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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  October 5, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

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you are with bbc news, i am sally van dyck with the latest viewers for —— news for viewers around the world. viewers for -- news for viewers around the world.— viewers for -- news for viewers around the world. facebook says it's a- -s around the world. facebook says it's apps such — around the world. facebook says it's apps such as _ around the world. facebook says it's apps such as facebook - around the world. facebook says it's apps such as facebook and i it's apps such as facebook and instagram are up and running after they apologise for the biggest outage in use the. out of the blackout, under the spotlight, lawmakers from a facebook whistleblower who claims the company covered up research into a time to mental health. the migrants sent back to a country that had not lived in four years. we report from haiti on america's deportees. what hurts is the treatment we received, inhuman, most of all, the chains on our feet, we're
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not slaves, migration is right, not slaves, migration is right, not a crime. not slaves, migration is right, not a crime-— not a crime. the real-life star trek, william _ not a crime. the real-life star trek, william shatner - not a crime. the real-life star trek, william shatner is - not a crime. the real-life star trek, william shatner is to . trek, william shatner is to boldly go into space at the age of 90. a warm welcome to the programme. it has been a rough 24 programme. it has been a rough 2a hours for facebook. billions of users of the social media platform and its other services, whatsapp and instagram have finally had services restored after a six—hour global outage. facebook apologised and said teams working as fast as possible to debug and restore the platforms are. shares closed down almost 5%, the outage coming after a whistleblower went on us television to reveal she was
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behind the legal documents alleging facebook put profits before public safety. francis will testify at the senate subcommittee later today. here is james clayton with what happened in the last days. the number of people who use facebook across the world a staggering. 10.3 million. when something goes wrong, it goes very wrong. the outage was set to cause mayhem at facebook�*s headquarters here, as technicians scramble to work out what was going on. facebook was losing over £100,000 a minute and its share price fell. marks zuckerberg personally lost around £4 billion. most of these kinds of outages last for around one hour. what made this so unusual was how long it took to fix.
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the scale of it as well, the outage was not localised, it was global, affecting users across the world.— was global, affecting users across the world. you might see... across the world. you might see. . . this _ across the world. you might see... this could _ across the world. you might see... this could not - across the world. you might see... this could not have i see... this could not have happened _ see... this could not have happened in _ see... this could not have happened in the _ see... this could not have happened in the worse - see... this could not have i happened in the worse type see... this could not have - happened in the worse type for facebook. today a whistleblower who used to work for facebook, francis haugen, will tell us politicians that facebook�*s own research found that instagram was dangerous to teenager's mental health. a bad week for the social network is getting worse for the day. lets now talk to ryan, who was an executive vice president of cyber security strategy. he joins us live from california. hello to you. in your words, just talk us through what went wrong technically. i5 just talk us through what went wrong technically.— wrong technically. is much as we all depend _ wrong technically. is much as we all depend on _ wrong technically. is much as we all depend on the - wrong technically. is much asj we all depend on the internet we all depend on the internet we are occasionally given reminders that the internet is built on a programme decades old, and there is a
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straightforward system called bg p straightforward system called bgp that tells everyone on the internet where to find you and facebook appears to have made a mistake where they cannot recover from very quickly. six. recover from very quickly. six hours outage, what you think about that? is that something they managed to sort out as swiftly as they could? could it have been longer? it swiftly as they could? could it have been longer?— swiftly as they could? could it have been longer? it could have been longer _ have been longer? it could have been longer because _ have been longer? it could have been longer because when - have been longer? it could have been longer because when you | been longer because when you disconnect from the internet and tell the rest of the internet that you are basically gone, it is quite difficult to figure out how to undo that decision. you could have a data centre where you need physical access to a server and making sure the right person with the right knowledge had the right sort of access to figure that, it is not something that anyone rehearses, even of those of us in tech companies who are expected to be on 24/7. this was a bullet lodged in many ways. was a bullet lodged in many wa s. . , was a bullet lodged in many wa s. .,, ., was a bullet lodged in many was. ., ., ., ways. has facebook now had a look at this, _ ways. has facebook now had a look at this, i'm _ ways. has facebook now had a look at this, i'm sure - ways. has facebook now had a look at this, i'm sure they've l look at this, i'm sure they've had a big look back at the last 24 hours to make sure it does
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not happen again. the engineer that made _ not happen again. the engineer that made this _ not happen again. the engineer that made this change - not happen again. the engineer that made this change will - that made this change will never repeat that mistake in his or her life. suffice to say this is a wake—up call for us all. inasmuch as we depend on the internet there are these old ridiculous protocols that were never designed to support the sort of things, the criticality of the internet makes all too clear every day for us and that's not something that facebook by itself can resist although their processes are old. a , resist although their processes are old. , , resist although their processes areold. , , ., , are old. many people initially thou~ht are old. many people initially thought facebook _ are old. many people initially thought facebook had - are old. many people initially thought facebook had been l thought facebook had been hacked, this is part of another actor trying to disrupt facebook, whatsapp, instagram, but what does this tells about that risk going forward quelling it really is a good reminder that this information will spread in the absence of better information. with all the news cycle swelling around, nobody but the actual people working on the incident will have the story and that's incredibly sensitive to share publicly. incredibly sensitive to share ublicl . ~ ,, ., publicly. we saw dribs and drabs come _
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publicly. we saw dribs and drabs come out _ publicly. we saw dribs and drabs come out of- publicly. we saw dribs and drabs come out of it - publicly. we saw dribs and - drabs come out of it throughout the day but the vacuum was fall by the typical disinformation merchants claiming a hacker, this was related to the whistleblower and that all turn out to be false but it is a challenging new cycle to deal with with something prominent has facebook.— with with something prominent has facebook. ryan, thank you, aood to has facebook. ryan, thank you, good to talk _ has facebook. ryan, thank you, good to talk to _ has facebook. ryan, thank you, good to talk to you, _ has facebook. ryan, thank you, good to talk to you, live - has facebook. ryan, thank you, good to talk to you, live from i good to talk to you, live from california. let's now talk in more detail about the whistleblower who will testify in a senate hearing later. courtney, we were hearing from james there that there is a really difficult day ahead for facebook still.— facebook still. that's right, and later— facebook still. that's right, and later the _ facebook still. that's right, and later the day _ facebook still. that's right, and later the day they - facebook still. that's right, and later the day they will i and later the day they will hear from an ex— facebook employee who has accused the company of prioritising profits over people, and that's because of the algorithm which she says promotes harmful content and the company knows how harmful this content is. their own research shows the harm it is causing. she went further to say that facebook knows that
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they are causing this damage, they are causing this damage, they know how to make it safer but they won't do it because it will affect the bottom line, and they actually planted her testimony to liken facebook to tobacco companies which for years minimise the impact of smoking on health. she spoke to 60 minutes on serbia's ahead of this hearing, let's have a listen. . this hearing, let's have a listen- -_ listen. . content that is hateful. _ listen. . content that is hateful, divisive, - listen. . content that is - hateful, divisive, polarising, it easier_ hateful, divisive, polarising, it easier to inspire people to anger— it easier to inspire people to anger that it is to other emotions. misinformation, angry content _ emotions. misinformation, angry content is — emotions. misinformation, angry content is enticing to people, and it— content is enticing to people, and it keeps them on the platform. and it keeps them on the platform-— and it keeps them on the latform. , platform. gas. facebook is realised that _ platform. gas. facebook is realised that if _ platform. gas. facebook is realised that if they - platform. gas. facebook is| realised that if they change the algorithm to be safer, people will spend less time on the side, they were click on less ads, and they will make less ads, and they will make less money. less ads, and they will make less money-— less money. francois fillon facebook. _ less money. francois fillon facebook, she _ less money. francois fillon facebook, she left - less money. francois fillon facebook, she left earlier i less money. francois fillon i facebook, she left earlier this year— facebook, she left earlier this year and — facebook, she left earlier this year and on facebook, she left earlier this yearand on herway facebook, she left earlier this year and on her way out she made — year and on her way out she made copies of a number of internal— made copies of a number of internal documents which we have — internal documents which we have seen leaks to us media over— have seen leaks to us media over recent weeks. facebook has
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responded — over recent weeks. facebook has responded to her claims and said — responded to her claims and said many of them are misleading. we can bring up a statement, and have gone on to suggest — statement, and have gone on to suggest that... critics say that there are 2.8 million — critics say that there are 2.8 million users worldwide, it's an impossible task to police all of— an impossible task to police all of that information that is generated by all of those users. _ generated by all of those users, and the senate hearing will look— users, and the senate hearing will look at the impact in the us. — will look at the impact in the us, but— will look at the impact in the us, but they say this needs to be widened out, most of facebook's users are outside of the us, — facebook's users are outside of the us, and this only goes some way to— the us, and this only goes some way to examining the huge impact _ way to examining the huge impact that social media is having _ impact that social media is having on our lives, and a lot of it— having on our lives, and a lot of it is— having on our lives, and a lot of it is negative.— of it is negative. thank you for now. — of it is negative. thank you for now, and _ of it is negative. thank you for now, and we _ of it is negative. thank you for now, and we will- of it is negative. thank you for now, and we will have i of it is negative. thank you - for now, and we will have more on that later on in our business coverage, that's in around 20 minutes time. just to say, facebook, instagram and whatsapp may have been down but our own bbc news website is up and running, so do log on, you can use the app as well to read
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after the latest on this story and the other stories that we're covering, but we will have more and facebook a little later. let's get some of the days other news. a court in australia has been told that the founder of the hills on chargeable read not guilty to withholding child sex abuse information. his lawyer indicated he would deny the charge. the case has been adjourned until the 23rd of november. camera operators, make—up artists and other behind—the—scenes workers in hollywood films and tv shows have voted overwhelmingly to go on strike. this would be the first nationwide industry strike in the industry's 128 strike in the industry's128 year history. 0fficials strike in the industry's128 year history. officials in california say the oil slick washing up along the coast is spreading to more beaches. booms have been put in place in several locations to stop the crude oil from
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several locations to stop the crude oilfrom reaching several locations to stop the crude oil from reaching the shore. a slick is spreading after a pipeline leak south of la, is spilling almost 600,000 litres. the us has begun flying hundreds of migrants from haiti back to the corinthian after they illegally cast into taxes via mexico — caribbean. there have been housed in del rio, and there has been a surge in patients trying to flee political instability and natural disasters in their country, hoping for asylum in the us. they have now been returned home. many haven't set foot on haitian soil in almost a decade. now they are being sent back in their droves. every day, plane—loads of haitian deportees arrive in port—au prince airport, returned from the border camps in texas. exhausted and disappointed, most own nothing in haiti but the clothes on their back.
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daniella and her family spent four months in chile. their son was born there. now, thrust back into a country on the brink of collapse. the family was never given a chance to apply for asylum by us officials, who reportedly told the deportees they were being flown to florida. translation: what hurts isn't being deported. - i knew from the start there were two options — being let in or being deported. what hurts is the treatment we received. inhumane. most of all, the chains on our feet. we are not slaves. migration is a right, not a crime. there is some immediate aid for the disorientated deportees but haiti can ill—afford thousands more desperately people arriving, hour after hour. as we are talking, there is another bus right behind you. there is the sort of constant return, then? yes, as i say, this is a record day. we expect flights all day
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coming in, untill this evening. the situation in haiti is critical. there are at least three humanitarian crises at the same time. there was an earthquake six weeks ago, there are people displaced by gang violence. these deportations began at the us—mexico border but there are many more thousands of haitian migrants stuck around the region, bottlenecked in colombia, panama, centralamerica. a truly continent—wide crisis landing back on haiti's shores. like most of the child deportees, this family's children are foreign nationals, born in brazil and seeing haiti for the first time. on arrival, they had nowhere to go and are staying at a friend's home, in a gang—controlled part of town. "what now?" he asks. "we have nothing, we will have to travel again. "the children aren't even haitians, they are brazilians.
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"when they asked me, �*what is happening, daddy?�* "i have to say, �*we have not got anything here,�* "life is very tough." theirs is the story of so many migrants from this complex and troubled nation. they went through hell to reach the us, and now find themselves back where they started, with no savings or prospects in the one place they did everything to leave. will grant, bbc news, port—au—prince. stay with us her own bbc news, still to come, a real—life star trek william shatner who played captain kirk is to travel to space at the age of 90. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. they believe everything's going to be different from now on. they think their country will be respected in the world once more, as it used to be
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before slobodan milosevic took power. the dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. as the parade was reaching its climax, two grenades i exploded and a group of- soldiersjumped from a military truck taking part in the paradel and ran towards the president, firing from kalashnikov automatic rifles. - after 437 years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's tragic warship emerged. but even as divers worked to buoy her up, the mary rose went through another heart—stopping drama. i want to be the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of california. you're abc news. the top stories. —— you're with bbc
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news. facebook has had its bigger avenue outage. they say full access may take some time. 0ut full access may take some time. out of the blackout and under the spotlight. us lawmakers will hear evidence from a facebook whistleblower claims the company covered research into its harm on mental health. survivors of institutions for unmarried mothers in northern ireland are to find out today what form of state enquiry is to be held into the abuse they suffered. dozens of women spent time in mother and baby homes and workhouses called magdalene laundries which were run by religious orders until 1990s. women were detained against their well and forced to cover up their well and forced to cover up their babies for adoptions. chris paige has been speaking to survivors about what they went through. the secrets of these
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institutions are being shattered by the stories of those who were once shamed. women were sent to mother and baby homes in northern ireland and they would have them is of and they would have them is of a harsh reality.— a harsh reality. you have hundreds _ a harsh reality. you have hundreds of _ a harsh reality. you have hundreds of thousands i a harsh reality. you have| hundreds of thousands of children who haven't been claimed to therefore have no vice. —— voice. my brother didn't have a voice at the time either but i will be his voice now. ,, ,. ., either but i will be his voice now. ,, ,_, , ., now. she discovered her brother had died as _ now. she discovered her brother had died as a — now. she discovered her brother had died as a baby _ now. she discovered her brother had died as a baby and - now. she discovered her brother had died as a baby and search i had died as a baby and search for his burial place. i for his burial place. i wouldn't call it a grave, there were over 30 babies on the spot where he was buried. they were alljust where he was buried. they were all just thrown where he was buried. they were alljust thrown in together like they didn't matter in an concentrated ground in a bog at the bottom of the cemetery. she recently had _ the bottom of the cemetery. she recently had a — the bottom of the cemetery. she recently had a headstone put up to mark her siblings 50th beth a. ., , to mark her siblings 50th beth
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a. ., y ., , ., a. finally he had his name in marble. a. finally he had his name in marble- -- — a. finally he had his name in marble. -- 50th _ a. finally he had his name in marble. -- 50th birthday. i a. finally he had his name in i marble. -- 50th birthday. that is what he _ marble. -- 50th birthday. that is what he always _ marble. -- 50th birthday. that is what he always should - marble. -- 50th birthday. that is what he always should have| is what he always should have have. . , , have. ultimately it is the survivors _ have. ultimately it is the survivors who _ have. ultimately it is the survivors who have - have. ultimately it is the i survivors who have broken have. ultimately it is the - survivors who have broken the stigma i speaking out that has led to this enquiry. they want answers and accountability for what happens in these institutions and for the suffering of women and children.— suffering of women and children. , ., ., ., �*, children. this violated women's ri . hts to children. this violated women's rights to equality. _ children. this violated women's rights to equality. un _ children. this violated women's rights to equality. un human i rights to equality. un human riahts rights to equality. un human rights experts _ rights to equality. un human rights experts have - rights experts have investigated the homes across the island. investigated the homes across the island-— the island. systematic torture and ill-treatment, _ the island. systematic torture and ill-treatment, girls - the island. systematic torture and ill-treatment, girls and i and ill—treatment, girls and women were involuntarily detained a stripped of their identities, forced to work constantly, not paid wages. unpaid labour was particularly exhausting in these institutions. magdalene laundries. there were four in northern ireland. more than 3000 women spent time in one.
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caroline was sent to one in londonderry during her early teens. it londonderry during her early teens. . , , teens. it was frightening. very steam , teens. it was frightening. very steamy. very _ teens. it was frightening. very steamy, very warm. _ teens. it was frightening. very steamy, very warm. the - teens. it was frightening. very i steamy, very warm. the constant machines, you could hear the machines, you could hear the machines always going to stop at a very young age. i was being taught how to use oppressor. it was oppressor as big as this table.— big as this table. there were many women _ big as this table. there were many women in _ big as this table. there were many women in there - big as this table. there were many women in there who i big as this table. there were i many women in there who had been there for a long time. b, been there for a long time. long, long time. some where there from young girls and died in it. , ., ., , in it. there is a lasting legacy _ in it. there is a lasting legacy of _ in it. there is a lasting legacy of trauma. - in it. there is a lasting - legacy of trauma. survivors hope the enquiry will expose wrongdoing and bring healing. the most important thing is the children that was taken away. the women's identity that was taken away. women were ashamed. they shouldn't have been ashamed. that was caroline mcgee, a
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survivor of the magdalene laundry are speaking to chris paige. now time for all the latest sport news. hello i am marc edwards with your sport news. some big decisions this week as england's cricketers find out whether they will be heading down under the ashes this winter. the players were presented with proposed conditions for the series on sunday in the sport's ravening body the ecb will meet this week to decide whether the men's ashes tour of australia will go ahead. there have been concerns over whether the players�* families could travel with them, quarantine arrangements and any potential bubble they may have to live in australia has some of the strictest covid—19 protocols of —— in the world, a situation complicated by the fact that different states have their own regulations. the first test is due to begin on the 18th of september —— december. in due to begin on the 18th of september -- december. in order for the ashes _ september -- december. in order for the ashes series _ september -- december. in order for the ashes series do _ september -- december. in order for the ashes series do not - september -- december. in order for the ashes series do not go - for the ashes series do not go a quiet —— go ahead would require a boycott from the ecb, not in those stronger terms but a postponement in the current
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scheduling arrangement that we have, i can�*t see that happening. there is too much on the line financially. the ashes is effectively an industry inside of cricket. there is so much on the line for both boards stop our agreement, the commercial arrangements that underpin all of that with broadcast and beyond. ijust can�*t see a scenario where there is a complete pull—out. football now and claudia minyerri has been appointed at what could�*s new coach. he was led to promotion from the championship last season. watford life 50th in the table having won two of their opening premier league games. claudio ranieri becomes the 13th manager. the women�*s champions league, whether 16 teams will start their group stage games later on tuesday as barcelona
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begin their title defence in their new look tournament. crowned champions after beating chelsea in a meeting a first—time finalist last may, barcelona are heavy favourites to book their place in the next round. first up for them, a matchup with 2007 winners arsenal, while there are two new teams to the competition in their group. oppenheimerand their group. oppenheimer and their group. oppenheimer and the danish their group. oppenheimerand the danish club. a dramatic day for the final day of the major—league baseball regular—season at the new york yankees and the boston red sox both quench the wildcard spots. the yankees made bev game —— fans sweat in the game in tampa bay and had to wait for the ninth inning before the homerun came in the winning victory. they will take on the red sox on tuesday. tyson fury will be set to fight in the uk once again. he has not fought in brighton since 2018 after signing a deal to stage his fight in america, competing there four times. mac fury is
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to take on wilder in las vegas. the american wilder was knocked out by fury after their contest endedin out by fury after their contest ended in a draw. from me, marc edwards and the rest of the team, goodbye. thanks to mark and the team. he has endured wild winds, storms and injured and injured ankle. but will renwick has finally completed his challenge to run up every mountain over 600 metres in wales, that is a total of 189. he says instant mashed noodles and chocolate bars kept him going. hywel griffith reports. he has claimed every mountain and had to cross a few streams, too. at the end of well�*s run up too. at the end of well�*s run up and down all 189 picks across wales only one question remains, why do it? i
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across wales only one question remains, why do it?— remains, why do it? i can't get enou:h remains, why do it? i can't get enough of _ remains, why do it? i can't get enough of it- _ remains, why do it? i can't get enough of it. i _ remains, why do it? i can't get enough of it. i love _ remains, why do it? i can't get enough of it. i love wales - remains, why do it? i can't get enough of it. i love wales was| enough of it. i love wales was buy need to explore this every nook and cranny because we have such a beautiful country and i want to see every debate. i saw a bbc news article about two guys who walked a route taking in every single mountain and as soon as i saw that squiggly line going from south to north wales i thought, i�*ve got to do that. wales i thought, i've got to do that. ~ ., ., that. well travelled light and on his own — that. well travelled light and on his own and _ that. well travelled light and on his own and stayed - that. well travelled light and on his own and stayed social| that. well travelled light and i on his own and stayed social by posting online so that people could track his progress. —— will, he went back from swansea on a 500 mile route that wound its way up through the brecon beacons into mid— wales, climbing a total of hundred thousand feet by taking on the peaks of snowdonia and working his way down after 23 days on foot to the finish line. will was raising money for the mental health charity that helps people access the outdoors. having walked the entire coast of wales a few years ago, it is a place he feels at home, but he was still
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exposed to the elements. we were worried _ exposed to the elements. - were worried about him the entire time and fielding messages from his mum when she gets concerned as well, but he has had a gps tracker though he has had a gps tracker though he has been able to be followed along his route. i hadn�*t realised he was switching it on —— off at night so there would be a flashing escalation mark and i would panic at those points. b. and i would panic at those oints. �* ., ., points. a relief than that every summit _ points. a relief than that every summit was - points. a relief than that | every summit was scaled points. a relief than that - every summit was scaled and will can finally put his feet up. i may be to be relaxed and start planning the next adventure. i will griffith, start planning the next adventure. iwill griffith, bbc news. now let�*s talk about william shatner, the actor who played captain kirk in the cult television show star trek will fly above —— aboard blue origin�*s rocket into space. tim allman has the details. i know what you�*re thinking, hasn�*t he already been? # star trekking across the universe... # 0n the starshipentreprise under captain kirk..." well, no, james t kirk may have explored strange new worlds
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for more than 50 years, but the man who plays him has remained firmly on the earth, until now. william shatner will, if everything goes to plan, soon be boldly going where no nonagenarian canadian actor has ever gone before. in a statement he said... and this will be his uss enterprise — blue 0rigin�*s new shepherd rocket, which had its first successful flight with a crew injuly, this year. at 90 years old, william shatner will become the oldest person ever to fly into space, which must raise at least some concerns. being 90, just like kinda getting out of bed in the morning is a bit of a risk, i suppose. so anybody getting on a spacecraft that�*s being launched off earth via rocket —
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that�*s a dangerous thing to do, you know, we aren�*t in the age of star trek where this stuff is routine. his will be a ten—minute voyage, rather than a five—year mission. it�*s not quite the final frontier but it�*s pretty close. tim allman, bbc news. after a couple of days of sunshine and showers we are now seeing an area of low pressure moving in from the south—west that�*s mainly affecting england and wales. that�*s bringing with it some heavy rain and it�*s also strengthening the winds too. we start with some heavy rain across east anglia and the south—east but that will soon move away. but for northern england, it will be wet through much of the day. that rain continues to push into the south—east of scotland. for wales, the midlands and southern england it may brighten up, there may be sunshine but also showers. around the area of low pressure we have strong winds, particularly where it�*s wet, and it will make it feel cold. some of the wet weather could push into the north—east of scotland later, but we are missing the worst of the weather across western scotland and northern ireland
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with no more than one or two showers and some sunshine. the area of low pressure bringing the wet windy weather is slowly going to move away during wednesday, and the next system will be pushing in from the atlantic. we started with wind easing on for eastern england. the winds will ease, cloud and showers move away, sunshine comes out for many but then we look to the west. it will be clouding, then rain pusing in through northern ireland. clearing through the day, than in the afternoon rain will push in mainly for northern ireland. ahead of that, it should be a little bit warmer. temperatures of 16 or 17 degrees. there�*s warmer weather on the way later in the week. the weather front parking off scotland and northern ireland, high pressure into the south—east of the uk, so drawing drawing in a south—westerly wind all the way from the tropics. that�*s going to bring some higher temperatures, probably bring a lot of cloud, mind you, on thursday, and rain and drizzle at times across scotland and northern ireland.
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some dampness here and there across western england and wales with brighter skies further east. even with a lot of cloud, temperatures could reach 19 degrees in belfast and newcastle. could make 20 or so across other parts of england and wales. we still have that weather front hanging around a bit across northern parts of the uk. the position of the rain keeps chopping and changing, there�*s still the threat of rain for northern ireland, perhaps first thing in northern england as the rain moves northward into southern and central scotland. these areas not quite as warm, but with lighter winds and more sunshine breaking through across england and wales, it will be very mild, temperatures of 20 and 21
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when micah began to bbc news, time now for the top business stories. tech giants lead the losers, us oil prices surged to a seven—year high. mind the gap, gender pay inequality is still a long way off. we look at the latest figures. and wall, the wonder material that keeps us warm, but why are hundreds of tons destroyed in the uk every year —— wool?

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