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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 4, 2021 2:00pm-4:59pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines — the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, amid concerns over living standards. rishi sunak says he will consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you, our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt is almost a 100% of gdp, so we need to fix our public finances. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers say a second prominent donor to the conservative party was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. a serving metropolitan police officer appears in court
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charged with rape. he denies the allegation. the military is called in to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in parts of england. protesters clash with motorists as insulate britain cause more disruption across london. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the chancellor rishi sunak has told the conservative party conference in manchester that he wants to do �*whatever it takes�* to help britain recover from the pandemic. saying he believed in fiscal responsibility, mr sunak defended tax rises, and said he'd like to cut taxes when public finances are on a "sustainable footing". and he insisted brexit was in the long term interests of the uk economy, despite disruption to fuel supplies. the government is commiting £500 million to renew job support programmes,
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amid concerns about a rise in the cost of living and the scrapping of the £20 per week uplift in universal credit. here's our political correspondent iain watson. the message from the prime minister and the chancellor is clear. the slogan is �*build back better�*. translated, this means the economy could be stronger after the pandemic than before. but it takes time to train more workers, and right now, with the cost of living rising, they have to find a way to try to stop their political stock from falling. hogging attention outside the conference, pig farmers were complaining about labour shortages. their costs and our prices could be increasing. during the pandemic, he was the good guy, picking up plaudits for paying people's wages. now, though, it is payback time. this tax—raising chancellor took on critics in his own ranks. whilst i know tax rises are unpopular, some will even say
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un—conservative, i'll tell you what is un—conservative. unfunded pledges, reckless borrowing and soaring debt. anyone who tells you that you can borrow more today, and tomorrow will simply sort itself out, just doesn't care about the future. he is also about to reverse a temporary increase in universal credit. but he wanted the conference to focus on the future, with a £500 million jobs fund and more investment in artificial intelligence. oh, and the b word was back. i was proud to back brexit, proud to back leave, because despite the challenges, i believe in the long term, the agility, flexibility and freedom provided by brexit would be more valuable in a 21st—century, global economy. and the prime minister also had his eye on the future, rather than current difficulties. looking at the progress that we're making in wind power, where we lead the world in offshore wind, we think we can get to complete clean
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energy production by 2035. you won't hear much criticism on the conference floor of the government's direction of travel, but around the conference there is what is best described as quiet concern among some of the grassroots. there is a danger that in the rush to embrace the decarbonisation route, that actually working people's concerns are brushed under the table. we keep getting told that you are not going to be worse off, everything is going to be fine. actually, your day—to—day life you just see prices increasing all the time. i think sometimes the message doesn't match up to the reality. obviously with the universal credit situation, it is not— ideal for young people, especially on low - incomes, with that cut. however, we've also got to where |you're coming out of a pandemic. | applause. so the prime minister and the chancellor will be hoping that people judge the government not by short—term difficulties, but by long—term vision.
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iain watson, bbc news, manchester. 0ur chief political correspondent chris mason can join us now. chris, i mean, someone had to explain to the party faithful, to the most die hard conservatives where you are, why taxes are going up, explaining away price increases, food shortages, wages not going up soon as people want, did rishi sunak do enough of a convincing job to convince rank and file conservatives that the party government is on the right one? that the party government is on the ri . ht one? . that the party government is on the riaht one? . , , , ., right one? that is the big question this afternoon _ right one? that is the big question this afternoon and _ right one? that is the big question this afternoon and that _ right one? that is the big question this afternoon and that is - right one? that is the big question this afternoon and that is the - right one? that is the big question this afternoon and that is the talk| this afternoon and that is the talk of a conference now, the extent to which, as we heard in en's report, there is a gap between some of the rhetoric we have heard from the government and the reality of people's lives at the moment, perhaps around the cost of living that then also the shortages that are leading to so many of the current problems. and then that question of tax, because what has
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been really striking here in the last couple of days is that you've had conservative senior ministers falling over themselves to say that the conservatives are a low tax party at just the time that they are putting up national insurance, that they have put up corporation tax. they will also be making the argument they are committed to a low immigration model for the british economy, which they hope in the longer term will be tied to higher wages but what is the leaver they have reached a0 try to ease current issues around labour market problems? well, immigration, albeit temporarily, and albeit in relatively small numbers, certainly compared to the ones that labour were calling for last week at their conference in brighton. so i think there is an awareness here, as we emerge out of what is hoped to be the worst elements of the pandemic, that there are big questions being asked about the current situation in the economy. and big questions around the extent to which the government is doing what is necessary to ease those restrictions. the government to some
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of these issues are down to private sector employers to resolve, for instance the shortage of wagon drivers, but to what extent, particularly of these problems stretch out across the autumn in the winter, well in the end people blame the government, bluntly? chris mason in manchester. — the government, bluntly? chris mason in manchester, thank _ the government, bluntly? chris mason in manchester, thank you. _ i'm joined now by torsten bell, chief executive of the resolution foundation, a left—leaning think tank focused on improving living standards for those on low to middle incomes. good to see you, thanks for being with us. that point that rishi sunak made at conference, that, in the longer term, the move towards, in his view, a low immigration, high wage economy is something that will happen and is clearly a good thing. that seems to make sense to a lot of people, doesn't it? first that seems to make sense to a lot of people, doesn't it?— people, doesn't it? first of all i should say _ people, doesn't it? first of all i should say we _ people, doesn't it? first of all i should say we are _ people, doesn't it? first of all i should say we are not - people, doesn't it? first of all i should say we are not a - people, doesn't it? first of all i - should say we are not a left-leaning should say we are not a left—leaning think tank, we are an independent think tank, we are an independent think tank, we are an independent think tank, and david willetts was up think tank, and david willetts was up at the conservative today might
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think it was news to him that you described it in that way.- think it was news to him that you described it in that way. thank you for that correction, _ described it in that way. thank you for that correction, much - described it in that way. thank you for that correction, much needed. | for that correction, much needed. that's fine, back to the substance, which are slightly more important. what is the underlying truth is that changes in migration can have big effects on some particular sectors and obviously hgv drivers are the ones focused on right now because thatis ones focused on right now because that is driving big changes in our economy and indeed our ability to get fuel from the pump. but in the longer run, it is not the levels of migration that determine most of what's important in our economy. there are those that are in favour of high migration and actually those that would like to see less migration, and both overstate how big a deal migration is in determining the wages of most working people up and down this country. what we are going to see in the short term is wages rising for hgv drivers, becausejust the short term is wages rising for hgv drivers, because just like gas prices, wages are rising fast because you can't quickly turn on a new supply of hgv drivers. you need to be trained, it is a very important role. but actually if you
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step back from that, what happens is hgv drivers wages go up, but so will places in the shops — micro prices in shops that hgv drivers contribute to, because when you have your goods taken to the supermarket the costs matter. so hgv drivers's wages will go matter. so hgv drivers's wages will 9° up matter. so hgv drivers's wages will go up and everybody else's wages in terms of what they can actually buy will come down and that is a relative change in wages, it is not about overall wages the economy going up. about overall wages the economy auoin u -. ,, ~ about overall wages the economy oiini.u. ,, ~ ., about overall wages the economy oiiinu. ,, ~ ., , . about overall wages the economy iioin u-. ,, . . , . ., going up. sure. we are expecting an announcement, _ going up. sure. we are expecting an announcement, £500 _ going up. sure. we are expecting an announcement, £500 million - going up. sure. we are expecting an announcement, £500 million of- going up. sure. we are expecting an | announcement, £500 million of help over the next 3.5 years for the young and over—50s coming off furlough. is that enough money? i think it is welcome that the chancellor has recognised the inevitable, which is that the crisis has gone on just much longer than he was hoping when he announced the scheme is that he is basically now extending. these are existing schemes largely that were providing support to young people and to some older workers and some longer term unemployed, and what has happened as the crisis has dragged on, he is now recognising that by extending the
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time period over which the support will be available. i think that's the right thing for tim —— for him to have done. bigger picture, it was quite a short speech from the chancellor today, that is good news for all of us listening to it, in some ways, but actually, if you look at the scale of the cost of living crisis facing families, prices going up, whether that is from gas or food, and then also incomes coming down below —— for low income households will lose 5% of their income on wednesday this week when the prime minister stands up, that is the same day universal credit will be cut by £1000 a year for a million of the poorest households in our country. it is the commendation of those two, rising prices and falling incomes that make this automate serious cost of living crunch for lots of families. i wonder then, finally, crunch for lots of families. i wonderthen, finally, rising prices, wonder then, finally, rising prices, falling incomes, fuel charges going up, energy going up, income going down, as you say, the cut in the uplift of universal credit, how do you explain, then, the four point lead the conservatives have over labour? is this more about labour
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thanit labour? is this more about labour than it is about what the conservatives are actually doing, do you think? i conservatives are actually doing, do ou think? , ., ., ., you think? i should leave other ieoile you think? i should leave other peeple to _ you think? i should leave other people to comment _ you think? i should leave other people to comment on - you think? i should leave other people to comment on the - you think? i should leave other. people to comment on the politics you think? i should leave other- people to comment on the politics of this. all i would say is if you look at the bigger picture here, boris johnson did promise to get brexit done, and that has happened over the course of the last few years, and people will have noticed that and they will also have noticed if you look at what rishi sunak said today, whether or not you agree with the specifics of what he's saying, there is obviously an optimism and a future focused energy to what he is trying to say, even if it is slightly california enthused in its enthusiasm that everyone is going to be working in al injust enthusiasm that everyone is going to be working in al in just a few years, and the dangerfor be working in al in just a few years, and the danger for the conservatives is that that optimism is what people want to hear, but if the clash between that and the reality of people's lives as prices go reality of people's lives as prices 9° up reality of people's lives as prices go up and incomes come down becomes too great, that actually may turn it into a political problem rather than an asset, but as i say, you should get some political commentators on
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for much more insight as to how we have got two where we have got two. always a treasure to speak to, toast and bell from the independent resolution foundation. —— thorsten fink. the army has begun to help in the delivery of fuel, amid ongoing shortages in parts of the country. more than a fifth of petrol stations in london and the south east still do not have fuel, according to the petrol retailers association. it says it could be more than a week before things get back to normal. here's theo leggett. army drivers, getting ready to ferry fuel around the country. 200 military personnel are being deployed to help deliver petrol and diesel to forecourts. in many areas, the situation has eased dramatically, retailers say. but in london and the south—east, queues remain common. the news this morning is better than bad. it is slightly positive. but our poll later in the day will confirm whether it is a real turning point today. and i think that the military drivers will add a little bit
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of confidence to that, but it is not a full policy. but it is not a full panacea. at the height of the crisis, some 65% of service stations said they were running dry, as a wave of panic buying took hold across the country. but by the weekend, that figure had fallen to just 16%. the government is hoping that, with the help of the military, a site like this, a petrol station that has run out of petrol, will become a thing of the past. but people within the industry are warning that the root causes of the crisis have yet to be addressed. the problem is a severe shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers, which is affecting other parts of the economy as well. ministers say that disruption to supply chains are not confined to the uk. there are things that we can do, and it is reasonable that people expect us to do what we can, whether that is short—term visas, speeding up testing for drivers, we should and are doing those things. but we cannot wave a magic wand and make a global supply chain challenge disappear overnight.
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challenges disappear overnight. there never was a shortage of fuel. the problem was getting it to forecourts quickly enough to meet demand. the crisis has thrown a harsh spotlight once again on the challenges facing what were once the uk's carefully tuned supply chains. theo leggett, bbc news. the rules on foreign travel have changed, with the old traffic light system scrapped. there will now be just one list of so—called "red countries", and anyone travelling to them will have to quarantine for ten days in a hotel when they return. but most fully vaccinated travellers coming from other destinations will no longer need to take a covid test before departure. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports. going abroad just got cheaper, and a whole lot easier. the amber list has been scrapped. now there's just a red list of countries. those passengers still have to pay to quarantine in a hotel when they get home. but for everywhere else, there is only one pcr test when you get back. as long as you are fully
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vaccinated, no other test is needed, and no isolation. but for people who have not beenjabbed, all the old rules still apply. a test before travelling home, self isolation and tests on day two and day eight. the changes are just in time for those desperate to escape for half term. plenty of families have been put off international travel because the system has been so complicated and so expensive. there are still some deals out there and definitely prices are still a little bit lower than they were pre—pandemic. but i think once we start to see the likes of the us opening up, which is happening sometime in november, then i think really we are going to see prices gradually start to creep up, as companies, you know these airlines, have had virtually no income for many months now, and they have to make up the billions of pounds of debt they have built up. the travel industry is delighted, even though we are well into the last remnants of the holiday season. we need to do more. you know, the requirement to do a test after arrival,
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particularly a pcr test, and they will change that to a rapid antigen, but i don't understand why they are waiting for some time to change that. i think the industry could adapt and introduce that change much quicker. but it is going in the right direction. there are still different rules for any country you are travelling to. these changes are only about what you have to do when you are coming home. the red list is to be reviewed again this week, and more countries may be given the green light at that stage. so whether it's for pleasure, for business, or to see family, a simpler, cheaper system is now in place. colletta smith, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the chancellor announces half £1 billion to help get people back to work after the pandemic, amid concerns over living standards. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers show a secretive russian businessmen, linked to conservative
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party donations, made millions from alleged fraud. a serving metropolitan police officer appears in court, charged with rape. he denies the allegation. moore on one of oui’ moore on one of our top stories. a bbc investigation has discovered how a major conservative party donor was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. leaked documents reveal how mohamed amersi — who's given half a million pounds to the tories — worked on a series of controversial deals for a swedish telecoms company. the swedish company was later fined almost a billion dollars for bribery. mr amersi denies any wrongdoing. the bbc worked alongside the international consortium of investigativejournalists and the guardian on the investigation. richard bilton reports. mohamed amersi is wealthy and well—connected. here he is talking about the dangers of corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life.
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so where did his wealth come from? some of it comes from this company in sweden, a company fined almost $1 billion for bribery. telia was prosecuted over a corrupt telecoms deal. the firm paid $220 million to an offshore company secretly controlled by gulnara karimova, the daughter of the then president of uzbekistan. the american authorities described it as a $220 million bribe. we have obtained documents showing how mr amersi was involved in the deal. in one e—mail, a telia boss writes... "i do not want to be involved in the day to day negotiations, so maybe you could handle it." mr amersi reponds... "sure, i agree." and here's mr amersi's invoice for his part in project uzbekistan. he got a success fee of $500,000 for his work. mr amersi's lawyers said the offshore company had been vetted
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and approved by telia and its involvement did not raise any red flags to mr amersi. all of this matters because he has given more than half a million to the conservative party. this morning, borisjohnson gave his reaction. i see that story today but all i can say on that one is that all these donations are vetted in the normal way in accordance with rules that were set up under the labour government. so we vetted them the whole time. a conservative spokesman said government policy is in no way influenced by the donations the party receives. they are entirely separate. "we are motivated by the priorities of the british public acting in the national interest." richard bilton, bbc news. 0ur correspondent andy verity is with me. this afternoon we have heard about another businessmen link to
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conservative party donations called victor fed secretive russian whose businesses have backed 3a conservatives mps, he was involved in a russian corruption scandal. that is also included in the bbc investigation. his lawyers told the bbc there is no evidence whatsoever that viktor fedotov behaved improperly. the revelations come from those pandora papers, a leak of 12 million offshore documents. andy, what more do we know about this man? viktor fedotov has very close connections to the conservative party, he has donated more than £700,000 through his businesses, including donations to a dozen tory mps. now the link between him and the conservatives is controversial, because later this month the government will decide whether to approve his company's plans for £1 billion undersea energy link between the uk and france. now, working with the uk and france. now, working with the consortium, international consortium of investigative genitive
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is in the guardian, bbc panorama has found documents that show how he, viktor fedotov, made his fortune. they reveal how he and two managers of trends in f, the russian state oil firm, of trends in f, the russian state oilfirm, took money of trends in f, the russian state oil firm, took money from a of trends in f, the russian state oilfirm, took money from a pipeline project and shifted it offshore. it looks like they siphoned off more than $100 million and hid the money in secretive trusts. we asked andrew mitchell about it, who is a barrister specialising in fraud cases. ii barrister specialising in fraud cases. , ., barrister specialising in fraud cases. ., ., cases. if people are able to construct — cases. if people are able to construct a _ cases. if people are able to construct a scheme, - cases. if people are able to l construct a scheme, whereby cases. if people are able to - construct a scheme, whereby they cases. if people are able to _ construct a scheme, whereby they can extract _ construct a scheme, whereby they can extract for— construct a scheme, whereby they can extract for doing nothing $100 million _ extract for doing nothing $100 million plus, out of government funds, _ million plus, out of government funds, then the real losers are the mem _ funds, then the real losers are the men, women and children who rely on the government to give them education, health, roads, social services — education, health, roads, social services. . , , ., ~ ., ., services. lawyers for aqua wind, and mr fedotov. — services. lawyers for aqua wind, and mr fedotov, aqua _
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services. lawyers for aqua wind, and mr fedotov, aqua wind _ services. lawyers for aqua wind, and mr fedotov, aqua wind is _ services. lawyers for aqua wind, and mr fedotov, aqua wind is his - mr fedotov, aqua wind is his company. —— aquind aces company. mr fedotov denies any allegations of wrongdoing, and has no interest in british politics and has always worked in an open entrance current manner. the conservatives say compliance was made and checks were made. 12 compliance was made and checks were made. ' ., , ., ., i, made. 12 million documents analysed b the made. 12 million documents analysed by the guardian. _ made. 12 million documents analysed by the guardian, the _ made. 12 million documents analysed by the guardian, the bbc— made. 12 million documents analysed by the guardian, the bbc panorama i by the guardian, the bbc panorama programme and so on, that is in the pandora papers. a while back we had the panama papers. i think there are a number of others in between beginning with the p as well. what i want to know is is anything changing? a lot of the people who are putting money into the offshore accounts are doing it legally. are we seeing governments giving these relegations the latest today actually changing the system? iriat actually changing the system? not et come actually changing the system? not yet come out _ actually changing the system? iirrt yet come out of today's revelations, but maybe that would be a bit quick, but maybe that would be a bit quick, but certainly since the panama papers back in 2016 there have been reforms was to david cameron was put
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on the back foot by some of the revelations, the former prime minister. he introduced a reform where in companies house, where they keep all the details about companies in the uk, you can find out who the person of significant control is, but only if they are bridged in the uk. if they are registered in an overseas territory like the british virgin islands etc, you can't find out, so we need leaks like this if we are ever going to know. there was a move a few years ago by margaret hodge mp and andrew mitchell mp to force overseas territories and crown dependencies to have registries of an official ownership but that got watered down so they don't publish it, although law enforcement are going to be able to see it. so still a lot less than transparent campaigners would like. indeed, thank ou campaigners would like. indeed, thank you very — campaigners would like. indeed, thank you very much. _ and you can see more on that story tonight in panorama, the pandora papers, on bbc one at 7.35pm. a metropolitan police officer has appeared in court, charged with rape. pc david carrick works
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in scotland yard's parliamentary and diplomatic protection command. he denies the allegation. 0ur correspondent, graham satchell, is at st albans magistrates' court and he sent this update. david carrick was not in court. he appeared on a video link from stevenage police station. it was a procedural affair, so very short. he spoke only a couple of times, to confirm his name, age and address. he is charged with one count of rape. he emphatically denied that charge. through his the alleged offences are said to have occurred in st albans last september, when david carrick was off duty. he is, as you say, a police constable in the metropolitan police serving in the parliamentary and protection command, so in the houses of parliament, but currently suspended from duty. the metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dick, has said she is deeply concerned that such a serious offence should be associated with a serving police officer. she said she understood the public would be concerned as well. david carrick bowed his head as he was remanded in custody
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by the sitting magistrate, and he will appear in court again at the beginning of next month. graham satchell reported. a former facebook employee, who anonymously leaked compromising documents about the company, has revealed her identity. the documents highlighted internal research by the company research by the firm, which suggested its instagram platform was impacting the mental health of teenagers. facebook said the leaks were misleading. in an interview on the us network cbs, frances haugen accused the social media company of putting its profits above everything else. you have your phone. you might see only 100 pieces of content, if you sit and scroll for five minutes. but facebook has thousands of options it could show you. how facebook is picking up that content today is that it is optimising for content that gets engagement, a reaction. but its own research is showing that content that is hateful, that is divisive, that is polarising
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— it's easier to inspire people to anger than it is to other emotions. scientists who discovered how our bodies feel the warmth of the sun, or the touch of a loved one, have been awarded the nobel prize for medicine. david julius and ardem patapoutian share the prize for their work on the sense of touch, and temperature. they unpicked how our bodies convert physical sensations into electrical messages in the nervous system. their findings could lead to new ways of treating pain. climate change protesters crest —— blocked the entrance to the blackwall tunnel. they also targeted wandsworth bridge, arnos grove and the hangar lane gyratory. the high court has previously issued injunctions to try to stop those protest but they don't cover those roots. forthree protest but they don't cover those roots. for three weeks, insulate roots. forthree weeks, insulate britain have been targeting london's roads and motorways. the tactic, lie
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down on the tarmac or glue themselves to it. this morning, there were four protests at locations in london. at hangar lane, malik was caught up in a disruption. he is a dentist and had to cancel appointments. you have any with insulate britain? ida. appointments. you have any with insulate britain?— appointments. you have any with insulate britain? no, not at all. so insulate britain? no, not at all. so i am allfor— insulate britain? no, not at all. so i am all for protecting _ insulate britain? no, not at all. so i am all for protecting the - insulate britain? no, not at all. so i am all for protecting the planet, l i am all for protecting the planet, reducing our carbon footprint, but it has just caused such a huge amount of inconvenience, and, i mean, just driving past, if you see a row of cars, and i'm sure in those cars will have nhs workers, workers trying to get to hospitals, emergency doctors but it seems they have no consideration for that and they have just blocked everything offjust they have just blocked everything off just to they have just blocked everything offjust to make a point, and the point is a valid point, but there must be a better way around it. {lii must be a better way around it. of the group want to highlight the lack of insulation in the country's housing stock, which, it claims, was the least energy efficient in
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europe. the government has tried injunctions to stop the protest, threatening prison sentences and fines, but that hasn't stopped them. now it is planning more. we brought in new measures, _ now it is planning more. we brought in new measures, which _ now it is planning more. we brought in new measures, which we - now it is planning more. we brought in new measures, which we are - in new measures, which we are announcing _ in new measures, which we are announcing today, so that they can either— announcing today, so that they can either face — announcing today, so that they can either face six months injail, or unlimited — either face six months injail, or unlimited fines, and we will use section— unlimited fines, and we will use section 60 — unlimited fines, and we will use section 60 powers so that the police can do— section 60 powers so that the police can do stop — section 60 powers so that the police can do stop and search of those who are bringing — can do stop and search of those who are bringing superglue or whatever to hioch— are bringing superglue or whatever to block the traffic on our motorways. to block the traffic on our motorways-— motorways. whistle drivers _ motorways. whistle drivers have - motorways. whistle drivers have startedl motorways. whistle - drivers have started trying to remove the protesters themselves. the moment the authorities know continue to struggle to prevent the demonstrations. tom edwards, bbc london. more news coming up but now time for the time now for the weather with susan. hello. we've seen some sunshine across the uk to start the week. it will be interspersed
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for the rest of today, though, with some heavy or squally showers. they will tend to fade through the evening but that is because they will be usurped by this area of low pressure rolling into the south west, injecting energy into the atmosphere in terms of bringing strong winds, and dropping some heavy rain to the evening across the south—west of wales, carrying that rain further north and east into england in the small hours. relatively mild to the south of the uk. perhaps close to a frost in some of the scottish glens, early on tuesday. scotland and northern ireland keep quite a bit of sunshine tuesday and wednesday. a couple of showers around. windy across the board but heavy rain across much of northern and eastern england, on and off, throughout the day. it will brighten towards the west. strong gusts of wind to contend with, potentially doing some damage. no surprises, with the wind and rain, it's going to feel quite chilly.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, amid concerns over living standards. he says he will only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers show how a second prominent donor to the conservative party was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. the military is called in to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in london and the south east. protesters clash with motorists as insulate britain cause more disruption across london. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. a decision on whether england's cricket team will play in this
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winter's ashes tour in australia will be made this week when the sport's governing body, the ecb, meets. the players were told about conditions for the trip last night. there have been concerns over whether their families can travel with them, quarantine arrangements and any potential "bubble" they may have to live in. australia has some of the strictest covid—19 protocols in the world, a situation complicated by the fact its different states have their own regulations. the first test is due to begin on 8 december. meanwhile, many of england's t20 squad will be in the mix for a potential ashes place. they're getting ready to head to the middle east, ahead of the format�*s world cup later this month. tymal mills who won't be involved in the test team feels the players won't be distracted by the off field discussions. i would like to think not. nobody in this team is young and naive and will get caught up in those things, i wouldn't have thought. they are well versed in what is going on and it is a world cup, it is a massive deal, and whilst we are there, i'm sure everybody will be fully dialled in to that and then whatever happens after that will happen after that,
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but i've got no doubt that the guys will come together whenever we get together officially. and we will be fully focused on the world cup. claudio ranieri is at watford's training ground to discuss becoming their new manager, after they sacked xisco munoz afterjust ten months. watford have won two of their opening seven premier league games and sit in 15th. ranieri is understood to be the owners' first choice. he, of course, won the premier league with leicester city in 2016. but the 69 year old was sacked the following season, and has since had short spells with nantes, fulham, roma and sampdoria. tyson fury could be set to return to the fight in the uk again after this weekend's heavyweight showdown with deontay wilder. that's according to his co—promoter frank warren. wbc champ fury hasn't fought in britain since 2018 after signing a deal to stage his fights in america, competing there four times. fury is due to take on wilder this saturday night in las vegas. the third time they've met after fury beat his american opponent to take the wbc title in february last year.
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tom brady has become the nfl's leading passer after helping his tampa bay buccaneers side to a 19—17 victory over his former team the new england patriots. brady managed to pass the 80,358 yard milestone set by drew brees and what a place to break the record against the franchise he steered to six super bowls. there was late drama as new england almost took the lead with 55 seconds left, only for nick folk�*s field goal to come back off the post. the night belonged to brady, though, who returned to his old stomping ground for the first time with tampa. i tried not to predict what was going on and i had a few emotional moments, thinking about the people that have meant so much to me in my life, that are part of this community, and i'm just gratefulfor
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an amazing time here. like i said, my footballjourney took an amazing time here. like i said, my football journey took me somewhere else. cameron norrie's brilliant run at the san diego 0pen ended in last night's final. the british no 2 was beaten by casper ruud, who'd earlier knocked out andy murray, he went down 6—0 in the first before losing the second 6—2 to the second seed. that's all the sport for now. food producers have been protesting outside the conservative party conference as fears grow of an animal welfare crisis. they were joined by pig farmers worrried that thousands of animals may have to be culled because of a shortage of specialist butchers. andrew sinclair reports from manchester. they were outside the conference centre before first light. farmers and food producers who are becoming desperately worried. this meat processorfrom essex has had to cut production
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because he's 30 staff down. we are at critical stage now, we need butchers to process these pigs. farmers have backlogs and are running out of space and we need solutions now. the government says you should be paying staff more. if we want to go out of business. the ministry wants them to ease these rules but there was anger after the prime minister said on friday that the problem could be solved by raising wages. they need to think about ways in which they can make those jobs, those butcher jobs more attractive. and even more anger after he said this yesterday... i hope to break it to you but the food processing industry does involve killing a lot of animals. on some farms, like these in yorkshire,
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there is serious overcrowding. farmers say they had to start culling pigs later this week. this is heartbreaking. they are seeing their hard earned ware, a really good pork product going to waste. the nfu says pay for butchers is already good but it is a specialistjob, raising wages would just push up prices and not solve the immediate labour problem. 0ne local mp described the prime minister's comments as ill informed and unhelpful. i understand talks are taking place today with defra and the home office. the industry desperate for a speedy solution. let's get more reaction now to the chancellor, rishi sunak, defending his decision to increase taxes, saying there could be no prosperous future unless it was built on the foundation of strong public finances. despite record government borrowing during the crisis, he made it clear that more borrowing is not the long—term answer. fiur that more borrowing is not the long-term answer. that more borrowing is not the loni-term answer. .., , .., , long-term answer. our recovery comes with a cost- _ long-term answer. our recovery comes with a cost- 0ur — long-term answer. our recovery comes with a cost. our national _ long-term answer. our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt - long-term answer. our recovery comes
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with a cost. our national debt is - with a cost. our national debt is almost 800% of gdp. so we need to fix our public finances. i'm joined now by sir ed davey, leader of the liberal democrats. he is right, isn't he? they have spent enough and borrowed enough and they can't do any more borrowing, they can't do any more borrowing, they have got to do something else? the conservatives have broken their promises on taxation several times, and i would expect them to break them again because of the mess they are making of the public finances. what i was surprised, though, it was we had a chancellor which ignored the reality that most working families are facing in our country. this is an out of touch chancellor. you would imagine that listening to him that there was no fuel crisis, no energy crisis, no shortages, no problems in the abattoirs with the pig and chicken industry. it was astonishing. he had an opportunity to say how the government was going to say how the government was going to help families who were struggling
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and help businesses but he completely missed it. i can't remember a government so out of touch from what is happening around the country. we touch from what is happening around the count . ~ touch from what is happening around the country-— the country. we will get onto the cost of living _ the country. we will get onto the cost of living in _ the country. we will get onto the cost of living in a _ the country. we will get onto the cost of living in a moment, - the country. we will get onto the cost of living in a moment, but i cost of living in a moment, but first of all, if you were in government you would have to raise taxes? , . , ., , , ., taxes? the liberal democrats before the last election _ taxes? the liberal democrats before the last election said _ taxes? the liberal democrats before the last election said because - taxes? the liberal democrats before the last election said because we - the last election said because we wanted to invest in the nhs and social care that we needed a fair tax rise to pay for that and we had a costed manifesto. the conservatives pretended that taxes did not have to go up and they persuaded people that there was an easy way of going on but of course now the chickens are coming home to roost. the government has had to break its promises on tax and no doubt will break them again. what the liberal democrats want is more honesty from the chancellor and from the prime minister, and the prime minister is not very good on that score, and i think they need to level with the british people. in doing so they need to face up to the crisis that people are facing,
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businesses are facing. you believe they should _ businesses are facing. you believe they should raise _ businesses are facing. you believe they should raise taxes _ businesses are facing. you believe they should raise taxes again? - businesses are facing. you believe they should raise taxes again? i i businesses are facing. you believe | they should raise taxes again? i did not say that- _ they should raise taxes again? i did not say that. taxes _ they should raise taxes again? i c c not say that. taxes because of the mismanagement of the budget probably had to go up, they had to break their promises but they should not have made them in the first place. when they make a promise, they did not have a cop out clause, they guarantee taxes would not go up and they towed people national insurance would not increase in vat would not go would not increase in vat would not 9° up would not increase in vat would not go up and they are breaking their promises — they told people. what is worse, they are taxing working families, so the national insurance tax rise hit lower paid people and it hits small businesses and employers, and guess what? they are letting the wealthiest people, the multinationals, off. if you have to raise taxes, at least do it in a fair way but the way they are treating working families, the cut to universal credit, 2 million people losing year who will now pay the jobs tax rise,
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people losing year who will now pay thejobs tax rise, and it really people losing year who will now pay the jobs tax rise, and it really is a full frontal attack on low paid families. i'm staggered that the conservatives and the chancellor has the audacity to stand up at the conference and make out everything is going so well when he is attacking low—paid poor people. given where we are, do you think taxes should go up again? we made clear that if — taxes should go up again? we made clear that if you _ taxes should go up again? we made clear that if you wanted _ taxes should go up again? we made clear that if you wanted high - clear that if you wanted high quality services and a decent nhs and social care, which i believe, i think care workers have been badly hit over many years, and you needed to pay for it, we were honest about that at the last election. the conservatives were not. they are now forced to break their promises and the worst thing is they are doing it in an unfairway, the worst thing is they are doing it in an unfair way, hitting people who can least afford it. the in an unfair way, hitting people who can least afford it.— can least afford it. the narrative it seems to _ can least afford it. the narrative it seems to be _ can least afford it. the narrative it seems to be coming - can least afford it. the narrative it seems to be coming from - can least afford it. the narrative it seems to be coming from the | it seems to be coming from the conservative party conference and from rishi sunak and others is that
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in order to deal with the cost of living crisis and so on, employers should pay workers more. is that the solution and does that feel to long term solution potentially for the problem is that working people are suffering at the moment? i problem is that working people are suffering at the moment?- suffering at the moment? i have alwa s suffering at the moment? i have always argued — suffering at the moment? i have always argued that _ suffering at the moment? i have always argued that we _ suffering at the moment? i have always argued that we needed . suffering at the moment? i have i always argued that we needed fair wages in this country, people need a fair deal. they are not getting it from the way the government has run the economy so if the government at long last are realising that wages need to go up, i'm not going to change my mind, that is right. they should be a fair deal for working people but the idea it will solve the fuel crisis and the energy crisis and the shortages in the shops, is a total nonsense. i would argue that the conservatives need to listen to businesses out there, the farmers out there, they have asked, given this is a huge crisis, huge shortages, pigs may have to be slaughtered and not eating and just waited, and those examples, they
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really should enable visas to be given for people to come to this country who used to be supporting us and working with us. the crisis in farms and abattoirs and in the hgv lorry drivers and the crisis in the care sector, the crisis in the construction sector, this is all happening because of the conservatives misguided policies. the idea they can wish this away and suddenly think there a magic solution, i can't believe the conservatives have so lost touch with business, not only the british people, but it is offering solutions which will not work. the chancellor should get a grip of this. there's a crisis out there for ordinary people. the liberal democrats will stand up for businesses and hard—working families. this stand up for businesses and hard-working families. this is really interesting _ hard-working families. this is really interesting because - hard-working families. this isi really interesting because you hard-working families. this is - really interesting because you talk about the crisis out there and it is very real for many people, the energy crisis, the fuel crisis, empty shelves and the problem with
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abattoirs and yet the conservatives are four points ahead of the labour party and you are trailing in third. how do you explain that? given everything that has happened. let’s everything that has happened. let's see what the _ everything that has happened. let's see what the polls _ everything that has happened. let's see what the polls say _ everything that has happened. let�*s see what the polls say in a few months' time. myjob as the opposition — the leader of the liberal democrats is to explain what the problems are and to say we have alternative solutions, we have solutions to these problems, practical ones. i was secretary for energy and climate change and i plan to avoid a fuel crisis and i did that successfully but this government is so incompetent. even though it has been warned the crisis are going to happen and that it needed to prepare for a pandemic and warned it needed to prepare for pulling out of afghanistan, a warning it needed to prepare for the problems in the farming industry, the problems with hgv drivers, it did nothing. we have the most
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incompetent government i think in living memory. they are totally out of touch. i don't know when the polls will change, i have no crystal ball, but i think people watching this incompetence, out of touch government will begin to change their minds and think, maybe we should look at the liberal democrats as a party that has some practical policies. as a party that has some practical iolicies. �* , , ., ., ., policies. i'm sure you have heard about the revelations _ policies. i'm sure you have heard about the revelations concerning | policies. i'm sure you have heard . about the revelations concerning the pandora papers. leaked documents about the finances of the rich and powerful stop including details of a secretive russian businessmen linked to the conservative party donations, what are your thoughts? i’m to the conservative party donations, what are your thoughts?— what are your thoughts? i'm quite alarmed, actually. _ what are your thoughts? i'm quite alarmed, actually. your— what are your thoughts? i'm quite alarmed, actually. your viewers . what are your thoughts? i'm quite i alarmed, actually. your viewers will want people to pay their taxes and not dodge their taxes. you don't expect the chancellor to crack down on these people who are avoiding taxes — you expect. he did nothing
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about that today. they will be worried that the conservatives are being funded by this type of donor. i wonder whether or not they should pay back that donation to charity to show they are acting in good faith. this is unacceptable.— this is unacceptable. thanks for “oinini this is unacceptable. thanks for joining us- _ the head of the metropolitan police, cressida dick, has ordered an independent review into the force, after its performance was strongly criticised following the murder of sarah everard. the commissioner said she wanted to restore public trust. today, i am announcing that we will be doing a review. that will be led by a high—profile independent person, and the review will look at our internal culture and it will look at our professional standards, systems processes, leadership training, to make sure that we are the best possible met police we can be.
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and i am absolutely determined that we rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can. our special correspondent lucy manning spoke to the commissioner and gave us more details of what she had to say. well, this was the first interview the commissioner has done since wayne couzens was charged with the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. we only got a quick four minutes. she was doing a couple of other interviews, as well. but she was clear that things obviously need to change inside of the met, because they have now appointed, or are going to appoint, somebody independent to look at what might be going wrong. we don't know who that person is, who will lead it. we understand it will last for a minimum of six months. we don't know what will happen with any recommendations made. we do know it is not the public enquiry some people have been calling for.
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that would have a lot more powers. and what i also asked her was, given that this officer, given that couzens was an officer when she was his overall boss, it was on her watch that this has happened, shouldn't she take responsibility for it and resign? she said she knew it was on her watch but she intended to carry on and she had a job to do. we also talked a bit about vetting, how could couzens have been a police officer? he had gone from the civil nuclear constabulary to kent, and then to the met. the commissioner said she has asked for the national policing body to look at the vetting of police officers. and on the indecent exposure which he was accused of days before the murder of sarah everard, she confirmed as far as she was aware they had not known
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the person accused of the indecent exposure was a police officer. lucy manning, there. the brexit minister, lord frost, has renewed his threat to suspend part of the brexit deal affecting northern ireland. the northern ireland protocol was designed to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland but has meant new checks on some products travelling from great britain. but lord frost told the conservative conference in manchester that the arrangements agreed with the eu "have begun to come apart even more quickly than we feared". the northern ireland protocol is not working and needs to change. yes, we agreed the protocol in that difficult autumn two years ago, we knew we were taking a risk, but a worthy one in the cause of peace and the cause of protecting the good friday agreement. it was the right thing to do. it ended a constitutional crisis and meant our country could leave the eu, whole, free, and with real choices. of course, we wanted to negotiate something better. if it had not been for the madness of the surrender act
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we could have done so. we worried from the start that the protocol would not take the strain if not handled sensitively. as it has turned out, we were right. the arrangements have begun to come apart even more quickly than we feared. thanks to the eu's heavy—handed actions, support has collapsed. the protocol itself is undermining the belfast good friday agreement. businesses, political parties, institutions and all in northern ireland face instability and disruption. we can still solve these problems. i set out injuly a set of proposals that would establish a new balance for a lasting future for northern ireland. i will soon be sending a set of legal texts to the eu to support them. we still await a formal response from the eu to our proposals. but from what i hear, i worry
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that we will not get a response which enables the significant change we need. so i urge the eu to be ambitious. it is no use tinkering around the edges. we need significant change. if we can agree something better, as i would like us to do, we can get back to where we wanted to be, an independent britain with friendly relations with the eu based on free trade. but we can't wait forever. without an agreed solution soon, we will need to act using the article 60 safeguard mechanism to address the impact the protocol is having on northern ireland. it's feared the eruption of the volcano on the spanish island of la palma could continue for months. lava has now been flowing for 15 days, destroying more than 1,000 homes. part of the volcano has collapsed,
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causing the lava to spread faster and in new directions. locals are wondering what the future will hold when the eruption finally stops. danjohnson is on the island and sent this report. incredibly, this eruption is now into a third week and it keeps getting stronger. the volcano is producing even more lava with even more force. that's why all that lava, all that ash, is pouring up into the sky higher and higher, and that means more of a risk to a bigger area — the potential for more people to be evacuated on top of the 6,000 or so who have been out of their homes for a fortnight now. and i was talking to the director of the canary islands volcano institute, who said he expects this eruption to continue for at least another ten days, potentially another two months. and even then, when the volcanic eruption stops, when the lava stops flowing, that's not the end of the story. he said it could take years to recover from this because there are vast lava trails right across the landscape here. they have cut through towns
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and villages, destroyed over 1,000 homes, communication lines and infrastructure have been destroyed. so what to do with that lava — how to live with it — is a major question for the future here that is dominating the future potential of people's lives and their livelihoods, as well. but there are people still living here, right in the shadow of the volcano — some of them saying they've had enough now, after a fortnight of that thing thundering, rumbling right through their lives day and night. some have had enough, they can't get sleep, they want to leave. some are making the decision to get to safer places. but then i've also spoken to people who live with that volcano effectively in their back garden who say, "no, as long as the authorities will let me, i'm going to stay, i'm going to see it out." but this is already much worse than anybody has ever seen on this volcanic island — it's produced twice the amount of lava of the previous eruption 50 years ago, and it's still unknown how long that will continue, how much more lava it will produce, and how much more destruction it will cause.
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a large oil slick has begun washing ashore in southern california. beaches in orange county, southeast of los angeles, have been closed, as oil and dead wildlife wash up on the sand. almost half a million litres of oil has leaked from a pipeline connected to an offshore oil rig. courtney bembridge reports. california is known for its beaches, but not like this. clumps of oil and tar the size of softballs scatter the shoreline, as well as dead birds and fish. more than 120,000 gallons of oil has leaked into the ocean from a broken pipeline five miles off the coast. we are in the midst of a potential ecological disaster here at huntington beach and as the exhibits and pictures here illustrate, the oil spill has significantly impacted our community. the broken pipeline is connected
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to an offshore oil platform run by a subsidiary of houston—based amplify energy. the company says the pipeline has now been shut off and the remaining oil suctioned out. it has been maintained. we are investigating, if the pipeline is the source of this, how this happened. a huge clean—up operation is under way to try to stop the oil reaching sensitive wetlands nearby and people are being urged to avoid the beaches. you can feel the vapour in the air. i saw what i'll describe as little pancake clusters of oil along the shoreline and i've described it as something like an egg yolk — if you push it, it kind of spreads out, so we don't want people to disturb those little clusters. local authorities say it is too soon to say whether the company responsible will face criminal charges. courtney bembridge, bbc news. we have more coming up from the pandora papers, more than the
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conservative party conference, just more of everything here on bbc news stop but now the weather forecast. hello. we've seen some sunshine around to start the week, but on into the evening, it will be increasingly peppered with some quite heavy and squally showers. but tomorrow, though, it is a more widespread area of strong winds and some intense rain that we are up against, as we see this area of low pressure making its way in from the atlantic, and in fact it will edge into the south—west even later on this evening. many of the showers in the east tending to thin out through the evening, but some very wet weather for the south—west of england and wales. strengthening winds as well, and that rain makes it's way further north and east through the course of the night. the winds perhaps strong enough, actually, to do some damage. it is relatively mild to the south of the uk. lighter winds, clearer skies. it could get close to freezing in some of the scottish glens. scotland and northern ireland pick up a few showers on tuesday. it will be windy here, but the heaviest rain will be close
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to the centre of this area of low pressure, particularly wet into tuesday afternoon for northern and eastern england, and some strong gusts of wind to contend with, as well. no surprises, where we have the heavy and persistent rain, it's going to feel pretty chilly, too, temperatures barely scraping into double figures. what a contrast, then, for wednesday, as this area of low pressure pulls off into the north sea, and we just briefly see a ridge of high pressure building. a very different day, especially across england and wales. much lighter winds, a lot of sunshine and fine weather. come the afternoon, however, cloud will start to encroach on northern ireland, and some rain by the end of the day. our next atlantic system edging its way in. warmer for wednesday, temperatures in the mid—teens. for the end of the week, though, it could turn out to be unseasonably warm, particularly across the southern half of the uk. we are going to see some fronts working their way into the north—west. it will be pretty breezy, but it is a south—westerly breeze,
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so that pulls air from a long way south, as the name implies, and that is going to bump up the temperatures quite nicely for thursday and friday. even where we have some rain with these weather fronts across scotland and northern ireland, temperatures in the mid to high teens. we could be looking at the low 20s, though, with some sunny spells across england and wales. unseasonably warm, certainly for this point in the year, and it looks like we could continue with some warmer weather even on into next week.
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this is bbc news, i am clive myrie. the chancellor announces half—a—billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he'll only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you, our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt is almost a 100% of gdp, so we need to fix our public finances. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers. a secretive russian whose businesses have backed 3a conservative mps conservative mps was involved in a russian corruption scandal. a serving metropolitan police officer appears in court charged with rape. he denies the allegation. the military is called in to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in london and the south east. protesters clash with motorists as insulate britain cause more
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disruption across london. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the chancellor rishi sunak has told the conservative party conference in manchester that he wants to do �*whatever it takes�* to help britain recover from the pandemic. saying he believed in fiscal responsibility, mr sunak defended tax rises, and said he�*d like to cut taxes when public finances are on a "sustainable footing". and he insisted brexit was in the long term interests of the uk economy, despite disruption to fuel supplies. the government is commiting £500 million to renew job support programmes, amid concerns about a rise in the cost of living and the scrapping of the £20 per week uplift in universal credit. here�*s our political correspondent iain watson.
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the message from the prime minister and the chancellor is clear. the slogan is �*build back better�*. translated, this means the economy could be stronger after the pandemic than before. but it takes time to train more workers, and right now, with the cost of living rising, they have to find a way to try to stop their political stock from falling. hogging attention outside the conference, pig farmers were complaining about labour shortages. their costs and our prices could be increasing. during the pandemic, he was the good guy, picking up plaudits for paying people�*s wages. now, though, it is payback time. this tax—raising chancellor took on critics in his own ranks. whilst i know tax rises are unpopular, some will even say un—conservative, i�*ll tell you what is un—conservative. unfunded pledges, reckless borrowing and soaring debt.
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anyone who tells you that you can borrow more today, and tomorrow will simply sort itself out, just doesn�*t care about the future. he is also about to reverse a temporary increase in universal credit. but he wanted the conference to focus on the future, with a £500 million jobs fund and more investment in artificial intelligence. oh, and the b word was back. i was proud to back brexit, proud to back leave, because despite the challenges, i believe in the long term, the agility, flexibility and freedom provided by brexit would be more valuable in a 21st—century, global economy. and the prime minister also had his eye on the future, rather than current difficulties. looking at the progress that we're making in wind power, where we lead the world in offshore wind, we think we can get to complete clean energy production by 2035.
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you won�*t hear much criticism on the conference floor of the government�*s direction of travel, but around the conference there is what is best described as quiet concern among some of the grassroots. there is a danger that in the rush to embrace the decarbonisation route, that actually working people�*s concerns are brushed under the table. we keep getting told that you are not going to be worse off, everything is going to be fine. actually, your day—to—day life you just see prices increasing all the time. i think sometimes the message doesn't match up to the reality. obviously with the universal credit situation, it is not— ideal for young people, especially on low - incomes, with that cut. however, we've also got to weigh up coming out of a pandemic. _ applause. so the prime minister and the chancellor will be hoping that people judge the government not by short—term difficulties, but by long—term vision. iain watson, bbc news, manchester.
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0ur political correspondent, chris mason can join us now. in the great north—western city of manchester. the chancellor says he would do whatever it takes to help britain recover from the would do whatever it takes to help britain recoverfrom the pandemic. he hasn�*t ruled out raising taxes again, has it? he hasn't ruled out raising taxes again. has it?— again, has it? your bolt only in iride again, has it? your bolt only in pride coming — again, has it? your bolt only in pride coming across _ again, has it? your bolt only in pride coming across there. - again, has it? your bolt only in pride coming across there. he | again, has it? your bolt only in - pride coming across there. he was trying to do that thing of simultaneously saying that his instincts as a conservative chancellor were to be careful with public spending, to be low tax and for that to be sought of his mindset and ideal, whilst at the same time we know, don�*t we, that he is a chancellor who has presided over the coming rise in national insurance, a rise in corporation tax as well, and we saw the prime minister the other day not ruling out the potential of further tax rises, and in many ways that tax conversation has been central to the chat around this conference for the last couple of days because the tax burden is
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historically very high. the argument from the government is as the prime minister put at the other day has been the fiscal meteorite of a pandemic and with that the vast splurge of public spending around for instance the furlough scheme, whilst for so many conservatives, that instinct to be low tax is there, and you have had ministers falling over themselves to say this is a low tax party, whilst at the same time, look at the evidence of the tax burden right now, and an awareness i think within government that they are not necessarily sure just what is around the corner, and they are very aware of just just what is around the corner, and they are very aware ofjust how much spending there has been, just where debt levels are, and therefore just what a set of difficult decisions are coming, as we emerge, hopefully come out of the emergency phase of a pandemic. come out of the emergency phase of a iandemic. . . ., . ., pandemic. yeah, and the chancellor also depending _ pandemic. yeah, and the chancellor also depending on _ pandemic. yeah, and the chancellor also depending on the _ pandemic. yeah, and the chancellor also depending on the floor - pandemic. yeah, and the chancellor also depending on the floor brexit. l also depending on the floor brexit. is this a pattern that we might see developed over the next few weeks, where ministers and senior members of government are going to have to say, look, in the long term, we
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believe brexit is right, despite the current issues that some point to as a result of being from brexit, fuel shortages and so on?— a result of being from brexit, fuel shortages and so on? yeah, i think that is exactly _ shortages and so on? yeah, i think that is exactly it. _ shortages and so on? yeah, i think that is exactly it. so _ shortages and so on? yeah, i think that is exactly it. so we _ shortages and so on? yeah, i think that is exactly it. so we are - shortages and so on? yeah, i think that is exactly it. so we are seeing | that is exactly it. so we are seeing the government framed the current bumps around supply chains and shortages and wagon drivers and all the rest of it through the prism of brexit, through what they see as a desire from many for a lower immigration, higherwage desire from many for a lower immigration, higher wage economy, and that these are the bumps of the transition to that. i think what is interesting politically is where does the blame lie, is it on private sector companies who are not shifting to current market conditions quickly enough, or bluntly, does the buck stop with the government, and i think in many senses how that plays out will be determined by how long these short—term pressures go on for. do they trundle on all the way through they trundle on all the way through the autumn and winter, do they cause
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problems over christmas, do we see shortages on the selves —— on the shelves, or is it what ligament sees as a longer—term economic transition? let�*s continue analysis in this frame. we can talk to tony danko, the chairman of the cbi. nice to talk to you, afternoon to you. what did you make of what we heard from the chancellor? i what did you make of what we heard from the chancellor?— from the chancellor? i think it was a iood from the chancellor? i think it was a good speech. — from the chancellor? i think it was a good speech, he _ from the chancellor? i think it was a good speech, he talked - from the chancellor? i think it was a good speech, he talked about i from the chancellor? i think it was | a good speech, he talked about the present— a good speech, he talked about the present day and securing the jobs in the economy, that has been his watch work all— the economy, that has been his watch work all the _ the economy, that has been his watch work all the way through and then he took a _ work all the way through and then he took a big _ work all the way through and then he took a big leap into the future, talking — took a big leap into the future, talking about an ai technologically driven _ talking about an ai technologically driven economy. the stuff in between, _ driven economy. the stuff in between, it is what we were talking about, _ between, it is what we were talking about, how — between, it is what we were talking about, how are we going to get growth — about, how are we going to get growth going in the next year or ton _ growth going in the next year or two. i_ growth going in the next year or two, i suspect we will hear more in the budget— two, i suspect we will hear more in the budget but i enjoyed his speech today~ _ the budget but i en'oyed his speech toda . ~ ., ., the budget but i en'oyed his speech toda .~ ., ., the budget but i en'oyed his speech toda. ., ., the budget but i en'oyed his speech toda .~ ., ., ., today. what would you say to him, what are you _ today. what would you say to him, what are you saying _ today. what would you say to him, what are you saying to _ today. what would you say to him, what are you saying to ministers i today. what would you say to him, i what are you saying to ministers you are meeting here about the situation in the economy right now, whether it be the supply chain issues, we have seen the issues at petrol stations, 93ps seen the issues at petrol stations, gaps on shop shelves for instance which the government hopes is a
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transition revamp if you like. what are you saying to ministers? i think we have been _ are you saying to ministers? i think we have been raising _ are you saying to ministers? i think we have been raising the _ are you saying to ministers? i think we have been raising the issue - are you saying to ministers? i think we have been raising the issue of. we have been raising the issue of lahour— we have been raising the issue of labour shortages were three or four months _ labour shortages were three or four months now. it has been pretty clear that as _ months now. it has been pretty clear that as the _ months now. it has been pretty clear that as the entire world economy bounces — that as the entire world economy bounces back there are shortages everywhere. but whilst the cause of the problems might be global, the solutions— the problems might be global, the solutions need to be local, and so we are _ solutions need to be local, and so we are saying let's get round the table. _ we are saying let's get round the table. to— we are saying let's get round the table, to your earlier point, not business — table, to your earlier point, not business as— table, to your earlier point, not business as fault or government pork, _ business as fault or government pork. this— business as fault or government pork, this is a global crisis, a current— pork, this is a global crisis, a current reality. let's get round the table _ current reality. let's get round the table and — current reality. let's get round the table and work out what is going to takei _ table and work out what is going to take, do— table and work out what is going to take, do we — table and work out what is going to take, do we need some short—term visasi _ take, do we need some short—term visas, do _ take, do we need some short—term visas, do we — take, do we need some short—term visas, do we need some skills money to train— visas, do we need some skills money to train people up quickly, do we need _ to train people up quickly, do we need businesses to make different decisions, — need businesses to make different decisions, but rather than be taken surprise _ decisions, but rather than be taken surprise at — decisions, but rather than be taken surprise at these things when people are queueing up at the pumps, let's sit down _ are queueing up at the pumps, let's sit down together, government and business. _ sit down together, government and business, we can tell them what can happen— business, we can tell them what can happen when, and let's start to roll our sleeves — happen when, and let's start to roll our sleeves up. we happen when, and let's start to roll our sleeves up-_ our sleeves up. we saw receives to neck making _ our sleeves up. we saw receives to neck making a _ our sleeves up. we saw receives to neck making a virtue _ our sleeves up. we saw receives to neck making a virtue out _ our sleeves up. we saw receives to neck making a virtue out of- our sleeves up. we saw receives to neck making a virtue out of brexit, | neck making a virtue out of brexit, the opportunities as he sees it for the opportunities as he sees it for the british economy, how much to blame brexit for what we are seeing in the british economy at the
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moment? i in the british economy at the moment?— in the british economy at the moment? ., �* ~ , moment? i don't. ithink it is so busily clear _ moment? i don't. ithink it is so busily clear and _ moment? i don't. ithink it is so busily clear and the _ moment? i don't. ithink it is so busily clear and the committee i moment? i don't. i think it is so - busily clear and the committee make this point— busily clear and the committee make this point that there is a lot of worldwide pressure on supply chains on labour— worldwide pressure on supply chains on labour shortages, on energy prices — on labour shortages, on energy prices is — on labour shortages, on energy irices. , ., ., , on labour shortages, on energy riices, , ., ., , on labour shortages, on energy irices. , ., ., , prices. is not worse here in many instances — prices. is not worse here in many instances though? _ prices. is not worse here in many instances though? i _ prices. is not worse here in many instances though? i think - prices. is not worse here in many instances though? i think there l prices. is not worse here in many| instances though? i think there is prices. is not worse here in many. instances though? i think there is a brexit dimension _ instances though? i think there is a brexit dimension to _ instances though? i think there is a brexit dimension to it _ instances though? i think there is a brexit dimension to it in _ instances though? i think there is a brexit dimension to it in the - instances though? i think there is a brexit dimension to it in the uk, i brexit dimension to it in the uk, which _ brexit dimension to it in the uk, which is — brexit dimension to it in the uk, which is about how workers gone homei _ which is about how workers gone home, are — which is about how workers gone home, are they coming back, but when you try— home, are they coming back, but when you try to— home, are they coming back, but when you try to talk— home, are they coming back, but when you try to talk to those workers, they _ you try to talk to those workers, they don't— you try to talk to those workers, they don't really tell you whether or not _ they don't really tell you whether or not it — they don't really tell you whether or not it is — they don't really tell you whether or not it is brexit or covid, it is everything _ or not it is brexit or covid, it is everything really, so i don't think you can _ everything really, so i don't think you can pin— everything really, so i don't think you can pin it on brexit. i think we should _ you can pin it on brexit. i think we should be — you can pin it on brexit. i think we should be incredibly optimistic about— should be incredibly optimistic about the next ten years, the british— about the next ten years, the british economy. there is a lot of growth, — british economy. there is a lot of growth, i— british economy. there is a lot of growth, i think the prime minister is right— growth, i think the prime minister is right to — growth, i think the prime minister is right to be optimistic about that, — is right to be optimistic about that, but— is right to be optimistic about that, but we're not going to get there _ that, but we're not going to get there unless we roll up our sleeves and deal— there unless we roll up our sleeves and deal with his current problems. speak— and deal with his current problems. speak to _ and deal with his current problems. speak to our viewer who says, 0k, and deal with his current problems. speak to our viewer who says, ok, i hope you are right about the optimism in ten years but what about the now, given these problems we are seeing? i the now, given these problems we are seeini ? ~ ., ., the now, given these problems we are seeini ? ~ . ., ., seeing? i think that fair enough, and the prime _ seeing? i think that fair enough, and the prime minister - seeing? i think that fair enough, and the prime minister at - seeing? i think that fair enough, and the prime minister at the i seeing? i think that fair enough, l and the prime minister at the start of the _ and the prime minister at the start of the week i think set the tone well by— of the week i think set the tone well by saying we need higher wages, hi-h well by saying we need higher wages, high skills. _ well by saying we need higher wages, high skills, high productivity, high growth _ high skills, high productivity, high growth economy, and i agree with
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that _ growth economy, and i agree with that, of— growth economy, and i agree with that, of course i do, everybody does — that, of course i do, everybody does the _ that, of course i do, everybody does. the problem we have at the moment— does. the problem we have at the moment is— does. the problem we have at the moment is that it seems to be only the wages — moment is that it seems to be only the wages bit that is on the move, and the _ the wages bit that is on the move, and the real— the wages bit that is on the move, and the real risk which i think the chanceiior— and the real risk which i think the chancellor is attentive to is that risk of— chancellor is attentive to is that risk of inflation, because if you have _ risk of inflation, because if you have constantly higher wages and constantly higher prices and you don't _ constantly higher prices and you don't have — constantly higher prices and you don't have economic growth to pay for it. _ don't have economic growth to pay for it. you — don't have economic growth to pay for it, you get inflation, so i think— for it, you get inflation, so i think that _ for it, you get inflation, so i think that is something to watch, and i_ think that is something to watch, and i think— think that is something to watch, and i think it is why the chancellor has his— and i think it is why the chancellor has his eye — and i think it is why the chancellor has his eye on it.— has his eye on it. isn't there irritation _ has his eye on it. isn't there irritation amongst _ has his eye on it. isn't there irritation amongst some - has his eye on it. isn't there irritation amongst some of i has his eye on it. isn't there . irritation amongst some of your members, that some of the noises coming out of government both publicly and privately, some of these problems are not the government fault, it is your fault because companies have not adopted quickly enough to the changing nature of the post—brexit economy? look, i think most business people are used _ look, i think most business people are used to — look, i think most business people are used to politician saying all kinds _ are used to politician saying all kinds of— are used to politician saying all kinds of things on television to get out of— kinds of things on television to get out of pickles. that kinds of things on television to get out of pickles.— kinds of things on television to get out of pickles. that sounds like you are irritated. _ out of pickles. that sounds like you are irritated. look, _ out of pickles. that sounds like you are irritated. look, i— out of pickles. that sounds like you are irritated. look, iwould- out of pickles. that sounds like you are irritated. look, i would rather. are irritated. look, iwould rather we stoi are irritated. look, iwould rather we stop trying — are irritated. look, iwould rather we stop trying to _ are irritated. look, iwould rather we stop trying to have _ are irritated. look, iwould rather we stop trying to have this - we stop trying to have this discussion and instead get round the table _ discussion and instead get round the table. roli— discussion and instead get round the table, roll up our sleeves and sought— table, roll up our sleeves and sought the problem is, it is going
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to take _ sought the problem is, it is going to take government and business together— to take government and business together getting through all of this _ together getting through all of this i— together getting through all of this. i realise it is party conference weeks are not going to say too _ conference weeks are not going to say too much but let's get round the table _ say too much but let's get round the table and _ say too much but let's get round the table and sort them out.— table and sort them out. there is a diilomat table and sort them out. there is a diplomat in — table and sort them out. there is a diplomat in your— table and sort them out. there is a diplomat in your future, _ table and sort them out. there is a diplomat in your future, i - table and sort them out. there is a diplomat in your future, i think. . diplomat in yourfuture, i think. tony danko, plenty more reaction and analysis to the chancellor�*s speech and everything else going on around here throughout the day on bbc news. nice one, chris in manchester, thank you. the army has begun to help in the delivery of fuel, amid ongoing shortages in parts of the country. more than a fifth of petrol stations in london and the south east still don�*t have fuel, according to the petrol retailers association. it says it could be more than a week before things get back to normal. here�*s theo leggett. army drivers, getting ready to ferry fuel around the country. 200 military personnel are being deployed to help deliver petrol and diesel to forecourts. in many areas, the situation has eased dramatically, retailers say. but in london and the south—east, queues remain common.
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the news this morning is better than bad. it is slightly positive. but our poll later in the day will confirm whether it is a real turning point today. and i think that the military drivers will add a little bit of confidence to that, but it is not a full panacea. at the height of the crisis, some 65% of service stations said they were running dry, as a wave of panic buying took hold across the country. but by the weekend, that figure had fallen to just 16%. the government is hoping that, with the help of the military, a site like this, a petrol station that has run out of petrol, will become a thing of the past. but people within the industry are warning that the root causes of the crisis have yet to be addressed. the problem is a severe shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers, which is affecting other parts of the economy as well. ministers say that disruption to supply chains are not confined to the uk. there are things that we can do, and it is reasonable that people expect us to do what we can, whether that is short—term visas,
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speeding up testing for drivers, we should and are doing those things. but we cannot wave a magic wand and make a global supply chain challenges disappear overnight. there never was a shortage of fuel. the problem was getting it to forecourts quickly enough to meet demand. the crisis has thrown a harsh spotlight once again on the challenges facing what were once the uk�*s carefully tuned supply chains. theo leggett, bbc news. you�*re watching gibson use, the top story. the headlines on bbc news: the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he�*ll only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers. a secretive russian whose businesses have backed 3a conservative mps was involved in a russian corruption scandal. a serving metropolitan police officer appears in court charged with rape. he denies the allegation.
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0ne one of ourtop one of our top stories is that bbc investigation that has helped discover how a major conservative party donor was involved in one of europe�*s biggest corruption scandals. leaked documents reveal how mohamed amersi, who�*s given half—a—million pounds to the conservatives, worked on a series of controversial deals for a swedish telecoms company. the swedish company was later fined almost a billion dollars for bribery. mr amersi denies any wrongdoing. the bbc worked alongside the international consortium of investigativejournalists and the guardian on the investigation. richard bilton reports. mohamed amersi is wealthy and well—connected. here he is talking about the dangers of corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life.
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so where did his wealth come from? some of it comes from this company in sweden, a company fined almost $1 billion for bribery. telia was prosecuted over a corrupt telecoms deal. the firm paid $220 million to an offshore company secretly controlled by gulnara karimova, the daughter of the then president of uzbekistan. the american authorities described it as a $220 million bribe. we have obtained documents showing how mr amersi was involved in the deal. in one e—mail, a telia boss writes... "i do not want to be involved in the day—to—day negotiations, so maybe you could handle it." mr amersi reponds... "sure, i agree." and here�*s mr amersi�*s invoice for his part in project uzbekistan. he got a success fee of $500,000 for his work. mr amersi�*s lawyers said the offshore company had been vetted and approved by telia, and that its involvement did not
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raise any red flags to mr amersi. all of this matters because he has given more than half a million to the conservative party. this morning, borisjohnson gave his reaction. i see that story today but all i can say on that one is that all these donations are vetted in the normal way in accordance with rules that were set up under the labour government. so we vetted them the whole time. a conservative spokesman said government policy is in no way influenced by the donations the party receives. they are entirely separate. "we are motivated by the priorities of the british public acting in the national interest." richard bilton, bbc news. that report was about tory donor mohamed amersi. this afternoon we have heard about another businessman linked to conservative party donations, called viktor fedotov. 0ur correspondent andy verity
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gave me this update. viktor fedotov has very close connections to the conservative party, he has donated more than £700,000 through his businesses, including donations to a dozen tory mps. now the link between him and the conservatives is controversial, because later this month the government will decide whether to approve his company�*s plans for a £1 billion undersea energy link between the uk and france. now, working with the consortium, international consortium of investigativejournalists and the guardian, bbc panorama has found documents that show how he, viktor fedotov, made his fortune. they reveal how he and two managers of transneft, the russian state oil firm, took money from a pipeline project and shifted it offshore. it looks like they siphoned off more than $100 million and hid the money in secretive trusts. we asked andrew mitchell about it, who is a barrister specialising in fraud cases.
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if people are able to construct a scheme, whereby they can extract for doing nothing $100 million plus, out of government funds, then the real losers are the men, women and children who rely on the government to give them education, health, roads, social services. lawyers for aquind, and mr fedotov, aquind is his company, say there was no evidence that funds were embezzled from transneft. mr fedotov denies any allegations of wrongdoing, and never had any interest in british politics and has always worked in an open, transparent manner. the conservatives say compliance was made and checks were made. 12 million documents
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analysed by the guardian, the bbc panorama programme and so on, that is in the pandora papers. a while back we had the panama papers. i think there are a number of others in between beginning with the letter p as well. what i want to know is, is anything changing? a lot of the people who are putting their money into the offshore accounts are doing it legally. are we seeing governments, given these revelations, the latest today, actually changing the system? not yet, out of today�*s revelations, but maybe that would be a bit quick, but certainly since the panama papers back in 2016 there have been reforms was to david cameron was put on the back foot by some of the revelations, the former prime minister. he introduced a reform where in companies house, where they keep all the details about companies in the uk, you can find out who the person of significant control is, but only if they are registered in the uk. if they are registered in an overseas territory like the british virgin islands etc, you can�*t find out, so we need leaks like this
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if we are ever going to know. there was a move a few years ago by margaret hodge mp and andrew mitchell mp to force overseas territories and crown dependencies to have registries of an official ownership but that got watered down so they don�*t publish it, although law enforcement are going to be able to see it. so still a lot less than transparent campaigners would like. and you can see more on that story tonight in panorama, the pandora papers, on bbc one at 7.35pm. a metropolitan police officer has appeared in court, charged with rape. pc david carrick works in scotland yard�*s parliamentary and diplomatic protection command. he denies the allegation. 0ur correspondent, graham satchell, is at st albans magistrates�* court and he sent this update. david carrick was not in court. he appeared on a video link from stevenage police station. it was a procedural affair, so very short. he spoke only a couple of times, to confirm his name, age and address. he is charged with one count of rape. he emphatically denied that charge. the alleged offences
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are said to have occurred in st albans last september, when david carrick was off duty. he is, as you say, a police constable in the metropolitan police serving in the parliamentary and protection command, so in the houses of parliament, but currently suspended from duty. the metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dick, has said she is deeply concerned that such a serious offence should be associated with a serving police officer. she said she understood the public would be concerned as well. david carrick bowed his head as he was remanded in custody by the sitting magistrate, and he will appear in court again at the beginning of next month. climate change protestors blocked the entrance to the blackwall tunnel one of london�*s busiest river crossings during this morning�*s rush hour. they also targeted wandsworth bridge, arnos grove and the hanger lane gyratory. the high court has previously issued
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injunctions to try to stop such protests but they don�*t cover those routes. here�*s our transport correspondent tom edwards. for three weeks, insulate britain have been targeting london�*s roads and motorways. the tactic, lie down on the tarmac, or glue themselves to it. this morning, there were four protests at locations in london, at hanger lane, malik was caught up in the disruption. he�*s a dentist, and had to cancel appointments. do you have any sympathy with insulate britain? no, not at all. i�*m all for protecting the planet, reducing our carbon footprint. but it�*s just caused such a huge amount of inconvenience. i mean, just driving past, if you see a row of cars, i�*m sure in those cars you will have nhs workers, workers trying to get to hospitals, emergency doctors. but it seems like they have no consideration for that, they�*ve just blocked everything off, just to make a point. and the point is a valid point, but there must be a better way round it.
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the group wants to highlight the lack of insulation in the country�*s housing stock, which it claims is the least energy efficient in europe. the government has tried injunctions to stop the protests, threatening prison sentences and fines. but that hasn�*t stopped them. now it is planning more. we have brought in new measures, which we are announcing today, so they can either face six months injail or unlimited fines, and we will use section 60 powers, so that the police can do stop and search of those who are bringing superglue or whatever to block the traffic. drivers have started trying to remove the protesters themselves. at the moment, the authorities though continue to struggle to prevent the demonstrations. i , edwards, bbc london.
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the rules on foreign travel have changed, with the old traffic light system scrapped. there will now be just one list of so—called "red countries", and anyone travelling to them will have to quarantine for ten days in a hotel when they return. but most fully—vaccinated travellers coming from other destinations will no longer need to take a covid test before departure. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports. going abroad just got cheaper, and a whole lot easier. the amber list has been scrapped. now there�*s just a red list of countries. those passengers still have to pay to quarantine in a hotel when they get home. but for everywhere else, there is only one pcr test when you get back. as long as you are fully vaccinated, no other test is needed, and no isolation. but for people who have not beenjabbed, all the old rules still apply. a test before travelling home, self—isolation, and tests on day two and day eight. the changes are just in time for those desperate to escape for half term.
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plenty of families have been put off international travel because the system has been so complicated and so expensive. there are still some deals out there and definitely prices are still a little bit lower than they were pre—pandemic. but i think once we start to see the likes of the us opening up, which is happening sometime in november, then i think really we are going to see prices gradually start to creep up, as companies, you know these airlines, have had virtually no income for many months now, and they have to make up the billions of pounds of debt they have built up. the travel industry is delighted, even though we are well into the last remnants of the holiday season. we need to do more. you know, the requirement to do a test after arrival, particularly a pcr test, and they will change that to a rapid antigen, but i don't understand why they are waiting for some time to change that. i think the industry could adapt and introduce that change much quicker. but it is going in
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the right direction. there are still different rules for any country you are travelling to. these changes are only about what you have to do when you are coming home. the red list is to be reviewed again this week, and more countries may be given the green light at that stage. so whether it�*s for pleasure, for business, or to see family, a simpler, cheaper system is now in place. colletta smith, bbc news. scientists who discovered how our bodies feel the warmth of the sun, or the touch of a loved one, have been awarded the nobel prize for medicine. david julius and ardem patapoutian share the prize for their work on the sense of touch, and temperature. they unpicked how our bodies convert physical sensations into electrical messages in the nervous system. their findings could lead to new ways of treating pain. now it�*s time for the weather. hello. we�*ve seen some sunshine
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across the uk to start the week. it will be interspersed for the rest of today, though, with some heavy or squally showers. they will tend to fade through the evening but that is because they will be usurped by this area of low pressure rolling into the south west, injecting energy into the atmosphere in terms of bringing strong winds, and dropping some heavy rain to the evening across the south—west of wales, carrying that rain further north and east into england in the small hours. relatively mild to the south of the uk. perhaps close to a frost in some of the scottish glens, early on tuesday. scotland and northern ireland keep quite a bit of sunshine tuesday and wednesday. a couple of showers around. windy across the board but heavy rain across much of northern and eastern england, on and off, throughout the day. it will brighten towards the west. strong gusts of wind to contend with, potentially doing some damage. no surprises, with the wind and rain, it�*s going to feel quite chilly.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he�*ll only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers. a secretive russian whose businesses have backed 3a conservative mps was involved
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in a russian corruption scandal. a serving metropolitan police officer appears in court charged with rape. he denies the allegation. the military is called in to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in london and the south east. protesters clash with motorists as insulate britain cause more disruption across london. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. a decision on whether england�*s cricket team will play in this winter�*s ashes tour in australia will be made this week when the sport�*s governing body, the ecb, meets. there have been concerns over whether their families can travel with them, quarantine arrangements and any potential "bubble" they may have to live in. australia has some of the strictest covid—19 protocols in the world, a situation complicated by the fact its different states have their own regulations.
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the first test is due to begin on 8th december. in orderfor the ashes in order for the ashes not to go ahead would require a boycott from the ecb, not in those terms, but a postponement, which in the current scheduling arrangement that we had, ijust scheduling arrangement that we had, i just can�*t see that happening. scheduling arrangement that we had, ijust can�*t see that happening. too much on the line financially. the ashes is effectively an industry insider cricket and there�*s so much on the line both boards, there are commercial arrangements that underpin that with broadcast and beyond, and ijust can�*t see a scenario where there is a complete pull—out. meanwhile, many of england�*s t20 squad will be in the mix for a potential ashes place. they�*re getting ready to head to the middle east, ahead of the format�*s world cup later this month. tymal mills who won�*t be involved in the test team feels
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the players won�*t be distracted by the off field discussions. i would like to think not. nobody in this team is young and naive and will get caught up in those things, i wouldn�*t have thought. they are well versed in what is going on and it is a world cup, it is a massive deal, and whilst we are there, i�*m sure everybody will be fully dialled in to that and then whatever happens after that will happen after that, but i�*ve got no doubt that the guys will come together whenever we get together officially. and we will be fully focused on the world cup. claudio ranieri is at watford�*s training ground to discuss becoming their new manager, after they sacked xisco munoz afterjust ten months. watford have won two of their opening seven premier league games and sit in 15th. ranieri is understood to be the owners�* first choice. he, of course, won the premier league with leicester city in 2016. but the 69 year old was sacked the following season, and has since had short spells with nantes, fulham, roma and sampdoria. watford have got rid of 13 managers since 2012. but this man says the unusual approach has worked before. it
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approach has worked before. iii obviously works because since these owners came in, we were a lower league championship side on the brink of administration but since then we have had one play—off final, two promotions, one of those immediately after getting relegated, bouncing straight back, fa cup semifinal in 2016, fa cup final in 2019, highest ever premier league points tally and the highest league position since the 1980s. so, yes, it is frustrating on the one hand, not having the stability that supporters crave, but it is hard to argue with the results that have fallen watford�*s way in the last decade. tyson fury could be set to return to the fight in the uk again after this weekend�*s heavyweight showdown with deontay wilder. that�*s according to his co—promoter frank warren. wbc champ fury hasn�*t fought in britain since 2018 after signing a deal to stage his fights in america, competing there four times. fury is due to take on wilder this saturday night in las vegas. the third time they�*ve met after fury beat his american
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opponent to take the wbc title in february last year. that�*s all the sport for now. thank you for that. a £20 a week increase in universal credit has helped many families keep food on the table during the pandemic, but with that uplift coming to an end this week it�*s feared some will be forced into debt. research carried out by thejoseph rowntree foundation showed that bradford will be the worst affected place in the country. 82% of families with children in bradford west will be impacted by the cut and 71% of families with children in bradford east will be affected. the same research found there were 35 local authorities across the country where at least half of all working age families with children would be impacted by the cut. 0ur political correspondent chris
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mason can join us now. the squeeze on living standards, fuel issues, energy prices, these are dominating a lot of the debate where you are?— where you are? they really are. it is a massive _ where you are? they really are. it is a massive issue _ where you are? they really are. it is a massive issue and _ where you are? they really are. it is a massive issue and when - where you are? they really are. it is a massive issue and when you i is a massive issue and when you speak to ministers privately they are acutely aware that the coming weeks and months, so many of these issues could become much more acute. for so many families. we can now discuss it in the company of alistair freaking from the salford food bank. — alistairfrom alistair freaking from the salford food bank. — alistair from the salford food bank. tell me about the situation where you are in salford and the demand for the services you provide? we and the demand for the services you irovide? ~ . ., ., , , and the demand for the services you irovide? ~ . . ., , , ., provide? we have already seen an increase on _ provide? we have already seen an increase on demand _ provide? we have already seen an increase on demand for— provide? we have already seen an| increase on demand for emergency food parcels and based on last year we were _ food parcels and based on last year we were doing approximately 60 emergency food parcels per week but we are _ emergency food parcels per week but we are now— emergency food parcels per week but we are now doing over 100 which is a 67% increase —
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we are now doing over 100 which is a 67% increase. the concern is that with the — 67% increase. the concern is that with the energy prices increasing at the £20 _ with the energy prices increasing at the £20 uplift to universal credit ending _ the £20 uplift to universal credit ending and also the furlough scheme ending. _ ending and also the furlough scheme ending. our— ending and also the furlough scheme ending, our concern is that the demand — ending, our concern is that the demand for emergency food parcels is really— demand for emergency food parcels is really going to outstrip what we can supply _ really going to outstrip what we can supply. tell really going to outstrip what we can su- il . ., really going to outstrip what we can sun-l. , supply. tell me about the people comini to supply. tell me about the people coming to you. — supply. tell me about the people coming to you, are _ supply. tell me about the people coming to you, are they - supply. tell me about the people coming to you, are they in - supply. tell me about the people coming to you, are they in work, | supply. tell me about the people i coming to you, are they in work, are they out of work? abs, coming to you, are they in work, are they out of work?— they out of work? a very wide variety of _ they out of work? a very wide variety of people _ they out of work? a very wide variety of people that - they out of work? a very wide variety of people that come . they out of work? a very wide | variety of people that come to they out of work? a very wide - variety of people that come to our distribution centres. your viewers may be _ distribution centres. your viewers may be surprised to find that quite a lot of— may be surprised to find that quite a lot of them are actually in work and it— a lot of them are actually in work and it is— a lot of them are actually in work and it is not— a lot of them are actually in work and it is not uncommon for us to have _ and it is not uncommon for us to have a _ and it is not uncommon for us to have a couple with children come to a distribution centre, and they are both working but they are simply not are earning _ both working but they are simply not are earning enough to make ends meet so they— are earning enough to make ends meet so they end _ are earning enough to make ends meet so they end up needing emergency food _ so they end up needing emergency food is _ so they end up needing emergency food. , , . ., so they end up needing emergency food. , , . . ~ , ., food. is the picture that alistair iaints food. is the picture that alistair paints typical — food. is the picture that alistair paints typical of _ food. is the picture that alistair paints typical of your _ food. is the picture that alistair| paints typical of your experience around the country? absolutely. just
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last ear around the country? absolutely. just last year we — around the country? absolutely. just last year we saw— around the country? absolutely. just last year we saw an _ around the country? absolutely. just last year we saw an egg _ around the country? absolutely. just last year we saw an egg never - - around the country? absolutely. just last year we saw an egg never - a i last year we saw an egg never — a significant — last year we saw an egg never — a significant increase _ last year we saw an egg never — a significant increase and _ last year we saw an egg never — a significant increase and we - significant increase and we delivered _ significant increase and we delivered over— significant increase and we delivered over 1 _ significant increase and we delivered overi million- significant increase and we - delivered overi million parcels and 'ust delivered overi million parcels and just over— delivered overi million parcels and just over i — delivered overi million parcels and just overi million— delivered overi million parcels and just overi million of— delivered overi million parcels and just overi million of those - delivered overi million parcels and just overi million of those were . delivered overi million parcels and just overi million of those were to| just overi million of those were to children. _ just overi million of those were to children. and— just overi million of those were to children, and of— just overi million of those were to children, and of course _ just overi million of those were to children, and of course we - just overi million of those were to children, and of course we now- just overi million of those were to. children, and of course we now face a cut— children, and of course we now face a cut of— children, and of course we now face a cut of £20 — children, and of course we now face a cut of £20 to _ children, and of course we now face a cut of £20 to universal— children, and of course we now face a cut of £20 to universal credit - children, and of course we now face a cut of £20 to universal credit and | a cut of £20 to universal credit and the end _ a cut of £20 to universal credit and the end of— a cut of £20 to universal credit and the end of the _ a cut of £20 to universal credit and the end of the furlough— a cut of £20 to universal credit and the end of the furlough scheme - a cut of £20 to universal credit and the end of the furlough scheme sol a cut of £20 to universal credit and l the end of the furlough scheme so we fear a _ the end of the furlough scheme so we fear a significant _ the end of the furlough scheme so we fear a significant increase _ the end of the furlough scheme so we fear a significant increase in— the end of the furlough scheme so we fear a significant increase in the - fear a significant increase in the number— fear a significant increase in the number of— fear a significant increase in the number of people _ fear a significant increase in the number of people having - fear a significant increase in the number of people having to - fear a significant increase in the| number of people having to turn fear a significant increase in the i number of people having to turn to emergency— number of people having to turn to emergency food _ number of people having to turn to emergency food again. _ number of people having to turn to emergency food again. the - number of people having to turn to emergency food again.— emergency food again. the loss of £20 for universal— emergency food again. the loss of £20 for universal credit, - emergency food again. the loss of £20 for universal credit, what - emergency food again. the loss of £20 for universal credit, what are| £20 for universal credit, what are you saying to ministers about it, how big an impact as it having? it is going to have a catastrophic impact — is going to have a catastrophic impact we _ is going to have a catastrophic impact. we did _ is going to have a catastrophic impact. we did research - is going to have a catastrophic impact. we did research with. is going to have a catastrophic. impact. we did research with you is going to have a catastrophic- impact. we did research with you guv that surveyed — impact. we did research with you guv that surveyed people _ impact. we did research with you guv that surveyed people on— impact. we did research with you guv that surveyed people on universal. that surveyed people on universal credit— that surveyed people on universal credit and — that surveyed people on universal credit and just _ that surveyed people on universal credit and just over— that surveyed people on universal credit and just over three - that surveyed people on universal| credit and just over three quarters said already — credit and just over three quarters said already before _ credit and just over three quarters said already before the _ credit and just over three quarters said already before the cut - credit and just over three quarters said already before the cut they. said already before the cut they were _ said already before the cut they were struggling _ said already before the cut they were struggling to _ said already before the cut they were struggling to meet- said already before the cut they were struggling to meet their. said already before the cut they. were struggling to meet their bills and cover— were struggling to meet their bills and cover the _ were struggling to meet their bills and cover the essentials _ were struggling to meet their bills and cover the essentials and - were struggling to meet their bills and cover the essentials and of. and cover the essentials and of those _ and cover the essentials and of those people _ and cover the essentials and of those people we _ and cover the essentials and of those people we spoke - and cover the essentials and of those people we spoke to, - and cover the essentials and of those people we spoke to, half and cover the essentials and of. those people we spoke to, half of them _ those people we spoke to, half of them said — those people we spoke to, half of them said if— those people we spoke to, half of them said if the _ those people we spoke to, half of them said if the cut _ those people we spoke to, half of them said if the cut goes - those people we spoke to, half of them said if the cut goes ahead, i them said if the cut goes ahead, they wiii— them said if the cut goes ahead, they will have _ them said if the cut goes ahead, they will have to _ them said if the cut goes ahead, they will have to skip _ them said if the cut goes ahead, they will have to skip meals - them said if the cut goes ahead, they will have to skip meals and | them said if the cut goes ahead, i they will have to skip meals and go without— they will have to skip meals and go without food — they will have to skip meals and go without food. that _ they will have to skip meals and go without food. that is _ they will have to skip meals and go without food. that is concerning, i
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without food. that is concerning, that is _ without food. that is concerning, that is about _ without food. that is concerning, that is about 1.3 _ without food. that is concerning, that is about 1.3 million i without food. that is concerning, that is about 1.3 million extra i that is about 1.3 million extra people — that is about 1.3 million extra people saying _ that is about 1.3 million extra people saying they— that is about 1.3 million extra people saying they will- that is about 1.3 million extra people saying they will have i that is about 1.3 million extrai people saying they will have to that is about 1.3 million extra i people saying they will have to skip meals _ people saying they will have to skip meals and — people saying they will have to skip meals and probably— people saying they will have to skip meals and probably have i people saying they will have to skip meals and probably have to i people saying they will have to skip meals and probably have to turn i people saying they will have to skip meals and probably have to turn to| meals and probably have to turn to food banks— meals and probably have to turn to food banks to — meals and probably have to turn to food banks to get _ meals and probably have to turn to food banks to get by. i meals and probably have to turn to food banks to get by. that i meals and probably have to turn to food banks to get by. that is i meals and probably have to turn to food banks to get by. that is not i food banks to get by. that is not right _ food banks to get by. that is not riiht. ~ , ., ., food banks to get by. that is not riiht. ~ y., ., ., right. when you hear that the chancellor — right. when you hear that the chancellor is i right. when you hear that the chancellor is talking i right. when you hear that the chancellor is talking about i right. when you hear that the i chancellor is talking about other support that the government is seeking to offer, helping people back into work and keeping people in work and i take the point that plenty of people on universal credit are in work, does that cut through in any way? do you have any hope? it is really welcome, the fact the government— is really welcome, the fact the government is— is really welcome, the fact the government is focusing i is really welcome, the fact the government is focusing on i is really welcome, the fact thei government is focusing on this, is really welcome, the fact the i government is focusing on this, as was the _ government is focusing on this, as was the furlough _ government is focusing on this, as was the furlough scheme i government is focusing on this, as was the furlough scheme and i government is focusing on this, as was the furlough scheme and the i was the furlough scheme and the intervention— was the furlough scheme and the intervention is— was the furlough scheme and the intervention is the _ was the furlough scheme and the intervention is the government i was the furlough scheme and the i intervention is the government have made _ intervention is the government have made in _ intervention is the government have made in the — intervention is the government have made in the pandemic, i intervention is the government have made in the pandemic, but- intervention is the government have made in the pandemic, but it i intervention is the government have made in the pandemic, but it is i made in the pandemic, but it is about— made in the pandemic, but it is about recognising i made in the pandemic, but it is about recognising that i made in the pandemic, but it is about recognising that for- made in the pandemic, but it is| about recognising that for those people — about recognising that for those people who _ about recognising that for those people who are _ about recognising that for those people who are already i about recognising that for those people who are already in i about recognising that for those people who are already in workl about recognising that for those i people who are already in work on low pay, _ people who are already in work on low pay, or— people who are already in work on low pay, or between _ people who are already in work on low pay, or between jobs, i people who are already in work on low pay, or between jobs, who i people who are already in work on| low pay, or between jobs, who are 'ust low pay, or between jobs, who are just not— low pay, or between jobs, who are just not able — low pay, or between jobs, who are just not able to _ low pay, or between jobs, who are just not able to work _ low pay, or between jobs, who are just not able to work because i low pay, or between jobs, who are just not able to work because theyi just not able to work because they have a _ just not able to work because they have a disability _ just not able to work because they have a disability or— just not able to work because they have a disability or caring i have a disability or caring responsibilities, i have a disability or caring responsibilities, how- have a disability or caring responsibilities, how do i have a disability or caring l responsibilities, how do we have a disability or caring - responsibilities, how do we make sure they— responsibilities, how do we make sure they are _ responsibilities, how do we make sure they are not _ responsibilities, how do we make sure they are not facing - responsibilities, how do we make i sure they are not facing destitution this winter? — sure they are not facing destitution this winter? how— sure they are not facing destitution this winter? how do _ sure they are not facing destitution this winter? how do we _ sure they are not facing destitution this winter? how do we make - sure they are not facing destitution this winter? how do we make sure| this winter? how do we make sure they have — this winter? how do we make sure they have enough _ this winter? how do we make sure they have enough money- this winter? how do we make sure they have enough money for- this winter? how do we make sure they have enough money for the l they have enough money for the essentials— they have enough money for the essentials like _ they have enough money for the essentials like food _ they have enough money for the essentials like food and - essentials like food and accommodation? - essentials like food and accommodation? thati essentials like food andi accommodation? that is essentials like food and - accommodation? that is the essentials like food and _ accommodation? that is the thing we have got— accommodation? that is the thing we have got to _ accommodation? that is the thing we have got to focus _ accommodation? that is the thing we have got to focus on, _ accommodation? that is the thing we have got to focus on, as _ accommodation? that is the thing we have got to focus on, as well- accommodation? that is the thing we have got to focus on, as well as - have got to focus on, as well as looking — have got to focus on, as well as looking at— have got to focus on, as well as looking at increasing _ have got to focus on, as well as looking at increasing jobs - have got to focus on, as well as looking at increasing jobs and l looking at increasing jobs and prospects _ looking at increasing jobs and prospects for _ looking at increasing jobs and prospects for people - looking at increasing jobs and prospects for people moving i looking at increasing jobs and i prospects for people moving into
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work _ prospects for people moving into work it— prospects for people moving into work. , p, prospects for people moving into work. , t, , prospects for people moving into work. , ., , ., work. it is a broader point about the role of _ work. it is a broader point about the role of food _ work. it is a broader point about the role of food banks _ work. it is a broader point about the role of food banks in - work. it is a broader point about | the role of food banks in society, providing an incredible service but may be also indicative of a broader societal failure around managing priorities and making sure people have enough food. how do you reflect on your role in a broader society and what leads to these problems that means there is a massive spike in demand?— that means there is a massive spike in demand? , ., , , ., ., in demand? obviously, we would love to be in the — in demand? obviously, we would love to be in the situation _ in demand? obviously, we would love to be in the situation where _ in demand? obviously, we would love to be in the situation where our- to be in the situation where our services — to be in the situation where our services are not required at all. indeed — services are not required at all. indeed that is our vision, together, that one _ indeed that is our vision, together, that one day britain will not have any food — that one day britain will not have any food banks at all. that is a situation — any food banks at all. that is a situation that we would love to be in but _ situation that we would love to be in but obviously it is not going to happen— in but obviously it is not going to happen try— in but obviously it is not going to happen by accident. it will need a tremendous shift in thinking and some _ tremendous shift in thinking and some big — tremendous shift in thinking and some big changes, to actually make that happen. do some big changes, to actually make that happen-— that happen. do you think we will aet that happen. do you think we will net to that happen. do you think we will get to that _ that happen. do you think we will get to that point _ that happen. do you think we will get to that point where _ that happen. do you think we will get to that point where you - that happen. do you think we will get to that point where you are l that happen. do you think we will| get to that point where you are no longer needed? it is get to that point where you are no longer needed?—
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get to that point where you are no longer needed? it is our vision and it is entirely _ longer needed? it is our vision and it is entirely possible. _ longer needed? it is our vision and it is entirely possible. we - longer needed? it is our vision and it is entirely possible. we are - it is entirely possible. we are clear— it is entirely possible. we are clear that _ it is entirely possible. we are clear that we _ it is entirely possible. we are clear that we have _ it is entirely possible. we are clear that we have seen - it is entirely possible. we are clear that we have seen 128%i clear that we have seen 128% increase _ clear that we have seen 128% increase in _ clear that we have seen 128% increase in food _ clear that we have seen 128% increase in food bank- clear that we have seen 128% increase in food bank usage i clear that we have seen 128% - increase in food bank usage over the last five _ increase in food bank usage over the last five years. — increase in food bank usage over the last five years, because _ increase in food bank usage over the last five years, because of— increase in food bank usage over the last five years, because of very - last five years, because of very specific — last five years, because of very specific policy _ last five years, because of very specific policy decisions, - last five years, because of very specific policy decisions, but i last five years, because of very . specific policy decisions, but they can be _ specific policy decisions, but they can be changed _ specific policy decisions, but they can be changed. we _ specific policy decisions, but they can be changed. we can - specific policy decisions, but they can be changed. we can reduce l specific policy decisions, but they. can be changed. we can reduce the number— can be changed. we can reduce the number of— can be changed. we can reduce the number of people _ can be changed. we can reduce the number of people coming - can be changed. we can reduce the number of people coming to - can be changed. we can reduce the number of people coming to food l number of people coming to food banks— number of people coming to food banks and — number of people coming to food banks and and _ number of people coming to food banks and and that. _ number of people coming to food banks and and that. it _ number of people coming to food banks and and that. it is- number of people coming to food banks and and that. it is about i banks and and that. it is about making — banks and and that. it is about making sure _ banks and and that. it is about making sure people _ banks and and that. it is about making sure people have - banks and and that. it is about. making sure people have enough banks and and that. it is about - making sure people have enough money for the _ making sure people have enough money for the essentials— making sure people have enough money for the essentials — _ making sure people have enough money for the essentials — and _ making sure people have enough money for the essentials — and and _ making sure people have enough money for the essentials — and and that. - for the essentials — and and that. we know— for the essentials — and and that. we know what— for the essentials — and and that. we know what is _ for the essentials — and and that. we know what is driving - for the essentials — and and that. we know what is driving people l for the essentials — and and that. | we know what is driving people to food banks— we know what is driving people to food banks and _ we know what is driving people to food banks and therefore - we know what is driving people to food banks and therefore we - we know what is driving people to food banks and therefore we can i we know what is driving people to . food banks and therefore we can take action— food banks and therefore we can take action but— food banks and therefore we can take action but we — food banks and therefore we can take action but we need _ food banks and therefore we can take action but we need to _ food banks and therefore we can take action but we need to have _ food banks and therefore we can take action but we need to have the - food banks and therefore we can take action but we need to have the will. action but we need to have the will to make _ action but we need to have the will to make sure — action but we need to have the will to make sure people _ action but we need to have the will to make sure people are _ action but we need to have the will to make sure people are not- action but we need to have the will. to make sure people are not coming to make sure people are not coming to food _ to make sure people are not coming to food banks — to make sure people are not coming to food banks— to food banks. what are the key thins to food banks. what are the key things which _ to food banks. what are the key things which have _ to food banks. what are the key things which have led _ to food banks. what are the key things which have led to - to food banks. what are the key things which have led to the - to food banks. what are the key things which have led to the big | things which have led to the big spike? as. things which have led to the big sike? �* . ., things which have led to the big sike? . . ., ., ., spike? a reduction in the value of benefits as _ spike? a reduction in the value of benefits as cost _ spike? a reduction in the value of benefits as cost of _ spike? a reduction in the value of benefits as cost of living - spike? a reduction in the value of benefits as cost of living has - benefits as cost of living has increased _ benefits as cost of living has increased and _ benefits as cost of living has increased and benefits - benefits as cost of living has increased and benefits have| benefits as cost of living has - increased and benefits have been frozen. _ increased and benefits have been frozen. a — increased and benefits have been frozen. a cap— increased and benefits have been frozen. a cap on— increased and benefits have been frozen, a cap on benefits, - increased and benefits have been frozen, a cap on benefits, two . increased and benefits have been l frozen, a cap on benefits, two child timit _ frozen, a cap on benefits, two child limit and _ frozen, a cap on benefits, two child limit and the — frozen, a cap on benefits, two child limit and the benefit _ frozen, a cap on benefits, two child limit and the benefit cap, _ frozen, a cap on benefits, two child limit and the benefit cap, but- frozen, a cap on benefits, two child limit and the benefit cap, but we i limit and the benefit cap, but we have _ limit and the benefit cap, but we have also — limit and the benefit cap, but we have also seen _ limit and the benefit cap, but we have also seen things _ limit and the benefit cap, but we have also seen things like - limit and the benefit cap, but wei have also seen things like benefit detays _ have also seen things like benefit delays caused _ have also seen things like benefit delays caused by _ have also seen things like benefit delays caused by the _ have also seen things like benefit delays caused by the five—week . have also seen things like benefit. delays caused by the five—week wait to get— delays caused by the five—week wait to get onto — delays caused by the five—week wait to get onto universal— delays caused by the five—week wait to get onto universal credit, - delays caused by the five—week wait to get onto universal credit, having| to get onto universal credit, having to get onto universal credit, having to get— to get onto universal credit, having to get a _ to get onto universal credit, having to get a loan— to get onto universal credit, having to get a loan to _ to get onto universal credit, having to get a loan to bridge _ to get onto universal credit, having to get a loan to bridge the - to get onto universal credit, having to get a loan to bridge the gap- to get onto universal credit, having to get a loan to bridge the gap and| to get a loan to bridge the gap and then the _ to get a loan to bridge the gap and then the resulting _ to get a loan to bridge the gap and then the resulting causes - to get a loan to bridge the gap and then the resulting causes of- to get a loan to bridge the gap and then the resulting causes of that, i then the resulting causes of that, so there — then the resulting causes of that, so there are — then the resulting causes of that, so there are issues _ then the resulting causes of that, so there are issues within - then the resulting causes of that, so there are issues within the - so there are issues within the system — so there are issues within the system that— so there are issues within the system that are _ so there are issues within the system that are built - so there are issues within the system that are built in- so there are issues within the system that are built in which so there are issues within the - system that are built in which can be built— system that are built in which can be built out— system that are built in which can be built out of— system that are built in which can be built out of the _ system that are built in which can be built out of the system - system that are built in which can be built out of the system but - be built out of the system but fundamentally _ be built out of the system but fundamentally it _ be built out of the system but fundamentally it is _ be built out of the system but fundamentally it is about - fundamentally it is about affordability. _
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fundamentally it is about affordability. are - fundamentally it is about affordability. are the - fundamentally it is about - affordability. are the benefits enough — affordability. are the benefits enough to— affordability. are the benefits enough to cover _ affordability. are the benefits enough to cover the - affordability. are the benefits . enough to cover the essentials? affordability. are the benefits - enough to cover the essentials? our food bank— enough to cover the essentials? our food bank experience _ enough to cover the essentials? our food bank experience would - enough to cover the essentials? our food bank experience would suggest not. ~ . , , food bank experience would suggest not. . ., , , ,., not. wants. they were both reflecting — not. wants. they were both reflecting on _ not. wants. they were both reflecting on the _ not. wants. they were both reflecting on the picture - not. wants. they were both i reflecting on the picture locally and also across the country in terms of food bank usage. thanks for joining us. the head of the metropolitan police, cressida dick, has ordered an independent review into the force, after its performance was strongly criticised following the murder of sarah everard. the commissioner said she wanted to restore public trust. today, i am announcing that we will be doing a review. that will be led by a high—profile independent person, and the review will look at our internal culture and it will look at our professional standards, systems processes, leadership training, to make sure that we are the best possible met police we can be.
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and i am absolutely determined that we rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can. our special correspondent lucy manning spoke to the commissioner and gave us more details of what she had to say. well, this was the first interview the commissioner has done since wayne couzens was charged with the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. we only got a quick four minutes. she was doing a couple of other interviews, as well. but she was clear that things obviously need to change inside the met, because they have now appointed, or are going to appoint, somebody independent to look at what might be going wrong. we don't know who that person is, who will lead it. we understand it will last for a minimum of six months. we don't know what will happen with any recommendations made. we do know that it's not the public enquiry some people have been calling for. that would have a lot more powers.
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and what i also asked her was, given that this officer, given that couzens was an officer when she was his overall boss, it was on her watch that this had happened, shouldn't she take responsibility for it and resign? she said she knew it was on her watch but she intended to carry on and she had a job to do. we also talked a bit about vetting, how could couzens have been a police officer? he had gone from the civil nuclear constabulary to kent, and then to the met. the commissioner said she has asked for the national policing body to look at the vetting of police officers. and on the indecent exposure which couzens was accused of days before the murder of sarah everard, she confirmed as far as she was aware they had not known the person accused of the indecent exposure was a police officer. lucy manning, there.
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a nurse accused of murdering eight babies has heeded not guilty to all the charges against her. she is charged with murdering five boys and three girls at the countess of chester hospital between 2015 and 2016. she is also accused of the attempted murder of ten other babies. the 31—year—old has been remanded in custody until her trial next year. the brexit minister, lord frost, has renewed his threat to suspend part of the brexit deal affecting northern ireland. the northern ireland protocol was designed to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland but has meant new checks on some products travelling from great britain. but lord frost told the conservative conference in manchester that the arrangements agreed with the eu "have begun to come apart even more quickly than we feared". the northern ireland protocol is not working and needs to change. yes, we agreed the protocol in that difficult autumn two years ago, we knew we were taking a risk,
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but a worthy one in the cause of peace and the cause of protecting the good friday agreement. it was the right thing to do. it ended a constitutional crisis and meant our country could leave the eu, whole, free, and with real choices. of course, we wanted to negotiate something better. if it had not been for the madness of the surrender act we could have done so. we worried from the start that the protocol would not take the strain if not handled sensitively. as it has turned out, we were right. the arrangements have begun to come apart even more quickly than we feared. thanks to the eu's heavy—handed actions, support has collapsed. the protocol itself is undermining the belfast good friday agreement. businesses, political parties, institutions and all in northern ireland face instability and disruption. we can still solve these problems.
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i set out injuly a set of proposals that would establish a new balance for a lasting future for northern ireland. i will soon be sending a set of legal texts to the eu to support them. we still await a formal response from the eu to our proposals. but from what i hear, i worry that we will not get a response which enables the significant change we need. so i urge the eu to be ambitious. it is no use tinkering around the edges. we need significant change. if we can agree something better, as i would like us to do, we can get back to where we wanted to be, an independent britain with friendly relations with the eu
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based on free trade. but we can't wait forever. without an agreed solution soon, we will need to act using the article 60 safeguard mechanism to address the impact the protocol is having on northern ireland. the european commission has said they do not remark on comments made. the headlines on bbc news: the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he'll only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers. a secretive russian whose businesses have backed 3a conservative mps was involved in a russian corruption scandal. a serving metropolitan police officer appears in court charged with rape. he denies the allegation. dozens of religious leaders
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from around the world have appealed to politicians to agree a new deal to combat climate change. they were gathered at a ceremony in the vatican, where pope francis urged governments to raise their ambition ahead of the un climate conference in glasgow. the archbishop of canterbury was among those at the event. here's mark lowen. they came from across the planet, faith leaders urging politicians to save it. christian and jewish, buddhist and muslim, taoist and confucian, signing a joint appeal to world leaders who will meet at the cop26 in glasgow, to commit to net zero emissions, to limit the temperature rise degrees to support poorer countries. a pope who is focused on environmental concern and an archbishop with this warning... 0urabuse, ourwar against the climate, affects the poorest among us. reconciliation with creation, in obedience to our creator,
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proclaims the love of god. the world has just enough time to get this right. in return, the signatories say they will educate their faithful, spreading the message of climate awareness. the document was handed to alok sharma, the cop26 president, to take to next month's summit, telling us the faith leaders are an essential resource. the message from them has been very clear. this is a critical moment for the world. and the message was one of the head and the heart. the scientists telling us the message from the head is very clear — it is humanity that is creating climate change and we need to act now. and the message of the heart is about morality. the call is urgent. man—made climate change and fossil fuels have prompted the warmest decade on record, with floods, fires and heat waves. this may be the last chance to halt the damage. religion and science don't
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always go hand in hand. climate change deniers are sometimes fuelled by religious conservatives. but with research finding that 84% of people around the globe identify with a faith, world leaders know those meeting here today have a chance of getting their followers to change their behaviour. mark lowen, bbc news, at the vatican. a large oil slick has begun washing ashore in southern california. beaches in orange county, southeast of los angeles, have been closed, as oil and dead wildlife wash up on the sand. almost half a million litres of oil has leaked from a pipeline connected to an offshore oil rig. courtney bembridge reports. california is known for its beaches, but not like this. clumps of oil and tar the size of softballs scatter the shoreline, as well as dead birds and fish. more than 120,000 gallons of oil has leaked into the ocean from a broken pipeline five miles off the coast. we are in the midst of a potential
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ecological disaster here at huntington beach and as the exhibits and pictures here illustrate, the oil spill has significantly impacted our community. the broken pipeline is connected to an offshore oil platform run by a subsidiary of houston—based amplify energy. the company says the pipeline has now been shut off and the remaining oil suctioned out. it has been maintained. we are investigating, if the pipeline is the source of this, how this happened. a huge clean—up operation is under way to try to stop the oil reaching sensitive wetlands nearby and people are being urged to avoid the beaches. you can feel the vapour in the air. i saw what i'll describe as little pancake clusters of oil along the shoreline and i've described it as something like an egg yolk — if you push it, it kind of spreads out, so we don't want people to disturb those little clusters. local authorities say it is too soon to say
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whether the company responsible will face criminal charges. courtney bembridge, bbc news. it's feared the eruption of the volcano on the spanish island of la palma could continue for months. lava has now been flowing forfifteen days, destroying more than a thousand homes. part of the volcano has collapsed, causing the lava to spread faster and in new directions. locals are wondering what the future will hold when the eruption finally stops. danjohnson is on the island and sent this report. incredibly, this eruption is now into a third week and it keeps getting stronger. the volcano is producing even more lava with even more force. that's why all that lava, all that ash, is pouring up into the sky higher and higher, and that means more of a risk to a bigger area — the potential for more people to be evacuated on top of the 6,000 or so who have been out of their homes for a fortnight now. and i was talking to the director
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of the canary islands volcano institute, who said he expects this eruption to continue for at least another ten days, potentially another two months. and even then, when the volcanic eruption stops, when the lava stops flowing, that's not the end of the story. he said it could take years to recover from this because there are vast lava trails right across the landscape here. they have cut through towns and villages, destroyed over 1,000 homes, communication lines and infrastructure have been destroyed. so what to do with that lava — how to live with it — is a major question for the future here that is dominating the future potential of people's lives and their livelihoods, as well. but there are people still living here, right in the shadow of the volcano — some of them saying they've had enough now, after a fortnight of that thing thundering, rumbling right through their
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lives day and night. some have had enough, they can't get sleep, they want to leave. some are making the decision to get to safer places. but then i've also spoken to people who live with that volcano effectively in their back garden who say, "no, as long as the authorities will let me, i'm going to stay, i'm going to see it out." but this is already much worse than anybody has ever seen on this volcanic island — it's produced twice the amount of lava of the previous eruption 50 years ago, and it's still unknown how long that will continue, how much more lava it will produce, and how much more destruction it will cause. the government wants all uk electricity to come from renewable sources by 2035. borisjohnson says the country is already a world leader in offshore windpower, and shouldn't rely on energy produced from fossil fuels overseas. ministers are under pressure to speed up the shift in how energy is produced, as our climate editor, justin rowlatt, reports. if you thought your commute to work was rough going, check this out.
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we're with a team trying to get out to service a wind turbine. so... ..the north sea is famous for its savage weather. but that's why they've put these wind turbines out here, because this is where the wind is. but, of course, it means they are very hard — oh! — to maintain. the swell is up to three metres high today, making it too dangerous to climb the ladder. so it's back to the ship for us. this is where the team of engineers who keep the blades turning, live and work. these guys do 12 hours shifts out here for 1h straight days, and then get two weeks off. it can be tough, but the flourishing
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offshore wind industry is creating thousands of well—paid, skilled jobs, most of them in places like grimsby and east yorkshire, that have seen traditional industries decline. my grandad went to sea when he was 1a as a cabin boy. for seafaring families like mine, offshore wind is really giving more options. and it is comfortable on the ship. right, so this is my cabin. pretty cushti, eh? and then, come and have a look at this. so this is the lounge. sorry, lads. and this... ..this is the dining area. what's for tea? today it's fish, chips and mushy peas. and we've got pork chops with chausseur sauce. erm, bread—and—butter pudding and custard. oh, my god! sounds good, doesn't it? and you can work all that off down here. these monsters are almost 200 metres high.
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and each turn of the blades is reckoned to generate enough electricity to power an average uk home for a day. it's nice to know that your time and your energy is contributing to this world that runs on green energy, and it's something what's going to be a better future for everybody. 0rsted says this one wind farm can power up to one million homes. and they've almost finished another, even bigger one next to it. and there are plans for many more around the country. what's more, the wind revolution isn'tjust happening here in the uk. it's starting to take off all around the world. justin rowlatt, bbc news. the american pop star billie eilish has been confirmed as one of the headline acts for next year's glastonbury festival. the singer will be the main act on the pyramid stage on the friday night. she'll be the youngest ever solo act to headline the festival. now, the weather forecast. hello.
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we've seen some sunshine across the uk to start the week. it will be interspersed for the rest of today, though, with some heavy or squally showers. they will tend to fade through the evening but that is because they will be usurped by this area of low pressure rolling into the south west, injecting energy into the atmosphere in terms of bringing strong winds, and dropping some heavy rain through the evening across the south—west of wales, carrying that rain further north and east into england in the small hours. relatively mild to the south of the uk. perhaps close to a frost in some of the scottish glens, early on tuesday. scotland and northern ireland keep quite a bit of sunshine tuesday and wednesday. a couple of showers around. windy across the board but heavy rain across much of northern and eastern england, on and off, throughout the day. it will brighten towards the west. strong gusts of wind to contend with, potentially doing some damage. no surprises, with the wind and rain, it's going to feel quite chilly.
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this is bbc news. i am clive myrie. 0ur this is bbc news. i am clive myrie. our top stories... the chancellor announces half—a—billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he'll only consider cutting taxes, when the economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you, our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt is almost a 100% of gdp, so we need to fix our public finances. the military is called in to help distribute fuel to petrol stations, as shortages continue in london and the south east. an independent review will be carried out into the metropolitan police's standards and culture, following the murder of sarah everard — but cressida dick rejects calls to resign. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers. a secretive russian, whose businesses have backed 3a conservative mps,
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was involved in a russian corruption scandal. and santas make a breakthrough, successfully treating a patient with severe depression, by using a pacemakerfor severe depression, by using a pacemaker for the severe depression, by using a pacemakerfor the brain —— pacemaker for the brain —— scientists pacemakerfor the brain —— scientists make a breakthrough. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the chancellor rishi sunak has told the conservative party conference in manchester that he wants to do 'whatever it takes' to help britain recover from the pandemic. saying he believed in fiscal responsibility, mr sunak defended tax rises, and said he'd like to cut taxes when public finances are on a "sustainable footing". and he insisted brexit was in the long—term interests of the uk economy, despite disruption to fuel supplies.
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the government is commiting £500 million to renew job support programmes, amid concerns about a rise in the cost of living and the scrapping of the £20 per week uplift in universal credit. here's our political correspondent iain watson. the message from the prime minister and the chancellor is clear. the slogan is 'build back better�*. translated, this means the economy could be stronger after the pandemic than before. but it takes time to train more workers, and right now, with the cost of living rising, they have to find a way to try to stop their political stock from falling. hogging attention outside the conference, pig farmers were complaining about labour shortages. their costs and our prices could be increasing. during the pandemic, he was the good guy, picking up plaudits for paying people's wages. now, though, it is payback time.
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everything is going to be fine. actually, your day—to—day life you just see prices increasing all the time. i think sometimes the message doesn't match up to the reality. 0bviously with the universal credit situation, it is not— ideal for young people, especially on low - incomes, with that cut. however, we've also got to weigh up coming out of a pandemic. _ applause. so the prime minister
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and the chancellor will be hoping that people judge the government not by short—term difficulties, but by long—term vision. iain watson, bbc news, manchester. let's go to the conservative conference in manchester and our political correspondent chris mason. chris, iain watson talks about quiet concern among some of the party faithful. are you discerning quiet concern over universal credit uplift being cut back, fuel costs, energy prices and so on?— prices and so on? yes, there is definitely _ prices and so on? yes, there is definitely some _ prices and so on? yes, there is definitely some of— prices and so on? yes, there is definitely some of that, - prices and so on? yes, there is definitely some of that, clive, l prices and so on? yes, there is l definitely some of that, clive, no doubt about it, because whilst we have heard from the government that big pitch about a longer term economic shift towards higher wages and low immigration, people here are acutely aware of those real world changes, whether it be the end of fellow, the removal of the £20 uplift a universal credit, the rise in prices, the various shortages we are seeing in the economy, and on top of that the whole plethora of other stuff being debated on the margins, the fringes of a
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conservative conference with a multitude of events discussing different things. catherine fletcher, conservative mp for south ribble. thank you forjoining us. i will come to what you have been doing round and about the conference, just to address the conversation i was having with clive around those challenges around cost of living, what is happening with universal credit etc, what are your constituents telling you, what were they telling you you should be speaking to people about as far as what concerns are like in lancashire?— what concerns are like in lancashire? , ., ., ., lancashire? first of all welcome to manchester. _ lancashire? first of all welcome to manchester, this _ lancashire? first of all welcome to manchester, this is _ lancashire? first of all welcome to manchester, this is my _ lancashire? first of all welcome to manchester, this is my home - lancashire? first of all welcome to manchester, this is my home town j lancashire? first of all welcome to - manchester, this is my home town and it is a _ manchester, this is my home town and it is a delight _ manchester, this is my home town and it is a delight to have the national media _ it is a delight to have the national media focusing on it. they are wanting — media focusing on it. they are wanting opportunity. what they want is their— wanting opportunity. what they want is their skill base to be able to go and get _ is their skill base to be able to go and get the job that they want, they want to— and get the job that they want, they want to be _ and get the job that they want, they want to be able to get to work quickly. — want to be able to get to work quickly, they want recognition. some of the _ quickly, they want recognition. some of the conversations you have around the fringe _ of the conversations you have around the fringe is— of the conversations you have around the fringe is people going, you know the fringe is people going, you know the problem with some of the green industrial—
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the problem with some of the green industrial revolution we have to happen, — industrial revolution we have to happen, we don't have the skills base _ happen, we don't have the skills base to — happen, we don't have the skills base to do — happen, we don't have the skills base to do it. well, if you have been _ base to do it. well, if you have been past _ base to do it. well, if you have been past birmingham in the last 40 years. _ been past birmingham in the last 40 years. as _ been past birmingham in the last 40 years. as a _ been past birmingham in the last 40 years, as a man from the north yoursetf, — years, as a man from the north yourself, you will realise that the skills _ yourself, you will realise that the skills base is there and it is realty— skills base is there and it is reallyjust the seed that needs watering. so that is the type of message — watering. so that is the type of message i have been talking about in various— message i have been talking about in various different forums here full stop we — various different forums here full stop we have the pride, the skills, the nous, — stop we have the pride, the skills, the nous, let's water that seed and .et the nous, let's water that seed and get going _ the nous, let's water that seed and get going with it. the nous, let's water that seed and get going with it— the nous, let's water that seed and get going with it. what about these um -s at get going with it. what about these pumps at the _ get going with it. what about these pumps at the moment _ get going with it. what about these pumps at the moment around - get going with it. what about these pumps at the moment around the l pumps at the moment around the shortages we are seeing, the cues from the petrol station, we were talking about the food bank talking about their fears and the lack and the dropping of this, are you comfortable with that? it is the dropping of this, are you comfortable with that? it is 6 billion quid — comfortable with that? it is 6 billion quid a _ comfortable with that? it is 6 billion quid a year. _ comfortable with that? it is 6 billion quid a year. it - comfortable with that? it is 6 billion quid a year. it was - comfortable with that? it is 6 billion quid a year. it was putj comfortable with that? it is 6 i billion quid a year. it was put in place _ billion quid a year. it was put in place to— billion quid a year. it was put in place to help people, but if i got sick, _ place to help people, but if i got sick, i_ place to help people, but if i got sick, i want to spend 600 million quid sick, i want to spend 600 million guid not — sick, i want to spend 600 million quid not giving you a hand out, i want _ quid not giving you a hand out, i want to— quid not giving you a hand out, i want to give you the skills that allow _ want to give you the skills that allow you — want to give you the skills that allow you to get in and i think that is what _ allow you to get in and i think that is what the — allow you to get in and i think that is what the chancellor's speech was about— is what the chancellor's speech was about today. he was talking about the plan _ about today. he was talking about the plan forjobs when we are doing
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different— the plan forjobs when we are doing different investments. if you are from _ different investments. if you are from a _ different investments. if you are from a disadvantage background, perhaps— from a disadvantage background, perhaps your families are on you see, _ perhaps your families are on you see, you — perhaps your families are on you see, you can apply and get like naia scholarship, because you know you have the _ scholarship, because you know you have the nous, just not the opportunities that we will help you .et opportunities that we will help you get right— opportunities that we will help you get right past it and get those fabulousjobs. whilst we get right past it and get those fabulous jobs. whilst we are talking about— fabulous jobs. whilst we are talking about that — fabulous jobs. whilst we are talking about that kind of innovation space, today— about that kind of innovation space, today ben _ about that kind of innovation space, today ben wallace the defence secretary has been ten minutes outside — secretary has been ten minutes outside of my patch, and we will have _ outside of my patch, and we will have a _ outside of my patch, and we will have a new _ outside of my patch, and we will have a new national cyber force based _ have a new national cyber force based there. if that is not a vote of confidence in the skills of people _ of confidence in the skills of people in lancashire and the north—west with gchq in manchester, i north—west with gchq in manchester, i don't _ north—west with gchq in manchester, i don't know— north—west with gchq in manchester, i don't know what is. that is what we are _ i don't know what is. that is what we are doing, investing so you can kind of— we are doing, investing so you can kind of move forward. 30 we are doing, investing so you can kind of move forward. sol we are doing, investing so you can kind of move forward. so i suppose when people _ kind of move forward. so i suppose when people say — kind of move forward. so i suppose when people say and _ kind of move forward. so i suppose when people say and people - kind of move forward. so i suppose when people say and people do - kind of move forward. so i suppose when people say and people do say this, there is that's local than levelling up at what is it actually mean in practical terms, that is what you would point to?- mean in practical terms, that is what you would point to? yes, i am not a sloganeering _ what you would point to? yes, i am not a sloganeering type _ what you would point to? yes, i am not a sloganeering type of - what you would point to? yes, i am not a sloganeering type of girl, - what you would point to? yes, i am not a sloganeering type of girl, if i not a sloganeering type of girl, if i'm honest, iam not a sloganeering type of girl, if i'm honest, i am a not a sloganeering type of girl, if i'm honest, iam a northerner, you know, _ i'm honest, iam a northerner, you know. what— i'm honest, iam a northerner, you know, what does it mean in practical action? _ know, what does it mean in practical action? it— know, what does it mean in practical action? it means different levels of
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qualifications, different opportunities, creating uk export finance _ opportunities, creating uk export finance so — opportunities, creating uk export finance so that all of the small businesses we have across the north of england _ businesses we have across the north of england can help get government money— of england can help get government money to— of england can help get government money to get contracts abroad and expand _ money to get contracts abroad and expand their customer base and then they can _ expand their customer base and then they can take on more people and it is that's— they can take on more people and it is that's snowball that rolls downhill and starts with history, pride _ downhill and starts with history, pride and — downhill and starts with history, pride and the framework from the government, and a hand—out, it doesn't — government, and a hand—out, it doesn't work for me, it is a hand up we need. _ doesn't work for me, it is a hand up we need. and — doesn't work for me, it is a hand up we need, and only a little one because — we need, and only a little one because we are marvellous! let's look ahead _ because we are marvellous! let's look ahead to _ because we are marvellous! let's look ahead to the _ because we are marvellous! let's look ahead to the prime - because we are marvellous! let�*s look ahead to the prime minister was back speech, if you could bend his heir, i don't know, maybe you have, what do you need to hear from heir, i don't know, maybe you have, what do you need to hearfrom him? i what do you need to hear from him? i am going to contradict myself because — am going to contradict myself because i am about to use a slogan and i_ because i am about to use a slogan and i didn't— because i am about to use a slogan and i didn't know we were using it, we have _ and i didn't know we were using it, we have just — and i didn't know we were using it, we have just got to get on with it, and that— we have just got to get on with it, and that is— we have just got to get on with it, and that is practical, that is about giving _ and that is practical, that is about giving local people a bit more power. — giving local people a bit more power, you know, lancashire is looking — power, you know, lancashire is looking for— power, you know, lancashire is looking for a devolution deal can you have — looking for a devolution deal can you have greater manchester firing
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ahead _ you have greater manchester firing ahead of— you have greater manchester firing ahead of the combined authorities and the _ ahead of the combined authorities and the mayoralty is that god brought— and the mayoralty is that god brought in by the previous government. what i want him to do is help us— government. what i want him to do is help us to _ government. what i want him to do is help us to help ourselves and put in place _ help us to help ourselves and put in place the _ help us to help ourselves and put in place the positions and the seed financing — place the positions and the seed financing. government is never going to be _ financing. government is never going to be able _ financing. government is never going to be able to pay for levelling up, what _ to be able to pay for levelling up, what it _ to be able to pay for levelling up, what it needs to do is stick little pots of— what it needs to do is stick little pots of money in on the right place with the _ pots of money in on the right place with the right frameworks so everyone can go, yes, that is investable, and then sometimes it is about— investable, and then sometimes it is about strategic planning. can we get to the _ about strategic planning. can we get to the jobs. — about strategic planning. can we get to the jobs, do the trains arrive on time? _ to the jobs, do the trains arrive on time? let's— to the jobs, do the trains arrive on time? let's continue going with that type of— time? let's continue going with that type of stuff. that is the message .ets type of stuff. that is the message gets roomy and lots of other midlands, north, south west, welsh mps, midlands, north, south west, welsh mps. you— midlands, north, south west, welsh mps, you know, we also the same thing. _ mps, you know, we also the same thing. tet's— mps, you know, we also the same thing, let's crack on with it, here is our— thing, let's crack on with it, here is our practical idea, they don't all make — is our practical idea, they don't all make the cut or the list understandably, but the amount ideas flyin- understandably, but the amount ideas flying around is his problem in some respects _ flying around is his problem in some respects. he has to pick from a list _ respects. he has to pick from a list. �* , . ., respects. he has to pick from a list. �* , , ., ., , , list. briefly before we wrap up, live us list. briefly before we wrap up, give us an _ list. briefly before we wrap up, give us an insight _ list. briefly before we wrap up, give us an insight into - list. briefly before we wrap up, give us an insight into life - list. briefly before we wrap up, give us an insight into life as i list. briefly before we wrap up, | give us an insight into life as an mp ata give us an insight into life as an mp at a party conference, what is on your agenda for the rest of today?
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this is the first one i have ever done _ this is the first one i have ever done as— this is the first one i have ever done as an _ this is the first one i have ever done as an mp. i keep on bumping into my— done as an mp. i keep on bumping into my pals, where we normally sit and have _ into my pals, where we normally sit and have a — into my pals, where we normally sit and have a beerand into my pals, where we normally sit and have a beer and a laugh, into my pals, where we normally sit and have a beerand a laugh, you make— and have a beerand a laugh, you make friends in this game, it has been _ make friends in this game, it has been fun — make friends in this game, it has been fun. but it has been work work. i been fun. but it has been work work. i have _ been fun. but it has been work work. i have been— been fun. but it has been work work. i have been talking about what we can do _ i have been talking about what we can do to — i have been talking about what we can do to trade and deliver a net zero _ can do to trade and deliver a net zero we — can do to trade and deliver a net zero. we have been talking about what _ zero. we have been talking about what we — zero. we have been talking about what we can do to help people understand their personal finances. if understand their personal finances. if you _ understand their personal finances. if you try _ understand their personal finances. if you try and make people laugh, they will— if you try and make people laugh, they will listen you a bit more so you'll— they will listen you a bit more so you'll have — they will listen you a bit more so you'll have to ask people for a bit of feedback and see if it works but i of feedback and see if it works but i have _ of feedback and see if it works but i have managed to keep the jokes on the right— i have managed to keep the jokes on the right side of it. but it is interesting, you go round and you are struck— interesting, you go round and you are struck by passion, energy, you know, _ are struck by passion, energy, you know. it _ are struck by passion, energy, you know. it may— are struck by passion, energy, you know, it may be all the southerners up know, it may be all the southerners up here _ know, it may be all the southerners up here feeding off the north of england — up here feeding off the north of england come you never know! nice to talk to you. — england come you never know! nice to talk to you, thank _ england come you never know! nice to talk to you, thank you _ england come you never know! nice to talk to you, thank you very _ england come you never know! nice to talk to you, thank you very much, - talk to you, thank you very much, catherine fletcher, conservative mp, channelling, clive, a mancunian spirit with which you will be familiar. , . ,.,
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familiar. indeed, very much so. thanks, chris _ familiar. indeed, very much so. thanks, chris mason. _ the army has begun to help in the delivery of fuel, amid ongoing shortages in parts of the country. more than a fifth of petrol stations in london and the south east still don't have fuel, according to the petrol retailers association. it says it could be more than a week before things get back to normal. here's theo leggett. army drivers, getting ready to ferry fuel around the country. 200 military personnel are being deployed to help deliver petrol and diesel to forecourts. in many areas, the situation has eased dramatically, retailers say. but in london and the south—east, queues remain common. the news this morning is better than bad. it is slightly positive. but our poll later in the day will confirm whether it is a real turning point today. and i think that the military drivers will add a little bit of confidence to that, but it is not a full panacea. at the height of the crisis,
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some 65% of service stations said they were running dry, as a wave of panic buying took hold across the country. but by the weekend, that figure had fallen to just 16%. the government is hoping that, with the help of the military, a site like this, a petrol station that has run out of petrol, will become a thing of the past. but people within the industry are warning that the root causes of the crisis have yet to be addressed. the problem is a severe shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers, which is affecting other parts of the economy as well. ministers say that disruption to supply chains are not confined to the uk. there are things that we can do, and it is reasonable that people expect us to do what we can, whether that is short—term visas, speeding up testing for drivers, we should and are doing those things. but we cannot wave a magic wand and make a global supply chain challenges disappear overnight. there never was a shortage of fuel. the problem was getting it to forecourts quickly enough to meet demand. the crisis has thrown a harsh
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spotlight once again on the challenges facing what were once the uk's carefully tuned supply chains. theo leggett, bbc news. the head of the metropolitan police, cressida dick, has ordered an independent review into the force, after its performance was strongly criticised following the murder of sarah everard. the commissioner said she wanted to restore public trust. our special correspondent lucy manning spoke to today we are announcing i can do a review, that will be led by a higher profile, independent person and the review will look at our internal culture and it will look at our professional standards, systems, processes, leadership, training, to make sure that we are the best possible met police we can be. and i am absolutely determined that we rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can.
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our special correspondent lucy manning spoke to the commissioner and gave us more details of what she had to say: well, this was the first interview the commissioner has done since wayne _ the commissioner has done since wayne couzens her officer was charged — wayne couzens her officer was charged with the kidnap, rape and murder— charged with the kidnap, rape and murder of— charged with the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. we only got a quick— murder of sarah everard. we only got a quick four— murder of sarah everard. we only got a quick four minutes. she was doing a quick four minutes. she was doing a couple _ a quick four minutes. she was doing a couple of— a quick four minutes. she was doing a couple of interviews as well but she was — a couple of interviews as well but she was clear that things obviously need _ she was clear that things obviously need to— she was clear that things obviously need to change inside the met, because — need to change inside the met, because they have now appointed, or are going _ because they have now appointed, or are going to— because they have now appointed, or are going to appoint somebody who will be _ are going to appoint somebody who will be looking at what is going wrong — will be looking at what is going wrong. we don't know who that person is, who— wrong. we don't know who that person is, who will— wrong. we don't know who that person is, who will lead it, we understand it will— is, who will lead it, we understand it will ask— is, who will lead it, we understand it will ask for a minimum of six months — it will ask for a minimum of six months. we don't know what will happen— months. we don't know what will happen with any recommendations made _ happen with any recommendations made. what we do know as it is not the public— made. what we do know as it is not the public inquiry are some people have been— the public inquiry are some people have been calling for, that would have _ have been calling for, that would have a _ have been calling for, that would have a lot — have been calling for, that would have a lot more powers, and what i also asked — have a lot more powers, and what i also asked her was that given that this officer, given that wayne couzens — this officer, given that wayne couzens was an officer when she was his overall— couzens was an officer when she was his overall boss, it was on her
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watch — his overall boss, it was on her watch that— his overall boss, it was on her watch that this happened, shouldn't she take _ watch that this happened, shouldn't she take responsibility for that and resign? _ she take responsibility for that and resign? she said she knew it was on her watch _ resign? she said she knew it was on her watch but she intended to carry on, her watch but she intended to carry on. and _ her watch but she intended to carry on. and she — her watch but she intended to carry on, and she had a job to do. we also talked _ on, and she had a job to do. we also talked a _ on, and she had a job to do. we also talked a bit _ on, and she had a job to do. we also talked a bit about vetting, how could _ talked a bit about vetting, how could wayne couzens have been a police _ could wayne couzens have been a police officer? he had gone from this, _ police officer? he had gone from this, and — police officer? he had gone from this, and then she said she had asked _ this, and then she said she had asked for— this, and then she said she had asked for the national policing boarding to ask for vetting of policing _ boarding to ask for vetting of policing officers and on indecent exposure, — policing officers and on indecent exposure, wayne couzens was accused 'ust exposure, wayne couzens was accused just in _ exposure, wayne couzens was accused just in the _ exposure, wayne couzens was accused just in the days before sarah everard's _ just in the days before sarah everard's murder, she confirmed that as far— everard's murder, she confirmed that as far as— everard's murder, she confirmed that as far as she — everard's murder, she confirmed that as far as she was aware they had not known _ as far as she was aware they had not known that— as far as she was aware they had not known that that person accused of the indecent exposure was a police officer _ the indecent exposure was a police officer. . , ~., staying with the metropolitan police, and a met police officer has appeared in court, charged with rape. pc david carrick works in scotland yard's parliamentary and diplomatic protection command. he denies the allegation.
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0ur correspondent, graham satchell, is at st albans magistrates' court and he sent this update. david carrick was not in court. he appeared on a video link from stevenage police station. it was a procedural affair, so very short. he spoke only a couple of times, to confirm his name, age and address. he is charged with one count of rape. he emphatically denied that charge. the alleged offences are said to have occurred in st albans last september, when david carrick was off duty. he is, as you say, a police constable in the metropolitan police serving in the parliamentary and protection command, so in the houses of parliament, but currently suspended from duty. the metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dick, has said she is deeply concerned that such a serious offence should be associated with a serving police officer. she said she understood the public would be concerned as well. david carrick bowed his head as he was remanded in custody by the sitting magistrate, and he will appear in court again at the beginning of next month.
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a bbc investigation has discovered how a major conservative party donor, was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. leaked documents reveal how mohamed amersi, who's given half—a—million pounds to the conservatives, worked on a series of controversial deals for a swedish telecoms company. the swedish company was later fined almost a billion dollars for bribery. mr amersi denies any wrongdoing. the bbc worked alongside the international consortium of investigativejournalists and the guardian on the investigation. richard bilton reports. mohamed amersi is wealthy and well—connected. here he is talking about the dangers of corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life. so where did his wealth come from?
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some of it comes from this company in sweden, a company fined almost $1 billion for bribery. telia was prosecuted over a corrupt telecoms deal. the firm paid $220 million to an offshore company secretly controlled by gulnara karimova, the daughter of the then president of uzbekistan. the american authorities described it as a $220 million bribe. we have obtained documents showing how mr amersi was involved in the deal. in one e—mail, a telia boss writes... "i do not want to be involved in the day—to—day negotiations, so maybe you could handle it." mr amersi reponds... "sure, i agree." and here's mr amersi's invoice for his part in project uzbekistan. he got a success fee of $500,000 for his work. mr amersi's lawyers said the offshore company had been vetted and approved by telia, and that its involvement did not raise any red flags to mr amersi.
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all of this matters because he has given more than half a million to the conservative party. this morning, borisjohnson gave his reaction. i see that story today but all i can say on that one is that all these donations are vetted in the normal way in accordance with rules that were set up under the labour government. so we vetted them the whole time. a conservative spokesman said government policy is in no way influenced by the donations the party receives. they are entirely separate. "we are motivated by the priorities of the british public acting in the national interest." richard bilton, bbc news. that report was about tory donor mohamed amersi. this afternoon we have heard about another businessman linked to conservative party donations, called viktor fedotov.
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his lawyers told the bbc there is no evidence whatsoever that mr fedotov behaved improperly. 0ur correspondent andy verity gave me this update. viktor fedotov has very close connections to the conservative party, he has donated more than £700,000 through his businesses, including donations to a dozen tory mps. now the link between him and the conservatives is controversial, because later this month the government will decide whether to approve his company's plans for a £1 billion undersea energy link between the uk and france. now, working with the consortium, international consortium of investigativejournalists and the guardian, bbc panorama has found documents that show how he, viktor fedotov, made his fortune. they reveal how he and two managers of transneft, the russian state oil firm, took money from a pipeline project and shifted it offshore. it looks like they siphoned off more than $100 million and hid the money in secretive trusts.
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we asked andrew mitchell about it, who is a barrister specialising in fraud cases. if people are able to construct a scheme, whereby they can extract for doing nothing $100 million plus, out of government funds, then the real losers are the men, women and children who rely on the government to give them education, health, roads, social services. lawyers for aquind, and mr fedotov, aquind is his company, say there was no evidence that funds were embezzled from transneft. mr fedotov denies any allegations of wrongdoing, and never had any interest in british politics and has always worked in an open, transparent manner. the conservatives say compliance was made and checks were made. say there was no evidence that funds were embezzled from transneft. mr fedotov denies any allegations of wrongdoing, and never had any interest in british politics and has always worked in an open,
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transparent manner. the conservatives say compliance was made and checks were made. 12 million documents analysed by the guardian, the bbc panorama programme and so on, that is in the pandora papers. a while back we had the panama papers. i think there are a number of others in between beginning with the letter p as well. what i want to know is, is anything changing? a lot of the people who are putting their money into the offshore accounts are doing it legally. are we seeing governments, given these revelations, the latest today, actually changing the system? not yet, out of today's revelations, but maybe that would be a bit quick, but certainly since the panama papers back in 2016 there have been reforms was to david cameron was put on the back foot by some of the revelations, the former prime minister. he introduced a reform where in companies house, where they keep all the details about companies in the uk, you can find out who the person of significant control is, but only if they are registered in the uk. if they are registered in an overseas territory like the british virgin islands etc, you can't find out, so we need leaks like this if we are ever going to know. there was a move a few years ago by margaret hodge mp and andrew mitchell mp to force
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overseas territories and crown dependencies to have registries of an official ownership but that got watered down so they don't publish it, although law enforcement are going to be able to see it. so still a lot less than transparent campaigners would like. and you can see more on that story tonight in panorama, the pandora papers, on bbc one at 7.35pm. a nurse who is accused of murdering eight babies and attempting to murder ten others has pleaded not guilty to all the charges against her. lucy letby, from hereford is charged with murdering five boys and three girls at the countess of chester hospital between 2015 and 2016.
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she is also accused of the attempted murder of ten other babies. the 31—year—old has been remanded in custody until her trial next year. scientists in a new study have successfully treated a patient with severe depression by using a "pacemaker for the brain". using a surgically implanted device, they tapped into the specific brain circuit involved in depressive brain patterns and reset them using the instrument. i'm joined now by professor jonathan roiser, from the university college london institute of cognitive neuroscience. it is good to see you. thanks for being with us. so just explain how this thing works. being with us. so 'ust explain how this thing works.— this thing works. yes, it is a fascinating _ this thing works. yes, it is a fascinating study _ this thing works. yes, it is a fascinating study and - this thing works. yes, it is a fascinating study and taking | this thing works. yes, it is a l fascinating study and taking a totally different approach to previous studies that have tried to do this deep brain stimulation as it is caught with a pacemaker. so usually in these kind of studies, it will put in an electrode and it remains there and it remains on for a long of time, and it is not bespoke to the particular circuit that might be involved in the depressive symptoms in that particular individual, which
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assimilate the same region for everyone. instead of this study what they have done as they have tried to map the circuit in advance to try to figure out exactly what the centre of the circuit driving the depressive symptoms might be, and then they found another region in then they found another region in the circuit which they have stimulated in order to bring activity down in that central hub. which we have known has been involved in depression for a very long time, and then finally they set “p long time, and then finally they set up a closed system, as they call it, where the sensor detects activity, and when it gets too high, this stimulated turns on in other region for a very short period of time, just a few seconds, brings activity back down again and then automatically turns itself off again. so it is a totally different way and are much more sophisticated way and are much more sophisticated way of delivering the stimulation. in this case it had a very dramatic effect on the patient�*s symptoms. absolutely amazing. so the specific circuit offering depressive symptoms is targeted, and when the symptoms,
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i don't know, manifest themselves, the little machines which is on? well, it may be even more than that, it may be that the symptoms never even get there because what it is doing is detecting the activity directly in the brain that we think is driving the symptoms, and probably it turns itself on at a particular threshold, so may be the symptoms never even get to express themselves in the first place, and i agree with you, a really remarkable piece of engineering to do it. it is piece of engineering to do it. it is mind—boggling. i wonder then, piece of engineering to do it. it is mind—boggling. iwonderthen, if piece of engineering to do it. it is mind—boggling. i wonder then, if it is bespoke, and this is a study, i mean, is this something perhaps you see being used more widely? at what point would we get to that stage, do you think? point would we get to that stage, do ou think? �* , , , point would we get to that stage, do ou think? �*, , , . ., , you think? let's be very clear, this kind of very _ you think? let's be very clear, this kind of very invasive _ you think? let's be very clear, this kind of very invasive intervention l kind of very invasive intervention which is a surgical intervention, requires having brain surgery and also the mapping stage before hunt would only ever be used in the most severe patients. it is actually similar to an approach that has been used for many years in parkinson disease, there are many tens of
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thousands of patients around the world where you can reduce the tremor or the stiffness by having this kind of implant. so it is not unheard of, by any means. but of course this is only a single case study, a single patient they are talking about, so in future, it remains to be seen using a randomised controlled trial where they have periods where they stimulate isn't actually on whether this is actually going to be generalisable to other patients and whether it has a much better effect than sham stimulation, because of course there was all sorts of expectancy effects. but the preliminary results to look extremely encouraging and the interesting thing about it is taking this very neuro scientifically based approach to try to figure out exactly where to stimulate in that particular individual. in another individual they would probably have to stimulate in note that the place. and for different forms and types of depression as well? yes. and for different forms and types of depression as well?— depression as well? yes, they do mention in _ depression as well? yes, they do mention in this _ depression as well? yes, they do mention in this paper— depression as well? yes, they do mention in this paper that - depression as well? yes, they do | mention in this paper that patient, with the boot going up very quickly
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and down, in other patients, it is very likely it would have to be in different parts. 0ne very likely it would have to be in different parts. one of the things that has become increasingly clear over the last decade or so is that although we have this syndrome of depression, it is very likely that different parts of the brain are implicated in different individuals and we are not necessarily talking about a single disorder in which the symptoms are all for example controlled by the amygdala, which seem to be the key area in this patient. so it is very early days, the first proof of principle study using this approach but yes, i agree, potentially very exciting. good to get your perspective on this. thank you forjoining us. thank you very much. the this. thank you forjoining us. thank you very much. the star trek actor william _ thank you very much. the star trek actor william shatner _ thank you very much. the star trek actor william shatner who - thank you very much. the star trek actor william shatner who is - thank you very much. the star trek| actor william shatner who is captain kark commanded the starship enterprise of course is going to go into space, for real, at the age of 94 stop he will head to the heavens next week with a crew from blue origin, the space company owned by the multi—billionaire amazon boss
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jeff bezos. shatner confirmed the news on twitter saying yes, it is true, i am going to be a rocket man. good luck. now time for a look at the time now for the weather with susan powell. sadly, i am the time now for the weather with susan powell. sadly, lam not the time now for the weather with susan powell. sadly, i am not off on a satellite any time soon but it is a satellite any time soon but it is a busy day out there, now the showers are marching in across the uk. thanks to our weather watchers, some beautiful images, some great double rainbows being sent in. such a lot of showers packing in with that sunshine and you are just reflecting that like to get those beautiful bows of colour. a good soaking out of some of their showers as they continue to track eastward through this evening but the story for this evening and overnight really is this curl of rain running into the uk. it is a low pressure centre, it will drop some heavy rain across wales in the south—west through this evening and by the end of the night the wettest weather will be sitting towards the east. and then the front tends to pivot across northern england from tuesday, so not much letup in the rain here. elsewhere, brighter skies, a few showers for scotland
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and northern ireland, becoming much drierfor wales and the and northern ireland, becoming much drier for wales and the south—west. pretty much a windy day across the board, and it is going to feel quite cool where the rain is persistent, temperatures barely making it into double figures across parts of northern england. elsewhere, we may push up towards the mid—teens. won't hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he'll only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. the military is called in to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in london and the south east. an independent review will be carried out into the culture and standards of the met police following the murder of sarah everard but cressida dick sags
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following the murder of sarah everard but cressida dick says she will not resign. _ more revelations from the leaked pandora papers. a secretive russian whose businesses have backed 34 conservative mps was involved in a russian corruption scandal. scientists have made a breakthrough in treating depression by creating a pacemaker for the in treating depression by creating a pacemakerfor the brain. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. claudio ranieri is at watford's training ground to discuss becoming their new manager, after they sacked xisco munoz afterjust ten months. watford have won two of their opening seven premier league games and sit in 15th. ranieri is understood to be the owners' first choice. he, of course, won the premier league with leicester city in 2016. watford have got rid of 13 managers since 2012. but this watford podcaster says the unusual approach has worked before.
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it obviously works because since these owners came in, we were a lower league championship side on the brink of administration but since then we have had one play—off final, two promotions, one of those immediately after getting relegated, so bouncing straight back, fa cup semifinal in 2016, fa cup final in 2019, highest ever premier league points tally and our highest league position since the 1980s. so, yes, it is frustrating on the one hand, not having the stability that supporters crave, but it is hard to argue with the results that have fallen watford's way in the last decade. a decision on whether england's cricket team will play in this winter's ashes tour in australia will be made this week when the sport's governing body, the ecb, meets to discuss conditions for the trip. there have been concerns over whether their families can travel with them, quarantine arrangements and any potential "bubble" they may have to live in. australia has some of the strictest covid—19 protocols in the world,
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a situation complicated by the fact its different states have their own regulations. the first test is due to begin on 8th december. cricket writer adam collins does not believe the ashes is in doubt. in order for the ashes not to go ahead would require a boycott from the ecb, not in those strong terms, but a postponement, which in the current scheduling arrangement that we have, i just can't see that happening. there's too much on the line financially. the ashes is effectively an industry inside of cricket and there's so much on the line for both boards. i wouldn't doubt for a heartbeat that the majority of players if presented with a modest quarantine arrangement in a country that is opening up, i would expect the majority of them, the vast majority will tick box a. ben majority of them, the vast ma'ority will tick box xi will tick box a. ben ainslie is lookin: will tick box a. ben ainslie is looking to — will tick box a. ben ainslie is looking to try _ will tick box a. ben ainslie is looking to try and _ will tick box a. ben ainslie is looking to try and win - will tick box a. ben ainslie is looking to try and win the - will tick box a. ben ainslie is - looking to try and win the america's
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cup. new zealand are the defending champions. the new zealand are the defending champions-— new zealand are the defending chamions. , , , champions. the synergy is there in terms of developing _ champions. the synergy is there in terms of developing simulation - champions. the synergy is there in l terms of developing simulation tools and the formula 1 cars are not in the water but there is an aerodynamic and hydrodynamic discipline that we have got to over come up with the america's cup. it all ties into formula 1 and the attention to detail and the discipline formula 1 has, we believe that could make a difference to our organisation. tyson fury could be set to return to the fight in the uk again after this weekend's heavyweight showdown with deontay wilder. that's according to his co—promoter frank warren. wbc champ fury hasn't fought in britain since 2018 after signing a deal to stage his fights in america, competing there four times. fury is due to take on wilder this
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saturday night in las vegas. the third time they've met after fury beat his american opponent to take the wbc title in february last year. that's all the sport for now. thank you for that. scientists who discovered how our bodies feel the warmth of the sun, or the touch of a loved one, have been awarded the nobel prize for medicine. david julius and ardem patapoutian share the prize for their work on the sense of touch, and temperature. they unpicked how our bodies convert physical sensations into electrical messages in the nervous system. their findings could lead to new ways of treating pain. james gallagher is here to tell me more. most people just most peoplejust think, most people just think, our nerves are stimulated by the heat and that is how you feel, but this actually gets a bit deeper than that. you are auoin dee gets a bit deeper than that. you are going deep to _ gets a bit deeper than that. you are going deep to figure _ gets a bit deeper than that. you are going deep to figure out _ gets a bit deeper than that. you are going deep to figure out what - gets a bit deeper than that. you are going deep to figure out what is - going deep to figure out what is going deep to figure out what is going on. in a year when we have not
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been able to hug anybody because of covid, this is scientists explaining what is going on inside your body when you have a lovely hug, it is quite nice. they tried to understand how you connect those electrical messages that go throughout the body, how we understand the world, with physical sensations, and the missing link in between them, so they were looking for receptors on they were looking for receptors on the surface of nerve cells and what they do is detect the environment around themselves and then respond to it and create the electrical signal. they found the first one for heat and they started with chilis, basically, the more of it in there, it gets hotter. you can have that in a drink as well. in it gets hotter. you can have that in a drink as well.— it gets hotter. you can have that in| a drink as well._ it a drink as well. in vodka? maybe. it can be very — a drink as well. in vodka? maybe. it can be very hot _ a drink as well. in vodka? maybe. it can be very hot and _ a drink as well. in vodka? maybe. it can be very hot and painfully - a drink as well. in vodka? maybe. it can be very hot and painfully hot, i can be very hot and painfully hot, the same thing with the chemical in
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chilis, that's how they found the first heat receptor. the first touch receptor was basically, he is a microscope and we are going to go in and manually poke cells in a dish until we find which ones have the right receptor to detect touch. and thenit right receptor to detect touch. and then it has ballooned from there, so we have found cold receptors, very hot receptors, different types of touch receptors, and all of it really comes together to help explain how we experience and feel the world around us. what explain how we experience and feel the world around us.— the world around us. what are the ractical the world around us. what are the practical applications _ the world around us. what are the practical applications of _ the world around us. what are the practical applications of knowing l practical applications of knowing this stuff? . , ., , ., this stuff? once you understand the detail and the _ this stuff? once you understand the detail and the mechanics _ this stuff? once you understand the detail and the mechanics you - this stuff? once you understand the detail and the mechanics you can i detail and the mechanics you can start thinking about how we can play around with it, how drugs can tap into it, so when you look for the receptors in the body they are everywhere. involving a whole wide range of different processes. 0ne everywhere. involving a whole wide range of different processes. one of thoseis range of different processes. one of those is pain. if you can find a way that taps into these systems and routes them, you might be able to
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find new treatments for chronic pain and that is the leading idea turning this fundamental science, how our bodies work, it is something which can also have medical benefits. amazing stuff. good to see you. an excited james gallagher, i can tell. climate change protestors blocked the entrance to the blackwall tunnel which is one of london's busiest river crossings, during this morning's rush hour. they also targeted wandsworth bridge, arnos grove and the hanger lane gyratory. the high court has previously issued injunctions to try to stop such protests but they don't cover those routes. here's our transport correspondent tom edwards. for three weeks, insulate britain have been targeting london's roads and motorways. the tactic, lie down on the tarmac, or glue themselves to it. this morning, there were four protests at locations in london. at hanger lane, malik was caught
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up in the disruption. he's a dentist, and had to cancel appointments. do you have any sympathy with insulate britain? no, not at all. so i'm all for protecting the planet, reducing our carbon footprint. but it's just caused such a huge amount of inconvenience. i mean, just driving past, if you see a row of cars, i'm sure in those cars you will have nhs workers, workers trying to get to hospitals, emergency doctors. but it seems like they have no consideration for that, they've just blocked everything off, just to make a point. and the point is a valid point, but there must be a better way round it. the group wants to highlight the lack of insulation in the country's housing stock, which it claims is the least energy efficient in europe. the government has tried injunctions to stop the protests, threatening prison sentences and fines. but that hasn't stopped them.
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now it is planning more. we have brought in new measures, which we are announcing today, so they can either face six months injail or unlimited fines, and we will use section 60 powers, so that the police can do stop and search of those who are bringing superglue or whatever to block the traffic on our motorways. drivers have started trying to remove the protesters themselves. at the moment, the authorities though continue to struggle to prevent the demonstrations. tom edwards, bbc london. the rules on foreign travel have changed, with the old traffic light system scrapped. there will now be just one list of so—called "red countries", and anyone travelling to them will have to quarantine for ten days in a hotel when they return. but most fully vaccinated travellers coming from other destinations will no longer need to take a covid test before departure. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports. going abroad just got cheaper, and a whole lot easier. the amber list has been scrapped.
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now there's just a red list of countries. those passengers still have to pay to quarantine in a hotel when they get home. but for everywhere else, there is only one pcr test when you get back. as long as you are fully vaccinated, no other test is needed, and no isolation. but for people who have not beenjabbed, all the old rules still apply. a test before travelling home, self—isolation, and tests on day two and day eight. the changes are just in time for those desperate to escape for half term. plenty of families have been put off international travel because the system has been so complicated and so expensive. there are still some deals out there and definitely prices are still a little bit lower than they were pre—pandemic. but i think once we start to see the likes of the us opening up, which is happening sometime in november, then i think really we are going to see prices gradually start to creep up, as companies, you know these
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airlines, have had virtually no income for many months now, and they have to make up the billions of pounds of debt they have built up. the travel industry is delighted, even though we are well into the last remnants of the holiday season. we need to do more. you know, the requirement to do a test after arrival, particularly a pcr test, and they will change that to a rapid antigen, but i don't understand why they are waiting for some time to change that. i think the industry could adapt and introduce that change much quicker. but it is going in the right direction. there are still different rules for any country you are travelling to. these changes are only about what you have to do when you are coming home. the red list is to be reviewed again this week, and more countries may be given the green light at that stage. so whether it's for pleasure, for business, or to see family, a simpler, cheaper system is now in place. colletta smith, bbc news.
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a man who raped an elderly woman 40 years ago hasjust a man who raped an elderly woman 40 years ago has just been sentenced after advances in dna technology. kenneth wells broke into the woman's house in a wiltshire village. at home in salisbury injune, until the police banged on his gate, kenneth wells who is known as kenny, had been living his life thinking he had got away with it. i’m been living his life thinking he had got away with it.— got away with it. i'm arresting you for the rape _ got away with it. i'm arresting you for the rape and _ got away with it. i'm arresting you for the rape and false _ got away with it. i'm arresting you i for the rape and false imprisonment — forced imprisonment and a burglary... - forced imprisonment and a burglary- - -— - forced imprisonment and a burglary... - forced imprisonment and a burula ., ., ' burglary... violet round was 71 in 1980 and living _ burglary... violet round was 71 in 1980 and living alone _ burglary... violet round was 71 in 1980 and living alone in - burglary... violet round was 71 in 1980 and living alone in which . burglary... violet round was 71 in 1980 and living alone in which it| 1980 and living alone in which it went kenny wells and at least one other man broke into her house while she was sleeping. it other man broke into her house while she was sleeping.— she was sleeping. it was a horrific
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crime. she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime- during _ she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime. during the _ she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime. during the night _ she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime. during the night she - she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime. during the night she was i crime. during the night she was awoken by masked men with torches, shouting abuse and aggressive instructions to her, in her bedroom. she was assaulted, she was raped in the bedroom. in her own bed. they searched the premises and stole items from her home. they were there for some time, the telephone line was cut in when they left they lock the front door with a deadbolt and she was unable to get out. thea;r the front door with a deadbolt and she was unable to get out. they took the key with — she was unable to get out. they took the key with them _ she was unable to get out. they took the key with them and _ she was unable to get out. they took the key with them and she _ she was unable to get out. they took the key with them and she was - she was unable to get out. they took the key with them and she was in - she was unable to get out. they tookj the key with them and she was in the house _ the key with them and she was in the house hiding behind the door for many— house hiding behind the door for many hours until the postman was there _ many hours until the postman was there and — many hours until the postman was there and able to free her. it affected _ there and able to free her. it affected her for the rest of her life _ affected her for the rest of her life. ., . . affected her for the rest of her life. ., ., , , . , life. violet has since died in this hoto life. violet has since died in this photo highlights _ life. violet has since died in this photo highlights the _ life. violet has since died in this photo highlights the fact - life. violet has since died in this photo highlights the fact every l life. violet has since died in this . photo highlights the fact every rape victim has a name, even though they have a right to anonymity during their lifetime. even after his arrest, the rapist was still claiming innocence. i
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arrest, the rapist was still claiming innocence. arrest, the rapist was still claimin: innocence. ., claiming innocence. i hope you have not some claiming innocence. i hope you have got some proof— claiming innocence. i hope you have got some proof of _ claiming innocence. i hope you have got some proof of all _ claiming innocence. i hope you have got some proof of all this. _ claiming innocence. i hope you have got some proof of all this. the - got some proof of all this. the roof got some proof of all this. the proof was _ got some proof of all this. the proof was in — got some proof of all this. the proof was in the _ got some proof of all this. the proof was in the police archives, collected long before scientists began using dna profiling to solve crimes. , ~ . , , crimes. the dna evidence suggested ou were crimes. the dna evidence suggested you were the — crimes. the dna evidence suggested you were the nasty — crimes. the dna evidence suggested you were the nasty one, _ crimes. the dna evidence suggested you were the nasty one, described i crimes. the dna evidence suggested j you were the nasty one, described by violet, who you've raped in the early hours of that day in 1980. he looks pretty relaxed being interviewed, he was quite arrogant and dismissive of the process, being interviewed — and dismissive of the process, being interviewed in relation to this. he knows _ interviewed in relation to this. he knows futi— interviewed in relation to this. he knows full well he was responsible, of course, — knows full well he was responsible, of course, and we knew he was responsible, but it demonstrates his lack of— responsible, but it demonstrates his lack of remorse and lack of consideration for anybody. the detectives _ consideration for anybody. the detectives say _ consideration for anybody. tie: detectives say his sentencing consideration for anybody. ti9: detectives say his sentencing should serve as a warning to his accomplice who watched him rape violet as there is hope dna may also reveal his identity in the future.
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the headlines on bbc news: the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic. he says he'll only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers. a secretive russian whose businesses have backed 34 conservative mps was involved in a russian corruption scandal. the military is called in to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in london and the south east. breaking news from the conservative party conference in manchester. we are hearing a conservative party member has been thrown out of the conference and suspended by the party after allegedly being involved in an assault. a woman, who heads an energy company, told a fringe event
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she had been violently assaulted by a man in a bar in the hotel where senior ministers are staying and she continued, she said she wanted to take the opportunity to say women are often unsafe in places where other people feel safe and it is really important that we start to take that much more seriously as a society and starting with the police. a conservative party spokeswoman says this behaviour is unacceptable and the party has revoked the pass of the individual concerned and is working with the police, so this story coming out of the conservative party conference in manchester. 0ur correspondent is reporting that conservative party member has been thrown out of the conference in manchester and suspended by the party after an allegation of an assault on a woman. any more on that we will bring it to you later.
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a large oil slick has begun washing ashore in southern california. beaches in orange county, southeast of los angeles, have been closed, as oil and dead wildlife wash up on the sand. almost half a million litres of oil has leaked from a pipeline connected to an offshore oil rig. courtney bembridge reports. california is known for its beaches, but not like this. clumps of oil and tar the size of softballs scatter the shoreline, as well as dead birds and fish. more than 120,000 gallons of oil has leaked into the ocean from a broken pipeline five miles off the coast. we are in the midst of a potential ecological disaster here at huntington beach and as the exhibits and pictures here illustrate, the oil spill has significantly impacted our community. the broken pipeline is connected to an offshore oil platform run by a subsidiary of houston—based amplify energy. the company says the pipeline
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has now been shut off and the remaining oil suctioned out. it has been maintained. we are investigating, if the pipeline is the source of this, how this happened. a huge clean—up operation is under way to try to stop the oil reaching sensitive wetlands nearby and people are being urged to avoid the beaches. you can feel the vapour in the air. i saw what i'll describe as little pancake clusters of oil along the shoreline and i've described it as something like an egg yolk — if you push it, it kind of spreads out, so we don't want people to disturb those little clusters. local authorities say it is too soon to say whether the company responsible will face criminal charges. courtney bembridge, bbc news. dozens of religious leaders from around the world have appealed to politicians to agree a new deal to combat climate change. they were gathered at a ceremony in the vatican, where pope francis urged governments to raise their ambition ahead of the un climate conference in glasgow. the archbishop of canterbury
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was among those at the event. here's mark lowen. they came from across the planet, faith leaders urging politicians to save it. christian and jewish, buddhist and muslim, taoist and confucian, signing a joint appeal to world leaders who will meet at the cop26 in glasgow, to commit to net zero emissions, to limit the temperature rise to 1.5 degrees to support poorer countries. a pope who is focused on environmental concern and an archbishop with this warning... 0urabuse, ourwar against the climate, affects the poorest among us. reconciliation with creation, in obedience to our creator, proclaims the love of god. the world has just enough time to get this right. in return, the signatories say
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they will educate their faithful, spreading the message of climate awareness. the document was handed to alok sharma, the cop26 president, to take to next month's summit, telling us the faith leaders are an essential resource. the message from them has been very clear. this is a critical moment for the world. and the message was one of the head and the heart. the scientists telling us the message from the head is very clear — it is humanity that is creating climate change and we need to act now. and the message of the heart is about morality. the call is urgent. man—made climate change and fossil fuels have prompted the warmest decade on record, with floods, fires and heat waves. this may be the last chance to halt the damage. religion and science don't always go hand in hand. climate change deniers are sometimes fuelled by religious conservatives. but with research finding that 84% of people around the globe identify with a faith,
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world leaders know those meeting here today have a chance of getting their followers to change their behaviour. it's feared the eruption of the volcano on the spanish island of la palma could continue for months. lava has now been flowing for 15 days, destroying more than 1,000 homes. part of the volcano has collapsed, causing the lava to spread faster and in new directions. locals are wondering what the future will hold when the eruption finally stops. danjohnson is on the island and sent this report. incredibly, this eruption is now into a third week and it keeps getting stronger. the volcano is producing even more lava with even more force. that's why all that lava, all that ash, is pouring up into the sky higher and higher, and that means more
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of a risk to a bigger area — the potential for more people to be evacuated on top of the 6,000 or so who have been out of their homes for a fortnight now. i was talking to the director of the canary islands volcano institute, who said he expects this eruption to continue for at least another ten days, potentially another two months. and even then, when the volcanic eruption stops, when the lava stops flowing, that's not the end of the story. he said it could take years to recover from this because there are vast lava trails right across the landscape here. they have cut through towns and villages, destroyed over 1,000 homes, communication lines and infrastructure have been destroyed. so what to do with that lava — how to live with it — is a major question for the future here that is dominating the future potential of people's lives and their livelihoods, as well. but there are people still living here, right in the shadow of the volcano — some of them saying they've had enough now, after a fortnight of that thing thundering, rumbling right through their lives day and night. some have had enough,
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they can't get sleep, they want to leave. some are making the decision to get to safer places. but then i've also spoken to people who live with that volcano effectively in their back garden who say, "no, as long as the authorities will let me, i'm going to stay, i'm going to see it out." but this is already much worse than anybody has ever seen on this volcanic island — it's produced twice the amount of lava of the previous eruption 50 years ago, and it's still unknown how long that will continue, how much more lava it will produce, and how much more destruction it will cause. the government wants all uk electricity to come from renewable sources by 2035. borisjohnson says the country is already a world leader in offshore windpower, and shouldn't rely on energy produced from fossil fuels overseas. ministers are under pressure to speed up the shift in how energy is produced, as our climate editor, justin rowlatt, reports. if you thought your commute to work was rough going, check this out. we're with a team trying to get out
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to service a wind turbine. so... ..the north sea is famous for its savage weather. but that's why they've put these wind turbines out here, because this is where the wind is. but, of course, it means they are very hard — oh! — to maintain. oh, god! 0h! the swell is up to three metres high today, making it too dangerous to climb the ladder. so it's back to the ship for us. this is where the team of engineers who keep the blades turning, live and work. these guys do 12 hours shifts out here for 14 straight days, and then get two weeks off. it can be tough, but the flourishing offshore wind industry is creating thousands of well—paid, skilled jobs, most of them
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in places like grimsby and east yorkshire, that have seen traditional industries decline. my grandad went to sea when he was 14 as a cabin boy. for seafaring families like mine, offshore wind is really giving more options. and it is comfortable on the ship. right, so this is my cabin. pretty cushti, eh? and then, come and have a look at this. so this is the lounge. sorry, lads. and this... ..this is the dining area. what's for tea? today it's fish, chips and mushy peas. and we've got pork chops with chausseur sauce. erm, bread—and—butter pudding and custard. oh, my god! sounds good, doesn't it? and you can work all that off down here. these monsters are almost 200 metres high. and each turn of the blades
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is reckoned to generate enough electricity to power an average uk home for a day. it's nice to know that your time and your energy is contributing to this world that runs on green energy, and it's something what's going to be a better future for everybody. 0rsted says this one wind farm can power up to one million homes. and they've almost finished another, even bigger one next to it. and there are plans for many more around the country. what's more, the wind revolution isn'tjust happening here in the uk. it's starting to take off all around the world. justin rowlatt, bbc news. the american pop star billie eilish has been confirmed as one of the headline acts for next year's glastonbury festival. the singer will be the main act on the pyramid stage on the friday night. she'll be the youngest ever solo act to headline the festival. now, the weather forecast. if you are about to head out, or
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maybe head home this evening, you are about to play at dodge the showers. some sunshine between the showers. some sunshine between the showers that are giving these beautiful optical illusions but the showers will give a good soaking in the coming hours, then this happens, an area of low pressure coming in from the atlantic, dropping heavy rain over wales and the south—west, which sweeps further east over england over night and the wettest weather in the far south—east by the end of the night, but this front stalls through tuesday so fairly relentless rain to come and pretty windy across the board. it becomes much drier for wales and southern england, through the afternoon, but the wind remains gusty throughout. temperatures at best in the sunshine, 14—15, but where we have the wind and the rain, scraping to get to double figures. not very good for anyone likejustin out on that boat!
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this is bbc news. i'm clive miry. 0ur i'm clive miry. our top stories. the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, and says he'll only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you, our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt is almost a 100% of gdp, so we need to fix our public finances. a 100% of gdp, so we need the a 100% of gdp, so we need military is called in to i distribute the military is called in to help distribute fuel. more revolutions from the leaked pandora papers. the russian whose businesses have backed 34 conservative mps was involved in a
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russian corruption scandal. a review will be carried out into the

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