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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  October 4, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, welcome to outside source, i'm ros atkins. the pandora papers exposed wealth from dozens of leaders. a major donor to the conservative party is also caught up in the scandal, and he denies any wrongdoing. journalists have been looking into 12 million documents in a year—long investigation. we will speak to one of them from bbc arabic. facebook is accused by one of its former execs of putting the growth of its business ahead of user safety. growth of its business ahead of user safe . w , growth of its business ahead of user
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safe . , ., , ., safety. facebook is realised that if they change _ safety. facebook is realised that if they change the — safety. facebook is realised that if they change the algorithm - safety. facebook is realised that if they change the algorithm to - safety. facebook is realised that if they change the algorithm to be . they change the algorithm to be safer, people will spend less time on the site and make less money. find on the site and make less money. and there's been — on the site and make less money. and there's been a massive outage of a number of platforms, potentially affecting millions of users. the bbc investigation has discovered how a major conservative party donor was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. documents reveal how mohammed amersi worked on a series of deals for swedish telecom company. the company was later fined almost $1 billion for bribery. mr amersi denies wrongdoing. bbc worked with the
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guardian on this investigation. mohamed amersi is wealthy and well—connected. here he is talking about the dangers of corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life. so, where did his wealth come from? some of it comes from this company in sweden, a company fined almost $1 billion for bribery. telia was prosecuted over a corrupt telecoms deal. the firm paid $220 million to an offshore company secretly controlled by gulnara karimova, the daughter of the then president of uzbekistan. the american authorities described it as a $220 million bribe. we have obtained documents showing how mr amersi was involved in the deal in one e—mail, a telia boss writes...
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mr amersi responds... and here's mr amersi's invoice for his part in project uzbekistan. he got a success fee of $500,000 for his work. mr amersi's lawyers said the offshore company had been vetted and approved by telia and its involvement did not raise any red flags to mr amersi. all of these matters because he has given more than half a million to the conservative party. we've got details the payments included expenses for lab risk — — lavish corporate entertainment. they were not evidenced by copies of receipts. the internal report recommended tele a's relationship to terminated. who is
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mr x y? that is mohammed amersi. he has been involved in one of of the biggest scandals _ has been involved in one of of the biggest scandals we _ has been involved in one of of the biggest scandals we have - has been involved in one of of the biggest scandals we have seen . has been involved in one of of the biggest scandals we have seen in | biggest scandals we have seen in sweden. and understand the whole context. mr sweden. and understand the whole context. ~ �* , �* , sweden. and understand the whole context. ~ �* ., , , sweden. and understand the whole context. ~ ~ . , , context. mr amersi's lawyers it says his fees were _ context. mr amersi's lawyers it says his fees were entirely _ context. mr amersi's lawyers it says his fees were entirely in _ context. mr amersi's lawyers it says his fees were entirely in keeping - his fees were entirely in keeping with practice and telia did not require site of the receipts. they say it's entirely false to suggest his contract was terminated. all of this matters because mr amersi has given more than half £1 million to the conservative party. this morning, borisjohnson gave his reaction. i see that story today, but all i can say on that one is that all these donations are vetted in the normal way in accordance with rules that were set up under the labour government. so, we vetted them the whole time. a conservative spokesman said
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government policy is in no way influenced by the donations the party receives. they are entirely separate. "we are motivated by the priorities of the british public acting in the national interest." richard bilton, bbc news. this is one of many revelations coming from the pandora papers, which have expose the dealings of hundreds of world leaders, politicians and billionaires. more than 600 journalists and 117 countries have been finding stories that are being published this week. a bbc investigation discovered one.... let's speak to the bbc�*s and
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the verity. what more can you tell us? this the verity. what more can you tell us? �* , , ., ., the verity. what more can you tell us? as you mentioned, that's bought time with three _ us? as you mentioned, that's bought time with three tory _ us? as you mentioned, that's bought time with three tory prime _ us? as you mentioned, that's bought time with three tory prime minister l time with three tory prime minister is, time with three tory prime minister �*s, including borisjohnson. the documents we've got show her wealth comes from her husband. 0ne email describes her as financially supported, another as a housewife. her husband is a finance minister who came to london in 200a. documents show he's continued to do business with people close to the russian government. we spoke to experts on this who said they would ask themselves if he's not identified as a boner, why? why is he willing to have his name alongside hers? =
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he willing to have his name alongside hers?— he willing to have his name alongside hers? he willing to have his name alonuside hers? ., ., ., ., �* , alongside hers? - - as a donor. any of her political _ alongside hers? - - as a donor. any of her political donations _ alongside hers? - - as a donor. any of her political donations had - alongside hers? - - as a donor. any of her political donations had been i of her political donations had been funded by improper _ of her political donations had been funded by improper means - of her political donations had been funded by improper means are - funded by improper means are infected by the influence of anything else. donations to the conservative party our interest. and comply fully with the law, and they say fundraising is legitimate part of the democratic process. later we will be reacting to some of the current and former leaders. there is a lot more — current and former leaders. there is a lot more on _ current and former leaders. there is a lot more on them _ current and former leaders. there is a lot more on them and _ current and former leaders. there is a lot more on them and what - current and former leaders. there is a lot more on them and what they . a lot more on them and what they reveal over the coming days. be more revelations. that's .com/ news. — — bbc .com. facebook, instagram and what staff are suffering interruptions. as you can see,
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complete outage. all three are operated by facebook, which is that it's aware of the issue — — whatsapp. let's bring in the bbc�*s technology reporter. chris, what's going on? it’s technology reporter. chris, what's auoin on? v ~' , technology reporter. chris, what's uaoinon? v ~' , ., technology reporter. chris, what's uaoinon? h ~' , ., going on? it's cold turkey for those of us who are _ going on? it's cold turkey for those of us who are social— going on? it's cold turkey for those of us who are social media addicts. j of us who are social media addicts. facebook, instagram, whatsapp, these pic of bill apps with billions of user were out at around four o'clock. why it happened, still a lot of speculation. some people pointing to dns, the system that turns human readable site addresses into addresses that computers can deal with. but really, all facebook is doing is saying they're sorry and
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they're working on it. if you try and log on, you just get nothing. is and log on, you just get nothing. is this a problem that specific to facebook and the entities that it owns, or are there other services that are caught up in this? that owns, or are there other services that are caught up in this?- that are caught up in this? at the moment, that are caught up in this? at the moment. this — that are caught up in this? at the moment, this looks _ that are caught up in this? at the moment, this looks very - that are caught up in this? at the moment, this looks very much i that are caught up in this? at the i moment, this looks very much like it's a facebook problem. we have seen with these kind of incidents a whole range of different services, if you like. what tends to be behind it are companies that provide services, for example, things like dns, to a whole range of different websites. we saw that with two outages over the summer. sort of a summer season of websites not working, and that was mostly because of companies who provided services to different organisations. help of companies who provided services to different organisations.— to different organisations. help me understand this- _ to different organisations. help me understand this- facebook-
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to different organisations. help me understand this- facebook owns i to different organisations. help me . understand this- facebook owns these understand this— facebook owns these three apps and websites. when i use them, they feel completely disconnected from each other, but behind the scenes, is there technology intertwined? that would seem to be the _ technology intertwined? that would seem to be the conclusion. - technology intertwined? that would seem to be the conclusion. i - seem to be the conclusion. i hesitate to speculate on an internal workings of facebook. i mean, one thing that was shared on twitter was some employees were having difficulties with internal systems. to answer your question honestly, i'm not sure how their infrastructures are arranged, but it seems that something is vital to all those three to services that has gone wrong. those three to services that has gone wrong-— those three to services that has ”onewron. . , . gone wrong. thank you very much, chris. the president — — let's return to washington. the us trade representative says there are more
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direct trade talks to come between the us and china.— direct trade talks to come between the us and china. trade and economic relationship is — the us and china. trade and economic relationship is one _ the us and china. trade and economic relationship is one of— the us and china. trade and economic relationship is one of profound - relationship is one of profound consequence. as the two largest economies in the world, how we relate to the each other does not just affect our countries, it impacts the entire world and billions of workers. this bilateral relationship is complex and competitive. president biden welcomes that competition to support american workers, grow our economy and createjobs at american workers, grow our economy and create jobs at home. american workers, grow our economy and createjobs at home. he believes we need to manage the competition responsibly and ensure that it is fair. , ., , ., ., fair. divided administration has ke -t fair. divided administration has kept sanctions _ fair. divided administration has kept sanctions on _ fair. divided administration has kept sanctions on china, - fair. divided administration has kept sanctions on china, but i fair. divided administration has - kept sanctions on china, but donald trump responded with sanctions. more than half of what china and the us cell each other has at some form of tariff on it. let's bring in barbara
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plitt usher. can you help me fresh out — — flush out what america is accusing china of? out - - flush out what america is accusing china of?— out - - flush out what america is accusing china of? catherine tai was referrin: to accusing china of? catherine tai was referring to a — accusing china of? catherine tai was referring to a trade _ accusing china of? catherine tai was referring to a trade deal— accusing china of? catherine tai was referring to a trade deal in the - referring to a trade deal in the trump administration to end the trade war, and one commitment that china made was to buy an extra $200 billion worth of manufactured industries. the administration says it has not made that goal. they haven't said how big the shortfall is, but it's haven't said how big the shortfall is, but its estimated only around 60%, so that will be one of the things that catherine tai will be raising. frank discussions happening relatively soon. help raising. frank discussions happening relatively soon.— relatively soon. help me understand because it was _ relatively soon. help me understand because it was difficult _ relatively soon. help me understand because it was difficult to _ relatively soon. help me understand because it was difficult to keep - because it was difficult to keep track of all this. the us and china did sign a creed deal of sorts during the trump administration — —
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trade deal. during the trump administration - - trade deal. ~ �* , ., trade deal. well, it's not... it will continue _ trade deal. well, it's not... it will continue with _ trade deal. well, it's not... it will continue with this. - trade deal. well, it's not... it will continue with this. the i trade deal. well, it's not... it| will continue with this. the big question whether it will be around two of negotiations. which given an advantage of the global marketplace. miss tai indicated that will not happen, and she said there's no indication that the chinese are interested. she will raise those concerns when she has talks, but she will be focusing specific the on the trade deal that has already been negotiated. 0therwise, trade deal that has already been negotiated. otherwise, the focus is going to be on improving american competitiveness at home and also on coordinating allies in terms of fair
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trade. just briefly, i coordinating allies in terms of fair trade. just briefly,— trade. just briefly, i think this is where joe _ trade. just briefly, i think this is where joe biden's _ trade. just briefly, i think this is where joe biden's expiration - trade. just briefly, i think this is where joe biden's expiration to | trade. just briefly, i think this is i where joe biden's expiration to see wherejoe biden's expiration to see china as a rival because it gets difficult because he has to get into detail now. ., ., ., , ., detail now. that whole rival but not enemy approach — detail now. that whole rival but not enemy approach has _ detail now. that whole rival but not enemy approach has not _ detail now. that whole rival but not enemy approach has not been - detail now. that whole rival but not enemy approach has not been very| enemy approach has not been very successful. it depends on china compartmental mental lies in different areas in the same way the us does. confrontational when they have to be, cooperative when they can be on mutual interest. the chinese have been saying tone down your rhetoric, change your rhetoric before we work with you. there's hope on a practical issue like trade, if the biden administration and recognises the trade has to continue, there will be a so—called decoupling and there'll be some room from progress. in terms of actual results coming from other issues
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have not been promising. barbara, thank ou have not been promising. barbara, thank you very _ have not been promising. barbara, thank you very much _ have not been promising. barbara, thank you very much indeed. - have not been promising. barbara, thank you very much indeed. we . have not been promising. barbara, - thank you very much indeed. we heard earlier about facebook�*s outage issues. in a completely separate development, a former facebook employee has accused the company of prioritising... she left earlier this year and prioritising... she left earlier this yearand in prioritising... she left earlier this year and in an interview with 60 minutes, she confirmed she was the source of a series of anonymous leaks published in the wall street journal. they've been dubbed the facebook files. here's some of what francis told 60 minutes. you facebook files. here's some of what francis told 60 minutes.— facebook files. here's some of what francis told 60 minutes. you may see onl 100 francis told 60 minutes. you may see only 100 pieces _ francis told 60 minutes. you may see only 100 pieces of— francis told 60 minutes. you may see only 100 pieces of content. _ francis told 60 minutes. you may see only 100 pieces of content. facebook| only 100 pieces of content. facebook has thousands of options. how it is picking out that content is it is optimising for content that gets engagement. but its own research is
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showing that content is hateful and divisive and polarising, it's easier to inspire people to anger than it is to other emotions. misinformation, angry content is enticing — misinformation, angry content is enticing to people? xbier? misinformation, angry content is enticing to people? very enticing. and kee -s enticing to people? very enticing. and keeps them _ enticing to people? very enticing. and keeps them on _ enticing to people? very enticing. and keeps them on the _ enticing to people? very enticing. and keeps them on the platform. | enticing to people? very enticing. - and keeps them on the platform. yes, facebook is realised _ and keeps them on the platform. ye: facebook is realised that if they change the algorithm, people will click on less ads and make less money. click on less ads and make less mone . , ., , ., ~ money. the documents that she leaked show that facebook _ money. the documents that she leaked show that facebook treated _ show that facebook treated celebrities and politicians differently to everyone else, with different rules governing what those people could post. the leaks revealed facebook is facing a lawsuit from some of its own shareholders over the company's $5 billion payment to withdrawal the cambridge scandal. they claimed it was an attempt to protect mark zuckerberg from personal liability. there's a leak about instagram that shows facebook has not shared findings from its on studies showing
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the app is toxic for teenagers. facebook play down any negative effects on its users, but this study found that 32% of teenage girls surveyed said when they felt bad about their bodies, instagram made them feel worse. francis haugen will be testifying before a senate subcommittee on tuesday. here's the response to all of this from technology researcher stephanie hair. i technology researcher stephanie hair. ., technology researcher stephanie hair. ~' , ., , , ., hair. i think the problem is that we have heard — hair. i think the problem is that we have heard these _ hair. i think the problem is that we have heard these stories _ hair. i think the problem is that we have heard these stories and - have heard these stories and sewed many _ have heard these stories and sewed many different _ have heard these stories and sewed many different ways. _ have heard these stories and sewed many different ways. what's - have heard these stories and sewedj many different ways. what's helpful if she _ many different ways. what's helpful if she managed _ many different ways. what's helpful if she managed to _ many different ways. what's helpful if she managed to get _ many different ways. what's helpful if she managed to get so _ many different ways. what's helpful if she managed to get so many- if she managed to get so many documents _ if she managed to get so many documents. but— if she managed to get so many documents. but these - if she managed to get so many. documents. but these problems if she managed to get so many- documents. but these problems are known _ documents. but these problems are known and — documents. but these problems are known and facebook's _ documents. but these problems are known and facebook's users - documents. but these problems are known and facebook's users i - documents. but these problems are known and facebook's users i thinkl known and facebook's users i think have accepted _ known and facebook's users i think have accepted a _ known and facebook's users i think have accepted a certain _ known and facebook's users i think have accepted a certain amount - known and facebook's users i think have accepted a certain amount ofl have accepted a certain amount of harm _ have accepted a certain amount of harm in_ have accepted a certain amount of harm in exchange _ have accepted a certain amount of harm in exchange for— have accepted a certain amount of harm in exchange for the - have accepted a certain amount of harm in exchange for the benefits| harm in exchange for the benefits that come — harm in exchange for the benefits that come from _ harm in exchange for the benefits that come from the _ harm in exchange for the benefits that come from the convenience i harm in exchange for the benefits| that come from the convenience it offers _ that come from the convenience it offers it's— that come from the convenience it offers. it's really— that come from the convenience it offers. it's really about _ that come from the convenience it offers. it's really about is- offers. it's really about is facebook _ offers. it's really about is facebook breaking - offers. it's really about is facebook breaking any. offers. it's really about is- facebook breaking any laws? they offers. it's really about is— facebook breaking any laws? they say they're _ facebook breaking any laws? they say they're doing — facebook breaking any laws? they say they're doing everything _ facebook breaking any laws? they say they're doing everything they- facebook breaking any laws? they say they're doing everything they can - they're doing everything they can publicly— they're doing everything they can publicly to — they're doing everything they can publicly to stop _ they're doing everything they can publicly to stop these _ they're doing everything they can publicly to stop these harms, - they're doing everything they can publicly to stop these harms, but behind _ publicly to stop these harms, but behind the —
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publicly to stop these harms, but behind the scenes, _ publicly to stop these harms, buti behind the scenes, acknowledging that they— behind the scenes, acknowledging that they aren't, _ behind the scenes, acknowledging that they aren't, that's _ behind the scenes, acknowledging that they aren't, that's potentiallyj that they aren't, that's potentially lawbreaking _ that they aren't, that's potentially lawbreaking. in _ that they aren't, that's potentially lawbreaking. in terms _ that they aren't, that's potentially lawbreaking. in terms of - lawbreaking. in terms of generalised, _ lawbreaking. in terms of generalised, facebook. lawbreaking. in terms of - generalised, facebook doesn't lawbreaking. in terms of _ generalised, facebook doesn't care and there _ generalised, facebook doesn't care and there is— generalised, facebook doesn't care and there is no— generalised, facebook doesn't care and there is no law— generalised, facebook doesn't care and there is no law for— generalised, facebook doesn't care and there is no law for that. - generalised, facebook doesn't care and there is no law for that. it's - and there is no law for that. it's up and there is no law for that. it's up for— and there is no law for that. it's up for all— and there is no law for that. it's up for all of— and there is no law for that. it's up for all of us _ and there is no law for that. it's up for all of us to _ and there is no law for that. it's up for all of us to ask why- and there is no law for that. it's up for all of us to ask why are i up for all of us to ask why are we using _ up for all of us to ask why are we using this — up for all of us to ask why are we using this company _ up for all of us to ask why are we using this company when - up for all of us to ask why are we using this company when it - using this company when it makes this product— using this company when it makes this product that _ using this company when it makes this product that we _ using this company when it makes this product that we know- using this company when it makes this product that we know does i using this company when it makesl this product that we know does the things— this product that we know does the things that — this product that we know does the things that it — this product that we know does the things that it does? _ this product that we know does the things that it does?— things that it does? facebook has resonded things that it does? facebook has responded to _ things that it does? facebook has responded to the _ things that it does? facebook has responded to the claims - things that it does? facebook has responded to the claims made i things that it does? facebook has responded to the claims made in| responded to the claims made in the leaks. it's director said during the 60 minutes interview, francis haugen claimed after the 2020 election, facebook disbanded the civil integrity team she had worked on and it was designed to stop dangerous misinformation and extremism. a decision she claims contributed to the storming of the capitol in washington onjanuary the 6th. let's hearfrom facebook's
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communications collector respond to that claim — — director. i communications collector respond to that claim - - director.— that claim - - director. i think if the assertion _ that claim - - director. i think if the assertion is, _ that claim - - director. i think if the assertion is, i _ that claim - - director. i think if the assertion is, ijust _ that claim - - director. i think if the assertion is, i just think - the assertion is, ijust think that's ludicrous. the responsibility for the violence onjanuary that's ludicrous. the responsibility for the violence on january the that's ludicrous. the responsibility for the violence onjanuary the 6th and the insurrection on that day lies squarely with the people who inflicted the violence and those who encourage them. i think it would be too easy to suggest that with a tweak to an algorithm, somehow all the disfiguring polarisation would evaporate. i think it evolves people of passing the harder questions about the reasons that have led to the politics that we have in the us today. the politics that we have in the us toda . ,, ., the politics that we have in the us toda . . ., . the politics that we have in the us toda . ,, ., . ., today. senior tech reporter for the wall street _ today. senior tech reporter for the wall street journal, _ today. senior tech reporter for the wall street journal, one _ today. senior tech reporter for the wall street journal, one of - today. senior tech reporter for the wall street journal, one of the - wall streetjournal, one of the reporters who worked on the facebook files. sam, thank you very much. what do you make of the defence that facebook is putting out? well. what do you make of the defence that facebook is putting out?— facebook is putting out? well, what i can talk about _ facebook is putting out? well, what i can talk about is _ facebook is putting out? well, what i can talk about is our _ facebook is putting out? well, what i can talk about is our reporting, - i can talk about is our reporting,
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and i think our reporting shows this deserves credit for hiring a team of researchers that are really looking into the harms that its platform might cause. we've reviewed thousands of documents showing the kind of in—depth research that they do. i think the question that raises, however, and the question miss haugen is raising is what actions is the company taking after the fact? and we see in the documents, plenty of staffers saying they've seen facebook being slow to respond or not respond to some of the recommendations, or only implement them in emergencies. help us understand — implement them in emergencies. help us understand more what you've learned about the way facebook handles misinformation when it becomes aware of it.— handles misinformation when it becomes aware of it. well, what we see through — becomes aware of it. well, what we see through these _ becomes aware of it. well, what we see through these documents - becomes aware of it. well, what we see through these documents is - becomes aware of it. well, what we | see through these documents is that a company is actually aware that its products and systems can fail and cause harm. for instance, there was
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plenty of evidence in the beginning of this year that facebook's comment sections on post from authoritative sources were swarming with comments opposed to vaccination. they were struggling to tackle this problem at the same time in public, mark zuckerberg was bragging about what facebook was doing to promote the vaccine. 0verand facebook was doing to promote the vaccine. over and over again, you see a disjuncture between facebook's public statements and what people inside the company are finding. while you and your colleagues at the journal are doing, for politicians also getting involved. francis haugen will speak at this subcommittee this week. how does the dimension of this play into the story? dimension of this play into the sto ? ~ , ., ., ., dimension of this play into the sto ? ~ i. ~ ., ., dimension of this play into the sto?~ «a, ., , story? well, you know, what happens next is really — story? well, you know, what happens next is really an _ story? well, you know, what happens next is really an open _ story? well, you know, what happens next is really an open question. - next is really an open question. it depends in part on how facebook
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responds going forward and it depends on what measures might be taken in law. there are certainly debates on both sides of the atlantic on how to handle social media and whether there needs to be new regulations. that's the kind of thing that presumably will come up in these hearings. if the kind of thing the eu and the uk have debated. so, there certainly could be action taken that would perhaps for some of the things that haugen is asking for. just for some of the things that haugen is asking for-— is asking for. just before i let you no. i'm is asking for. just before i let you go. i'm interested _ is asking for. just before i let you go. i'm interested how— is asking for. just before i let you go. i'm interested how you - is asking for. just before i let you go. i'm interested how you found j go. i'm interested how you found your dealings with facebook. the journal went to facebook and said that you have all these leaks showing all these things, how did facebook respond as a company is? the company was professional and we
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reflected their responses to our reporting in our stories. we went through them in detail and their responses are reflected there. that's about as much as i can say. thank you very much indeed, sam. you can read his reporting on the wall streetjournal website. pope francis and nearly a0 other religious leaders have called for urgent radical action to combat climate change. four weeks but for scott 22 — — sc cop26. the pope issued an appeal to save the planet from an unsent unprecedented ecological crisis. leaders from several religions were there, and so was the church of england's archbishop of canterbury. lode was the church of england's archbishop of canterbury. we need a -'l~ rimaue archbishop of canterbury. we need a pilgrimage to — archbishop of canterbury. we need a pilgrimage to a _ archbishop of canterbury. we need a pilgrimage to a clean _ archbishop of canterbury. we need a pilgrimage to a clean economy - archbishop of canterbury. we need a pilgrimage to a clean economy which j
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pilgrimage to a clean economy which decreases _ pilgrimage to a clean economy which decreases carbon emissions and increases — decreases carbon emissions and increases renewable energy development and use. we need a global— development and use. we need a global financial architecture which repents _ global financial architecture which repents of its past sins and is renewed _ repents of its past sins and is renewed to be the foundation of a green _ renewed to be the foundation of a green global economy. with that, there _ green global economy. with that, there must be a dramatic and rapid change _ there must be a dramatic and rapid change in _ there must be a dramatic and rapid change in taxation and trade rules. that promote green activity. the reliuious that promote green activity. iie: religious leaders that promote green activity. "iie: religious leaders want that promote green activity. i““i2 religious leaders want all government to take action to limit temperature rises to 1.5 celsius. before that big meeting in november. they urged wealthier nations to take the lead, describing climate change as a great threat. also at the
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vatican was the president of cop26. the crisis we face is grave. and it's of our making. it's a crisis built by human hands, and it is easy to feel overwhelmed by the challenge and the injustice of the situation where the poorest are suffering the most, having contributed the least to climate change. this appeal is a powerful call in support of those efforts, and i commit to working with you all to spread its message where the world decide the future of our planet and its people. and i request you to do the same. religious leaders committed to listen more to science and educate their communities, stressing the need for more sustainable lice files. — — lifestyle. later on, we will bring you the first in a new series where we look at the biggest carbon emitters in the world and
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what they're committing to do and actually doing. hello. it's been a day of sunshine and showers again today, but things are going to change overnight because we will find some rain moving in from the southwest. with that, the winds will strengthen. we're looking down to the southwest, this area doesn't look very much. it will thicken up and develop an area of low pressure and will give a bit more shape for the rain. that rain pushes eastwards across england and wales, and it's in that rain that we will find some gusty winds and heavy bursts of rain too. but scotland looks largely dry and here it's going to be quite chilly, close to
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freezing. should be generally dry. we'll see the back of this rain across east anglia and the southeast of england, but the rain will linger in southeast scotland, much of northern england and wales, perhaps the midlands as well. all that wet weather is wrapped around an area of low pressure, and it's around this side of the low that will have the strongest of the wind. top numbers are only going to be into the bit teens or so. we should get some sunshine and showers across england and wales. that area of low pressure will continue to bring wind and rain into tuesday evening for a while before it moves away towards the continent. still quite windy. the cloud and showers should move away and we get them some time coming out. cloud will start to bring some rain into northern ireland. but temperatures for much of england and wales in particular should be a bit
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higher than expected on tuesday. this is the situation as we head towards the middle and later part of the week. this will bring some rain toward scotland and northern ireland. the high pressure towards the southeast, which means we've got a south westerly winds that will draw in some warmer air. tropical maritime airand draw in some warmer air. tropical maritime air and lift the temperatures as well. there will be cloud around for scotland and northern ireland both on could be some drizzle around hills and coasts. temperatures are climbing close to 19 or 20 celsius.
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hello. this is outside source. leaked financial documents known as the pandora paper have exposed the secret wealth and financial dealings of a dozen of world leaders from the king ofjordan to vladimir putin. here in the uk, a major donated a party also caught up in the scandal he denies any wrongdoing. 0ver party also caught up in the scandal he denies any wrongdoing. over 650 generalists have been looking into 12 million documents in a year—long investigation. we will be speaking to one of them from bbc arabic. new zealand has admitted it can no longer get rid of the coronavirus and it's longer get rid of the coronavirus and its beginning to switch its strategy from elimination to suppression. strategy from elimination to suppression-— strategy from elimination to suppression. elimination was important — suppression. elimination was important because _ suppression. elimination was important because we - suppression. elimination was important because we did i suppression. elimination was |
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important because we did not suppression. elimination was - important because we did not have vaccines. now we do. so we can begin to change the way we do things. ahead of the global climate summit in glasgow we will bring it a a new series of videos looking at the big carbon and he will start with the biggest of them all. china. the secret dealings of hundreds of world leaders, politicians, and billionaires have been exposed in the biggest leak of offshore documents in history. the pandora papers include revelations about the king ofjordan, the president of kenya, and that an air pollutant. it's a leak of almost 12 million documents that reveals hidden wealth, tax avoidance, and in some cases money laundering. by some of the worlds richest and most powerful people. more than 600 generalists and 117 countries have been going through the files for months finding stories that have been published this week. that includes the family
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of this man came to's president who may have dominated the country but since independence and investigation reveals basically earned a network of offshore companies for decades. here is our kenyan reporter. at the very least it is very embarrassing to his legacy as he would be as transparent and possibly in trying to help the country out of corruption when he was running for office as required by law he said he set out all his assets and now that the public of public knowledge and reinventing the family has been keeping 13 companies in secret and tax havens and at least one of them run in a way in which its ownership cannot have been traced back to the family. we have a foundation where he's on mother has in the state as a direct beneficiary and upon her death the president to be the direct
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beneficiary and the value of this company is not known. there is a company is not known. there is a company now that his brother runs and has told us $30 million and the third one which has an ownership and won the family used to buy an apartment in the uk of at least $1 million and sell another question is why so much secrecy and the source of all this money. the president says he is currently abroad. we will give a comprehensive response when he returns. he does say the pandora papers will go a long way in enhancing the financial transparency and openness we require in kenya and around the globe. let's have a look at some of the other world leaders named in the pantera papers and their responses. the billionaire prime minister allegedly failed to declare an offshore investment company used to buy two villas in the south of france for more than $60 million. he says the reports are
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an attempt to discredit him before the upcoming election. the president and his family have long been accused of corruption and he has secretly been involved in property deals in the uk with more than $520 million. they had comment. russia's president has been linked to secret assets in monaco. this was the response to the kremlin. lode assets in monaco. this was the response to the kremlin. we did not see any hidden _ response to the kremlin. we did not see any hidden wealth _ response to the kremlin. we did not see any hidden wealth of _ response to the kremlin. we did not see any hidden wealth of putting's i see any hidden wealth of putting's in a circle. apparently publishing will continue. for now, we have not seen anything special. if there are serious publications that are based on something concrete and refer to something specific then we will be done with interest. so far, we see no reason. done with interest. so far, we see no reason-— done with interest. so far, we see no reason. ., ., ., , ., no reason. the pandora papers also reveal that — no reason. the pandora papers also reveal that this _ no reason. the pandora papers also reveal that this man, _ no reason. the pandora papers also reveal that this man, the _ no reason. the pandora papers also reveal that this man, the king - no reason. the pandora papers also reveal that this man, the king of. reveal that this man, the king of jordan secretly spent $10 million on a property empire in the uk and the us. it includes houses here in london and in malibu on the
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california coast. let us someone who's been working on the story. can you give us more details of the allegations?— you give us more details of the alleaations? , �*, ., , ,, :: :: allegations? yes. it's actually $100 million, that — allegations? yes. it's actually $100 million, that is _ allegations? yes. it's actually $100 million, that is their _ allegations? yes. it's actually $100 million, that is their estimated - million, that is their estimated figure of this secret property empire that spreads across around the world. so as you mentioned the us, uk, there is a $68 million villa complex on the in california and a multi—million dollar apartment in london and washington, dc and beat are properties that have been registered through tax havens and painting so you're able to hide the true owner and the ultimate owner of these companies. now, it's important to say that there is no evidence of any quality but in a poor country such as driving i think it has raised questions about the boundaries between the public purse and the royal paris and allegations that the palace has been quick to
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refute. ,, ., , ~ �* that the palace has been quick to refute. ,, ., , . �* ., ., refute. stay with us. we've had a full statement _ refute. stay with us. we've had a full statement on _ refute. stay with us. we've had a full statement on the _ refute. stay with us. we've had a full statement on the allegations | full statement on the allegations from the palace enjoyed them. it says media reports included inaccuracies and distracted and exaggerated facts. it goes on... if we bring you back in, let responsibly heard from thejordanian government and from thejordanians? as you say, that the government in the palace has called the reporting the palace has called the reporting the reporting defamatory and have said that they all the purchases have been made using his own private wealth and no public funds have been used at all for this and in fact the reason why they have used this offshore structure is these are properties that are used for oil
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visits, private visits, and the royal family's safety was the main goal here. now, local media has shied away from reporting on this. most of the media today has focused on unrelated positive stories about the king. however, we have heard about one news organization enjoyed and that david carry a report about the leaks and washington post reports that they received that this organization enjoyed and received a call from jordanian intelligence to remove the article. however, social media is buzz with talk and criticism about this secret property empire. 0thers criticism about this secret property empire. others have defended the king and he's obviously a rich man and has the right to use his wealth as he sees fit. we and has the right to use his wealth as he sees fit.— as he sees fit. we worked on the pandora papers _ as he sees fit. we worked on the pandora papers and _ as he sees fit. we worked on the pandora papers and this - as he sees fit. we worked on the | pandora papers and this particular story. what was the process you went through once given access? you
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story. what was the process you went through once given access?— through once given access? you will know generalists _ through once given access? you will know generalists are _ through once given access? you will know generalists are a _ through once given access? you will know generalists are a competitive i know generalists are a competitive bunch but it was a real fantastic process to go through with over 600 generalists from many news organizations around the world sifting through these millions of documents and slowly, painstakingly building the links between memes that have phone companies and silly painting a picture of many of these hidden assets and properties empires and it's been months and months of hard work and i would say he tuned because there are still big revelations to come. thank you. ensuring reporting. the latest global summit on climate change is approaching. copp 26 will be in glasgow in a few weeks. we hear a lot about the need for a global response to climate change but any response cannot work without the biggest emitters on board. any new series we will focus on them. a
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a look at the countries village produce half of the world emissions. any climate solution has to involve china, the us, europe, and india. we will start with the biggest inventor of all. china. it produces 27% of all of the world's here much more than half is — twice as much as any other country which is why china matters. asjohn kerry emphasized his opposite number in beijing. lode his opposite number in bei'ing. we are all his opposite number in beijing. 2 are all going to be dealing with the certainty for the rest of our lives. this challenge is as big as any that we face in a global basis. in china my friend plays a soup role. but it is china willing _ my friend plays a soup role. but it is china willing to _ my friend plays a soup role. but it is china willing to pay _ my friend plays a soup role. but it is china willing to pay that - is china willing to pay that critical role? industrialization has lifted millions of chinese out of poverty but to build china how its industry is happening? as the where with all the top emitters, and it is check what's been promised and what's being done. china has made a
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number of climate commitments. it's emissions have almost quadrupled since 1990 to about 1a billion tonnes of c02 per year. now it says emissions will peak before 2030. it's progress has shown a blue and it's on course to meet that target. right now china's emissions are going up unlike the us and eu. china has another aim, shown with a redline, it wants to be carbon neutral by 2060. for context, the us and eu are aiming for 2050. the president highlights correctly that western countries have been emitting high levels of carbon for far longer than china and in fact western industrialized economies were created on the back of fossil fuels and china says if the west once developing countries not to follow their example they should provide more financial support. developing countries need _ more financial support. developing countries need to _ more financial support. developing countries need to increase - more financial support. developing countries need to increase climate | countries need to increase climate ambition and action and make
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concrete efforts to help developing countries accelerate the transition to clean and low carbon development. the issue is that however the west benefited from fossil fuels in the past, analysts now suggest china's current plan will not be enough to avoid a dangerous degree of global warming. they argue china would need to follow the yellow line that you can see here. the think tank would sit like this. aha, can see here. the think tank would sit like this-— can see here. the think tank would sit like this. a simple mathematical fact that if china _ sit like this. a simple mathematical fact that if china does _ sit like this. a simple mathematical fact that if china does not _ sit like this. a simple mathematical fact that if china does not meet - sit like this. a simple mathematical fact that if china does not meet the | fact that if china does not meet the conditions until 2030| did not think we have anything like a 50—50 chance of limiting global warming to 1.5 celsius. ., , of limiting global warming to 1.5 celsius. . , ., ., , ., celsius. that is, china argues that it is acting — celsius. that is, china argues that it is acting but _ celsius. that is, china argues that it is acting but that _ celsius. that is, china argues that it is acting but that it's _ celsius. that is, china argues that it is acting but that it's harder- celsius. that is, china argues that it is acting but that it's harder on i it is acting but that it's harder on developing countries to do this for others. ., ., , developing countries to do this for others. . ., , . ., developing countries to do this for others. . ., , _, ., ., others. china has committed to move the carbon neutrality _
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others. china has committed to move the carbon neutrality in _ others. china has committed to move the carbon neutrality in the _ others. china has committed to move the carbon neutrality in the much - the carbon neutrality in the much shorter time span than what you might take many developed countries and that requires extraordinary hard efforts for china. we and that requires extraordinary hard efforts for china.— efforts for china. we have seen evidence of— efforts for china. we have seen evidence of how _ efforts for china. we have seen evidence of how hard _ efforts for china. we have seen evidence of how hard this - efforts for china. we have seen evidence of how hard this is. i evidence of how hard this is. china's efforts to tackle our one factor in energy shortages that have hit some of its industries. besides this china still does need to do more. for example, at the paris climate agreement all countries to submit a plan and china have missed the tentative deadline to submit a detailed plan. if you look at the climate action tracker website it ranks china's current plans overall as highly insufficient for keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees. at the heart of china's emissions are its coal plants. more than half of its coal plants. more than half of its energy comes from coal and china has pledged to cut coal consumption after 2036 and its recently committed not to build any new coal plants in other countries but new plans continue to be built in china
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itself. the group process 2a were approved in the first half of this year. that momentum behind coal with antenna's economy is hard to stop. here is the analyst.— here is the analyst. what is sto- -|n~ here is the analyst. what is stopping china _ here is the analyst. what is stopping china to _ here is the analyst. what is stopping china to go - here is the analyst. what isj stopping china to go further here is the analyst. what is i stopping china to go further in domestic coal is the fact that large sections of the economy is dependent on coal—fired power and a lot of people employed by coal. on coal-fired power and a lot of people employed by coal. another factor is manufacturing. _ people employed by coal. another factor is manufacturing. china - people employed by coal. another factor is manufacturing. china is l factor is manufacturing. china is often described as the world factory and as manufacturing has moved from the west emissions have as well. one estimate says 10% of china's emissions come from products made in china exploited and then consumed. those are some of the reasons for china's huge carbon footprint and what it does continue to invest in coal it's also investing in green technology. china is a world leader in solar power and build the equivalent of a new facility such as
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this every day for the last three years. of course, that reduces the need for coal.— years. of course, that reduces the need for coal. our solar plants can save 50 or— need for coal. our solar plants can save 50 or 60,000 _ need for coal. our solar plants can save 50 or 60,000 tonnes - need for coal. our solar plants can save 50 or 60,000 tonnes of - need for coal. our solar plants can save 50 or 60,000 tonnes of coal| save 50 or 60,000 tonnes of coal each year. i am proud to doing this job and working in this industry. china's investment in solar and wind is creating cheaper, better technology but that many countries can use. it's also the world leader in electric cars and producing nearly half of the global output in the last ten years. china is acting to soak up some of the carbon it produces by planting millions of trees and trying a greener landscape that does not have large amounts of natural forest and this image shows progress being made and plant cover worldwide increased over the 20 years with china and india leading the way. tree planting is no separate for is coming emissions and its approach to curbing them cuts to a conundrum. china's middle class is
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evidence of how industrialization has brought wealth and security to millions of people. right now china's government may well be the cost of cutting emissions has to be paid for by lower economic growth. some may argue that trade—off may soon go away. what they are tackling is a huge massive economy which is growing at 10% everything the year and they're trying to actually lift all of their population out of extreme poverty.— all of their population out of extreme poverty. which was their central goal- _ extreme poverty. which was their central goal. now, _ extreme poverty. which was their central goal. now, they've - extreme poverty. which was their| central goal. now, they've almost done that, then they can actually focus on how to reproduce energy. the issue is whether china reaches that point before it's too late for a mechanic. in a few minutes, i'll be speaking to a leading epidemiologist in new zealand because the government switched its covid—19 strategy from elimination to suppression and see if this epidemiologist — epidemiologist agrees.
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in the uk it is the conservative parties conference and richi sunak the finance minister has defended recent tax raises. and he says brexit is in the long term interest of the uk despite the current disruptions to fuel and food supplies. the political editor has the report from manchester. standing room ran out for the chancellor who let go of the purse strings during the pandemic. emerging today to remind this crowd his instinct is that the tax expense. just borrowing my money and stacking up bills for future generations to pay is not just economically irresponsible it is tomorrow. just economically irresponsible it is tomorrow-— just economically irresponsible it istomorrow. �* , ,, ., ., is tomorrow. and whilst i know tax rises are unpopular— is tomorrow. and whilst i know tax rises are unpopular some - is tomorrow. and whilst i know tax rises are unpopular some will - is tomorrow. and whilst i know taxj rises are unpopular some will even say unconservative. i will tell you what is unconservative. unfunded
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pledges, reckless borrowing and soaring debt. pledges, reckless borrowing and soaring debt-— soaring debt. coming out of the covid-19 emergency _ soaring debt. coming out of the covid-19 emergency has - soaring debt. coming out of the covid-19 emergency has put - soaring debt. coming out of the| covid-19 emergency has put new covid—19 emergency has put new strains on the economy everywhere. the changes of brexit blood pressure as well. we the changes of brexit blood pressure as well. ~ ., .,. the changes of brexit blood pressure as well. 2 . . ., , ., as well. we are facing challenges to su -l as well. we are facing challenges to supply chains. _ as well. we are facing challenges to supply chains. not _ as well. we are facing challenges to supply chains, notjust _ as well. we are facing challenges to supply chains, notjust here - as well. we are facing challenges to supply chains, notjust here but - supply chains, notjust here but right around the world. tackling the cost of living is notjust a political sound bite it's one of the essential missions of this conservative government. essential missions of this conservative covernment. a ,, , conservative government. making ends meet is getting — conservative government. making ends meet is getting harder _ conservative government. making ends meet is getting harder for _ conservative government. making ends meet is getting harder for so _ conservative government. making ends meet is getting harder for so many - meet is getting harderfor so many people like leslie. she works at manchester college but paid £5 to join this community grocer. that michelle, that means she can fill a basket for £3 per week. this unusual kind of shop on the open a year ago. its 10th branch is coming any day. just as jacob was confronted today, ministers cannot turn their faces
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away. even the most polished political script can be written in a moment. and what happens in the real world outside. we are here in the bbc news room. i story is that the biggest ever in of offshore data known as the pandora papers has exposed the secret wealth and financial dealings of dozens world leaders and the king ofjordan to vladimir putin. that to new zealand because there has been a major shift in covid—19 policy. after weeks of struggling to contain an outbreak of the delta variance, the government is abandoning its strategy to eliminate covid—19. here is the prime minister. igrui’ith strategy to eliminate covid-19. here is the prime minister.— is the prime minister. with this outbreak the _ is the prime minister. with this outbreak the return _ is the prime minister. with this outbreak the return to - is the prime minister. with this outbreak the return to zero - is the prime minister. with this outbreak the return to zero is l outbreak the return to zero is incredibly difficult. 0ur restrictions alone are not enough to achieve it quickly and in fact for
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this outbreak it's clear that long periods of restrictions has not got us to zero cases. but that is ok. elimination was important because we did not have vaccines. now we do. so, we can begin to change to way we do things. the so, we can begin to change to way we do thins. ., ., ., ,, do things. the elimination approach has been considered _ do things. the elimination approach has been considered a _ do things. the elimination approach has been considered a success - do things. the elimination approach| has been considered a success since the start of the pandemic and the country recorded 27 deaths and from more than six months there were no nolan locally transmitted cases at all and let a lot of the world was living under lockdown or restrictions new zealanders were doing this like going to concerts in restaurants and sports and so on. in august a single case of the dental variant was detected and that changed things. — belltown darien. auckland went into a lockdown that that did not stop the delta variance from spreading. from september 22 there were more than a thousand cases and this was the director general of health.— cases and this was the director general of health. what we need to do is look at _ general of health. what we need to do is look at all _ general of health. what we need to do is look at all the _ general of health. what we need to do is look at all the things - general of health. what we need to do is look at all the things we - general of health. what we need to do is look at all the things we can i do is look at all the things we can
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pull and it's more thanjust vaccination i think their border response and our community response and content tracing and then our vaccination response to how we manage and reduce the number of cases in the community. that manage and reduce the number of cases in the community.— cases in the community. that was september _ cases in the community. that was september the — cases in the community. that was september the 22nd. _ cases in the community. that was september the 22nd. that - cases in the community. that was september the 22nd. that same i cases in the community. that was - september the 22nd. that same week that outbreak spread beyond auckland. then this sunday, this was the prime minister. he auckland. then this sunday, this was the prime minister.— the prime minister. he had a different approach _ the prime minister. he had a different approach to - the prime minister. he had a| different approach to covid-19 different approach to covid—19 within our sites and in our hands. as we all look ahead and rethink about summer and the plans that we are making, make the first step a vaccine. it is the thing that will make those summer players possible. these tough measures to stamp out the parents have not brought the numbers all the way down and criticism of the zero covid—19 approach has grown. 0ne former prime minister called new zealand a smoker making them and many have been critical of the current markdowns which have been one of the strictest in the world and they may be
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protests. this was auckland on sunday and this was one of the potus organizers. i sunday and this was one of the potus or: anizers. ., sunday and this was one of the potus oruanizers. ., �* , sunday and this was one of the potus oruanizers. . �*, ., organizers. i feel that it's gone too far and _ organizers. i feel that it's gone too far and with _ organizers. i feel that it's gone too far and with the _ organizers. i feel that it's gone too far and with the lockdowns| organizers. i feel that it's gone - too far and with the lockdowns and constantly being put under these positions means ourjobs and livelihoods and businesses in the mental health of people is becoming quite evident now that it's really a breaking point. in quite evident now that it's really a breaking point-— quite evident now that it's really a breaking point. in march 2020 there were around — breaking point. in march 2020 there were around i _ breaking point. in march 2020 there were around 1 million _ breaking point. in march 2020 there were around 1 million of _ breaking point. in march 2020 there were around 1 million of them - breaking point. in march 2020 there were around 1 million of them living| were around 1 million of them living abroad and district border measures mean thousands of people had been unable to get home. one new zealander told the independent newspaper rates awful to feel... the government acknowledged that getting the number of cases down has come at a cost. but to some degree they have been the relative low number of deaths and infections. this new approach very much relies on vaccinations in the prime
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minister says lockdowns would only the and once 90% of the eligible population was vaccinated and it's not clear how long that will take and about 2 million new zealanders have been fully vaccinated and that's about a8% of the eligible population. a long way to go. we will speak to an epidemiologist who helped advised the government in its response. thank you forjoining us. do you agree with the prime minister's change of tactics? yes. the government _ minister's change of tactics? yes. the government had _ minister's change of tactics? i2; the government had signaled his change in approach some time ago and following a somewhat similar approach to singapore and australia and i think it's recognizing that elimination worked extremely well for the last 18 months and it's kept cases very well and in the longer term we did need to recommit more
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and of course we have high effective vaccination cell things have changed. almost onlyjust over 50% to be at the target. that's right. definitely the plan was to look more at reconnecting early next year so that it's been brought forward by a real challenge of trying to control the outbreak and let lisa was an infection became very established and marginalized in south auckland and marginalized in south auckland and was very hard to stamp out the last lines of transmission. . do and was very hard to stamp out the last lines of transmission.— last lines of transmission. . do you acce -t last lines of transmission. . do you accept the — last lines of transmission. . do you accept the criticism _ last lines of transmission. . do you accept the criticism from _ last lines of transmission. . do you accept the criticism from new - accept the criticism from new zealanders i brought that if the policy at home is going to shift perhaps a policy and who can come back should also shift soon? i think
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it was very — back should also shift soon? i think it was very much _ back should also shift soon? i think it was very much part _ back should also shift soon? i think it was very much part of— back should also shift soon? i think it was very much part of the - it was very much part of the medium—term strategy and was to greatly increase our return to new zealand and that will happen it would be much easierfor new zealanders to return. ii would be much easier for new zealanders to return.- would be much easier for new zealanders to return. if we go back several months _ zealanders to return. if we go back several months he _ zealanders to return. if we go back several months he said _ zealanders to return. if we go back several months he said in - zealanders to return. if we go back. several months he said in interviews you are hopeful that new zealanders could continue to keep the virus at close to zero. do you think now perhaps that was a negative assessment of the potency of delta? we are learning all the time about how effective vaccines are and i still think there is a? ks and we still think there is a? ks and we still don't know about the long—term effects of lung covid—19 and chronic effects of lung covid—19 and chronic effects and hopefully in the future we will have much more effective vaccines that can give a sterilizing immunity and we can take the same approach with pt measles and b have
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vaccines that prevent the transmission and that would be changing the equation more to what's looking at long—term elimination. i don't think that strategy is going. i think it's an option that new zealand will have that for the foreseeable future we are transitioning to a suppression approach. do you imagine using and getting to the point that the uk is apt with no restrictions in place anytime soon?— apt with no restrictions in place anytime soon? apt with no restrictions in place an ime soon? ., ., �* ,, anytime soon? now, i don't think so. i think we need _ anytime soon? now, i don't think so. i think we need to _ anytime soon? now, i don't think so. i think we need to keep _ anytime soon? now, i don't think so. i think we need to keep public- i think we need to keep public health and social measures working with vaccines to keep transmission at because they are still serious effects for some people for getting this infection.— this infection. thank you. you can aet this infection. thank you. you can get further _ this infection. thank you. you can get further analysis _ this infection. thank you. you can get further analysis from - this infection. thank you. you can get further analysis from outside i get further analysis from outside source whenever you want via various digital means. you can find it on a prayer while you can follow me on twitter at bbc was at as an tweet out all the different clips that we produce so if you want to find them
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all in one place it's not a bad place to start. thank you for watching. that evening. it's been a day of sunshine and showers at them today. things are going to change overnight because he will find some rain moving in from the southwest. with that rain the wind will be strengthening and the way to bring the weather will be around in some areas tomorrow as well. we are looking down to the southwest in this area does not look very much like it will thicken up and develop an area of low pressure and we will get more shape to the rain and this is being we are expecting the rain to be around that night. it pushes east across england and wales and it's been we will find some windy and heavy rain as well. it will keep the temperature up but scotland looks dry and here it will be called in northern scotland close to
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freezing and should be general each i am ireland as well. we will see the back of the rain in the southeast fairly quickly but it will linger in in scotland and much of northern england and wales feeding infant mittens as well and elect whether it's wrapped around an area of low pressure and it's iran decide together with the rain we will have the strongest wind. it will make you feel called and top members will be in the mid teens or so and he will get some sunshine and showers across southern parts of england and wales and it's dry across scotland and for northern ireland. the area of low pressure will bring when you mess and rain into tuesday evening for a while before it moves away towards the continent. it still windy and the continent. it still windy and the eastern side in particular on wednesday morning and they showers should move away and begin sunshine coming out but then coming in quickly from the atlantic we have got more cloudiness which will bring rain into northern ireland and during the afternoon. temperatures for much of england and wales should be a bit higher. this is the
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situation as we head towards the middle part of the week and a leather friend middle part of the week and a leatherfriend has been bringing some rain and high pressure towards the south east of the uk it means we have a south westerly wind and it will draw in warm air and tropical maritime airand will draw in warm air and tropical maritime air and left temperatures as well. they will be a lot of cloudiness around for scotland and northern ireland and this is where we have most of the rain with drizzle around some hills and the brightest skies and sunshine towards the east but temperatures will be claiming close to 19 why 20
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the chancellor announces half—a—billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he'll only consider cutting taxes, when the economy is back on track. whatsapp, facebook and instagram have all gone off—line for users around the world. facebook, which owns all three, apologises in a post on its rival, twitter. the big tory party donor involved in one of europe has met biggest corruption scandals. i europe has met biggest corruption scandals. ., ., ., scandals. i need to go to the hospital. _ scandals. i need to go to the hospital, will— scandals. i need to go to the hospital, will you _ scandals. i need to go to the hospital, will you please - scandals. i need to go to the i hospital, will you please move scandals. i need to go to the - hospital, will you please move your cars, please! the hospital, will you please move your cars. please!— cars, please! the climate activist causina cars, please! the climate activist causing these — cars, please! the climate activist causing these scenes _ cars, please! the climate activist causing these scenes and - cars, please! the climate activist causing these scenes and many i cars, please! the climate activist - causing these scenes and many more like it. we will be speaking to
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insulate britain just after like it. we will be speaking to insulate britainjust after 8:30pm.

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