we are dealing with, unfortunately, a rise in the number of cases. he's tested positive for covid now... as of today we have hit 200 students and staff, which i think the highest number we've had last year at any one time was 28 cases across the school. bell rings. here an old building makes ventilation an issue. a spike in cases means open evenings are now online. assemblies are cancelled and the wearing of masks is being encouraged. how have you been, then? i haven't felt as bad as i thought i would be. for pupils in school and at home these are difficult times. i think the hardest thing is not seeing everyone. |
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i've been away from my family. so what are you doing, then? i've been doing teams from home. the teachers usually put power i points on four what lessons we can do so i've just been _ going through the power points by myself upstairs. and it'sjust a bit lonely. honestly, i'm so i excited to come back. everyone is missing you loads. yeah. emily is in year 11 and will be sitting her gcse exams next summer. it's a bit nervy for all of the year 11s, because we have not only missed year ten of our learning of our gcses but we have also missed year nine which is really disruptive. hi, you all right? just as we explained on the phone call... meanwhile, there is no let up for the welfare officer. i'll get him a pcr test. this pupil is going home. if they are negative, if he's feeling well he can come back to school. we have been doing the lateral flow tests and they have all come - back negative, so... but in the meantime i'm working l from home, so it's all right for him to be at home with me. all right, 0k.
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from tomorrow the school is preparing to vaccinate 12—15—year—olds. and it's very difficult to break that cycle... the department for education says along with vaccinations, it's about managing the risks with ventilation and regular testing. but with just over 200,000 pupils absent in schools in england, covid continues to keep children from the classroom. elaine dunkley, bbc news. more now on a facebook employee turned whistle—blower who told a us senate hearing that she was testifying against the social media company because she believed its projects harmed children, stoked division and weakened american democracy. joining me are the tech reporterfor democracy. joining me are the tech reporter for the telegraph in san francisco and stephen levy, author of facebook the inside story. gentlemen, get to see you both. thank you forjoining us. there has
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been a steady drip drip of negative stories about facebook over the last few weeks or so. the wall street journal has published a lot of the revelations from this whistle—blower. how damaging have the last few weeks been? i whistle-blower. how damaging have the last few weeks been?— the last few weeks been? i think the last few weeks been? i think the have the last few weeks been? i think they have been _ the last few weeks been? i think they have been quite _ the last few weeks been? i think they have been quite damaging. | the last few weeks been? i think- they have been quite damaging. this is a slightly unusual story in regards to facebook�*s problems. we get a lot of stories about facebook�*s problems. here we have somebody who has been inside the company who has direct experience of these problems saying outright that effectively a lot of the things that outsiders, journalists who has covered this company because they had suspect it is true. at least thatis had suspect it is true. at least that is her claim, that there has always been this question when journalists can very easily find things going on on facebook, eating disorder content, hate speech, extremist groups, whatever it may be, they go to facebook and go hey have you tried searching for this? there always been this question are they sort of incompetent and kind find the stuff on their own platform
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or are they not telling us what their own research might show? are they not telling us of their own investigations have found? and according to the whistle—blower, it's the latter. they have found many times that they have these big problems and they have consistently have been told that they are not to disclose that to the public. is have been told that they are not to disclose that to the public.- disclose that to the public. is that the difference _ disclose that to the public. is that the difference here, _ disclose that to the public. is that the difference here, that - disclose that to the public. is that the difference here, that it's - disclose that to the public. is that the difference here, that it's an . the difference here, that it's an insider who is at the heart of the organisation? it's notjust someone like you or me or others who have done a bit of digging in trying to find out what's going on. this is at the heart, someone at the heart who knew what was going on. it’s the heart, someone at the heart who knew what was going on.— knew what was going on. it's not just someone — knew what was going on. it's not just someone who _ knew what was going on. it's not just someone who is _ knew what was going on. it's not just someone who is at - knew what was going on. it's not just someone who is at the - knew what was going on. it's not| just someone who is at the heart, the frances hagen is a compelling for garrick, it is someone who stuck around and downloaded all these files, basically she is facebook snowden, just like snowden from hawaii or whatever downloaded all the nsa documents to get proof of what you thought was happening is really happening, that's what
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francis haugen dead, she downloaded tens of thousands of documents, and now she has the proof that facebook knew, which isn't a surprise to those of us who have been covering facebook for a long time. her those of us who have been covering facebook for a long time.— facebook for a long time. nor is it a surprise — facebook for a long time. nor is it a surprise that _ facebook for a long time. nor is it a surprise that in _ facebook for a long time. nor is it a surprise that in many _ facebook for a long time. nor is it a surprise that in many cases, - facebook for a long time. nor is it. a surprise that in many cases, mark zuckerberg — a surprise that in many cases, mark zuckerberg faced with a choice of improving — zuckerberg faced with a choice of improving a product in a way that it's better— improving a product in a way that it's better for society, better for users. _ it's better for society, better for users. it — it's better for society, better for users, it will take of course which is better— users, it will take of course which is better for— users, it will take of course which is better for facebook, not better for facebook's growth, better for profits _ for facebook's growth, better for profits i— for facebook's growth, better for profits. i have had a number of times— profits. i have had a number of times in— profits. i have had a number of times in my book earlier in the history— times in my book earlier in the history where facebooks choice made that choice _ history where facebooks choice made that choice for growth. but history where facebooks choice made that choice for growth.— that choice for growth. but that is democracy. _ that choice for growth. but that is democracy, isn't _ that choice for growth. but that is democracy, isn't a? _ that choice for growth. but that is democracy, isn't a? that's - that choice for growth. but that is democracy, isn't a? that's the - democracy, isn't a? that's the american way. you do what you can to make as much money as you can within the law. ., u, make as much money as you can within the law. ., ,_ . the law. you can probably make an arc ument the law. you can probably make an argument that _ the law. you can probably make an argument that the _ the law. you can probably make an argument that the lot _ the law. you can probably make an argument that the lot has - the law. you can probably make an argument that the lot has not - the law. you can probably make an j argument that the lot has not been catching up with these things. but i think, you know, what's precisely
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and how precisely the law of social media libel laws and legal shield which often protects social media companies from legal action from things on their platform, and there are two different things. this is not on facebook incidentally, it's within their rights as a corporation to find problems on their platform to find problems on their platform to find problems on their platform to find their instagram algorithms are pushing people towards eating disorder content to find that we are consistently not actually catching the majority of that hate speech or extremist content out there, they are just not going to tell anybody about that, many people ask us directly, hey, have you got any research on this? what does the research on this? what does the research show? how many people would accept that? that's what a corporation does. is that really what sort of people want to hear from facebook? i don't know. that's an interesting _ from facebook? i don't know. that's an interesting point, _ from facebook? i don't know. that's an interesting point, isn't— from facebook? i don't know. that's an interesting point, isn't it? - from facebook? i don't know. that's
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an interesting point, isn't it? have l an interesting point, isn't it? have the public in their billions around the public in their billions around the world, had they not signed up to this devils bargain, really, this packs that, you know, there are aspects of these platforms that are harmful, but you know what, we sort of know that and it's in the back of our mind command the fundamental fact as we enjoy all almost like someone goes into a
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clinic and fix themselves, admits being wrong, help us out here, because we cannot help ourselves. irate because we cannot help ourselves. we are to deepen his corruption and facehook— are to deepen his corruption and facebook is resisting that. i think that is— facebook is resisting that. i think that is and — facebook is resisting that. i think that is and is using concept, because _ that is and is using concept, because right now, facebook is suffering — because right now, facebook is suffering a moral culpability that is heingm — suffering a moral culpability that is being... it is not a question of legality. — is being... it is not a question of legality, just as smoking cigarettes was not _ legality, just as smoking cigarettes was not legal, but it is something at a certain— was not legal, but it is something at a certain point society cannot tolerate, — at a certain point society cannot tolerate, and i think it is having this effect— tolerate, and i think it is having this effect on facebook employees. obviously— this effect on facebook employees. obviously downloading tens of thousands of documents before you leave _ thousands of documents before you leave the _ thousands of documents before you leave the building is in extreme, but you — leave the building is in extreme, but you see among facebook employees, they are not happy with what their— employees, they are not happy with what their company is doing. all riuht. what their company is doing. all ri ht. it what their company is doing. all right- it is _ what their company is doing. all right. it is not _ what their company is doing. all right. it is not a _ what their company is doing. all right. it is not a great _ what their company is doing. all right. it is not a great place - right. it is not a great place to work. right. it is not a great place to work- good — right. it is not a great place to work. good to _ right. it is not a great place to work. good to talk to - right. it is not a great place to work. good to talk to you - right. it is not a great place to. work. good to talk to you both. thanks for _ work. good to talk to you both. thanks forjoining _ work. good to talk to you both. thanks forjoining us. _
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and it's been announced that the popular '90s series sex and the city will get a revival. sarahjessica parker, cynthia nixon and kristin davis are all set to star in the new series, titled "and just like that". it will premiere on streaming services in the us in december with a british release date yet to be confirmed. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. it is going to be turning drier overnight, especially across the western side of the uk, and the winds becoming lighter as well. further east, we do eventually see most of that rain moving away from scotland. still some rain overnight for eastern parts of england. and it's going to be very windy around some of those north sea coasts as well. further west, where skies clear and the winds are lighter, it could turn quite chilly overnight across parts of scotland and northern ireland. now, tomorrow, we start windy for eastern england and we've still got some rain around too. that'll move away, the cloud more reluctant to break up, the winds will ease. and then many other parts of the uk will see some sunshine for a while. but in the west, it's going to cloud over more and more.
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we'll see some rain coming in, mainly affecting northern ireland during the afternoon. ahead of that, something a little bit warmer across parts of england and wales. but there's warmer weather on the way during thursday and friday, some unusually warm weather for the time of year. temperatures widely going up to around 19 or 20 celsius.
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this is bbc news with me, christian fraser. a former facebook employee tells a senate hearing the company puts profit over the safety of its users. frances haugen leaked thousands of internal documents from facebook which show the company has known for years how much damage social media is having on the mental health of teenage girls. i'm here today because i believe facebook's products harm children, stoke division and weaken our democracy. a damning inquiry in france uncovers sexual abuse by french priests on an industrial scale. would a tax on virgin plastics help stop the build up of waste in our oceans? a us senator will tells us about the bill he is sponsoring to carry the fight to the plastics industry. and no longer one of america's richest men — donald trump drops off the forbes
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400 list of wealthiest people

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