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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 4, 2021 5:00pm-5:59pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm clive miry. our top stories. the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he'll only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you, our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt is almost a 100% of gdp, so we need to fix our public finances. a 100% of gdp, so we need the a 100% of gdp, so we need military is called in to i distribute the military is called in to help distribute fuel. more revolutions from the leaked pandora papers. the russian whose businesses have backed 3a conservative mps was involved in a
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russian corruption scandal. a review will be carried out into the metropolitan police�*s standard and culture following the murder of sarah everard. cressida dick says she won't resign. scientists make a breakthrough, successfully treating up breakthrough, successfully treating up patient with severe depression with a pacemaker. good afternoon to you. the chancellor has told the conservative party conference that he wants to do whatever it takes to help britain recover from the pandemic. whatever it takes to help britain recoverfrom the pandemic. he said he believed in fiscal responsibility. mr sunak defended tax rises and said he'd like to cut taxes. and he insisted brexit was in the long—term interest of the uk
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economy, despite disruption to fuel supplies. the government is committing £500 million to renew support programmes. here's our political correspondent. the message from the prime minister and the chancellor is clear. the slogan is �*build back better�*. translated, this means the economy could be stronger after the pandemic than before. but it takes time to train more workers, and right now, with the cost of living rising, they have to find a way to try to stop their political stock from falling. hogging attention outside the conference, pig farmers were complaining about labour shortages. their costs and our prices could be increasing. during the pandemic, he was the good guy, picking up plaudits for paying people's wages. now, though, it's payback time. this tax—raising chancellor took on critics in his own ranks. whilst i know tax rises are unpopular, some will even
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say un—conservative, i'll tell you what is un—conservative. unfunded pledges, reckless borrowing and soaring debt. anyone who tells you that you can borrow more today, and tomorrow will simply sort itself out, just doesn't care about the future. he is also about to reverse a temporary increase in universal credit. but he wanted the conference to focus on the future, with a £500 million jobs fund and more investment in artificial intelligence. oh, and the b word was back. i was proud to back brexit, proud to back leave, because despite the challenges, i believe in the long term, the agility, flexibility and freedom provided by brexit would be more valuable in a 21st—century, global economy. and the prime minister also had his eye on the future, rather than current difficulties. looking at the progress that we're making in wind power,
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where we lead the world in offshore wind, we think we can get to complete clean energy production by 2035. you won't hear much criticism on the conference floor of the government's direction of travel, but around the conference there is what's best described as quiet concern among some of the grassroots. there's a danger that in the rush to embrace the decarbonisation route, that actually working people's concerns are brushed under the table. we keep getting told that you're not going to be worse off, everything's going to be fine. actually, your day—to—day life you just see prices increasing all the time. i think sometimes the message doesn't match up to the reality. obviously with the universal credit situation, it's not ideal— for young people, especially on low— incomes, with that cut. however, we've also got to weigh up coming out of a pandemic. _ applause. so the prime minister and the chancellor will be hoping
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that people judge the government not by short—term difficulties, but by long—term vision. iain watson, bbc news, manchester. chris mason is that the conservative party conference. rishi sunak raised tax for the first time since 1974, he has raised taxes, the highest level for nearly 30 years. is he still the darling of the party? that's a good question, clive, because of so many ministers here say this is the low tax party, and yet that tax burden is higher than it's been for a generation. as far as popularity, there is no doubt plenty people here see him as a potential future prime minister, plenty people here see him as a potentialfuture prime minister, and probably politically, the going will get tough because he has been splurging money during the pandemic. he said that was sensible with
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things like the furlough scheme, but now comes the tough moments as he has to start making tough decisions and saying no to things. i've been getting reaction to the afternoon to the chancellor's speech. let me introduce you to craig, from the federation of small businesses. thanks for talking to us. what did you make of the speech? it thanks for talking to us. what did you make of the speech?- you make of the speech? it was very oli you make of the speech? it was very policy- -- there _ you make of the speech? it was very policy... there weren't _ you make of the speech? it was very policy... there weren't measures - policy... there weren't measures announced — policy... there weren't measures announced on employment cost or business _ announced on employment cost or business rates, the fuel crisis, not very much — business rates, the fuel crisis, not very much. so the apprenticeship was good, _ very much. so the apprenticeship was good, but _ very much. so the apprenticeship was good, but that was preannounced overnight— good, but that was preannounced overnight and that ended on thursday. even the one bit that was positive _ thursday. even the one bit that was positive probably wasn't what it looked — positive probably wasn't what it looked like on the ten.- positive probably wasn't what it looked like on the ten. from the perspective _ looked like on the ten. from the perspective of — looked like on the ten. from the perspective of your _ looked like on the ten. from the
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perspective of your members, i looked like on the ten. from the perspective of your members, if| looked like on the ten. from the - perspective of your members, if you had the ear of the chancellor, what do your members want? i had the ear of the chancellor, what do your members want?— had the ear of the chancellor, what do your members want? i think they want a low tax _ do your members want? i think they want a low tax dynamic _ do your members want? i think they want a low tax dynamic economy - do your members want? i think they| want a low tax dynamic economy and do your members want? i think they i want a low tax dynamic economy and a government... and it's not helping. they've _ government... and it's not helping. they've announced the ditching of the enterprise allowance which moves people _ the enterprise allowance which moves people into self—employment. all the support— people into self—employment. all the support you mentioned on covid is now winding down, and it's right and that the _ now winding down, and it's right and that the furlough scheme is, but is it right _ that the furlough scheme is, but is it right that — that the furlough scheme is, but is it right that is doctor terry stick the pay— it right that is doctor terry stick the pay isn't there — — statutory stick— the pay isn't there — — statutory stick pay? — the pay isn't there — — statutory stick pay? it _ the pay isn't there — — statutory stick pay? it was maybe the start of the budget— stick pay? it was maybe the start of the budget spending review from the chancellor, but there should have been _ chancellor, but there should have been more — chancellor, but there should have been more in it. why chancellor, but there should have been more in it.— chancellor, but there should have been more in it. why is there that .a . been more in it. why is there that gap between _ been more in it. why is there that gap between what _ been more in it. why is there that gap between what you _ been more in it. why is there that gap between what you want - been more in it. why is there that gap between what you want and l been more in it. why is there that. gap between what you want and what they're willing to offer? i gap between what you want and what they're willing to offer?— they're willing to offer? i think they're willing to offer? i think the aa- they're willing to offer? i think the gap is _ they're willing to offer? i think the gap is between _ they're willing to offer? i think the gap is between rhetoric . they're willing to offer? i think| the gap is between rhetoric and reality — the gap is between rhetoric and reality. we've been hearing a lot about _ reality. we've been hearing a lot about the — reality. we've been hearing a lot about the wages rising, and it's all sunny, _ about the wages rising, and it's all
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sunny, but— about the wages rising, and it's all sunny, but if you go outside, i don't — sunny, but if you go outside, i don't think— sunny, but if you go outside, i don't think you feel that. it's all about— don't think you feel that. it's all about build back better, but there's not much _ about build back better, but there's not much building going on and it's not much building going on and it's not better~ — not much building going on and it's not better. we're a little more surprise — not better. we're a little more surprise it _ not better. we're a little more surprise it wasn't today. we may see more _ surprise it wasn't today. we may see more in _ surprise it wasn't today. we may see more in boris — surprise it wasn't today. we may see more in borisjohnson's speech, but with labour— more in borisjohnson's speech, but with labour coming up on the flank, that's— with labour coming up on the flank, that's pretty compelling offer. what we don't _ that's pretty compelling offer. what we don't see is the conservative offer— we don't see is the conservative offer against that. with the election in 2023, they really need to start _ election in 2023, they really need to start on — election in 2023, they really need to start on that now.— to start on that now. let's talk about the _ to start on that now. let's talk about the issues _ to start on that now. let's talk about the issues at _ to start on that now. let's talk about the issues at the - to start on that now. let's talk. about the issues at the moment, particularly around supply chains and driver shortages and all the other things we've been reporting in the last few weeks. give us a sense of how crippling that is for your members? abs, of how crippling that is for your members?— of how crippling that is for your members? �* ., ., , , ., members? a lot of members are saying the 're members? a lot of members are saying they're struggling _ members? a lot of members are saying they're struggling to _ members? a lot of members are saying they're struggling to get _ members? a lot of members are saying they're struggling to get things - they're struggling to get things delivers. a lot of members are looking — delivers. a lot of members are looking at— delivers. a lot of members are looking at solutions proposed. there's —
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looking at solutions proposed. there's 5000 visas coming for drivers. — there's 5000 visas coming for drivers, but it doesn't really help now _ drivers, but it doesn't really help now the — drivers, but it doesn't really help now. the army started... 0n the fuel crisis. _ now. the army started... 0n the fuel crisis, members have caught up. i have _ crisis, members have caught up. i have a _ crisis, members have caught up. i have a physiotherapist... do crisis, members have caught up. i have a physiotherapist. . .- have a physiotherapist... do you think this is _ have a physiotherapist... do you think this is the _ have a physiotherapist... do you think this is the vault _ have a physiotherapist... do you think this is the vault of - have a physiotherapist... do you think this is the vault of the - think this is the vault of the government?— think this is the vault of the rovernment? . , ., �* government? that is what we're seeinr government? that is what we're seeing because _ government? that is what we're seeing because blame _ government? that is what we're seeing because blame being - government? that is what we're seeing because blame being a i government? that is what we're . seeing because blame being a track to everyone, the businesses and blame _ to everyone, the businesses and blame on — to everyone, the businesses and blame on consumers. it seems like everyone _ blame on consumers. it seems like everyone is— blame on consumers. it seems like everyone is to blame except for the government. i think it's time for the government to say... if you're the government to say... if you're the chancellor, is this what you're and politics— the chancellor, is this what you're and politics to do — to see an econonry— and politics to do — to see an economy that isn't working well and tax it— economy that isn't working well and tax it more? i'm hoping there's more to come _ tax it more? i'm hoping there's more to come. . ~ tax it more? i'm hoping there's more to come. ., ,, ,., tax it more? i'm hoping there's more to come. ., ,, y., . ., tax it more? i'm hoping there's more to come. ., ,, . ., ., ,, ., to come. thank you. nice to talk to ou. to come. thank you. nice to talk to yom quite — to come. thank you. nice to talk to yom quite spiky — to come. thank you. nice to talk to you. quite spiky critique _ to come. thank you. nice to talk to you. quite spiky critique we - to come. thank you. nice to talk to you. quite spiky critique we heard l you. quite spiky critique we heard from craig as far as what the chancellor had to say. there is no doubt that in terms of the content from rishi sunak, it was relatively
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thin. there's a spending review coming up in the prime minister speech, but there wasn't a vast amount of new policy.— speech, but there wasn't a vast amount of new policy. thanks for that, chris _ amount of new policy. thanks for that, chris mason _ amount of new policy. thanks for that, chris mason there. - amount of new policy. thanks for that, chris mason there. the - amount of new policy. thanks for. that, chris mason there. the army has begun helping to deliver fuel amid ongoing shortages and parts of the country. more than a fifth of petrol stations still don't have any. it says it could be a more than any. it says it could be a more than a week before things get back to normal. army drivers, getting ready to ferry fuel around the country. 200 military personnel are being deployed to help deliver petrol and diesel to forecourts. in many areas, the situation has eased dramatically, retailers say. but in london and the south—east, queues south—east, queues remain common. the news this morning is better than bad. it's slightly positive. but our poll later in the day will confirm whether it is a real turning point today. and i
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think that the military drivers will add a little bit of confidence to that, but it's not the full panacea. at the height of the crisis, some 65% of service stations said they were running dry, as a wave of panic buying took hold across the country. but by the weekend, that figure had fallen to just 16%. the government is hoping that with the help of the military, a site like this, a petrol station that has run out of petrol, will become a thing of the past. but people within the industry are warning that the root causes of the crisis have yet to be addressed. the problem is a severe shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers, which is affecting other parts of the economy as well. but ministers say that disruption to supply chains are not confined to the uk. there are things that we can do and should do, and it's reasonable whether that's short—term visas, speeding up testing capacity for drivers, we should do those things,
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and are doing those things. but we can't wave a magic wand and make a global supply chain challenges disappear overnight. there never was a shortage of fuel. the problem was getting to forecourts quickly enough to meet demand. the crisis has thrown a harsh spotlight once again on the challenges facing what were once the uk's carefully tuned supply chains. theo leggett, bbc news. cressida dick has ordered an independent review into the force after the murder of sarah everard. the commissioners that she wanted to restore public trust. today, i am announcing _ restore public trust. today, i am announcing that _ restore public trust. today, i am announcing that we _ restore public trust. today, i am announcing that we will- restore public trust. today, i am announcing that we will be - restore public trust. today, i amj announcing that we will be doing restore public trust. today, i am l announcing that we will be doing a review, that will be led by a high—profile independent person, and it will look at internal culture and it will look at internal culture and it will look at internal culture and it will look at our professional standards, leadership, training, to make sure that we are the best possible met police we can be. and i
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am absolutely determined that we rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can. fiur rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can-— possibly can. our special correspondent _ possibly can. our special correspondent lucy - possibly can. our special- correspondent lucy manning possibly can. our special— correspondent lucy manning spoke to the commissioner. well, this was the first interview the commissioner has done since wayne couzens was charged with the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. we only got a quick four minutes. she was doing a couple of other interviews, as well. but she was clear that things obviously need to change inside the met, because they have now appointed, or are going to appoint, somebody independent to look at what might be going wrong. we don't know who that person is, who will lead it. we understand it will last for a minimum of six months. we don't know what will happen with any recommendations made. we do know that it's not the public enquiry some people have been calling for. that would have a lot more powers. and what i also asked her was, given that this officer, given that couzens was
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an officer when she was his overall boss, it was on her watch that this had happened, shouldn't she take responsibility for it and resign? she said she knew it was on her watch but she intended to carry on and she had a job to do. we also talked a bit about vetting, how could couzens have been a police officer? he had gone from the civil nuclear constabulary to kent, and then to the met. the commissioner said she has asked for the national policing body to look at the vetting of police officers. and on the indecent exposure which couzens was accused of days before the murder of sarah everard, she confirmed as far as she was aware they had not known the person accused of the indecent exposure was a police officer. lucy manning reporting there. the
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met police officer has appeared in court charged with rape. he denied the allegation. graham satchell is outside the court and sent us this update. it outside the court and sent us this u date. . , outside the court and sent us this udate. . , outside the court and sent us this udate. ., , , ., update. it was fairly short. he soke update. it was fairly short. he spoke only — update. it was fairly short. he spoke only a _ update. it was fairly short. he spoke only a couple _ update. it was fairly short. he spoke only a couple of- update. it was fairly short. he spoke only a couple of times. update. it was fairly short. he l spoke only a couple of times to confirm his name, age and address. he is charged with one count of rape through his lawyer who said he emphatically denied that charge. the offence occurred in st albans last september, when david carrick was off duty. he is a police constable in the met police, serving in the parliamentary and diplomatic protection command. currently suspended from duty. the met commissioner, dame cressida dick, said she's deeply concerned that such a serious offence should be
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associated with a serving police officer. she said she understood that the public would be concerned as well. david carrick bowed his head as he was remanded in custody by the sitting magistrate, and he will appear in court again at the beginning of next month. graham satchell reporting _ beginning of next month. graham satchell reporting there. - beginning of next month. graham satchell reporting there. our- beginning of next month. graham satchell reporting there. our top | satchell reporting there. our top stories for you! he says he will only better cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. the military has been called into distribute fuel to petrol stations. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers, a secretive russian whose businesses have backed 34 conservative mps was involved in a russian corruption scandal. rules rules on foreign travel change today with the old traffic life system
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scrapped. there will now be one list of red countries, and anyone travelling to them will have to quarantine for ten days in a hotel. but most fully vaccinated travellers coming from other destinations will no longer need to take a covid test before departure. coletta smith has the very latest. going abroad have just got cheaper, and a whole lot easier. the amber list has been scrapped. now there's just a red list of countries. those passengers still have to pay to quarantine in a hotel when they get home. but for everywhere else, there's only one pcr test when you get back. as long as you're fully vaccinated, no other test is needed and no isolation. but for people who have not beenjabbed, all the old rules still apply. a test before travelling home, self isolation and tests on day two and day eight. the changes are just in time for those desperate to escape for half term. plenty of families have been put off international travel because the system has been
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so complicated and so expensive. there are still some deals out there, and definitely prices are still a little bit lower than they were pre—pandemic. but i think once we start to see the likes of the us opening up, which is happening sometime in november, then i think really we are going to see prices gradually start to creep up, as companies, you know these airlines, have had virtually no income for many months now, and they have to make up the billions of pounds of debt they've built up. the travel industry is delighted, even though we're well into the last remnants of the holiday season. by the end of this month, the test on the second day you're home will be cheaper. but that will not be in place in time for half term holiday makers. we need to do more. you know, the requirement to do a test after arrival, particularly a pcr test, and they will change that to a rapid antigen, but i don't understand why they are waiting for some time to change that. i think the industry could adapt and introduce that change much quicker.
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but it's going on the right direction. there are still different rules for any country you're travelling to. these changes are only about what you have to do when you're coming home. the red list is to be reviewed again this week, and more countries may be given the green light at that stage. so whether it's for pleasure, for business or to see family, a simpler, cheaper system is now in place. colletta smith, bbc news. let's ta ke let's take a look at the government figures for the uk, and there were 33 deaths recorded in the least 24 hour period. 82.5% of those in the uk over the age of 16 have received two doses of the coronavirus vaccine. investigators discovered
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how a major donor was involved in a corruption scandal. he was given half £1 million to the conservatives, and worked on a series of deals for swedish telecoms company. that company was later find almost $1 billion or bribery. he denies any wrongdoing. the guardian on the... mohamed amersi is wealthy and well—connected. here he is talking about the dangers of corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life.
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they are entirely separate. "we are motivated by the priorities of the british public acting in the national interest." richard bilton, bbc news. andy verity is with me. there are another... andy verity is with me. there are another- - -— andy verity is with me. there are another... ., ., ., another... one of the leading female donors it's her _ another. .. one of the leading female donors it's her personal— another... one of the leading female donors it's her personal wealth - another... one of the leading female donors it's her personal wealth from | donors it's her personal wealth from her husband, who is been financially linked to people close to the kremlin. she has given more than £2 million to the conservatives. her
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lawyer says she's a british citizen and is entitled to do as he wishes with her money. this comes from the document we've been talking about, the pandora papers. she has given £2 million nearly to the conservatives, which has bought her time with three tory prime minister 's, including borisjohnson. they show her wealth boris johnson. they show her wealth comes from borisjohnson. they show her wealth comes from her husband. 0ne email describes her as financially supported by her husband. another is a housewife. her husband is vladimir, who is a ruston financial mentor — — russian finance minister, and he's continue to do business with people close to the russian government. secretly profiting from a property deal in st. petersburg in 2017. the reaction, their lawyer
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said it's not acceptable, and the conservatives said donations are properly declared and comply fully with the law. i properly declared and comply fully with the law-— with the law. i wonder where all these revelations _ with the law. i wonder where all these revelations and _ with the law. i wonder where all these revelations and leaks, - these revelations and leaks, we've had a number of mass dumps of information over the last few years. are we seeing anything changing as a result of these information leaks? are we seeing governments responding? have we seen anything change here? in responding? have we seen anything change here?— responding? have we seen anything chance here? ., , �*, , change here? in theory, there's been a massive change _ change here? in theory, there's been a massive change in _ change here? in theory, there's been a massive change in the _ change here? in theory, there's been a massive change in the sense - change here? in theory, there's been a massive change in the sense that l a massive change in the sense that what we used to call tax havens are now supposed to be under an obligation to know their customer. previously, they didn't have to bother knowing who the owner was of companies set up in their jurisdictions, so that's supposed to have changed. whether it's change in culture is another matter. you've
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also had a big that came reform in. but it wasn't supposed to happen overseas like the british for the — — virgin islands, but that got watered down, so it's only law enforcement. what campaigners want is for all information to be published. there may sometimes be reasons for people to use offshore companies, but it can be used for money laundering and tax avoidance, all these different issues. those are the issues that people are trying to address.— are the issues that people are trying to address. andy, many thanks. trying to address. andy, many thanks- you — trying to address. andy, many thanks. you can _ trying to address. andy, many thanks. you can see _ trying to address. andy, many thanks. you can see more - trying to address. andy, many thanks. you can see more on | trying to address. andy, many i thanks. you can see more on this story tonight in panorama. that's at 7:35 pm. a nurse who was accused of murdering eight babies and attempting to murder ten others has
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pleaded not guilty to all charges. lucy is charged with murdering five boys and three girls at the counters of chester hospital. she's also accused of the attempted murder of ten other babies. the 31—year—old has been remanded in custody until her trial next year. social media giants have confirmed they've been affected by a worldwide outage, showing tens of millions of users have potentially been impacted. the outage showed there were more than 20,000 incidents of people reporting issues with facebook and instagram. scientists and a new study have successfully treated of patient with severe depression by using a pacemakerfor severe depression by using a pacemaker for the severe depression by using a pacemakerfor the brain. the device tap into the specific brain circuits involved in depressive brain patterns and reset them. i'm joined now by the lead author of the study,
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doctor kathryn. it's good to see you. what an amazing breakthrough. just tell us exactly how it works. well, depression is incredibly common and there is a substantial number of people who remain resistant. and there is growing acceptance that if depression is caused by faulty function, the relationship between each individual patient�*s depression isn't well—known. we believe that we can use the brain stimulation, which is a common treatment that has been used previously to restore healthy function to these neural circuits in depression. so we set out to discover whether we could do this. to identify a patient�*s depression circus, we put electros across the circuit tory. we then delivered small pulses of stimulation and ask
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the patient how she felt. so we could go through and identify exactly where... we could go through and identify exactly where. .. we found that could go through and identify exactly where... we found that one of these brain areas, the amygdala, contained activity that could predict when symptoms were most severe. we implanted a small modulation device and developed this device to continually monitor for abnormal amygdala activity. when it was detected, to trigger a pulse of stimulation. when we turn the device on, she goes home and she goes through her normal life. and her depression went into remission within a couple months. it improve the next day we turned this device on. these results provide hope that we can develop this type of personalised treatment in the
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future. 50 personalised treatment in the future. h personalised treatment in the future. v . personalised treatment in the future. h ., ., future. so it's the unique nature of the treatment. _ future. so it's the unique nature of the treatment. it _ future. so it's the unique nature of the treatment. it can _ future. so it's the unique nature of the treatment. it can be _ future. so it's the unique nature of the treatment. it can be tailored . future. so it's the unique nature of| the treatment. it can be tailored to the treatment. it can be tailored to the individual patient. i wonder given the innovative nature of the procedure, if you could roll that out and make it viable for many more people. out and make it viable for many more --eole. , . ., �*, ., out and make it viable for many more n-eole. , ., ., �*, ., ., people. yes, and that's an important oint. this people. yes, and that's an important point. this treatment _ people. yes, and that's an important point. this treatment really - people. yes, and that's an important point. this treatment really was - people. yes, and that's an important point. this treatment really was for l point. this treatment really was for those patients who are most treatment resistant, who have tried every available option and are really disabled by their depression. this is a type of treatment right now that's tailored for that type of patients. however, what we're learning about the brain and the development of therapies can be applied more broadly and we're already developing, doing research on noninvasive correlates of this type of therapy that we described. amazing stuff. thank you so much for joining us. time for a look at the
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weather. hello. it's been a day of sunshine and showers, but we have some wet and windy weather to develop overnight tonight. the showers have been marching their way into eastern england, but it's this rain here that's beginning to show its hand in wales and the southwest. it's going to turn much wetter in the next few hours. that rain will turn heavy as it moves northwards and eastwards across most of england and wales. accompanied by some strengthening winds, keeping the temperatures up. it will turn drier and still dry for much of scotland. could be cold enough for a pitch of frost. we still got this wet and windy weather, that clears and rain continues to blow in to south—east scotland, north wales and england for a while, then into the midlands.
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it's around this area where we probably have the strongest of winds. we will get sunshine and temperatures in the mid teens at best. hello, our top stories. hello, ourtop stories. more revelations, one of the conservatives needing female donors gets her personal wealth from her husband who has been financially linked to the kremlin. the chancellor has announced half £1 billion to help get people back to work after the pandemic and said he would only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. the military has been called in to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in london and the southeast. an independent review will be carried out into the metropolitan police standards and culture following the
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murder of sarah everard but cressida dick says she will not resign. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin ra mjaun watford has been appointed a new head coach. stopped afterjust ten months in charge, of the opening seven premier league games and they lie 15th in the table. he was assigned a three year contract and the italian won the premier league with elasticity in 2016. the 69—year—old was fired the following season. he becomes the 14th manager since they took over in 2012. he will since they took over in 2012. he: will bring an a little bit of experience and he's probably the most high—profile head coach at what fred has ever had in the history of the club and numerous managerial honors and he's managed in several countries across europe and so really high—profile business for
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watford so having that in game experience will be massive for us. england's cricketers will learn to week whether they will compete in the ashes tour in australia and the governing body will meet to discuss the conditions to give the green light for the winter trip. there have been concerns over whether their families can travel with them. quarantine arrangements and any potential bubble the team including the captain may have to live in. australia has some of the strictest covid—19 particles in the world. the situation complicated by the fact the different states have their own regulations. the first test is due to begin on the 8th of december and adam rollins does not believe that ashesis adam rollins does not believe that ashes is in doubt. in adam rollins does not believe that ashes is in doubt.— ashes is in doubt. in order for the ashes series _ ashes is in doubt. in order for the ashes series not _ ashes is in doubt. in order for the ashes series not to _ ashes is in doubt. in order for the ashes series not to go _ ashes is in doubt. in order for the ashes series not to go ahead - ashes is in doubt. in order for the l ashes series not to go ahead would require a boycott, not in those strong terms i would imagine but a postponement which in the current scheduling arrangement that we have i cannot see that happening. there is too much on the line financially and the ashes is effectively an industry inside of cricket. there is so much on the line for both boards and the reciprocity of the
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agreements and the commercial arrangements that we broadcast and i can't see a scenario where there is a complete pull—out. can't see a scenario where there is a complete pull-out.— a complete pull-out. ainsley launched _ a complete pull-out. ainsley launched their _ a complete pull-out. ainsley launched their campaign - a complete pull-out. ainsley i launched their campaign today a complete pull-out. ainsley - launched their campaign today at the mercedes and what is where they will be based in the f1 team chief technical officerjames addison will help design the boats the next america's cup port sold a trophy set to take place in 2024. use it in the defending champions. in to take place in 2024. use it in the defending champions.— defending champions. in terms of simulation and _ defending champions. in terms of simulation and developing - defending champions. in terms of simulation and developing thosel simulation and developing those simulation and developing those simulation tools, the formula one cars are not on the water but there is a narrow dynamic and a hydrodynamic discipline that we have to overcome with the america's cup. it ties into formula one and that attention to detail and the discipline formula 1 has to be really believe that can make a big difference to our organization. charlotte has been talking about running the third fastest time for a
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british woman at yesterday's marathon. she finished 10th and shades more than two minutes of her previous personal best and was only 14 seconds of the second break — second best british time. the performance came only a few months after she was left out of the team gb squad after the olympics in tokyo. figs gb squad after the olympics in to 0. �* , gb squad after the olympics in to 0. a gb squad after the olympics in to , ,. gb squad after the olympics in to 0. a , ,. tokyo. as soon as the olympic door closed and — tokyo. as soon as the olympic door closed and i — tokyo. as soon as the olympic door closed and i was _ tokyo. as soon as the olympic door closed and i was able _ tokyo. as soon as the olympic door closed and i was able to _ tokyo. as soon as the olympic door closed and i was able to focus - tokyo. as soon as the olympic door closed and i was able to focus on i closed and i was able to focus on london it was like i'll forget about that now and focus on london cell i'm glad it went well yesterday. it's always a lot of going into a big event obviously with the marathon you cannot to run one every weekend so you go all in on this one day and then if it does not go well you have to re—plan and wait a bit of time before you go then but i'm happy that it went well so i can read — relax a bit and go again for the next one. read - relax a bit and go again for the next one-— read - relax a bit and go again for the next one. that's it from us for now. we the next one. that's it from us for now- we will _ the next one. that's it from us for now. we will have _ the next one. that's it from us for now. we will have more _ the next one. that's it from us for now. we will have more at - the next one. that's it from us for now. we will have more at half. the next one. that's it from us for i now. we will have more at half past six.
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the chancellor, rishi sunak has defended tax rises and stressed the need to "fix" the nation's finances as the economy emerges from the pandemic. he told the conservative party conference in manchester that recovery came with a cost, but that he was optimistic about the future. let's go to the conservative conference and our political correspondent chris mason he is optimistic about the future, how are the delegates? i he is optimistic about the future, how are the delegates?— he is optimistic about the future, how are the delegates? i think they are aware that _ how are the delegates? i think they are aware that there _ how are the delegates? i think they are aware that there is _ how are the delegates? i think they are aware that there is some - how are the delegates? i think they are aware that there is some pretty| are aware that there is some pretty dark clouds hanging around economically. we have seen the bumps at the moment with supply chain problems and petrol stations at all of that. coupled with the loss of the uplift to universal credits and there is plenty that was only temporary and it cost £6 billion per year so it could not carry on. there's plenty of mps and activities that there could be a bumpy time i had economically. the government tried to talk about the transition to an economy that is high wage and
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no immigration. let us go over some of the issues that he was reflecting on in his speech. it's a pretty short speech by the standards of a chancellor address to a party conference, just under half an hour. we can talk to the deputy political editor of the daily mail. what the makeup of the chancellor had to say? it was quite a short speech. that's for a _ it was quite a short speech. that's for a few— it was quite a short speech. that's for a few reasons. midway through the election cycle it does not look like we _ the election cycle it does not look like we will have an election for another— like we will have an election for another year or so. the party does not appeal— another year or so. the party does not appeal directly to the motors at this moment. and the riches of the neck— this moment. and the riches of the neck in _ this moment. and the riches of the neck in a _ this moment. and the riches of the neck in a couple of weeks i got his budget— neck in a couple of weeks i got his budget and — neck in a couple of weeks i got his budget and the spending review and it will— budget and the spending review and it will be _ budget and the spending review and it will be saving a lot of the bigger— it will be saving a lot of the bigger announcements until then have you got— bigger announcements until then have you got to _ bigger announcements until then have you got to think about the tories spend _ you got to think about the tories spend so— you got to think about the tories spend so much money over the last couple _ spend so much money over the last couple of— spend so much money over the last couple of years. there is not loads of cash _ couple of years. there is not loads of cash going about and they can't start making big funding premises 'ust start making big funding premises just out— start making big funding premises just out of— start making big funding premises just out of nowhere. so i think that's— just out of nowhere. so i think that's why— just out of nowhere. so i think that's why it was quite a short speech— that's why it was quite a short speech and there were no major policy— speech and there were no major policy announcement in the air. it was setting — policy announcement in the air. it was setting out his position on things— was setting out his position on things like welfare and the uc cup
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and ending infidel but no real new announcements. how and ending infidel but no real new announcements.— and ending infidel but no real new announcements. ., . ., ., , ., announcements. how much of it was a first draft of— announcements. how much of it was a first draft of who _ announcements. how much of it was a first draft of who he _ announcements. how much of it was a first draft of who he is _ announcements. how much of it was a first draft of who he is as _ announcements. how much of it was a first draft of who he is as a _ announcements. how much of it was a first draft of who he is as a man. - first draft of who he is as a man. he's only been chancellor for 18 months and it's been an extraordinary period and him staking his claim as to what kind of conservative he is. may be read half an eye on a job he might want to do in the future if i sense it is not around forever? yeah, i think it was around forever? yeah, i think it was a couple of moments in there it was clear it was a message to terry campese as much as voters at home. you saw him talking about brexit, picking up his brexit credentials and seeing he backed it from the start even though he was warned it might be damaging for his career. you compare that to someone like that and he talked about potential future leadership contender and she someone who is converted to brexit and it's now someone who talks of all the benefits about trade deals and at the time supported remain. and you heard richi sunak try to calm nerves. we heard a lot of conservatives from back benches over the last couple of weeks that the tax burden is way too high and it
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richi sunak�*s message to his mps today was ambi to put the finances back on a sustainable footing but at some point i do want to start looking at tax cuts again. he was askin: looking at tax cuts again. he was asking me _ looking at tax cuts again. he was asking me about _ looking at tax cuts again. he was asking me about the _ looking at tax cuts again. he was asking me about the extent - looking at tax cuts again. he was asking me about the extent to i looking at tax cuts again. he was . asking me about the extent to which people here are nervous about what's going on at the broader economy supply chain issues and the rest of it. i had a stab at answering his question and i wonder how you would read the mood of activists as far as what's going on beyond the conference?— what's going on beyond the conference? there are quite concerned- _ conference? there are quite concerned. the _ conference? there are quite concerned. the governmentj conference? there are quite - concerned. the government has got a clear message this week. they are trying to make this clear dividing line between dennant labor. they are saying that castar me last week said he let in hundred thousand immigrants on new visas to sort out the hgb started years and the government said we want — won't do that. we will limit migration and hopefully that will lead to a rise in wages for the workers. that works for the time being. if you see that these problems continue in the next two months, and we get to christmas and there's shortages and not sure
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voters will be buying that anymore. what do you think we will get on the prime _ what do you think we will get on the prime minister on monday? that has not been out — prime minister on monday? that has not been out of _ prime minister on monday? that has not been out of the _ prime minister on monday? that has not been out of the month _ prime minister on monday? that has not been out of the month net - - not been out of the month net — announcements this week. it seems the tory party had one story at a which was to suggest that they are saving a lot of it back to the prime minister speech on wednesday. and it's written it and usually he's a last—minute person and that hour is building up to the speech he still not written it and he has written it and that makes me think there could be quite a lot of policy and there they had to narrow down in advance. thank you. going over the analysis of the chancellor speech today. with the prime minister as big a dress that will round off the conference on wednesday. climate change protestors blocked the entrance to the blackwall tunnel— one of london's busiest river crossings— during this morning's rush hour. they also targeted wandsworth bridge, arnos grove and the hanger lane gyratory. the high court has previously issued injunctions to try to stop such protests—
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but they don't cover those routes. here's our transport correspondent tom edwards. for three weeks, they had been targeting london's roads and motorways. the tactic is to lie down on the tarmac or glue themselves to it. this morning, there were four protests at locations in london. i'm hungry again, maddock was caught up in the disruption. he is a dentist and had to cancel appointments. do you have any sympathy! hat and had to cancel appointments. do you have any sympathy!— and had to cancel appointments. do you have any sympathy! not at all. i am more for— you have any sympathy! not at all. i am more for protecting _ you have any sympathy! not at all. i am more for protecting the - you have any sympathy! not at all. i am more for protecting the panic. you have any sympathy! not at all. i am more for protecting the panic - l am more for protecting the panic — panic and reducing our carbon footprint but this just because it's such a huge amount of inconvenience and just driving past if you see a row of cars and i'm sure in this case you have workers trying to get hospitals but it seems they have no consideration for that and they just
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blocked everything offjust to make a point in the point is a valid points but they must be a better way around it. the points but they must be a better way around it. ., , ., , ., around it. the group wants to hiuuhliht around it. the group wants to highlight the _ around it. the group wants to highlight the lack _ around it. the group wants to highlight the lack of - around it. the group wants to l highlight the lack of installation in the country's housing stock. which it claims is the least energy efficient in europe. the government has tried injunctions to stop the process threatening prison sentences and fines but that has not stopped them. now it's more. thea;r and fines but that has not stopped them. now it's more.— them. now it's more. they are -auttin them. now it's more. they are putting new — them. now it's more. they are putting new measures - them. now it's more. they are putting new measures which i them. now it's more. they are | putting new measures which we them. now it's more. they are - putting new measures which we are drivers and start to the protesters _ drivers and start to the protesters themselves. i drivers and start to the l protesters themselves. the drivers and start to the - protesters themselves. the moment the authorities continue to continue to struggle to prevent the demonstrations.
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social media chains including facebook, instagram and whatsapp have confirmed they have been affected by a worldwide outage. 0ur correspondent is here, what does that mean? it correspondent is here, what does that mean?— correspondent is here, what does that mean? ., , ., ., , , that mean? it means for many people around the world _ that mean? it means for many people around the world and _ that mean? it means for many people around the world and we _ that mean? it means for many people around the world and we are - that mean? it means for many people around the world and we are talking i around the world and we are talking billions of people, facebook has 2.85 billion users globally, at least a great deal of them arriving no service and as you say it is facebook, whatsapp, instagram, they are all owned by facebook and 70s went down we think about an hour ago. these things do happen quite often i remember looking into an outage may be a couple of months ago and it was back online within maybe 20 minutes, 30 minutes. so that this is pretty long time not manage to get it fixed. we have had a statement from facebook. they actually had to put it out on twitter, but we have got andy stone at facebook communication saying we are aware that some people are
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having trouble accessing our apps and products and they're working to get things back to normal as quickly as possible. and we apologize for any inconvenience. it's worth seeing if anyone is trying to use any of their messaging systems, i was trying to message someone from my family they might send a message it's not going to get through at the moment today. you mentioned that this has happened before. is it this has happened before. is it something _ this has happened before. is it something that _ this has happened before. is it something that happens that often i wonder? , ., ., ., ., , wonder? they do have outages. certainly l _ wonder? they do have outages. certainly i was _ wonder? they do have outages. certainly i was looking - wonder? they do have outages. certainly i was looking into - wonder? they do have outages. certainly i was looking into this| wonder? they do have outages. i certainly i was looking into this of a case a few months ago. and before i was able to get enough information to come and tell you and they fixed it and it's been going on for more than an hour now and people who follow these things more closely than i do say it's a long time. a large oil slick has begun washing ashore in southern california. beaches in orange county — southeast of los angeles — have been closed, as oil and dead wildlife wash up on the sand.
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almost half a million litres of oil has leaked from a pipeline connected to an offshore oil rig. courtney bembridge reports. california is known for its beaches, but not like this. as well as dead birds and fish. more than 120,000 gallons of oil has leaked into the ocean from a broken pipeline five miles off the coast. we are in the midst of a potential ecological disaster here at huntington beach and as the exhibits and pictures here illustrate, the oil spill has significantly impacted our community. the broken pipeline is connected to an offshore oil platform run by a subsidiary of houston—based amplify energy. the company says the pipeline has now been shut off and the remaining oil suctioned out. it has been maintained. we are investigating, if the pipeline is the source of this, how this happened.
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a huge clean—up operation is under way to try to stop the oil reaching sensitive wetlands nearby and people are being urged to avoid the beaches. you can feel the vapour in the air. i saw what i'll describe as little pancake clusters of oil along the shoreline and i've described it as something like an egg yolk — if you push it, it kind of spreads out, so we don't want people to disturb those little clusters. local authorities say it is too soon to say whether the company responsible will face criminal charges. courtney bembridge, bbc news. there are our top stories. there are more revelations from the leaks pandora papers. 0ne more revelations from the leaks pandora papers. one of the conservatives gets a price know well from her husband who has been linked to people close to the kremlin. the chancellor announced half £1 billion to help get people back to work after the pandemic and said he would only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. the
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military has been called in to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in london on the southeast. after decades of war, afghanistan's children are continuing to pay the price of the conflict as unemployment rates and poverty soar. to avoid hunger, hundreds of afghan children are travelling to neighbouring countries, hidden under lorries, carrying goods to sell to try to make money for theirfamilies. shumaila jaffrey reports from the torkham border crossing between pakistan and afghanistan. this little girl has just said pakistan holding package heavier than her own rates. while she is trying to run, before she is caused by the border guards, another truck has arrived that more afghan children getting luggage. this practice is not new but many believe that now it's skin is much bigger than before. we
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that now it's skin is much bigger than before.— that now it's skin is much bigger than before. we are forced to do this because _ than before. we are forced to do this because of _ than before. we are forced to do this because of poverty. - than before. we are forced to do this because of poverty. my - than before. we are forced to do i this because of poverty. my father is unwell. it is better to earn something then to... we deal with supplies will give us goods and tell us where to drop them. when we delivered the stuff we take receipts from shopkeepers and get paid for it when we return. the from shopkeepers and get paid for it when we return.— when we return. the children bring small items _ when we return. the children bring small items like _ when we return. the children bring small items like sweets, _ when we return. the children bring| small items like sweets, cigarettes and fabric to set on the side. they are constantly searched and chased by the pakistani border guards who worry for their safety and keep sending them back. but the children usually return in the next week — in the next vehicle. afghan children are the victims of decades of conflict in their country. they understand the dangers of illegally crossing the border and hiding in undercarriage is and while doing so some of them had even got injured in the past. but they still feel it's worth taking a risk instead of dying of starvation. most of these
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children are under 15. the smaller, the better because they can fit under the tracks easily. still, there have been numerous accidents in the past. but the taliban guarding on the other side don't seem to mind. i guarding on the other side don't seem to mind.— guarding on the other side don't seem to mind. i have never gotten hurt, but seem to mind. i have never gotten hurt. but a — seem to mind. i have never gotten hurt. but a girl— seem to mind. i have never gotten hurt, but a girl did _ seem to mind. i have never gotten hurt, but a girl did some _ seem to mind. i have never gotten hurt, but a girl did some time - seem to mind. i have never gottenj hurt, but a girl did some time ago. she died because she was sitting on the engine. i never sit near the engine. i always sit at the back. in engine. i always sit at the back. in afghanistan unemployment is soaring through the roof. and unlike in the past, pakistan is tightly regulating the border. adults can only enter with proper documents for trade. so these children are used instead as they can smuggle things without immigration and customs. they say this exploitation of children is appalling. this exploitation of children is a- allinu. , this exploitation of children is anallina. , ., , this exploitation of children is anallina. , . , , ., this exploitation of children is a- allinu. , . , , ., .,~ appalling. these images should make us realize that _
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appalling. these images should make us realize that afghanistan's - appalling. these images should make us realize that afghanistan's future i us realize that afghanistan's future and afghanistan children and afghanistan youth, everything is at stake right now. and this is a call on everyone on the international communities with people who would be watching these images that this is a time to help and support these desperate individuals. this is not a time to look away from afghanistan. 0n time to look away from afghanistan. on average, these children earn around $10 per trip. but there are days when they goods are confiscated by the guards and after and during all the trouble and hurts they have no option but to return empty—handed. dozens of religious leaders have appealed to politicians set up a new deal to combat climate change. they were gathered at a ceremony in the vatican, where pope francis urged governments to raise their ambition ahead
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of the un climate conference in glasgow. the archbishop of canterbury was among those at the event. here's mark lowen. they came from across the planet, faith leaders urging politicians to save it. christian and jewish, buddhist and muslim, taoist and confucian, signing a joint appeal to world leaders who will meet at the cop26 in glasgow, to commit to net zero emissions, to limit the temperature rise to 1.5 degrees to support poorer countries. a pope who is focused on environmental concern and an archbishop with this warning. 0urabuse, ourwar against the climate, affects the poorest among us. reconciliation with creation, in obedience to our creator, proclaims the love of god. the world has just enough time to get this right. in return, the signatories say they will educate their faithful, spreading the message of climate awareness.
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the document was handed to alok sharma, the cop26 president, to take to next month's summit, telling us the faith leaders are an essential resource. the message from them has been very clear. this is a critical moment for the world. and the message was one of the head and the heart. the scientists telling us the message from the head is very clear — it is humanity that is creating climate change and we need to act now. and the message of the heart is about morality. the call is urgent. man—made climate change and fossil fuels have prompted the warmest decade on record, with floods, fires and heat waves. this may be the last chance to halt the damage. religion and science don't always go hand in hand. climate change deniers are sometimes fuelled by religious conservatives. but with research finding that 84% of people around the globe identify with a faith, world leaders know those meeting here today have a chance
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of getting their followers to change their behaviour. mark lowen, bbc news, at the vatican. it's feared the eruption of the volcano on the spanish island of la palma could continue for months. lava has now been flowing for fifteen days, destroying more than a thousand homes. part of the volcano has collapsed, causing the lava to spread faster and in new directions. locals are wondering what the future will hold when the eruption finally stops. danjohnson is on the island and sent this report. incredibly, this eruption is now into a third week and it keeps getting stronger. the volcano is producing even more lava with even more force. that's why all that lava, all that ash, is pouring up into the sky higher and higher, and that means more of a risk to a bigger area — the potential for more people to be evacuated on top of the 6,000 or so who have been out of their homes for a fortnight now. and i was talking to the director of the canary islands volcano
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institute, who said he expects this eruption to continue for at least another ten days, potentially another two months. and even then, when the volcanic eruption stops, when the lava stops flowing, that's not the end of the story. he said it could take years to recover from this because there are vast lava trails right across the landscape here. they have cut through towns and villages, destroyed over 1,000 homes, communication lines and infrastructure have been destroyed. so what to do with that lava — how to live with it — is a major question for the future here that is dominating the future potential of people's lives and their livelihoods, as well. but there are people still living here, right in the shadow of the volcano — some of them saying they've had enough now, after a fortnight of that thing thundering, rumbling right through their lives day and night. some have had enough, they can't get sleep, they want to leave. some are making the decision
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to get to safer places. but then i've also spoken to people who live with that volcano effectively in their back garden who say, "no, as long as the authorities will let me, i'm going to stay, i'm going to see it out." but this is already much worse than anybody has ever seen on this volcanic island — it's produced twice the amount of lava of the previous eruption 50 years ago, and it's still unknown how long that will continue, how much more lava it will produce, and how much more destruction it will cause. william shatner who is captain kirk's command of the starship enterprise will go into space at the age of 90. he will head to the heavens next week with a crew from blue origin, the space company owned by amazon bossjeff blue origin, the space company owned by amazon boss jeff pays blue origin, the space company owned by amazon bossjeff pays us and he confirmed the news on twitter saying yes it's true, i'm going to be a rocket nine. time for a look at the weather.
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it's been a day of sunshine and showers today. but the wet and windy weather will come towards the southwest. things will turn more windy. especially across england and wales and also wets as well. we will look at the satellite picture. it does not look like much but this area of cloudiness is developing into an area of low pressure and we will get more definition as well. 0ver will get more definition as well. over the past few hours we've had three showers and gaping pushing into the eastern parts of england as well. this is where we proceeded cloudiness and rain knocking on the door in the southwest and it will turn letter here in the next few hours. the wind will pick up as well. the rain will grow more shape and organization. it will march north and east and below get some rain in bright colors and it would be covered by gusty winds keeping the temperature is up. each intern dry across northern ireland and scotland. eight you could see temperatures close to freezing by the end of the night. across england and wales is an area of wet and windy weather and a heavy rain will
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clear into the southeast and the rain pushes into southeastern scotland affecting much of northern england. pushing into divisions as well. you can see the center of it and this is where we have got the strongest winds. it will make it feel cold and we could get some sunshine across south wales in southern england and northern ireland and left in scotland and temperatures here are no better than around 50 degrees. the area of low pressure bringing the wet and drink the blood that — weather and it will affect eastern areas into the night. but eventually it will move away towards continental europe. a brief range of high pressure and another with a sister comes in from the atlantic. it's a windy start for eastern england. they showers on the valley in the window shop and my areas look at some sunshine for a while. the cloudiness increases towards the west and be able to see rain coming in tonight and people see rain coming into northern ireland in the afternoon. temperatures across england and wales should be more warmer than we were expecting on tuesday. this is the latest situation as we head into thursday. we have got this weather
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front streaming into northern ireland and scotland bringing more cloudiness and outbreaks of rain. i pressure to the southeast which means the southwestern ring. it will draw in some tropical maritime air. it will also lift the temperatures. they will be a lot of cloudiness with the air mass and rain affecting west and scotland and parts of northern ireland. a few drizzle around western hills and close in england and brightness and sunshine to the east. look at these temperatures. could be up to 19 degrees in newcastle and belfast and we may reach 20 or even 21 degrees with some sunshine.
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the chancellor defends his tax rises and says no tax cuts until public finances allow. at the conservative party conference, rishi sunak makes it clear the difficult choices ahead. i have to be blunt with you. 0ur recovery comes with a cost. meanwhile, the army starts delivering fuel to try to help the petrol stations still running dry in the south east. the chancellor says despite the challenges, brexit is in the long—term interests of the country. also tonight. the big tory party donor involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. after the sarah everard case, the head of the met police announces a review of police vetting standards. facebook, instagram and whatsapp
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have all gone off—line in a

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