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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 4, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... the chancellor announces half—a—billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he'll only consider cutting taxes, when the economy is back on track. whatsapp, facebook and instagram have all gone off—line for users around the world. facebook, which owns all three, apologises in a post on its rival, twitter. the big tory party donor involved in one of europe has met biggest corruption scandals. i europe has met biggest corruption scandals. ., ., ., scandals. i need to go to the hospital. _ scandals. i need to go to the hospital, will— scandals. i need to go to the hospital, will you _ scandals. i need to go to the hospital, will you please - scandals. i need to go to the i hospital, will you please move scandals. i need to go to the - hospital, will you please move your cars, please! the hospital, will you please move your cars. please!— cars, please! the climate activist causina cars, please! the climate activist causing these — cars, please! the climate activist causing these scenes _ cars, please! the climate activist causing these scenes and - cars, please! the climate activist causing these scenes and many l cars, please! the climate activist - causing these scenes and many more like it. we will be speaking to
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insulate britain just after like it. we will be speaking to insulate britainjust after 8:30pm. insulate britain just after 8:30pm. do insulate britainjust after 8:30pm. do they have a point, and if so, our road blocks the right way to make it? what do you want to say to them this evening. get in touch, i am on twitter or you can use the hashtag bbc your questions. also tonight, a pacemakerfor bbc your questions. also tonight, a pacemaker for the bbc your questions. also tonight, a pacemakerfor the brain. how pacemaker for the brain. how scientists pacemakerfor the brain. how scientists have made a breakthrough in the treatment of severe depression. and glastonbury announces its youngest ever solo headliner, a shania singer billie eilish. —— oceania singer billie eilish. rishi sunak has defended recent tax rises saying he wants to cut taxes, but only when the public finances are on a "sustainable footing". in his first speech to the party conference in person as chancellor, he also insisted that brexit
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is in the long term interests of the uk making the economy more �*agile' despite the challenges. can people start leaving, please? no one wanted to give up a place in the queue. they weren't listening because they wanted to hear. standing room ran out for the chancellor, who let go of the purse strings during the pandemic. emerging today to remind the crowd his instinct isn't to tax or spend. just borrowing more money and stacking up bills forfuture generations to pay isn'tjust economically irresponsible, it is immoral, and whilst i know tax rises are unpopular, some will even say un—conservative, i'll tell you what is un—conservative. unfunded pledges, reckless borrowing and soaring debt.
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but coming out of the covid emergency has put new strains on the economy everywhere. the changes of brexit have brought pressure, too. we are facing challenges to supply chains, notjust here but right around the world. but tackling the cost of living isn't just a political soundbite. it's one of the central missions of this conservative government. but making ends meet is getting harderfor so many people, like leslie. she works at manchester college, but paid £5 tojoin this community grocer. like michelle, that means she can fill a basket for £3 per week. this unusual kind of shop only opened a year ago. its tenth branch is coming any day. the government need to be looking at the real world and the real people that suffer if there isn't a meal on the table.
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it doesn't matter how many hours you work, it's not just about your food shop, you've got all the other aspects, your mortgage payments, rent payments, gas, electric. at the end of the month, you're lucky if you've got anything left over. one cabinet minister told me the government is walking a tightrope when it comes to people and the public finances paying their way. rishi sunak�*s future will be shaped by whether he can hold the balance. atjust the moment when it feels like we've done enough, we must not stop. now is the time to show them that our plan will deliver. and now is the time at long last to finally turn to the future. thank you. maybe it was a down payment on his own politicalfuture, trying to reassure the rank and file he is a low—tax tory, but it might get much harder in the coming months to reassure the crowd outside.
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that the tories are really on their side. your party took myjob off me. just as jacob rees—mogg was confronted today, ministers can't turn their faces away. even the most polished political script can be written in a moment by what happens in the real world outside. let's go to the conservative conference and our political correspondent chris mason. an important day for ricky sunak to get his message across —— rishi sunak, did you think you did? it is sunak, did you think you did? it is interesting. _ sunak, did you think you did? it 3 interesting, rishi sunak saying i want to be a low—tech story, i want to reduce taxes if i can, but the caveat that was also a massive one, that he wants to balance the books, that he wants to balance the books, that there is going to be a period ahead where he is not going to be able to reduce taxes because he is trying to make sure that the economy stays in a stable position. so it
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kind of felt a bit to me like jam tomorrow from the chancellor. saying what he wants to do but not necessarily what he's going to do. let's chat this over with ali mirage, who i am glad to sayjoins me, a columnist for the article. ali, what do you think, do we know much more about rishi sunak today compared to what we knew yesterday? i think this was soon at the smooth, the sequeh — i think this was soon at the smooth, the sequel. you have the james bond -esque _ the sequel. you have the james bond —esque video sequence, very slick, and then_ —esque video sequence, very slick, and then rishi sunak had to things really— and then rishi sunak had to things really to— and then rishi sunak had to things really to do in the speech, it wasn't — really to do in the speech, it wasn't the soaring rhetoric we expect — wasn't the soaring rhetoric we expect from the likes of william hague _ expect from the likes of william hague or— expect from the likes of william hague or that cameron did in 2007 or mycoie _ hague or that cameron did in 2007 or mycole pruitt are loaded as shadow chancellor back in 2,000 but there were _ chancellor back in 2,000 but there were two— chancellor back in 2,000 but there were two things he wanted to do, one was to— were two things he wanted to do, one was to introduce himself formally to the tory— was to introduce himself formally to the tory faithful for the first time and von're — the tory faithful for the first time and you're right, he was focusing on the fact— and you're right, he was focusing on the fact that — and you're right, he was focusing on the fact that he was a fiscal conservative, but also that you know he is _ conservative, but also that you know he is a _ conservative, but also that you know he is a brexiteer. borisjohnson has promoted _ he is a brexiteer. borisjohnson has promoted liz truss leadership rival
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potentially who voted for remain. so that was _ potentially who voted for remain. so that was a _ potentially who voted for remain. so that was a nice piece of positioning. the other thing was he wanted _ positioning. the other thing was he wanted to— positioning. the other thing was he wanted to tell the british people directiv— wanted to tell the british people directly that he's got their backs. he is— directly that he's got their backs. he is like — directly that he's got their backs. he is like the reassuring family doctor— he is like the reassuring family doctor who says it is all going to be ok. — doctor who says it is all going to be ok, trust me, that's why he made the announcement of putting another 500 million in to support people coming — 500 million in to support people coming off fellow. but you are right to focus _ coming off fellow. but you are right to focus on — coming off fellow. but you are right to focus on the fiscal conservative credentials — to focus on the fiscal conservative credentials he was trying to display _ credentials he was trying to display. he is very worried about inflation — display. he is very worried about inflation and also about interest rates _ inflation and also about interest rates going up, and he made it very clear— rates going up, and he made it very clear that _ rates going up, and he made it very clear that the borrowing level we have _ clear that the borrowing level we have is _ clear that the borrowing level we have is now 100% of gdp, so that is clearly— have is now 100% of gdp, so that is clearly a _ have is now 100% of gdp, so that is clearly a focus that is on his mind. it clearly a focus that is on his mind. it has _ clearly a focus that is on his mind. it has been — clearly a focus that is on his mind. it has been fairly easy for rishi sunak to borrow a bunch of money when inflation is low because it is fairly cheap to pay back. it is going to get more expensive to pay back. but what i don't know from what i heard from the chancellor today, maybe you can help me shed some light on this, is when he wants to reduce taxes. it kind of sounded like, yeah, that is the thing i would love to do, but ijust can't do it. and that almost is the
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pragmatist in the chancellor, that he might have this ideology but he's not going to act on it. i he might have this ideology but he's not going to act on it.— not going to act on it. i think you are setting _ not going to act on it. i think you are setting the _ not going to act on it. i think you are setting the mode _ not going to act on it. i think you are setting the mode up - not going to act on it. i think you are setting the mode up for- not going to act on it. i think you are setting the mode up for the i are setting the mode up for the future — are setting the mode up for the future where he can do that, but he was very. _ future where he can do that, but he was very, very clear, with not only the party— was very, very clear, with not only the party faithful but also the country. _ the party faithful but also the country, they can't do that right now _ country, they can't do that right now you — country, they can't do that right now. you know that corporation tax is increasing — now. you know that corporation tax is increasing to 25%, we have had the national insurance increase as welt _ the national insurance increase as well. , ., ., , ., well. he is doing the opposite of what ou well. he is doing the opposite of what you said — well. he is doing the opposite of what you said he _ well. he is doing the opposite of what you said he was _ well. he is doing the opposite of what you said he was going - well. he is doing the opposite of what you said he was going to i well. he is doing the opposite of. what you said he was going to do. well. he is doing the opposite of - what you said he was going to do. he is also cutting a bit, the overseas aid budget— is also cutting a bit, the overseas aid budget has been cut back to 05%~ _ aid budget has been cut back to 0.5%. look, he is waiting fora boss who famously said he likes to have his cake _ who famously said he likes to have his cake and eat it, so the landing strip— his cake and eat it, so the landing strip for— his cake and eat it, so the landing strip for rishi sunak is quite narrow. _ strip for rishi sunak is quite narrow, he doesn't have a lot of room _ narrow, he doesn't have a lot of room for— narrow, he doesn't have a lot of room for manoeuvre, but he smart, he sensible. _ room for manoeuvre, but he smart, he sensible. he_ room for manoeuvre, but he smart, he sensible, he will get there, and what _ sensible, he will get there, and what he — sensible, he will get there, and what he is — sensible, he will get there, and what he is trying to do right now is to say— what he is trying to do right now is to say it _ what he is trying to do right now is to say it is — what he is trying to do right now is to say it is tough, we have 400 biiiion— to say it is tough, we have 400 billion of— to say it is tough, we have 400 billion of borrowing we have got, 2 trillion _ billion of borrowing we have got, 2 trillion of— billion of borrowing we have got, 2 trillion of public debt, we need to be sensible and mature, and he even went as _ be sensible and mature, and he even went as far— be sensible and mature, and he even went as far to say it was immoral to keep— went as far to say it was immoral to keep spending money and opening the wallet _ keep spending money and opening the wallet with no tomorrow, so i think he is _ wallet with no tomorrow, so i think he is very— wallet with no tomorrow, so i think he is very assiduously aware of the fact that _ he is very assiduously aware of the fact that he — he is very assiduously aware of the
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fact that he has to position himself as a fiscal— fact that he has to position himself as a fiscal conservative and hopefully in the future when the time _ hopefully in the future when the time is — hopefully in the future when the time is right, it may be before the next _ time is right, it may be before the next election, it may be afterwards, he positions — next election, it may be afterwards, he positions himself as a low tax conservative in principle.- he positions himself as a low tax conservative in principle. thank you for cominu conservative in principle. thank you for coming and _ conservative in principle. thank you for coming and sharing _ conservative in principle. thank you for coming and sharing your - conservative in principle. thank you i for coming and sharing your thoughts on the chancellor's speech. i suppose the question borisjohnson is going to be asked over the next few days is whether he is rolling out more tax rises as well, because when he was on the andrew marr show yesterday, he didn't quite get there, he said i don't want to do it, kind of similar to the chancellor actually, it, kind of similar to the chancelloractually, i it, kind of similar to the chancellor actually, i don't want to raise taxes but not quite saying that he wouldn't. so there is a bit of nervousness around this conference about exactly what the few months and weeks might mean. before i let you go, tell us about an incident of the conservative party member apparently being thrown out of the conference. what more do we know? , . , out of the conference. what more do we know? , ., , ., , we know? this was last night actuall . we know? this was last night actually- we _ we know? this was last night actually. we found _ we know? this was last night actually. we found out - we know? this was last night actually. we found out last . we know? this was last night| actually. we found out last -- we know? this was last night - actually. we found out last -- this actually. we found out last —— this morning that clementina colton, an
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energy executive, who works for octopus energy, she was at a fringe event and she told the conference she had been violently assaulted last night in a bar about 100 metres from where i am, it is in the hotel, a lot of ministers are staying there actually. now the conservative party says it was made aware of this, it is liaising with the police and that the behaviour was completely unacceptable. my understanding is that the person who has been thrown out of the conference was a member who has now been suspended from the party. so some pretty concerning scenes at the bar last night. one other thing i should tell you about come out in the streets of manchester, just outside the conference hall, iain duncan smith, the former conservative leader, says he was attacked by someone with a traffic cone as well. and a number of arrests have been made around that. so some pretty unsavoury scenes over the last 24 hours too. thank you very much indeed. whatsapp, instagram and facebook
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are all down tonight, in a major global black out. users have reported being unable to access all three apps, that are owned by facebook, since about five o'clock this evening. joining me now is scott helm, a cybersecurity expert. i checked literally a second or two ago, and whatsapp, facebook, still not available to people. what's going on? i available to people. what's going on? . , available to people. what's going on? ., , . . ~' on? i have been checking the incident for _ on? i have been checking the incident for a _ on? i have been checking the incident for a few _ on? i have been checking the incident for a few hours - on? i have been checking the incident for a few hours nowl on? i have been checking the i incident for a few hours now and on? i have been checking the - incident for a few hours now and it looks like this could well be a mistake that facebook app made, in taking their own services down, and it is taking them a lot longer than people thought to bring those services back online. it people thought to bring those services back online. it started around nine — services back online. it started around nine o'clock— services back online. it started around nine o'clock california | services back online. it started - around nine o'clock california time, wasn't it, the start of the working day over there. when you say taking their services off—line, what do you mean, what were they trying to do? so all of the indication so far looked to be that this is something to do with bgp. bgp, the border gateway protocol, is like the map of the internet and different companies
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publish the roots on how to get to their service to access their services. and it looks like facebook have withdrawn all of those roots, so right now nobody knows how to get to facebook�*s services. 50 so right now nobody knows how to get to facebook's services.— to facebook's services. so you would think if you — to facebook's services. so you would think if you could _ to facebook's services. so you would think if you could withdraw _ to facebook's services. so you would think if you could withdraw those - think if you could withdraw those routes you would find it easy to reinstall them again, with all the people they have come all those clever clogs working for them in silicon valley, you would think they would have an answer by now because it has been quite a long time? it has. as far as i have been checking this, around about three hours had passed since we lost access to facebook, instagram and whatsapp and it has been very surprising to see it has been very surprising to see it has been very surprising to see it has not been fixed sooner by facebook. but i guess as much technology as we have sometimes things break and it seems like somebody actually needs to go to the service to fix this. is it somebody actually needs to go to the service to fix this.— service to fix this. is it a question _ service to fix this. is it a question of _ service to fix this. is it a question of turning - service to fix this. is it a question of turning it. service to fix this. is it a j question of turning it off service to fix this. is it a - question of turning it off and on again then? i question of turning it off and on again then?— question of turning it off and on aaain then? , again then? i hope so, i hope it is that simple _ again then? i hope so, i hope it is that simple and _ again then? i hope so, i hope it is that simple and may _ again then? i hope so, i hope it is that simple and may will - again then? i hope so, i hope it is that simple and may will we - again then? i hope so, i hope it is that simple and may will we see l that simple and may will we see access restored soon but right now i think they're trying to get staff on to sites to resume things, and start to sites to resume things, and start to bring the services on come which
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could take one to two hours from now. ~ ., , , , now. with the embarrassing thing is that it has had — now. with the embarrassing thing is that it has had to _ now. with the embarrassing thing is that it has had to go _ now. with the embarrassing thing is that it has had to go on _ now. with the embarrassing thing is that it has had to go on to _ now. with the embarrassing thing is that it has had to go on to twitter. that it has had to go on to twitter to talk to its users and say, look, hello, it is us on facebook, we are having problems, apologies. that really must hurt.— really must hurt. yes, not a particularly _ really must hurt. yes, not a particularly good _ really must hurt. yes, not a particularly good look. - really must hurt. yes, not a particularly good look. but. really must hurt. yes, not a - particularly good look. but even the facebook status page is down right now so even if we wanted to check what facebook say about facebook on facebook, we have to do that via other channels like twitter. i facebook, we have to do that via other channels like twitter. i know ou are a other channels like twitter. i know you are a cybersecurity _ other channels like twitter. i know you are a cybersecurity expert - other channels like twitter. i know you are a cybersecurity expert but| you are a cybersecurity expert but you are a cybersecurity expert but you also have a love of the tech world, what does this tell us about the way technology and social media interact with our lives and how important it is, because i know quite a lot of people tonight are thinking how i might going to get my post on instagram, post on facebook, to whatsapp my friends? it is such an intricate part of our lives, and it shows when things like this happen. it shows when things like this hauen. , ., , ., happen. absolutely, and it is not 'ust our happen. absolutely, and it is not just our lack _ happen. absolutely, and it is not just our lack of— happen. absolutely, and it is not just our lack of ability _ happen. absolutely, and it is not just our lack of ability to - happen. absolutely, and it is not just our lack of ability to use - just our lack of ability to use facebook, instagram and social media platforms, whatsapp a bit more of a communication platform and people
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use that day to day but we have also been to websites and seen things like login with facebook button, which currently doesn't work, so some are currently struggling because features that work is much wider than not been able to get on to facebook. a bbc investigation has discovered how a major conservative party donor was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. leaked documents reveal how mohamed amersi — who's given half—a—million pounds to the tories — worked on a series of controversial deals for a swedish telecoms company. the swedish company was later fined almost a billion dollars for bribery. mr amersi denies any wrongdoing. the bbc worked alongside the international consortium of investigativejournalists and the guardian on the investigation. richard bilton reports. mohamed amersi is wealthy and well—connected. here he is talking about the dangers of corruption.
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corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life. so, where did his wealth come from? some of it comes from this company in sweden, a company fined almost $1 billion for bribery. telia was prosecuted over a corrupt telecoms deal. the company paid $220 million to an offshore company secretly controlled by the daughter of the then—president of uzbekistan. the american authorities described it as a $220 million bribe. we have now obtained documents that show how mr amersi was involved in the deal. in one e—mail, a telia boss writes... mr amersi responds... and here is mr amersi's invoice for his part in project uzbekistan. he got a success fee of $500,000 for his work.
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mr amersi's lawyers said that the offshore company had been vetted and approved by telia. and that its involvement did not raise any red flags to mr amersi. we have also seen evidence about how he was involved in other telia deals. we've got details of an internal report about a consultant referred to as mr xy, who was paid more than $65 million by telia. the payments included expenses for lavish corporate entertainment. they were usually between $100,000 and $200,000 a month, and were not evidenced by copies of receipts. the internal report recommended that telia's relationship with mr amersi be terminated. who is mrxy? that is mr amersi. he has been involved in one of the biggest corruption scandal is that we have seen in sweden
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in modern times. it is important that people around him that trust him and listen to him understand the whole context of his career and wealth. lawyers for mr amersi said that his fees and expenses were entirely in keeping with industry practice and that telia did not require regular sight of the receipts. they say that it is entirely false to suggest that his contract was terminated. all of this matters because mr amersi has given more than half a million pounds to the conservative party. this morning, borisjohnson gave his reaction. i see that story today, but all i can say on that one is that all of these donations are vetted in the normal way in accordance with rules set up under a labour government, so we have vetted them for a long time. a conservative spokesman said that government policy is in no way influenced by the donations the party receives. they are entirely separate. "we are motivated by the priorities of the "british public, acting on the national interest."
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richard bilton, bbc news. there's much more detail about the pandora papers and what they reveal on the bbc news website, and you can watch �*panorama — pandora papers: political donors exposed' tonight on bbc one at 7:35pm and on iplayer. now time to look at the quarter past headlines at 80 minutes past eight. the chancellor announces half £1 billion to help get people back to work after the pandemic and says he will only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. whatsapp, facebook and instagram have all been off—line for millions of re—users around the world. now for more than three hours. all details emerge about muhammad a mercy, a major conservative party donor who was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals.
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sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's mark edwards. we start with some football. claudio ranieri has been appointed as watford's new head coach. the club sacked xisco munoz afterjust ten months in charge at the weekend. munoz led them to promotion from the championship last season. watford lie 15th in the table, having won two the table, having won two of their opening seven premier league games. ranieri meanwhile has signed a two year contract at vicarage road. the italian won the premier league with leicester city in 2016. but the 69—year—old was sacked the following season. he becomes the 13th watford manager since the pozzo family took over the club in 2012. raleigh area will bring in a little bit of experience. he is probably the most high profile head coach watford has ever had in the history of the club. numerous managerial honours, he has managed in several countries across europe, so really high profile bit of business for watford. having that sort of in game
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experience will be massive for us. england's cricketers will learn this week whether they'll be heading down under for the ashes this winter. the sport's governing body, the ecb, are meeting to decide whether the men's ashes tour of australia will go ahead. there have been concerns over whether the players families can travel with them, quarantine arrangements and any potential �*bubble' the team, including captainjoe root, may have to live in. australia has some of the strictest covid—19 protocols in the world, a situation complicated by the fact its different states have their own regulations. the first test is due to begin on the eighth december and cricket writer adam collins doesn't believe the ashes are in doubt. in order for the ashes series not to id in order for the ashes series not to go ahead, — in order for the ashes series not to go ahead, we would require effectively a boycott from the ecb, not in _ effectively a boycott from the ecb, not in those strong terms i would imagine _ not in those strong terms i would imagine but a postponement, which in the current— imagine but a postponement, which in the current scheduling arrangement that we _ the current scheduling arrangement that we have, ijust can't see that happening — that we have, ijust can't see that happening. there is too much on the line financially. the ashes is effectively an industry insider cricket — effectively an industry insider cricket. there are so much on the line for— cricket. there are so much on the line for both _ cricket. there are so much on the line for both boards, ijust can't
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see a _ line for both boards, ijust can't see a scenario where there is a complete — see a scenario where there is a complete pull—out. iwouldn't see a scenario where there is a complete pull—out. i wouldn't doubt for a heartbeat that the vast majority _ for a heartbeat that the vast majority of players are presented with a _ majority of players are presented with a modest quarantine arrangement in a country— with a modest quarantine arrangement in a country that is opening up, versus— in a country that is opening up, versus staying at home, i would expect — versus staying at home, i would expect the — versus staying at home, i would expect the vast majority of them will take — expect the vast majority of them will take box a. tammy abraham and ben chilwell have been added to the england squad for their two upcoming world cup qualifiers. abraham, who moved from chelsea to roma in the summer, and his former blues team—mate chilwell will report to st george's park tomorrow along with the rest of gareth southgate's squad for the games with andorra and hungary. sir ben ainslie isjoining forces with the mercedes formula one team for his third attempt at winning the america's cup. ainslie's ineos brittania team launched their campaign today at mercedes�* brackley headquarters, where they will be based. the f1 team's chief technical officerjames allison will help design the boat. the next americas cup — sport's oldest trophy — is set to take place in 2024. new zealand are the defending champions.
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charlotte purdue has been talking about running the third fastest time for a british woman at yesterday's london marathon. purdue finished tenth and shaved more than two minutes off her previous personal best, and was only 14 seconds off mara yamauchi's second—best british time. this performance came only a few months after she was left out the team gb squad for this summer's olympics in tokyo. as soon as, like, the olympic door closed, and i was able to focus on london, it was kind of like, yeah, i will forget about that now. focus on london. so i'm just glad it went well yesterday. there was a was a lot of pressure going into a big event obviously with the marathon, you can't run one every weekend, so you can't run one every weekend, so you kind of go all in on this one day and if it doesn't go well, you have to really plan and wait a bit of time before you go again. but i'm just happy that it went well so i can relax a bit now and then go again for the next one. that
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can relax a bit now and then go again for the next one.- can relax a bit now and then go again for the next one. that is all the sort again for the next one. that is all the sport for _ again for the next one. that is all the sport for now. _ two american scientists who researched how our bodies feel the warmth of the sun all recognise the touch of a loved one have won the nobel prize for medicine. they use chilli and wasabi to identify the sensors that enable the body feel heat, pain and pressure. james clayton reports now from san francisco. the challenge that we set out to solve in the lab was to understand the molecules and signalling pathways that underlie our sense of touch. professorjulius and his team set out to better understand how we experience the world, how touch helps us experience everything from our morning coffee to a hug from a loved one. you might think it is pretty obvious when a cup of coffee is too hot or a drink is too cold, but scientists haven't actually understood fully how we experience those sensations, and that is why this research is deemed to be so important. not only does it improve our understanding, but it could have huge implications for how
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we manage pain. the research initially came from investigating the burning sensation we feel from eating a hot chilli pepper. they experimented with the source of a chilli's heat, the chemical capsicum. they discovered the specific type of receptor that responded to it. from there, the team found other receptors that respond to things like pressure. touch is one of the five senses. but it does something very special, because most cells in our bodies communicate through chemicals. and yet, these touch neurons have to sense physical stimuli, such as pressure and temperature, and in a way transform this information into chemical signals that cells can understand, and no one really knew how this happened. places like san francisco are in the grip of an opioid crisis.
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more people died here in the city of drugs, mainly from fentanyl overdoses, than from covid last year. the hope is that this research will allow scientists to create more targeted and perhaps even less addictive pain relief in the future. james clayton, bbc news, san francisco. now two big music stores today, the first that glastonbury is going to have its youngest ever solo headliner. billie eilish has been revealed as the first headline act for next year's festival. she will be 28 years younger than singer adele was —— she will be 20, eight years other than —— younger than adele was. could we be about to hear the first new music from adele since the first new music from adele since the time of that fashionably appearance? mark savage is in west london for us. talk me through billie eilish. i mean, a lot of
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excited fans out there will be thinking forward to next year. an incredible achievement for her as well. it incredible achievement for her as well. , ., , ,., , .,, incredible achievement for her as well. , , ., , well. it is absolutely. it was only two years _ well. it is absolutely. it was only two years ago — well. it is absolutely. it was only two years ago in _ well. it is absolutely. it was only two years ago in 2019 _ well. it is absolutely. it was only two years ago in 2019 that - well. it is absolutely. it was only two years ago in 2019 that she i well. it is absolutely. it was only i two years ago in 2019 that she was supposed to play the tinyjohn peel stage at glastonbury festival it only holds 10,000 people. a couple of weeks before the festival she was upgraded to the second—biggest age, the other stage that holds 40,000, and now she is going to be on the pyramid stage, so playing to more than 100,000 people. like you say, at the age of 20, it is a huge achievement. the youngest solo artist ever to take that slot. and the only person he was younger was actually the bass guitarist for the rock band ash. they only headlined the festival in 1997 at the last minute. they were on the bill already and stevie winwood, the us rock star, pulled out, they had to step into his lap. so technically she is the youngest person ever booked for that slot. find she is the youngest person ever booked for that slot.— booked for that slot. and this information _ booked for that slot. and this information will _ booked for that slot. and this information will of _ booked for that slot. and this information will of course - booked for that slot. and this. information will of course whet booked for that slot. and this - information will of course whet the appetite of those who are looking forward to glastonbury after a long hiatus. , , ., , ,
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forward to glastonbury after a long hiatus. , ., , , hiatus. yes, glastonbury has -robabl hiatus. yes, glastonbury has probably been _ hiatus. yes, glastonbury has probably been hit _ hiatus. yes, glastonbury has probably been hit the - hiatus. yes, glastonbury has probably been hit the worst l hiatus. yes, glastonbury has. probably been hit the worst of hiatus. yes, glastonbury has - probably been hit the worst of all the festivals in the uk simply because of the size of it. to build the site of glastonbury that hosts 200,000 people over the weekend takes months and months and months orso takes months and months and months or so they have to cancel much earlier than anybody else, both in 2020 and this year, and we are going to hear more headliner safely in the next couple of months. we can even hear an all—female headline set, because adele could come back, and taylor swift was booked to play in 2020 and she is still due her big customary appearance, so we could see a first time ever all—female headliner at b. see a first time ever all-female headliner at b.— see a first time ever all-female headliner at b. ., ., , , headliner at b. you have seemingly -- seamlessly _ headliner at b. you have seemingly -- seamlessly brought _ headliner at b. you have seemingly -- seamlessly brought in _ headliner at b. you have seemingly -- seamlessly brought in adele - headliner at b. you have seemingly -- seamlessly brought in adele fullj —— seamlessly brought in adele full stop it looks like there is some new music coming out, tell us about all the clues that have been thrown out into cyberspace. 50 the clues that have been thrown out into cyberspace-— into cyberspace. so this all started last weekend- _ into cyberspace. so this all started last weekend. friday, _ into cyberspace. so this all started last weekend. friday, 17th -- - last weekend. friday, 17th —— saturday night, the number 30 started being projected on buildings all around the world, in brazil, mexico, paris, new york, london, the tate modern over here, on the empire
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state building in new york. and people were speculating that this is going to be the name of a's fourth album, because her previous three were all named after ages in her life when she went through pivotal experiences, 19, 21, 25, and 30 was the year when very sadly her marriage broke down and she separated from her husband, simon. she has said in the past that is likely to be the focal point of this album, and so the internet rumour mill started going into overdrive over the weekend, just from the site of two numbers projected on to buildings. then today, just this afternoon, she wiped her website, and change the pictures on her social media accounts, on twitter and instagram, and they reflected the colour scheme of those projections, the number 30 is not there but the colour scheme is the same. so slowly it looks like we are getting toward some new adele music, the first adele music for six years. it feels like it is happening, thank you very much indeed mark savage. great to talk to. now it is time for
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a look at the time now for the weather with darren. sunshine and showers. this more organised band of rain will push eastwards across much of england and wales over stops and heavy bursts of rain, particularly here and that will be accompanied by some very gusty winds will stop the wind and rain keeping the temperatures up overnight but dry of northern ireland and for much of scotland where in the north of scotland temperatures could be close to freezing. we still have this wet and windy weather around on tuesday. the heavier rain soon clears east anglia and the south—east. wet weather continues to run into south—eastern parts of scotland. much of northern england, north wales for a while, pushing into the midlands as well. it is around an area of low pressure. we have some strong winds mainly where we are seeing that rain, that will make it feel particularly chilly. for some sunshine across other parts of england and western areas of scotland, temperatures mid—teens at best. that wet and windy weather clears away overnight, a brief ridge of high pressure on wednesday, but more rain coming in from the
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atlantic into northern ireland. this is bbc news. the headlines... the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he'll only consider cutting taxes, when the economy is back on track. whatsapp, facebook and instagram have all gone off—line for users around the world. facebook, which owns all three, apologises in a post on its rival, twitter. the major conservative party donor involved in one of your apartment biggest corruption scandals. i need to go to the hospital, will you please move your cars, please!
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the climate activists causing these scenes and many more like it. we will be speaking to insulate britainjust after 8:30pm. london's top police chief cressida dick has announced an independent review into the metropolitan police's culture and standards in an effort to try to restore public trust in the force. the move follows the conviction of wayne couzens who was a serving officer when he kidnapped, raped and killed sarah everard in march. cressida dick says she won't resign over the incident but that national police vetting standards should be looked at. she was talking to our special correspondent lucy manning. the metropolitan police commissioner on patrol this morning, on the same streets that some women feel scared to walk down alone at night. she and herforce have been rocked by the crimes of wayne couzens, and are now promising to restore trust, in the first interview since couzens was sentenced. your officer kidnapped,
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raped and murdered a lone female, sarah everard. you were his ultimate boss. it was on your watch. why won't you resign? these events have been absolutely dreadful. they have made everybody in the met furious. and we depend on public trust, so today, i am announcing that we will be doing a review that will be led by a high profile independent person, and the review will look at our internal culture and our professional standards. some would say that is not enough, that you need to go, did you offer to resign? people will be entitled to their opinion. i've got a job to do, i'm getting on with it. myjob now is to lead the met through difficult times. couzens, seen here the night that he murdered sarah, buying things to use in the attack, but could he be stopped days earlier in the met were investigating two incidents of indecent exposure?
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we have an independent office of police conduct investigation. there is one thing i do want to say, which is, as far as i am aware, and this needs to be assured by the iopc, at no stage during an investigation into indecent exposure was a police officer identified. how did couzensjoin the met firearms unit, when there had been a previous allegation of indecent exposure when he worked as an officer in kent, six years ago? what went wrong on vetting? in terms of vetting, the public will be rightly concerned. i have asked that there should be a review of national police vetting standards. couzens was not really vetted when he became a firearms officer or when he joined the metropolitan police. i am not going to discuss the details. this is for the iopc to say what happened, but what i can say that there has been much speculation about an incident in kent. no police officer was arrested,
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charged, convicted at all. the met will allow itself to be examined, but it is not a public inquiry or the resignation that some have called for. lucy manning, bbc news. asa as a police officer has been remanded in custody after a charge of raping a woman he met on a dating app. the pc david who is 46 denies the allegation. he was off—duty at the allegation. he was off—duty at the time of the alleged offence in september last year and is currently from duty. a nurse charged with murdering aid to babies and attempting to murder ten babies has pleaded not guilty to all charges against her. lucy from hereford worked at the chester hospital between june 2015 and june 2016.
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worked at the chester hospital betweenjune 2015 and june 2016. she repeated not guilty to all 18 charges as she appeared via video link in prison in peterborough. her trial is set to begin in october next year. military personnel have begun trying to tackle one aspect of the resulting shortages delivering fuel. and while there has been a big improvement across much of the country petrol stations in london and the southeast are still running out. our economics editor faisal islam has been assessing the economic backdrop to the speech. this is the army helping out in the distribution of british petrol. even as there are wider post—lockdown supply chain challenges across the globe, these scenes are unique to britain. for the government, this is an example of what the chancellor referred to as whatever it takes to deal with problems in getting goods to market normally.
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the latest figures showed there has been a marked improvement across the uk except in london and south—east, where the petrol situation remains challenging. the underlying haulage driver issue also remains. it's all very well saying improve pay and conditions. next week, boris will be whinging and whining that inflation has gone crazy because everyone is paying twice as much for their drivers as they were six months ago. the chancellor's speech didn't contain any big new announcements. he'll have the chance to do so at this month's budget. the thrust of economic policy now seems to be about trying to raise wages. this is about particular sectors where there is a problem, where wages for a certain group of workers could go up. we also hope there will be an increase in the national living wage, but if in general we want pay to go up, we've got to be more productive. that means more investment in skills and more investment in companies.
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farmers made their concerns clear outside the conference. yesterday, the pm played down the prospect of a possible mass cull of pigs that farmers have blamed on a post—brexit worker shortage. we don't want to see consumers going short of food and not being able to access high—quality british food, and we don't want to see farmers and growers going out of business because they can't get their food to market. the chancellor's long—term economic optimism faces short—term challenges. supply shortages are having a material impact on the bank of england's forecast for the economy, on consumer confidence. it's notjust hauliers and farmers questioning whether the government is really doing everything it takes to solve this issue. they were joined today by prominent conservative and brexit supporting retailer. the chief executive of next said cash alone cannot conjure up enough people, and warned forcing a rise in wages could lead to a 1970s—style spiral of rising prices.
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the chancellor is looking to a high—tech future for the economy. right now, there are real concerns about some ghosts from the past. so, did the chancellor's speech today reassure the hospitality industry that they'll receive the support they need ian robinson is the general manager of the white hart hotel in lincoln. thank you so much forjoining us. were you reassured? i thank you so much for “oining us. were you reassured?_ were you reassured? i think the devil will be _ were you reassured? i think the devil will be in _ were you reassured? i think the devil will be in the _ were you reassured? i think the devil will be in the details. - were you reassured? i think the devil will be in the details. an . devil will be in the details. an awful lot not — not an awful lot to get excited about. playing his cards close to the chest with the budget a few weeks away. lots to talk about to see some proof in the pudding. the chancellor says that brexit will provide long—term benefits, are you seeing any benefits at all in the short term, how is it impacting your business? �* , ,, short term, how is it impacting your business? , ,, , short term, how is it impacting your business? �* , ,, , business? business is absolutely stacked.
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business? business is absolutely stacked- we _ business? business is absolutely stacked. we have _ business? business is absolutely stacked. we have been - business? business is absolutely stacked. we have been busy - business? business is absolutely stacked. we have been busy forl business? business is absolutely - stacked. we have been busy for when we opened in may. that increased even further once the social distancing route restrictions were relaxed further injuly. and it has been nonstop since then and continuing all the way through. we are seeing this moving towards christmas for christmas events, etc. so a huge demand for people to get away after being understandably, wanted to get away after being locked up with coronavirus. there is huge demand there and the other side to that is trying to find the workforce to manage those expectations when we are helping to deliver peoples memories and experiences. deliver peoples memories and experiences-— deliver peoples memories and experiences. how difficult it has become experiences. how difficult it has loecome to _ experiences. how difficult it has become to find _ experiences. how difficult it has become to find the _ experiences. how difficult it has become to find the workforce i experiences. how difficult it has i become to find the workforce that you need and what you doing to mitigate that? get you need and what you doing to mitigate that?— you need and what you doing to mitigate that? you need and what you doing to mitiaate that? . ., ., ., mitigate that? got a great team to start with. essentially _
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mitigate that? got a great team to start with. essentially we - mitigate that? got a great team to start with. essentially we have - mitigate that? got a great team to | start with. essentially we have been able to, where we have a flexible workforce able to offer them more hours so they are able to have some consistency and reliability on that front. there is a huge shortfall i would suggest in quality of candidates coming forward and i think that is something the hospitality we need to look at how we package ourselves. not an industry that really needs to shake off some of the maybe old stereotypes of how hospitality used to be. not that at all. notjust youngsters coming into the business but an opportunity to re—evaluate the lifestyle and make it more mature ilk looking to come into the industry that offers great potential for careers. ., ., industry that offers great potential for careers-— for careers. you have taken on an apprentice. _ for careers. you have taken on an apprentice, haven't _ for careers. you have taken on an apprentice, haven't you? - for careers. you have taken on an apprentice, haven't you? tell- for careers. you have taken on an apprentice, haven't you? tell me| apprentice, haven't you? tell me more about that. is a
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apprentice, haven't you? tell me more about that.— more about that. is a raft of opportunities _ more about that. is a raft of opportunities out _ more about that. is a raft of opportunities out there - more about that. is a raft of opportunities out there that i more about that. is a raft of. opportunities out there that we more about that. is a raft of- opportunities out there that we are not just opportunities out there that we are notjust in the front of house opportunity but kitchen opportunities and etc. we're looking at recruiting at a younger level where we bring people through and we are also trying to find ways that we can bring more mature people into the business. so looking hospitality in a way maybe a little bit more than the consonant does where it's seen as a career and not something that you just do on a part—time basis for instance. ian that you just do on a part-time basis for instance. ian robinson, thank you _ basis for instance. ian robinson, thank you so _ basis for instance. ian robinson, thank you so much _ basis for instance. ian robinson, thank you so much for— basis for instance. ian robinson, thank you so much for taking - basis for instance. ian robinson, j thank you so much for taking the time to speak to us, good to speak to you. climate change activists who've been causing chaos on motorways in and around the capital over recent weeks clashed with motorists today as they turned their attention to some of london's busiest commuter routes. in defiance of the government attempts to stop them, they blocked the blackwall tunnel and wandsworth bridge. police arrested dozens of protestors.
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tom edwards reports. she's in the ambulance, she's going to the hospital in canterbury! at the blackwall tunnel this driver is trying to get through a line of protesters. she says trying to reach her mother who is on her way to hospital. for three weeks, insulate britain have been targeting roads and motorways. the tactic, lie down on the tarmac or glue themselves to it. this morning there were protests at four busy locations. this is my seventh arrest. i do not want to be here any more. why am i here? because we are not getting action from the government. please listen to us. this was hangar lane directory. this man was caught up in the disruption. he is a dentist and had to cancel appointments. do you have any sympathy with insulate britain? not at all. i'm all for protecting the planet, reducing our carbon footprint.
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it's caused such a huge amount of inconvenience and just driving past, if you see a row of cars, i'm sure in those cars you will have nhs workers trying to get to hospitals. they seem to have no consideration for that and have blocked everything off to make the point. it is a valid point but there must be a better way. the group wants the government to commit to insulating the country's homes which it claims are the least energy efficient in europe. the government has tried injunctions, threatening prison sentences and fines but that hasn't stopped them. further legislation is planned which could mean months in jail or unlimited fines. is it right people should be pulling protests out of the roads? i think we need to make sure our roads are running. drivers have started trying
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to remove protesters themselves. the authorities continue to struggle to prevent the demonstrations. craig is a spokesperson for insulate britain. what are you trying to achieve here because you are not exactly winning hearts and minds are you out there? i hope you guys in the public are aware of what we are trying to achieve it. we have to cut our co2 emissions and it's a legally binding issue for the government. and we have come with a plan that is the cheapest way to pound for pound to do this. it will get emissions down 15% which is the equivalent of taking 15 million cars off the road. it will create half a million quality jobs it will create half a million qualityjobs all over the country which will help boris to level up.
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it will stop 95 people dying every day from fuel poverty, take 7 million people out of fuel poverty. we want the government to commit to insulating all social housing by 2025 and then all houses by 2030. we have among the worst housing stock in europe and it'sjust have among the worst housing stock in europe and it's just inexcusable that this has not been looked at decades ago. that this has not been looked at decades ago-— that this has not been looked at decades ago. what you are doing, reall , is decades ago. what you are doing, really, is obscuring _ decades ago. what you are doing, really, is obscuring that _ decades ago. what you are doing, j really, is obscuring that message, aren't you? because in reality what is being picked up and what is making people talk is the disruption or causing not only to people potluck lives and livelihood but also blocking people from getting too sick relatives, and in some cases blocking emergency services as well. ~ ., well. winter said when that there would be issues _ well. winter said when that there would be issues with _ well. winter said when that there would be issues with disrupting i well. winter said when that there i would be issues with disrupting the public — we understood when planning death. we don't want to do that, but we have thought that the press can
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we have thought that the press can we have thought that the press can we have just got such quality press in this country, the bbc being a shining light around the world. we kind of thought that after the initial way of inconveniencing people that the press would start asking themselves why are we doing this? why do we feel the need to do this? why do we feel the need to do this? and the thousands of people who have given up theirjobs, but careers on hold, but business is on hold to come here. as sir david said recently, the next four years are crucial to the future of humanity. we are asking the deep underlying questions about government in action rather than i have... the questions about government in action rather than i have. . ._ rather than i have... the problem there with — rather than i have... the problem there with all _ rather than i have... the problem there with all due _ rather than i have... the problem there with all due respect - rather than i have... the problem there with all due respect is at. rather than i have... the problem | there with all due respect is at the media does not work like that. we are seeing pictures of a woman desperate to get her 81—year—old mother who is sick in ambulance going to hospital. that's what the media will pick up on. that's what
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i'm trying to explain to you, a lot of people saying the way that you are going about this is obscuring what you are trying to achieve by creating a different news story in the news cycle. do you think there is a different way to get your message across that is not going to anger and disrupt so many people's lives? ii anger and disrupt so many people's lives? ., , , ., , ., lives? if only. i wish there was and i would lives? if only. i wish there was and i would love _ lives? if only. i wish there was and i would love for _ lives? if only. i wish there was and i would love for somebody - lives? if only. i wish there was and i would love for somebody to - lives? if only. i wish there was and j i would love for somebody to come lives? if only. i wish there was and i i would love for somebody to come up with a great suggestion, because we have tried lobbying, tried targeting political leaders, government departments, people who have been doing this for two, three, four or five decades. we know from history that disruptive actions work. the government forcing our hand because they are not taking the biggest threat to humanity seriously. they have come up with statements that are wishy—washy but the policies would buy 3,000,004 insulate your house, and will insulate one house out of 500 in the country. that's a
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joke. out of 500 in the country. that's a 'oke. ., , ., . out of 500 in the country. that's a 'oke. . , ., . , . out of 500 in the country. that's a 'oke. . , , . ., joke. the ambulance service have said that a _ joke. the ambulance service have said that a delay _ joke. the ambulance service have said that a delay to _ joke. the ambulance service have said that a delay to us _ joke. the ambulance service have said that a delay to us reaching i said that a delay to us reaching someone who needs our care can cost someone who needs our care can cost someone who needs our care can cost lives. if you had a sick relative who was dying in ambulance trying to get through with you because the disruption that you have caused in the last few days knowing that? would you have a policy that we let all blue lake vehicles through. — blue light. all blue lake vehicles through. - blue liaht. , ., all blue lake vehicles through. - blue light-— blue light. hundreds of meters behind the _ blue light. hundreds of meters behind the traffic _ blue light. hundreds of meters behind the traffic jam, - blue light. hundreds of meters behind the trafficjam, you - blue light. hundreds of meters i behind the trafficjam, you cannot let them through without letting other cars through, what do you do? are you going to let me answer the question? i was midway through and you jumped in. question? i was midway through and youjumped in. if you question? i was midway through and you jumped in. if you ask me a question let me answer it. all blue light services are extremely professional and they fight through traffic jams stay professional and they fight through trafficjams stay in and day out. whenever a blue light vehicle comes anywhere near our protesters we let them through, that has been done day in and day out throughout our
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protest that will continue to be done. . ~ protest that will continue to be done. . ,, ,., protest that will continue to be done. . ~' ,. , protest that will continue to be done. . ,, y., , . protest that will continue to be done. . ,, , . .,~ done. thank you very much, take care gre: from done. thank you very much, take care greg from insulate _ done. thank you very much, take care greg from insulate britain. _ a former facebook employee has accused the company of prioritising profits over stopping hate speech and misinformation. frances haugen worked as a product manager on the civic integrity team at facebook, but left earlier this year. in an interview with 60 minutes on cbs news she confirmed she was the source of a series of anonymous leaks published in the wall streetjournal over the past three weeks they've been dubbed the facebook files. you have your phone, you might see only 100 pieces of content if you sit and scroll for, you know, five minutes. but facebook has thousands of options to show you. how facebook is eking out that content today is it is optimising for content that gets engagement. a reaction. but its own research is showing that content that is hateful, that is divisive, that is polarising — it's easier to inspire people to anger than it is to other emotions.
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misinformation, angry content is enticing to people... very enticing. it keeps them on the platform. yes. facebook has realised that if they change the algorithm to be safer people will spend less time on the site, they will click on less ads, they will make less money. facebook says leaks were misleading and glossed over positive research conducted by the company. during the 60 minute interview ms haugen also claimed that after the 2020 election facebook disbanded the civil integrity team she worked on that was designed to stop dangerous misinformation and extremism on the platform a decision she claims contributed to the january six capitol hill riots. here's facebook's communication director nick clegg responding to that claim in an interview with cnn. i think if the assertion is that january the 6th can be explained because of social media ijust think that is ludicrous. the responsibility for the violence of january the 6th, the insurrection
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on that day, lies squarely with the people who inflicted the violence and those who encourage them. i think it would be too easy, surely, to suggest with a tweak to an algorithm somehow all of the disfiguring, polarisation in us politics was suddenly evaporate. i think it absolves people of asking them the harder questions about the historical, cultural, social, economic reasons that have led to the politics that we have in the us today. 77,000 new infections in the latest period. being an average of 34,160 new cases per day in the last week. 33 deaths were reported in the last 24 hour period, that is people who died within 28 days of a positive covid test although some data has been delayed. it means on average
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111 deaths were announced every day in the past week. the latest figures on those being treated in hospital and percentage of people vaccinated have not been made available yet to us, we will bring them to you as and when we get them. scientists in a new study have successfully treated a patient with severe depression by using a so called "pacemakerfor the brain". the surgically implanted device tapped into the specific brain circuit involved in depressive brain patterns and reset them. researchers said the result could be transformative for patients with long term, treatment restistant depression joining me now is dr andrew krystal, who is an author on the study and a professor of psychiarty at the university of california, san francisco. so good to have a good news story to talk about. let me ask you first of all to explain the science behind what this does.— all to explain the science behind what this does. ., ,, , ., , . what this does. thank you very much. what we did — what this does. thank you very much. what we did is — what this does. thank you very much. what we did is based _ what this does. thank you very much. what we did is based on _ what this does. thank you very much. what we did is based on what - what this does. thank you very much. what we did is based on what we - what this does. thank you very much. what we did is based on what we do i what we did is based on what we do in epilepsy patients but they are trying to understand seizure
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activity happening to be able to intervene and fix it. we used a similar procedure in people with depression to be able to look at the effects of stimulating some of the most promising regions in the brain with the hope that we would also be able to record brain political activity as a means of detecting depression. this is a uniquely personalised approach and you try to figure out where best to stimulate and where to report from to detect the depression. and in this patient we found that there was one particular region of the brain where we stimulated that she had a profound and immediate improvement in her depression. we also found that from another region could detect the depression and that was connected to the region we were stimulate them from so it made us think about where he could stimulate and approve symptoms and normalise
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this markerfor and approve symptoms and normalise this marker for depression. and approve symptoms and normalise this markerfor depression. and then we put those together in a device like a pacemaker that monitors the brain activity in the region where we can detect depression — depression and when it senses depression and when it senses depression triggers treatment in a specific site that helps and therefore leads to improvement in therefore leads to improvement in the has improved the long—term. this the has improved the long-term. this is actuall the has improved the long—term. this is actually incredible. obviously very specific case and study but do you think going forward this can be used to treat these kinds of mental health issues? will this change the way depression is treated or is it too early to say?— way depression is treated or is it too early to say? this is something that is done _ too early to say? this is something that is done for— too early to say? this is something that is done for people _ too early to say? this is something that is done for people with - that is done for people with treatment resistant depression, people that have suffered horribly and have very poor quality of life and have very poor quality of life and have very poor quality of life and have failed all the treatments available. but the hope is that what we are going to learn from it will be usefulfor we are going to learn from it will be useful for people more broadly. we are going to learn from it will be usefulfor people more broadly. i think this does change how we treat
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depression going forward at least conceptually. one is that we understand personalisation and the ability to identify the specific part of the brain that is malfunctioning. and that we have shown proof of concept that it is possible to fix that. this has been something i've struggled with my whole career and seen people for 35 years in the clinic with depression. and they're all different, everybody of course is different. but people with depression have different sets of symptoms, well—known people with both look and respond differently to treatments and we had a very difficult time moving towards being able to capitalise on research to be able to capitalise on research to be able to capitalise on research to be able to figure out how to implement that and practice. this is an example that it can be done. amazing. so insightful to talk to you, thank you very much indeed.
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as we have been reporting this evening, whatsapp, instagram and facebook have all been down for over four hours. in a major global blackout. you should have reported being unable to access all three apps which of course are owned by facebook since about five o'clock this evening and as you might imagine there has been reaction on social media from other sites. let's take a look atjust a few. the world health organisation has tweeted because he can't go anywhere else, it says whatsapp down to my facebook down, instagram down to my facebook down, instagram down to my facebook down, whatsapp down but never let your mask down. i was getting the message on board. netflixjoined in as this with a reference to the latest series the squid games. the guy holding the other guy up is twitter and the other guy obviously is facebook. and twitter has tweeted hello literally everyone as people like the producers of this programme jumped ship from other social networking sites to twitter. we are
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not going anywhere here on bbc news, like it or not. we will be here with you all night so stay with us and now the weather. good evening, of sunshine and showers again today but things are going to change overnight because we're going to find rain moving in from the southwest and without rain the winds are going to be strengthening and that weather winter weather will be still around in some areas tomorrow as well. we are looking after the southwest in this area of cloud does not look very much, it will thicken up and to develop an area of low pressure and we will get a bit more shape to the rain and this is where we are expecting the rain to be around midnight. that rain pushes eastwards across england and wales and it's in that rain that we are going to find some very gusty winds and heavy bursts of rain as well. certainly keeping the temperatures up but scotland looks largely dry and here is go to be quite chilly in northern scotland, close to freezing. generally dry in northern ireland as well. the back of this rain across east anglia fairly quickly but the rain will linger in southeast
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scotland, much of northern england and north wales perhaps feeding into the midlands as well. all that whether weather is wrapped around the area of low pressure and around the area of low pressure and around the side of the low together with the side of the low together with the rain that we will have the strongest of the winds. they can feel particularly chilly. top numbers on the into the mid teens or so and get some sunshine and showers across more southern parts of england and wales and largely dry across scotland and also for northern ireland. that area of low pressure continue to bring some wind and rain into tuesday evening for allowed loud tuesday night before it moves away towards the continent. still quite windy down the eastern side of england in particular on wednesday morning and the cloud and showers should move away. sunshine coming out in the winds start to drop about coming in fairly quickly from the atlantic with more cloud and start to bring some rain it in northern ireland in particular during the afternoon. temperatures for much of england and wales in particular should be a bit higher we are expecting on tuesday. this is the situation as we head towards the middle later part of the week. this weather front will be bring rain
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toward scotland and northern ireland. higher pressure toward the south east of the uk commit means of got a southwest wind and that's going to draw in some warmer air, tropical maritime air and lifts the temperatures as well. still quite a lot of cloud around particularly for scotland and northern ireland. most of the rain but could be drizzling around some hills and coasts around western parts with brighter guys in such an temperatures climbing towards 19 or 20 celsius.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... facebook is having a bad day. a seriously bad day. a former employee has turned whistle—blower. she says the social media giant is misleading investors and putting profit over safety. the claims come on the day facebook and its network have said the services went off—line for hours in a major network back out affecting millions of users. the us accuses china of failing to uphold commitments that were agreed under a trade deal last year. leaked documents that form part of the so—called pandora papers has exposed the hidden wealth of dozens of world leaders, from the king ofjordan to the russian president and the check prime minister. and the scientists who unlocked the mystery of how our
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bodies feel warmth

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