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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 4, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... facebook is having a bad day. a seriously bad day. a former employee has turned whistle—blower. she says the social media giant is misleading investors and putting profit over safety. the claims come on the day facebook and its network have said the services went off—line for hours in a major network back out affecting millions of users. the us accuses china of failing to uphold commitments that were agreed under a trade deal last year. leaked documents that form part of the so—called pandora papers has exposed the hidden wealth of dozens of world leaders, from the king ofjordan to the russian president and the check prime minister. and the scientists who unlocked the mystery of how our
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bodies feel warmth and touch have won the nobel prize for medicine. we will speak live to one of them late in the programme. it has been a pretty torrid day for facebook. two interconnecting stories that together have wiped $7 billion of mark zuckerberg's wealth. we will come to each of them in turn. let's start with a first, the whistle—blower. two weeks ago the wall streetjournal published the facebook files, a damning series of reports that were based on a cache of the company's leaked internal documents. they reveal that facebook was aware of problems it was having with its apps, including the negative effects of misinformation and the harm that was being caused, especially to young girls, by instagram. we now have the identity of that whistle—blower. francis
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hogan, who until recently worked as a product manager on the civic integrity team at facebook. ahead of her team tomorrow before a senate committee where she will be giving evidence she has given an explosive interview to 60 minutes on cbs news. you have your phone. you might see only 100 pieces of content if you sit and scroll for five minutes. but facebook has thousands of options it could show you. how facebook is picking out that content today is it is optimising for content that gets engagement, a reaction. but its own research showing that content that is hateful, divisive, polarising, it is hateful, divisive, polarising, it is easier to inspire people to anger thanit is easier to inspire people to anger than it is to other emotions. misinformation, angry content is enticing — misinformation, angry content is enticing to people.— misinformation, angry content is enticing to people. very enticing. red and keeps — enticing to people. very enticing. red and keeps them _ enticing to people. very enticing. red and keeps them on - enticing to people. very enticing. red and keeps them on the - enticing to people. very enticing. - red and keeps them on the platform? alli yes. facebook has realised that if they change the algorithm to be safer, people will spend less time on the site, click on less ads, make
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less money. on the site, click on less ads, make less money-— on the site, click on less ads, make lessmone. , , less money. facebook has pushed back auainst less money. facebook has pushed back a . ainst that less money. facebook has pushed back against that report, _ less money. facebook has pushed back against that report, calling _ less money. facebook has pushed back against that report, calling many - less money. facebook has pushed back against that report, calling many of- against that report, calling many of the claim is misleading. in a statement, they said every day our teams have to balance protecting the ability of billions of people to express themselves openly with the need to keep our platform a safe and positive place. to suggest we encourage bad content and do nothing isjust not true. encourage bad content and do nothing is just not true. but that's not of the only problem they are facing. today there has been a major interruption to their network of services. facebook, whatsapp and instagram have all been off—line, and for several hours. this is what you will see if you log on. data from down detector, a company which tracks outages, suggests it is affecting user accounts across the world. facebook say they are working to get things back to normal as quick as possible. but no official reason for the problem has been given. we are going to speak to someone a little bit later about all the problems facebook is encountering. stay with us for that.
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the secret financial dealings of hundreds of world leaders, politicians and billionaires have been exposed in one of the biggest investigations of leaked offshore documents in history. the pandora papers include revelations about the king ofjordan, president putin, and the kenyan leader. the leak of almost 12 million documents reveals hidden wealth, tax avoidance and in some cases money—laundering by some of the world's rich and powerful. more than 600 journalists and 117 countries trawled through files from 14 countries trawled through files from 1a sources for months. they also reveal how a prominent donor to view capers public governing conservative party was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. richard bilton reports. mohamed amersi is wealthy and well—connected. here he is talking about the dangers of corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor
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of an equal opportunity in life. so, where did his wealth come from? some of it comes from this company in sweden, a company fined almost $1 billion for bribery. telia was prosecuted over a corrupt telecoms deal. the company paid $220 million to an offshore company secretly controlled by the daughter of the then—president of uzbekistan. the american authorities described it as a $220 million bribe. we have now obtained documents that show how mr amersi was involved in the deal. in one e—mail, a telia boss writes... mr amersi responds... and here is mr amersi's invoice for his part in project uzbekistan. he got a success fee of $500,000 for his work. mr amersi's lawyers said
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that the offshore company had been vetted and approved by telia. and that its involvement did not raise any red flags to mr amersi. we have also seen evidence about how he was involved in other telia deals. we've got details of an internal report about a consultant referred to as mr xy, who was paid more than $65 million by telia. the payments included expenses for lavish corporate entertainment. they were usually between $100,000 and $200,000 a month, and were not evidenced by copies of receipts. the internal report recommended that telia's relationship with mr amersi be terminated. who is mrxy? that is mr amersi. he has been involved in one of the biggest corruption scandal is that we have seen in sweden in modern times. it is important that people around him that trust him and listen to him understand the whole context of his career and wealth. lawyers for mr amersi said that his fees and expenses were entirely in keeping
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with industry practice and that telia did not require regular sight of the receipts. they say that it is entirely false to suggest that his contract was terminated. all of this matters because mr amersi has given more than half a million pounds to the conservative party. this morning, borisjohnson gave his reaction. i see that story today, but all i can say on that one is that all of these donations are vetted in the normal way in accordance with rules set up under a labour government, so we have vetted them for a long time. a conservative spokesman said that government policy is in no way influenced by the donations the party receives. they are entirely separate. "we are motivated by the priorities of the "british public, acting on the national interest." richard bilton, bbc news. there's much more detail about the pandora papers the us government has long been critical of these offshore things.
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but these papers reveal that some of these secret bank accounts are interest set up in the united states. 81 of them are in south dakota. 37 of them in florida. it is hard to ascertain what lies within these trusts or who owns some of the accounts because of the secrecy laws passed by state politicians. i'm joined by a passed by state politicians. i'm joined bya man passed by state politicians. i'm joined by a man who set up israel's financial intelligence unit, now a consultant on money—laundering risks. thank you very much for being with us. you have spent your entire career looking into this sort of stuff, what is different about these us states, the likes of south dakota, nevada, florida? the surprising _ dakota, nevada, florida? the surprising thing _ dakota, nevada, florida? tie: surprising thing is dakota, nevada, florida? tte: surprising thing is while dakota, nevada, florida? tt9 surprising thing is while the united states is a world leader in applying these international standards and combating and fighting money—laundering around the world, in its own home, in the united states, there is very little regulation. so while the trust
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companies are covered by the money—laundering regulations, but lawyers are not. so if a lawyer in the united states, and many states such as north, south dakota, or delaware, sets up a trust, for a politician, a corrupt politician abroad, he is under no duties, no under —— not under any money—laundering duties, doesn't have to identify the beneficiaries. there is no suspicious transaction reporting. this is very different than the situation in london for instance, where a solicitor, a british solicitor would be covered under such rules and regulations, and if he doesn't do it right, he will probably be fined by the law society in london. but these rules do not apply in the united states, and it was revealed today in the pandora papers, or yesterday, that corrupt politicians and autocrats around the world are taking advantage, abusing the american system, and in the united states, in their own backyard, they are actually having trusts set up as
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part of money—laundering schemes. and it is a lucrative business because the south should coat —— south dakota trust have quadrupled in size in the space of ten years to $360 billion. the largest trust in the state has confirmed it has clients from 5a countries and 47 states, including more than 100 billionaires. what you were saying, just to clarify, then, is that if those billionaires were investing in london, we would know who they were, but because they are investing in south dakota, we don't know who they are? it south dakota, we don't know who they are? , , :, :, south dakota, we don't know who they are? , :, :,, ,, are? it is important to stress there is nothin: are? it is important to stress there is nothing illegal— are? it is important to stress there is nothing illegal or _ are? it is important to stress there is nothing illegal or improper- are? it is important to stress there | is nothing illegal or improper about setting up a trust. they could be advantages in many ways, the taxation. what the anti—money—laundering rules require is that the beneficiary would be identified properly so if law enforcement agencies, police or tax authorities or whoever is seeking could get information. and while these standards are being applied in
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europe and in london for instance properly, of course not perfectly, but at least there is a process of legislation and the court has much to improve, but at least there are some rules. in the united states is covered in the set way but those uncovered at all. until recently congress the united states hasn't even obliged banks to ascertain who is the beneficial owner of a bank account. that was only passed recently, vetoed by president trump but eventually passed. so that is a good step. but still, trusts are a big loophole, especially when set up by lawyers in the united states. thank you very much indeed for that. so what is the united states government is going to do about it? lakshmi, is the policy director of the think tank in washington. thanks for being with us. i'm just trying to imaginejoe biden at the g20 in a few weeks' time lecturing other countries to go after these offshore
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profits, he is pressuring foreign governments to institute a global minimum tax, to close tax loopholes, and yet now we all learned that in several states back home in the united states, people are hiding wealth and we don't even know who they are. wealth and we don't even know who the are. , :, , :, they are. the truth is that everyone has to clean — they are. the truth is that everyone has to clean up _ they are. the truth is that everyone has to clean up the _ they are. the truth is that everyone has to clean up the financial - has to clean up the financial systems, and something the pandora papers realised it is notjust the us, it is the financial centres of the world that are all complicit and supporting this offshore economy. the us did pass the corporate transparency act, and it is our hope that once they are implementing regulations around this are enacted, we will be that much closer to curtailing the us role in all of this. at the same time, it is important to emphasise this is a global problem, it is a systemic issue, and they are only as strong as our weakest link. close allies of the us like australia for instance have yet to enact legislation, as
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has been mentioned already, that would identify individuals and use legal entities to hide money. and these legal entities are at the heart of this offshore economy. yes. heart of this offshore economy. yes, i heart of this offshore economy. yes, i understand — heart of this offshore economy. yes, i understand that, _ heart of this offshore economy. yes, i understand that, but _ heart of this offshore economy. yes, i understand that, but the united states has to lead from the front, and, as we havejust states has to lead from the front, and, as we have just heard, states has to lead from the front, and, as we havejust heard, congress struck down a law that would have tightened up the procedures. it therefore becomes very difficult for joe biden to stand on the world stage and lecture other countries about not closing the loopholes. absolutely. that is what organisations like myself, we are part of a large coalition called the fact coalition, we spent a decade trying to get the us to enact beneficial ownership legislation, and it did happen last year. in the hope is that as those late no regulations come into place, we will be able to more effectively target and identify individuals that choose to hide money using companies like
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companies, llcs, trusts. so we won a battle but the war still remains and working very hard to make sure to accurately portray having that money find itself have a home in the us is counter—productive to the us or national security and foreign policy interests. ads, national security and foreign policy interests. : :, :, :, interests. a lot of the time though, money like — interests. a lot of the time though, money like this _ interests. a lot of the time though, money like this is _ interests. a lot of the time though, money like this is off _ interests. a lot of the time though, money like this is off and _ interests. a lot of the time though, money like this is off and on - money like this is off and on caribbean islands or in smaller countries. this is like a domestic offshore economy that south dakota is profiting hugely from. does the federal government take any profit from the money that has been put there? t from the money that has been put there? :, : :, from the money that has been put there? . . ., ., ., there? i am clear about that, whether the _ there? i am clear about that, whether the federal - there? i am clear about that, i whether the federal government there? i am clear about that, - whether the federal government seeks to profit from this but what i can tell you is that in the work that we have done, and this was a critical part of how we were able to move forward legislation on beneficial ownership, in many parts, in all stages in the us, it is
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significantly easier to set up a she“ significantly easier to set up a shell corporation, an entity of the sort, than it is to acquire a library card in these countries, so it tells you the ease with which these entities have operated, the ease with which the industry exists, and i think for long there has been, it has never been clear that the economic incentives that these industries provide have a clear negative effect, sometimes on human rights, and aid assistance that the us provides or on otherforeign policy goals and really bringing that home has made legislative change. by no means perfect, it is still as the pandora papers show, still as the pandora papers show, still very much an egregious problem. but there have been critical in roads that have been made in the last few years to better capture and better address this. thank you for your thoughts. let's return to the headaches that
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facebook is facing today. there is explosive claims from a whistle—blower and now the global outage of its network of services. rachel lerman is a reporter for the washington post. a busy day and i know you are covering this in working hard on it. thanks for coming up and giving us some time. what have you managed to find out about why there has been such an outage? irate about why there has been such an outaae? ~ :, :, about why there has been such an outaae? ~ . ., ., :, ., ., outage? we are at about four and a half hours. — outage? we are at about four and a half hours, which _ outage? we are at about four and a half hours, which is _ outage? we are at about four and a half hours, which is pretty - half hours, which is pretty unheard—of for something as big as facebook and of course it also took down instagram and whatsapp and facebook messenger, so many services that people rely on. what we know so far, and the company hasn't confirmed anything, but researchers are telling us that basically facebook withdrew some of its roots from the internet that allow its addresses to be read. so basically when you type a web address into your tool bar, it changes it into a series of numbers, and then you get connected to the website. facebook, either through an error or it
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somehow withdrew its addresses from the internet, and therefore when you type it in, the computers can't find it. 50 type it in, the computers can't find it. y type it in, the computers can't find it. , :, �* ~ it. so they did it, we don't think they were _ it. so they did it, we don't think they were hacked? _ it. so they did it, we don't think they were hacked? it _ it. so they did it, we don't think they were hacked? it is - it. so they did it, we don't thinkj they were hacked? it is unclear. when i they were hacked? it is unclear. when i say _ they were hacked? it is unclear. when i say they _ they were hacked? it is unclear. when i say they did _ they were hacked? it is unclear. when i say they did it, - they were hacked? it is unclear. when i say they did it, the - they were hacked? it is unclear. . when i say they did it, the research seems to be it something internally, so it is possible it was just an error, someone rolled out a bad update or something like that, which is often what happens in this case was not we have seen from other hacks that there are some internal configuration change that somehow screws other things up, but we don't know if that is for sure what happened here. irate know if that is for sure what happened here.— know if that is for sure what ha ened here. ~ . ,, . ., happened here. we are speculating because frankly _ happened here. we are speculating because frankly the _ happened here. we are speculating because frankly the company - happened here. we are speculating| because frankly the company hasn't said anything, so four and a half hours into this there has been no statement. a lot of people will wonder whether it is a coincidence that this happens on the same day that this happens on the same day that we get this news from the whistle—blower. that we get this news from the whistle-blower.— that we get this news from the whistle-blower. there is a lot of speculation _ whistle-blower. there is a lot of speculation going _ whistle-blower. there is a lot of speculation going on _ whistle-blower. there is a lot of speculation going on out - whistle-blower. there is a lot of speculation going on out there, | whistle-blower. there is a lot of| speculation going on out there, i know, and it is really hard to say if this has anything to do with one another or if it is just a total
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coincidence. like you said, basically all facebook have said is we are aware people are experiencing issues and we are working on it but we haven't got any more information from them. flan we haven't got any more information from them. :, we haven't got any more information from them. ., ., ~ ., we haven't got any more information from them-— from them. can we talk about this whistle-blower _ from them. can we talk about this whistle-blower and _ from them. can we talk about this whistle-blower and the _ from them. can we talk about this whistle-blower and the into - from them. can we talk about this whistle-blower and the into theirl from them. can we talk about this l whistle-blower and the into their -- whistle—blower and the into their —— with the interview she gave on cbs? time and again we have had mark zuckerberg giving evidence to congress, saying he is aware of the problems internally, that they are doing something about it, but here she is, saying that in actual fact they are prioritising growth, they are going after the ad spend, and they are putting people at risk. how will congress react to that? t they are putting people at risk. how will congress react to that?- will congress react to that? i think the hearing _ will congress react to that? i think the hearing with _ will congress react to that? i think the hearing with the _ will congress react to that? i think. the hearing with the whistle-blower the hearing with the whistle—blower will be fascinating because congress has already been coming down pretty hard on facebook, looking into its privacy policies and its size, and debating whether or not it has monopoly power, and of course there is a federal lawsuit on going against facebook for some anti—trust
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concerns. so when something like this comes out, something congress is interested in already especially when it comes to children's safety online, i think it will be a very heated back and forth between congress and the company. the most de-aressin congress and the company. the most depressing thing _ congress and the company. the most depressing thing she _ congress and the company. the most depressing thing she said _ congress and the company. the most depressing thing she said as - congress and the company. the most depressing thing she said as it - congress and the company. the most depressing thing she said as it is - depressing thing she said as it is easier to inspire people to anger thanit easier to inspire people to anger than it is to other emotions, and if they change the algorithm so it is safer, the ad spend goes down. constantly we are talking about the algorithms that we don't properly understand, but it would seem that the algorithm in this case is the problem. the algorithm in this case is the roblem. , .,, the algorithm in this case is the roblem. , .. , the algorithm in this case is the roblem. , ., , ., the algorithm in this case is the roblem. , , ., . problem. this has been a concern about facebook _ problem. this has been a concern about facebook and _ problem. this has been a concern about facebook and other - problem. this has been a concern about facebook and other social l about facebook and other social media sites for so long, right, because if you are prioritising engagement, showing people what keeps them clicking, scrolling, often those are the things that can also be as she is alleging here harmful. :, ~ also be as she is alleging here harmful. ., ,, , ., , . also be as she is alleging here harmful. :, ~ , :, , : :, harmful. thank you very much for cominu harmful. thank you very much for coming up — harmful. thank you very much for coming up on _ harmful. thank you very much for coming up on a — harmful. thank you very much for coming up on a busy _ harmful. thank you very much for coming up on a busy day. - harmful. thank you very much for coming up on a busy day. just - harmful. thank you very much for coming up on a busy day. just to l harmful. thank you very much for i coming up on a busy day. just to say it has damaged the company financially, both of these stories. the tech stocks were down, facebook down 4.9% today, and as i say, the
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whole sector feeling the effects of this today. facebook down 4.9%. stay with us. still to come, thousands of haitians were deported from the us border last month, and now many of them are stuck in haiti, despite not having lived there for years was that we have a special report coming up. a metropolitan police officer has appeared via videolink in court, charged with rape. pc david carrick works in scotland yard's parliamentary and diplomatic protection command. he denies the allegation. graham satchell has more. , : :, allegation. graham satchell has more. , . ., ., allegation. graham satchell has more. ,. ., ., more. he is charged with one count of ra e. more. he is charged with one count of rape- through — more. he is charged with one count of rape. through his _ more. he is charged with one count of rape. through his lawyer - more. he is charged with one count of rape. through his lawyer who - more. he is charged with one count. of rape. through his lawyer who says he emphatically denied that charge. the alleged offence is alleged to have occurred in st albans last september when david carrick was off duty. he is as you say a police constable in the metropolitan police serving in the parliamentary and
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diplomatic protection command, so in the houses of parliament, but currently suspended from duty. the met commissioner dame cressida dick has said she is deeply concerned that such a serious offence should be associated with a serving police officer, and she said she understood that the public would be concerned as well. david carrick bowed his head as he was remanded in custody ijy head as he was remanded in custody by the city man —— with a sitting magistrate and he will appear in court again at the beginning of next month. the biden administration has sent thousands of haitian migrants back to haiti in recent weeks. many of them were rounded up at texan mexico is also repatriating haitians, putting additional pressure on an already impoverished caribbean country. those who return have been off—loaded with no money or housing, no work, some have no money. with the assassination of the present
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three months ago, the security situation has been worsening. many have not set foot on haitian soil in a decade full stop now they are being sent back in their droves, every day planeloads of haitian deportees arrive, returning from the border camp in texas, exhausted and disappointed, most own nothing in haiti but the clothes on their back. daniela and her family spent five years in chile. their son was born there. now thrust back into a country on the blink —— on the brink of collapse. the family was never given a chance to apply for asylum by us officials who reportedly told the deportees they were being flown to florida. translation: what the deportees they were being flown to florida. translation: what hurts isn't bein: to florida. translation: what hurts isn't being deported. _ to florida. translation: what hurts isn't being deported. i _ to florida. translation: what hurts isn't being deported. i knew- to florida. translation: what hurts isn't being deported. i knew from - isn't being deported. i knew from the start there were two options, being let in or being deported. what hurts is the treatment we received.
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inhuman. most of all the chains on ourfeet. we are not inhuman. most of all the chains on our feet. we are not slaves. migration is a right, not a crime. there are some immediate aid for the disoriented deportees but haiti can ill afford thousands more desperately poor people arriving hour after hour. as we are talking, there's another bus behind me. this is a constant return then. yes. there's another bus behind me. this is a constant return then.— is a constant return then. yes, this is a constant return then. yes, this is a constant return then. yes, this is a record — is a constant return then. yes, this is a record day- _ is a constant return then. yes, this is a record day. we _ is a constant return then. yes, this is a record day. we expect - is a constant return then. yes, this is a record day. we expect flights | is a record day. we expect flights all day _ is a record day. we expect flights all day coming in until this evening _ all day coming in until this evening. part of the suggestion is that haiti — evening. part of the suggestion is that haiti is critical, there are at least _ that haiti is critical, there are at least three _ that haiti is critical, there are at least three humanitarian crisis at the same — least three humanitarian crisis at the same time. there was an earthquake six weeks ago, there are people _ earthquake six weeks ago, there are people displaced by gang violence. these _ people displaced by gang violence. these deportations began at the us mexico border. but there are many more thousands of haitian migrants stuck around the region, bottlenecked in colombia, panama, central america. a truly continent wide crisis landing back on haiti's
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shores. it like most of the child deputies, these are foreign nationals born in brazil and seeing haiti for the first time. on arrival, they had nowhere to go and are staying at a friend's home in a gang controlled part of town. what now, he asks. will have to travel again full stop we have nothing to stop the children aren't even haitians, they are brazilians. when they asked me what is happening daddy, i say we haven't got anything here, life is very tough. theirs is the story of so many migrants from this complex and troubled nation. they went through hell to reach the us and now find themselves back where they started, with no savings or prospects in the one place they did everything to leave. will grant, bbc news, port—au—prince. a look at some of the other stories. centre—left candidates are set to
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win italy's big cities and local elections. those elections are being held in the country's four larger cities, rome, milan, naples and more than a smile —— 1,000 smaller centres. the incumbent mayor is heading for defeat. billie eilish has been announced as the first headliner for the 2022 glastonbury festival. the 20—year—old will be the youngest solo headliner at the festival. eilish will also be the first female headliner since 2016. last year's first female headliner since 2016. last yea r�*s festival first female headliner since 2016. last year's festival was cancelled of course due to the pandemic. now who was it that said life imitates art? this is a story that proves the point. the space company led by the american tech billionairejeff bizos hasjust confirmed it american tech billionairejeff bizos has just confirmed it was ending to space, wait for it, captain kirk. william shatner himself, who yes, in case you're wondering, is 90 years old. he will be a passenger on board blue origin's next crude rocket that sets off on the 12th of october. he will be accompanied by a former nasa
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entrepreneur, a tech entrepreneur and the vice president of blue origin's flight operations. it has been a day of sunshine and showers again today. things are going to change overnight, because we are going to find some rain moving on from the south—west. with that reign, the winds are going to be strengthening, and that wetter, windier weather will still be around in some areas tomorrow as well. we are looking out to the south—west will stop this area of cloud, doesn't look very much, it will thicken up and develop an area of low pressure and we will get a bit more shape to the rain. this is where we are expecting the rain to be around midnight full stop that rain pushes eastwards across england and wales and it is in that rain we will find some very gusty winds and some heavy bursts of rain too. certainly going to keep the temperatures up of course but scotland looks largely dry and here it will be quite chilly in northern scotland, close to freezing. should be generally dry in northern ireland
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as well but we will see the back of this rain across east anglia and the south—east of england fairly quickly but the rain will linger in south—east scotland, much of northern england, north wales, perhaps feeding into the midlands as well. all that wetter weather is wrapped around an area of low pressure and it is around this side of the low together with the rain that we will have the strong list of the wind. that will make it feel particularly chilly. top numbers will only be into the mid assay. we should get some sunshine and showers across more southern parts of and wales, and it is largely dry across scotland and also for northern ireland. that area of low pressure will continue to bring some wind and rain into tuesday evening for a while, tuesday night, before it moves away towards the continent. still quite windy down the eastern side of england in particular on wednesday morning. the cloud and showers should move away. then coming on fairly quickly from the atlantic we have more cloud and that will start to bring some rain into northern ireland in particular during the afternoon. but temperatures for much of englund and wales in particular should be a bit
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higher than we are expecting on tuesday. this is the situation as we head towards the middle and later part of the week. this weather front will be bringing some rain toward scotland, northern ireland. the higher pressure towards the south—east of the uk, that means we have a south—westerly wind. that is going to draw in some warmer air. tropical maritime air, and lift the temperatures as well. there will still be quite a bit of cloud around for scotland and northern ireland particularly, this is where we have most of the rain, could be some drizzly bits across hills and coast of western parts of england and wales, the brighter skies and sunshine towards these but temperatures climbing, close
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers here in the uk and around the world. the world public three leading social media and messaging platforms, facebook, whatsapp and instagram have all gone off—line for users around the world. the uk chancellor sets out the economic picture ahead warning that there are difficult choices to make with no prospect of tax cuts soon. a broken pipe line of the coast of california because one the worst oil spills in the state's recent history. plus we'll of the world public first 3d printed neighbourhood in southern mexico.
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the uk chancellor rishi sunak has told the conservative party conference in manchester that he will do whatever it takes to help bridge and recover from the pandemic. he is defending his decision to increase taxes telling party members that he needs to repair public finances and put them on a sustainable footing. he is our political correspondent. this on a sustainable footing. he is our political correspondent.— political correspondent. this was the uk's chancellor _ political correspondent. this was the uk's chancellor first - political correspondent. this was the uk's chancellor first chance l political correspondent. this was. the uk's chancellor first chance to speak to his party after the most significant pandemic restrictions were lifted a few months ago. and what he was trying to do was set out his plans for the uk economy after coronavirus. now he talked a lot about balancing the books, about the idea that you could notjust keep borrowing money, so he would have to make some tough decisions over the next few months. but it's really interesting that one of the big questions here at the conservative conference is whether the party is
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prepared to raise taxes and it's already broken some manifesto commitments to not raise tax and announced a few weeks ago that is going to raise national insurance in the uk. the chancellor said he instinctively wanted to reduce tax but because of the debt that had been amassed during the pandemic the pragmatist in him meant that he could not do that at the moment. so there is still some unanswered questions about what the next few weeks and months will look like and although rishi sunak has set out what he wants to do, what he actually does could be quite different. and one other thing that is going on at the same time as this conference is big questions being asked about the cost of living in the uk. so we have had thejob support scheme which kept people in employment during the pandemic. that has ended. one of the key benefits of universal credit that was an extra £20 a week given to claimants
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for the last 18 months is coming to an end as well. at the same time you are seeing bills go up because of a rising energy price and a rising fuel prices. rising food prices in some parts of the country as well. that has led some at this conference to be really worried about the cost of living in the next few months. in of living in the next few months. in large oil slick has begun washing ashore in southern california beaches and orange countyjust south of los angeles have been closed because parts of the coastline are now covered in oil and dead wildlife. thought to be one of the largest oil spills in the recent history of the state and almost half 1 million l of oil has leaked from a pipeline. investigation into the breach and what caused it is now under way but the impact on wildlife is ongoing. in under way but the impact on wildlife is onauoin. :, under way but the impact on wildlife is onauoin. ., ., is ongoing. in our initial assessment _ is ongoing. in our initial assessment of- is ongoing. in our initial assessment of the - is ongoing. in our initial assessment of the area | is ongoing. in our initial. assessment of the area of is ongoing. in our initial- assessment of the area of the number of birds and the general area seems to be lower than we had feared. we do have active overflights from a
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specialised plane that the department owns that is going to be covering this area daily. to look at animals and locations, the concentration that they might be in which will help us target those areas but at this point we are cautiously optimistic related to the number of animals that might be affected at this point.— number of animals that might be affected at this point. joined now b laura, affected at this point. joined now by laura. the _ affected at this point. joined now by laura, the state _ affected at this point. joined now by laura, the state director - affected at this point. joined now by laura, the state director for i by laura, the state director for environment california in san francisco. so depression, i know that beach and have been there and it's very popular with surfers. what do we know about the pipeline itself? , , ., , , . ,, itself? the pipeline was built back in the 1980s _ itself? the pipeline was built back in the 1980s and _ itself? the pipeline was built back in the 1980s and it _ itself? the pipeline was built back in the 1980s and it travelled - itself? the pipeline was built back| in the 1980s and it travelled about 17 miles from the california coastline out into federal waters and that's where the oil drilling has come on since the 1980s. these are old, ageing fossil fuel for structure that clearly is failing and so basically there was a breach in that pipeline that resulted in,
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as you said, nearly 500,000 litres of this sick, dirty oiljust being dumped right into the ocean and now washing up on the shore and has already killed fish and birds. and is threatening marine life. do already killed fish and birds. and is threatening marine life.- is threatening marine life. do we know what _ is threatening marine life. do we know what caused _ is threatening marine life. do we know what caused the _ is threatening marine life. do we know what caused the breach - is threatening marine life. do we | know what caused the breach was is threatening marine life. do we i know what caused the breach was a love that is not yet clear. there's a lot of questions that remain unanswered as yet. the beaches were only recently closed yesterday and even though this bill started with those reports of oil in the water starting saturday morning. unfortunately people walked on the beach and tried on that dirty tar which is toxic, and we fear that the clean—up effort started late but there remains a lot of questions and so we are calling for an immediate investigation and for hearings to prevent anything like this from happening again. you have called the
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ageing infrastructure and there must be some concern that it was not being properly monitored because it appears as if most of the oil in the pipeline has been spilled into the ocean. what will you be calling as part of the investigation for tighter restrictions and monitoring of these pipelines that are so old? first what you and all oil and gas drilling off of the california coast as well as off of all of our coastlines and this marine life and the ocean space is just too vulnerable and too precious to risk with dirty dangerous practices like oil drilling and right now congress is considering a permanent ban of new leases off of the california coast as well as other critical coastlines of the united states. we support that and then we think that clearly there was an oil spill off of the california coastjust clearly there was an oil spill off of the california coast just a clearly there was an oil spill off of the california coastjust a few
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hundred, orjust a few miles from the santa barbara coastline where there was a terrible oil spell in 2015 and clearly the measures we put in place back then to prevent anything like that from happening were not strong enough. and so we want to see stiffer penalties to make sure that polluters pay for the consequences of their dirty activities. especially when there has been negligence which we think may be the case here. we want to make sure that if it is found to be that there was, if that was negligent activity that there is criminal penalties and charges filed in those cases. so that's the second big thing we are fishing for. thank ou ve big thing we are fishing for. thank you very much _ big thing we are fishing for. thank you very much indeed. _ big thing we are fishing for. thank you very much indeed. before - big thing we are fishing for. thank you very much indeed. before he l you very much indeed. before he became president, joe biden was a vocal critic of the trop administration's approach to china. he called the trade were erratic and cut are productive. but nine months into his presidency there is little
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that differentiates his approach with that of his predecessor. today the us trade representative accused beijing of failing to uphold the commitments it made under a trade deal reached with the us last year. in a speech delivered in washington she said a recent review showed chinese trading practices are still hurting key parts of the us economy. we must defend to the hilt our economic— we must defend to the hilt our economic interests. that means taking _ economic interests. that means taking all— economic interests. that means taking all steps necessary to protect — taking all steps necessary to protect ourselves against the waves of damage inflicted over the years through— of damage inflicted over the years through unfair competition. we need to be prepared to deploy all tools and explore the development of new ones including through collaboration with other— ones including through collaboration with other economies and countries. and we _ with other economies and countries. and we must chart a new course to change _ and we must chart a new course to change the — and we must chart a new course to change the trajectory of our bilateral trade change the tra'ectory of our bilateral trade— change the tra'ectory of our bilateraltrad , :. : ., bilateral trade dynamic. barbara it was watching _
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bilateral trade dynamic. barbara it was watching out _ bilateral trade dynamic. barbara it was watching out for _ bilateral trade dynamic. barbara it was watching out for us. - bilateral trade dynamic. barbara it was watching out for us. china - bilateral trade dynamic. barbara it was watching out for us. china is l was watching out for us. china is not meeting their commitments, barbara, what purpose does it serve for the ministration to put this review out now? find for the ministration to put this review out now? and estimated for some time — review out now? and estimated for some time by _ review out now? and estimated for some time by the _ review out now? and estimated for some time by the us _ review out now? and estimated for some time by the us business - some time by the us business community because the budget ministration has not been clear about what the chinese trade policy is going to be. so this is only the initial steps that catherine is bringing out, she has been reviewing until now and says the first conclusions that she has drawn is this. essentially it's basically enforcing what donald trump negotiated in his last year in office. if that trade deal which called on beijing to purchase an extra $200 million of goods and services. one of the commitments made anybody ministration saying that it has not lived up to that and it's behind its persisting promises they're going to press it on that. they are not actually going to move into a new round of negotiations on
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this structural issues that so angered the americans, the state subsidies that give the chinese industries and advantage, a trade advantage which is what they say. they basically concluded that the chinese are not interested in any sort of reform of that kind of thing sort of reform of that kind of thing so they are going to focus on the agreement that exists and try to get the chinese to live up to their commitments that they are not living up commitments that they are not living up to although she said that some of it was working and then the other thing that they say is that they are going to work closely with allies and co—ordinate unfair trade practices in response to china but of course that will take some time to have an impact on the ground. t to have an impact on the ground. i was going to ask if they came to the realisation that maybe china will never change they had to deal with china as it is rather than how they would like it to be? t china as it is rather than how they would like it to be?— would like it to be? i think so and in fact that's _ would like it to be? i think so and in fact that's exactly _ would like it to be? i think so and in fact that's exactly what - would like it to be? i think so and in fact that's exactly what the - in fact that's exactly what the ministration official status they were previewing the remarks. a lot of the strategy is talks about things that they do have control over they say they want to build up
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the competitiveness at home by investing in infrastructure and workers and investing in innovation and then as i said this other element of working closely with allies which is something that donald trump did not do. his approach was chaotic and unilateral and they say hours were not be that way, it will be stabilising and done in conjunction with allies. but they have continued to the trade tariffs so donald trump imposed tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars of goods and that some of the chinese want them to lift and the measures you cannot do that in a sort of speedy or expedited way. and there was the suggestion that they would rule out for the tariffs needed to do that to confront the trade practices that they criticised. so something they feel and they don't want to increase trade tensions and there should be dialogue but at the end of the day their policy when it comes to the nuts and bolts of trying to enforce does not not look
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much different than what mr trump negotiated. 5m? much different than what mr trump ne . otiated. . : , much different than what mr trump ne . otiated. ,, ., , , much different than what mr trump neaotiated. ,, ._ , ., much different than what mr trump neaotiated. ,, , ., �* : negotiated. stay with us on bbc news, negotiated. stay with us on bbc news. still _ negotiated. stay with us on bbc news, still to _ negotiated. stay with us on bbc news, still to come _ negotiated. stay with us on bbc news, still to come speak - negotiated. stay with us on bbc| news, still to come speak at one negotiated. stay with us on bbc. news, still to come speak at one of the scientist to unlock the mystery of how our bodies feel warmth and touch. and just won a nobel prize. he has endured wild winds, storms and injured ankle but will has from the embedded his epic challenge to run up every bank to over 200,000 feetin run up every bank to over 200,000 feet in wales. 289 mountains. he's climbed every mountain, and had to cross a few streams, too. at the end of will's run up and down all 189 peaks across wales, only one question remains, why do it? i love exploring wales. i cannot get enough of it. i feel i have to explore every nook and cranny,
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just because it is such a beautiful country and i want to see every single bit of it. i saw a bbc news article about two guys who had walked a route taking in every single mountain, and as soon as i saw that squiggly line going from south wales to north wales i thought, i have got to do that. will travelled light and on his own, but stayed social by posting online so that people could track his progress. he set off from swansea back on september 10th on a 500 mile route that wound its way up through the brecon beacons up into mid—wales, climbing a total of 100,000 feet by taking on the peaks of snowdonia and working his way down after 23 days on foot to the finish line. will was raising money for a mental health charity that helps people access the outdoors. having walked the entire coast of wales a few years ago, it is a place that he feels at home, but he was still exposed to the elements. being worried about him the entire time, and fielding messages from his mum when he gets
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concerned as well. but he has had a gps tracker with him so we have been able to follow along his route. but i hadn't realised initially he was switching it off every night, so every now and then there would be a flashing exclamation mark, and i would panic at those points. a relief, then, that every summit was scaled and will can finally put his feet up. time, maybe, to relax and start planning the next adventure. hywel griffith, bbc news. two american scientist who discovered how our bodies sense the warmth of the sun or feel the hug of a loved one have won the nobel prize for medicine. david julius and oui’ our north american reporterjames clayton reports from san francisco. the challenge that we set out to solve in the lab was to understand the molecules
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and signalling pathways that underlie our sense of touch. professorjulius and his team set out to better understand how we experience the world, how touch helps us experience everything from our morning coffee to a hug from a loved one. you might think it is pretty obvious when a cup of coffee is too hot or a drink is too cold, but scientists haven't actually understood fully how we experience those sensations, and that is why this research is deemed to be so important. not only does it improve our understanding, but it could have huge implications for how we manage pain. the research initially came from investigating the burning sensation we feel from eating a hot chilli pepper. they experimented with the source of a chilli's heat, the chemical capsicum. they discovered the specific type of receptor that responded to it. from there, the team found other receptors that respond to things like pressure. touch is one of the five senses.
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but it does something very special, because most cells in our bodies communicate through chemicals. and yet, these touch neurons have to sense physical stimuli, such as pressure and temperature, and in a way transform this information into chemical signals that cells can understand, and no one really knew how this happened. places like san francisco are in the grip of an opioid crisis. more people died here in the city of drugs, mainly from fentanyl overdoses, than from covid last year. the hope is that this research will allow scientists to create more targeted and perhaps even less addictive pain relief in the future. james clayton, bbc news, san francisco. fascinating. you saw in that report, let's talk to professor david julius who joins us now. let's talk to professor david julius
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whojoins us now. many congratulations what was it like getting a call from the committee? thank you so much. it's a pretty amazing experience and it is a surprise no matter what people say or what they think. it's very overwhelming and then of course you are up and you are going full speed because there's no way to go back to sleep. it's a total immersion experience. sleep. it's a total immersion experience-_ sleep. it's a total immersion exerience. : ., , , ., experience. and so many people to call. talk experience. and so many people to call- talk to — experience. and so many people to call. talk to us _ experience. and so many people to call. talk to us a _ experience. and so many people to call. talk to us a little _ experience. and so many people to call. talk to us a little bit _ experience. and so many people to call. talk to us a little bit about - call. talk to us a little bit about your research because a lot of the focus today has been on touch and how we experience heat and cold and hugs. these pressure receptors that we were hearing about in that report their control of things besides that don't they? yes their control of things besides that don't the ? , ., �*, their control of things besides that don'tthe ? , ., �*, ., don't they? yes that's most of the work from — don't they? yes that's most of the work from the _ don't they? yes that's most of the work from the lab _ don't they? yes that's most of the work from the lab and _ don't they? yes that's most of the work from the lab and the - work from the lab and the molecules that he has discovered. control their involved a lot of cells and get into the body that are pressure sensitive and the cardiovascular system and bladder, some of those
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are nerve endings are on the tissues themselves. pressure sensation is important to regulating everything from touch as we call it, like feeling textures to regulating blood pressure to controlling shapes of cells as they move through the circulatory system. and in our own work on temperature sensation you know, there are numerous cells that are temperature sensitive but the ones that we have worked on that really are professionals at doing that are the nerve endings that are involved. in that are the nerve endings that are involved. , , , , ., involved. in very simple terms have ou made involved. in very simple terms have you made a — involved. in very simple terms have you made a discovery _ involved. in very simple terms have you made a discovery that - involved. in very simple terms have you made a discovery that cells - involved. in very simple terms have you made a discovery that cells talk to each other in a way that we did not understand before? t to each other in a way that we did not understand before?— to each other in a way that we did not understand before? i think so, as was mentioned _ not understand before? i think so, as was mentioned in _ not understand before? i think so, as was mentioned in the _ not understand before? i think so, as was mentioned in the piece - not understand before? i think so, as was mentioned in the piece willj as was mentioned in the piece will be really did not understand is how physical forces activate cells at least in the nervous system. how does something like a change in
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temperature from a hot or cold surface activate a precise molecular machinery that can transmit that information in our system? certainly how does a poke or a stretch of a cell do that. i think the studies really eliminate the detailed molecular mechanisms and processes that allow cells to sense not only chemical agents in our environment or chemicals in our nervous system but also physical forces that act on us and of course that's a really important component of what we experience in our world every day. especially with regards to touch sensation. a lot of what we experience is the physical environment interacting with our bodies. , : , environment interacting with our bodies. , ., . ., , bodies. james touched on in his re ort bodies. james touched on in his report that _ bodies. james touched on in his report that this _ bodies. james touched on in his report that this is _ bodies. james touched on in his report that this is a _ bodies. james touched on in his. report that this is a breakthrough for pain relief. as someone who suffers from a slipped disc i am most interested in this. how could you use the research you have done
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and the discoveries you have made to help someone like me for instance? the molecules we have identified are for acute pain physician or acute touch sensation that sort of sensation that is beneficial to us, that we normally rely on to tell us what the world is like and to avoid injury situations like touching a hot stove or touching a block of ice thatis hot stove or touching a block of ice that is too cold or poking our selves with something sharp. when there is an injury like a slipped disc or inflammation or a tumour thatis disc or inflammation or a tumour that is growing the body produces chemicals or other changes and then make all of these pathways hypersensitive. they are sending signals to the nervous system that are no longer beneficial and they're just sort of getting in the way of everyday life and they call them maladaptive. part of the research is
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understanding notjust how these molecules that we have discovered work normal protective pain sensations but what happens to them and how they change when they interact with tissues and inflammatory agents that are generated when they are is some kind of injury or disease. by understanding the process the goal is to understand how we can intervene and how we can interrupt that or reverse it is that we can reverse the hypersensitive parts of the pain pathway without disrupting the pain pathway without disrupting the aspects of the pain pathway. t the aspects of the pain pathway. i would love to talk to more about it but we are out of time. professor julius, nobel prize winner, thank you very much indeed. in mexico they just contracted the first 3d printer community. ten houses and 55 eagle block homes built by a huge computer. homes are made out of
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cement which pours out of a giant 3d machine layer by layer. a bit like a mr with me. it will be built two left scores of families out of poverty. the boss of the nonprofit that hagler is on the line. this is fascinating, talk to me about the printer and how it works and how you build these houses. you know it sounds like science fiction but it is real. wejust completed sounds like science fiction but it is real. we just completed the first community of 3d printed homes that families will be able to move into. how it works is a kind of say it's almost like the consistency coming out of the machine and nozzle is like soft—serve ice cream but what thatis like soft—serve ice cream but what that is is actually proprietary cement mix that's layering the interior and exterior walls of a built to last multi—generational house. and able to do that in less
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than 2a hours per home. one machine is able to 3d printer house and that we have local labour come on—site to put on a door and a roof and a few of the other things to complete the home. these houses built in a part of mexico that suffers from earthquakes so how safe are they consider the entire design was to make that homes could withstand any type of earthquakes or hurricanes, it's why we chose to do this project in a seismic area because a lot of the families in the world that need adequate housing of course are unfortunately subject to the issues that climate change is bringing which is around hurricanes and earthquakes. these are some of the strongest homes in the entire state and built to withstand the stronger earthquakes or hurricanes. do we know if these houses will last? thea;r know if these houses will last? they 'ust were know if these houses will last? they just were printed _ know if these houses will last? they just were printed so _ know if these houses will last? tt9 just were printed so we know if these houses will last? tt91 just were printed so we did everything to the best of our
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ability to ensure long—term safety for the families living in our homes so that was the number one objective to make sure that they are built to last safe homes and we did everything we could do over index the safety of these homes and the test that we have done the course of the local codes and had to pass everything very much pointing to some of the safest homes in the whole state. some of the safest homes in the whole state-— some of the safest homes in the whole state. ., , ~ .., , whole state. not 'ust mexico, i see developments — whole state. not 'ust mexico, i see developments in — whole state. notjust mexico, i see developments in california - whole state. notjust mexico, i see developments in california and - developments in california and texas, so is this the future? yes this project _ texas, so is this the future? yes this project you _ texas, so is this the future? yes this project you are _ texas, so is this the future? t'93 this project you are mentioning texas, so is this the future? t9; this project you are mentioning our through our construction technology partner a company called icon. icon is based out of austin, texas and has some very exciting projects happening in the us. in the future we are bullish on construction being a better and faster way to build
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houses. there is 1.6 billion people right now in the world in 2021 display all the advances we had that need housing and we believe these types of things... need housing and we believe these types of things- - -— need housing and we believe these types of things. .. thanks very much for watching- _ hello. we are going to see some pretty dramatic contrast in the weather across the uk through the coming week to ten days. tuesday we start off with a windy day across the board and some heavy rain in england and wales. this area of low pressure coming in from the atlantic. scotland and northern ireland will be spared the wettest of the weather, it went a day here on tuesday and there will be showers at times. the heaviest of the rain will be from northern england when this when the fight basicallyjust continues to sit in place was that rain pushing back into the midlands, east anglia and the southeast through the afternoon with strong and gusty winds. much betterfor
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wales and the southwest for the second half of the day. cold in the rain and temperatures barely getting up rain and temperatures barely getting up into double figures. as you move into wednesday this loan makes its way eastwards, still quite wet into the small hours of wednesday and windy across the eastern fringes of the uk but by the end of the night for many winds have fallen light and the skies have cleared. and there will be some sunshine to start us off on wednesday and that's thanks to this blink and you will miss that brief ridge of high pressure sandwiched between these two areas of low pressure. what a different day across england and wales and let winds of sunshine and it will feel warmer still. winds of sunshine and it will feel warmerstill. but winds of sunshine and it will feel warmer still. but of a nagging northerly breeze along the east coast and for northern ireland next to low feeding and clouded rain for the afternoon. that weather front will continue to sneak away to the northwest of the uk the end of the week but to the south of it we will pull in some very warm air. perhaps northern ireland in england for a
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time through scotland but ahead of that weather front tapping into air from a long way south of the atlantic that's been done the next going to really bolster our temperatures in where we have epics of rain. thursday there will be potentially some heavy rain for northern ireland and scotland but evenin northern ireland and scotland but even in the rain temperatures getting well up into the teens across england and wales is a very warm weather for this point in october and highs of 19 or 20 degrees. the front start bringing some rain into the northern half of the uk into friday and to the north of the fracture will be a little bit cooler across northern western aisles but set the can with sunshine looking at an unseasonably warm day up looking at an unseasonably warm day up to 20 degrees in cardiff and london. forthe up to 20 degrees in cardiff and london. for the weekend looks like it will push its way southeast into saturday and bring coolerfrom it will push its way southeast into saturday and bring cooler from the west and temperatures around average but ahead of the rain at 20 degrees
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day in london. then we look further ahead and ourforecast day in london. then we look further ahead and our forecast is being affected by something a long way away from us and this is hurricane sam. what it does is pull warm air high up into the atmosphere and cause thejet stream high up into the atmosphere and cause the jet stream but we are currently in a northerly plunge and that's why it's cool but through the end of the week with her things and from the south. saturday see this little dip and that's when the weather front goes through and also just pulling us in colder airfrom the north but on into next week. at the north but on into next week. at the moment looks like a game we could be pulling up airfrom a long way south. it also looks like things to be settling down next to an area of high pressure building. certainly on its next week still be trending unseasonably warm.
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tonight at ten — the chancellor defends his tax rises, saying a healthy post pandemic economy, required tough measures. at the conservative party conference, rishi sunak warned that more borrowing to balance the books, would be "immoral". there can be no prosperous future unless it is built on the foundation strong public finances. i have to be blunt with you. our recovery comes with a cost. he was speaking as the army began deliveries of fuel, to ease the petrol crisis, in parts of the south east. we'll be analysing the chanacellor�*s speech, as the economic squeeze hits millions of households. also tonight...
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millions around the world are forced off line,

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