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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 4, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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rumbling right through their lives day and night. some have had enough, they can't get sleep, they want to leave. some are making the decision to get to safer places. but then i've also spoken to people who live with that volcano effectively in their back garden who say, "no, as long as the authorities will let me, i'm going to stay, i'm going to see it out." but this is already much worse than anybody has ever seen on this volcanic island — it's produced twice the amount of lava of the previous eruption 50 years ago, and it's still unknown how long that will continue, how much more lava it will produce, and how much more destruction it will cause. that was dan johnson that was danjohnson on la palma. time for the weather. here is susan powell. good afternoon. some pretty big showers rolling around out there for you to dodge. but between them there are also print — make some pretty
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generous spells of sunshine. quite a notable breeze is making things on the cool side. temperatures around average for the time of the year. the satellite shows you where there is a lot of sunshine. the white blobs show you where the showers are brewing. some of them could be accompanied by thunder and lightning as they make their way across the uk. basically all areas potentially picking up some showers as we look at the latter part of the day. top temperatures 1a to 16 c. you will have noticed a band of more persistent rain getting towards the south—west by the end of the afternoon. that is the first signs that this pretty nasty area of low pressure that is going to work its way this evening and overnight. some very wet weather for the south—west and for wales this evening. the wind is picking up, rain by the end of the night in the midlands. that whether rests across northern england. all of this, scotland and northern ireland relatively quiet.
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milder to the south but it is wet and windy. what i will say though is the picture will improve quite dramatically in terms of the rain for the south—west and for wales by the time we get into tomorrow afternoon. for northern england and eastern areas that rain never too far away. eastern areas that rain never too faraway. it eastern areas that rain never too far away. it will be accompanied by some pretty pronounced gusts of wind. it will be a potentially damaging, that wind, and it will add to the cool feel. where we have the heaviest of the rain, perhaps temperatures getting no higher than double figures. but after all of that offered roles eventually out into the north sea. it could be a wet end to tuesday across eastern fringes of scotland and eastern england, but for wednesday it is almost link and you will miss it, a ridge of high pressure in there that makes for such a different day across england and wales, much lighter winds and some sunshine. temperatures are a little higher. probably in the mid teens quite widely. through the afternoon here comes the next weather system from the atlantic. wet to end the day for
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northern ireland. then these fronts will snake to the north—west of the uk through the end of the week. to the south we are pulling air from a long way south in the atlantic. a little bit of a surprise at this point in october, we will see temperatures across many parts of the uk in the high teens to low �*20s through the end of this week. for the rest of the sunshine, england and wales will be the place to be. still some showers further north. thank you. that's all from bbc news at one. so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s good afternoon. this is the latest from the bbc sport centre.
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a decision on whether england's cricket team will play in this winter's ashes tour in australia will be made this week — when the sport's governing body, the ecb, meets. the players were told about conditions for the trip last night. there have been concerns over whether their families can travel with them, quarantine arrangements and any potential bubble they may have to live in. australia has some of the strictest covid—19 protocols in the world, a situation complicated by the fact its different states have their own regulations. the first test is due to begin on 8 december. meanwhile, england's t20 squad are getting ready to head to the middle east ahead of the t20 world cup later this month. after an impressive summer of cricket, tymal mills has worked his way back into the side. i'd like to think nobody in this team is young and naive and can get caught up in distractions. the guys are well versed in what is going on, and it is a world cup. it's a massive deal, and whilst we are there i'm sure everybody will be fully dialled into that and whatever
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happens after that will happen after that, but i have no doubt that the guys will come together whenever we all kind of get together officially, and we will be fully focused on the world cup. 0 nto football world cup. onto football now. claudio ranieri is at watford's training ground to discuss becoming their new manager, after they sacked xisco munoz afterjust ten months. watford have won two of their opening seven premier league games and sit in 15th. ranieri is understood to be the owners�* first choice — he of course won the premier league with leicester city in 2016. but the 69—year—old was sacked the following season, and has since had short spells with nantes, fulham, roma and sampdoria. tyson fury could be set to return to fight in the uk again after this weekend's heavyweight showdown with deontay wilder. that's according to his promoter frank warren. he hasn't fought in britain since 2018 after signing a deal to stage his fights in america, completing their four
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times. he is due to take on while there this saturday in las vegas, there this saturday in las vegas, the third time they have met after fury beat his american opponent to take the title last year. tom brady has become the nfls leading passer after helping the tampa bay buccaneers to a 19—17 victory over the new england patriots. brady managed to pass the 80,358—yard milestone set by drew brees, and what a place to break the record — against the franchise he steered to six super bowls. there was late drama as new england almost took the lead with 55 seconds left, only for nick folk�*s field goal to come back off the post. the night belonged to brady, though, who returned to his former home for the first time with tampa. i'd try not to predict what was going to happen, and had a few emotional momentsjust going to happen, and had a few emotional moments just thinking about all the people that have meant so much to me in my life and that are a part of this community. i'm just very gratefulfor an
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are a part of this community. i'm just very grateful for an amazing time here, and my footballjourney took me somewhere else. cameron norrie�*s brilliant run at the san diego open ended in last night's final. the british number two was beaten by casper ruud, who'd earlier knocked out andy murray. he went down 6—0 in the first before losing the second 6—2 to the second seed. and finally, how about dealing with these conditions on your ride into work? this was the men's paris roubaix race yesterday — one of cycling's oldest bike races, the perils of racing on the old cobblestones laid bare. the riders absolutely covered from head to toe in mud. it was won in the end by sonny colbrelli, who mastered the route from northern paris to the belgian border. there we are. i don't think they mind being covered in mud, if you win the race, that's for sure! that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the metropolitan police will carry out a review into its culture amid allegations of misogyny and sexism
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following the conviction of the serving officer wayne couzens for the murder of sarah everard. in her first interview since my conviction, the commission of the met police, dame cressida dick, has told the bbc that she will not resign. these events have been absolutely dreadful. they have made everybody in the met furious, and we depend on public trust. in this country, policing is done by consent, and undoubtedly the killing of sarah and other events has damaged public trust. so today i am announcing that we will be doing a review that will be led by a high—profile independent person, and the review will look at our internal culture and our professional standards, systems, processes, leadership, training, to make sure that we are the best possible met police we can be. and i am absolutely determined that we will rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can.
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some people will say that that is not enough, that you should resign. people will be entitled to their opinion, i have a job to do, i need to get on with it and myjob now is to lead the met through a difficult time and rebuild public trust, which i am redoing through bringing in an independent person to do a review of our standards and culture. it was on your watch. did you offer to resign? it did happen on my watch, i'm public servant, i will carry on doing myjob. dame cressida dick speaking a little earlier. after decades of war, afghanistan's children are afg hanistan�*s children are continuing afghanistan's children are continuing to pay the price of the conflict as unemployment rates and poverty saw. to avoid hunger, hundreds of afghan children are travelling to neighbouring countries hidden under lorries, carrying goods to sell to try to make money for
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theirfamilies. this report from the border crossing between pakistan and afghanistan. this little afghan girl has just entered pakistan holding baggage heavier than her own weight. and while she is trying to run before she is caught by the border guards, another lorry has arrived with more afghan children carrying luggage. this practice is not new, but many believe that now its scale is much bigger than before. translation: we are forced to do this because of poverty. _ my father is unwell. it's better to earn something than stay idle and waste time. we deal with suppliers who give us the goods and tell us where to drop them. when we deliver the stuff, we take receipts from shopkeepers and get paid for it when we return. the children bring small items like sweets, cigarettes and fabric to sell on the side. they are constantly searched and chased by the pakistani border
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guards, who worry for their safety and keep sending them back. but the children usually return in the next vehicle. afghan children are the most tragic victims of decades of conflict in the country. they understand the dangers of illegally crossing the border, hiding in undercarriages and mudguards of such lorries, and while doing so, some of them have even got injured in the past. but they still feel it's worth taking the risk instead of dying of starvation. most of these children are under 15. the smaller the better, because they can fit under the trucks easily. still, there have been numerous accidents in the past. but the taliban guarding on the other side don't seem to mind. translation: i have never gotten hurt, but a girl did some time ago. j she died because she was sitting on the engine. i never sit near the engine. i always sit at the back. in afghanistan, unemployment
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is soaring to the roof. and unlike in the past, pakistan is tightly regulating the border. adults can only enter with proper documents for trade. so these children are used instead as they can smuggle things without immigration and customs. the unhcr says this exploitation of children is appalling. these images should make us realise that afghanistan's future, afghanistan's children, everything is at stake right now. and this is a call on everyone, on the international community, but people who will be watching these images, that this is a time to help and support to these desperate individuals. this is not a time to walk away from afghanistan. on average, these children earn around $10 a trip. but there are days when their goods
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are confiscated by the guards and after enduring all the trouble and hurt, they have no option but to return empty—handed. shumaila jaffrey, bbc news, torkham border. the brexit minister lord frost has renewed his threat to suspend part of the brexit deal affecting northern ireland. the northern ireland protocol was designed to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland, but has meant new checks on some products travelling from great britain. lord frost told the conservative conference in manchester that the arrangements agreed with the eu have begun to come apart even more quickly than we feared. we knew that we were taking a risk,
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but a worthy one in the cause of the good friday agreement, in the cause of protecting the peace. it was the right thing to do and ended our constitutional crisis. it meant our country could leave the eu, free and with real choices for the future. of course we wanted to negotiate something better. if it had not meant for the madness of the surrender act, we could have done so. so we worried right from the start that the protocol would not take the strain if not handled sensitively. as it has turned out, we were right. the arrangements have begun to come apart even more quickly than we feared. thanks to the eu's heavy—handed actions, cross community political risk —— support for the protocol has collapsed. businesses, political parties, the institutions and indeed all in northern ireland now face instability and disruption. we can still solve these problems. i set
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out in july a still solve these problems. i set out injuly a set of proposals that would establish a new balance for a lasting future for northern ireland, and i will soon be sending a new set of legal texts to the eu to support them. we still await a formal response from the eu to our proposals, but from what i hear, i worry that we will not get a response which enables the significant change we need. so i urge the eu to be ambitious. it is no use tinkering around the edges. we need significant change. if we can agree something better, as i would like us to do, we can get back to where we wanted to be, an independent britain with friendly relations with the eu based on free trade. though we cannot wait for ever. without an agreed solution soon, we will need to act, using the article 16 safeguard mechanism to address the impact the protocol is
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having in northern ireland. lord foster. now it is time for across the uk at, our look at the headlines across the uk. a £20 a£20a a £20 a week increase in universal credit has helped many families keep food on the table during the pandemic, but with that uplift coming to an end this week, it is feared some will be forced into debt. a search carried out by the joseph rowntree foundation shows that bradford west will be the worst place affected in the country, as michelle lyons reports. at its busiest, this food bank in bradford was helping around 2500 people a month during the pandemic. today they still get around a thousand people through the doors each month, and with universal credit going down, and food bills going up, staff
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will see another crisis looming. people will be massively hit by the cutting universal credit. people going from £409 as a single person, down to £320 a month, that is a 21% cut, especially with the fellow scheme ending and fuel prices rising, it will push more people into needing a food bank. the joseph rowntree foundation _ into needing a food bank. the joseph rowntree foundation has _ into needing a food bank. the joseph rowntree foundation has found - rowntree foundation has found bradford will be the worst affected place in the country by the universal credit cuts. in bradford west, 82% of families with children will be affected, and in bradford east it is 71%. plunging low income households into deeper poverty and debt. gary volunteers at the food bank, and he is already worried about how he will cope. i’m bank, and he is already worried about how he will cope. i'm going to be livin: about how he will cope. i'm going to be living on — about how he will cope. i'm going to be living on £25 _ about how he will cope. i'm going to be living on £25 a _ about how he will cope. i'm going to be living on £25 a week. _ about how he will cope. i'm going to be living on £25 a week. how - about how he will cope. i'm going to be living on £25 a week. how are - about how he will cope. i'm going to be living on £25 a week. how are we to manage? — be living on £25 a week. how are we to manage? i do worry about it, because — to manage? i do worry about it, because trying to look for work at the moment, there is nothing
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available _ the moment, there is nothing available. ., ., the moment, there is nothing available-— the moment, there is nothing available. ~ ., , available. the food bank also offers available. the food bank also offers a debt counselling _ available. the food bank also offers a debt counselling service - available. the food bank also offers a debt counselling service provided| a debt counselling service provided by christians against poverty. fear is that more will need the service if they are forced into borrowing money they can't pay back. it is more essentials _ money they can't pay back. it is more essentials now _ money they can't pay back. it is more essentials now than it was ten years— more essentials now than it was ten years ago— more essentials now than it was ten years ago when _ more essentials now than it was ten years ago when it _ more essentials now than it was ten years ago when it was _ more essentials now than it was ten years ago when it was more - more essentials now than it was ten years ago when it was more credit l years ago when it was more credit cards _ years ago when it was more credit cards and — years ago when it was more credit cards and store _ years ago when it was more credit cards and store card _ years ago when it was more credit cards and store card payments. it| cards and store card payments. it has become — cards and store card payments. it has become what _ cards and store card payments. it has become what we _ cards and store card payments. it has become what we call- cards and store card payments. it| has become what we call priorities now, _ has become what we call priorities now. which— has become what we call priorities now. which is— has become what we call priorities now, which is slightly— has become what we call priorities now, which is slightly concerning, | now, which is slightly concerning, because _ now, which is slightly concerning, because if— now, which is slightly concerning, because if you _ now, which is slightly concerning, because if you can't _ now, which is slightly concerning, because if you can't pay— now, which is slightly concerning, because if you can't pay your- because if you can't pay your priority— because if you can't pay your priority debts— because if you can't pay your priority debts and _ because if you can't pay your priority debts and bills, - because if you can't pay your priority debts and bills, youl because if you can't pay your. priority debts and bills, you can end up— priority debts and bills, you can end up losing _ priority debts and bills, you can end up losing your— priority debts and bills, you can end up losing your home, - priority debts and bills, you can end up losing your home, and i priority debts and bills, you can i end up losing your home, and that only makes— end up losing your home, and that only makes the _ end up losing your home, and that only makes the situation _ end up losing your home, and that only makes the situation worse - end up losing your home, and that only makes the situation worse for people _ only makes the situation worse for people going — only makes the situation worse for people going homeless. _ only makes the situation worse for people going homeless.— only makes the situation worse for people going homeless. despite the chancellor promising _ people going homeless. despite the chancellor promising £500 - people going homeless. despite the chancellor promising £500 million l people going homeless. despite the| chancellor promising £500 million to help people get back to work, it is predicted the cut in universal credit will be most severely felt in bradford, where there are so many struggling families. a man who raped an elderly woman more than 40 years ago has just been sentenced to 15 years after advances
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in dna technology. in 1980, kenneth wells broke into the woman's out and afterwards locked inside so that she couldn't call for help. bbc south today's nikki mitchell reports. at home in salisbury injune. until the police banged on his gate, kenneth wells, known as kenny, had been living his life thinking he'd got away with it.— got away with it. kenny, i am arresting _ got away with it. kenny, i am arresting you _ got away with it. kenny, i am arresting you for _ got away with it. kenny, i am arresting you for the - got away with it. kenny, i am arresting you for the rape - got away with it. kenny, i am| arresting you for the rape and got away with it. kenny, i am - arresting you for the rape and false imprisonment of violet brown on the 6th of november... imprisonment of violet brown on the 6th of november. . ._ 6th of november... violet was 71 ears old 6th of november... violet was 71 years old in _ 6th of november... violet was 71 years old in 1980 _ 6th of november... violet was 71 years old in 1980 and _ 6th of november... violet was 71 years old in 1980 and living - 6th of november... violet was 71 | years old in 1980 and living alone when kenny wells and at least one other man broke into her house while she was sleeping. it other man broke into her house while she was sleeping.— she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime. she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime- during _ she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime. during the _ she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime. during the night _ she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime. during the night she - she was sleeping. it was a horrific crime. during the night she is - crime. during the night she is awoken by men, masked, with torches, shouting abuse and aggressive instruction to her in her bedroom. she was assaulted, she was raped in
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the bedroom, in her own bed. they search the premises and stole items from her home. they were there for some time. the telephone line had been cut. and when they left, they locked the front door with a deadbolt and she was unable to get out. they took the key, and she was in the house hiding behind the door for hours until postman came and she was able to be freed. it affected herfor was able to be freed. it affected her for the rest of her life. violet has since died. _ her for the rest of her life. violet has since died. this _ her for the rest of her life. violet has since died. this photo - her for the rest of her life. violet l has since died. this photo released by her family highlights the fact every rape victim has a name, even though they have a right to anonymity during their lifetime. even after his arrest, violet's rapist was still playing the innocent. i rapist was still playing the innocent-— rapist was still playing the innocent. ~ ., ., innocent. i don't know nothing. honest to _ innocent. i don't know nothing. honest to god. _ innocent. i don't know nothing. honest to god. burglary - innocent. i don't know nothing. honest to god. burglary and i innocent. i don't know nothing. - honest to god. burglary and rape? i hope _ honest to god. burglary and rape? i hope you've — honest to god. burglary and rape? i hope you've got some proof for all this _ hope you've got some proof for all this. . ., ., hope you've got some proof for all this. , ., ., ., , hope you've got some proof for all this. , ., ., .,, ,., . this. the proof was in the police archives, collected _ this. the proof was in the police archives, collected long - this. the proof was in the police archives, collected long before. archives, collected long before scientists began using dna profiling to solve crimes. the
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scientists began using dna profiling to solve crimes.— to solve crimes. the dna evidence su: nests to solve crimes. the dna evidence suggests that _ to solve crimes. the dna evidence suggests that you _ to solve crimes. the dna evidence suggests that you were _ to solve crimes. the dna evidence suggests that you were the - to solve crimes. the dna evidence suggests that you were the nasty l suggests that you were the nasty one, described by violet, who raped her during the early hours of the 6th of november 1980. ida her during the early hours of the 6th of november 1980. no comment. you can see — 6th of november 1980. no comment. you can see he _ 6th of november 1980. no comment. you can see he looks _ 6th of november 1980. no comment. you can see he looks pretty _ 6th of november 1980. no comment. you can see he looks pretty relaxed l you can see he looks pretty relaxed being _ you can see he looks pretty relaxed being interviewed, _ you can see he looks pretty relaxed being interviewed, he _ you can see he looks pretty relaxed being interviewed, he was - you can see he looks pretty relaxed being interviewed, he was quite - being interviewed, he was quite arrogant— being interviewed, he was quite arrogant and _ being interviewed, he was quite arrogant and pretty _ being interviewed, he was quite arrogant and pretty dismissive i being interviewed, he was quite l arrogant and pretty dismissive of the process— arrogant and pretty dismissive of the process of— arrogant and pretty dismissive of the process of being _ arrogant and pretty dismissive of the process of being interviewed| arrogant and pretty dismissive of. the process of being interviewed in relation _ the process of being interviewed in relation to— the process of being interviewed in relation to this. _ the process of being interviewed in relation to this. he _ the process of being interviewed in relation to this. he knows - the process of being interviewed in relation to this. he knows full - the process of being interviewed in relation to this. he knows full well| relation to this. he knows full well that he _ relation to this. he knows full well that he was— relation to this. he knows full well that he was responsible, - relation to this. he knows full well that he was responsible, of- relation to this. he knows full welll that he was responsible, of course, and we _ that he was responsible, of course, and we knew— that he was responsible, of course, and we knew full— that he was responsible, of course, and we knew full well— that he was responsible, of course, and we knew full well that - that he was responsible, of course, and we knew full well that he - that he was responsible, of course, and we knew full well that he was l and we knew full well that he was responsible. _ and we knew full well that he was responsible, but— and we knew full well that he was responsible, but it _ and we knew full well that he was responsible, but it demonstratesl and we knew full well that he was i responsible, but it demonstrates his lack of— responsible, but it demonstrates his lack of remorse _ responsible, but it demonstrates his lack of remorse and _ responsible, but it demonstrates his lack of remorse and consideration i lack of remorse and consideration for anybody _ lack of remorse and consideration for anybody. ihe— lack of remorse and consideration for anybody-— lack of remorse and consideration foran bod. . , for anybody. the detectives say the sentencin: for anybody. the detectives say the sentencing today _ for anybody. the detectives say the sentencing today should _ for anybody. the detectives say the sentencing today should serve - for anybody. the detectives say the sentencing today should serve as i for anybody. the detectives say the sentencing today should serve as a| sentencing today should serve as a warning to his accomplice who watched him raped violet, as there is hope dna might also reveal his identity in the future. climate change protesters blocked the entrance to the blackwall tunnel, one of london's busiest river crossings, during this morning's rush hour. they also targeted the hangar lane gyratory,
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arnos grove and london bridge. the high court has previously issued injunctions to try to stop the protest, but they don't cover those roots. tom edwards reports. for three weeks, insulates britain have been targeting london's roads and motorways. the tactic, lie down on the tarmac or glue themselves to it. this morning, there were four protests at locations in london. at hangar lane, milik was caught up in a disruption. he is a dentist, and had to cancel appointments. do you have any sympathy with insulates britain? hat do you have any sympathy with insulates britain?— do you have any sympathy with insulates britain? all insulates britain? not at all. i'm all for protecting _ insulates britain? not at all. i'm all for protecting the _ insulates britain? not at all. i'm all for protecting the planet, - all for protecting the planet, reducing our carbon footprint, but it has caused such a huge amount of inconvenience, and just driving past, if you see a row of cars, and i'm sure in those cars you have nhs workers trying to get the hospitals, emergency doctors, it seems like they had no consideration for that and theyjust blocked levelling off,
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just to make a point. and the point is a valid point, but there must be a better way around it. the is a valid point, but there must be a better way around it.— a better way around it. the group want to highlight _ a better way around it. the group want to highlight the _ a better way around it. the group want to highlight the lack - a better way around it. the group want to highlight the lack of - want to highlight the lack of insulation in the country's housing stock, which it claims is the least energy efficient in europe. the government has tried injunctions to stop the protests, threatening prison sentences and fines, but that hasn't stopped them. now it is planning more. irate hasn't stopped them. now it is planning more-— hasn't stopped them. now it is planning more. hasn't stopped them. now it is ”lannin more. ~ . , ., planning more. we have brought in new measures _ planning more. we have brought in new measures which _ planning more. we have brought in new measures which are _ planning more. we have brought in| new measures which are announcing today— new measures which are announcing today so _ new measures which are announcing today so they can either face six months — today so they can either face six months in — today so they can either face six months injail or unlimited fines, months in jail or unlimited fines, and we _ months in jail or unlimited fines, and we will — months injail or unlimited fines, and we will use section 60 powers so that the _ and we will use section 60 powers so that the police can do stop and search— that the police can do stop and search of— that the police can do stop and search of those who are bringing supergtue — search of those who are bringing superglue or whatever to block the traffic _ superglue or whatever to block the traffic. , , ., , ., , traffic. drivers have started trying to remove the _ traffic. drivers have started trying to remove the protesters - traffic. drivers have started trying - to remove the protesters themselves, at the moment the authorities continue to struggle to prevent the demonstrations. tom edwards, bbc
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london. a larger oil slick has begun washing ashore in the southern california. beaches in orange county south—east of los angeles have been closed as oil and dead wildlife wash up on the sand. almost half a million litres of oil have leaked from a pipeline connected to an offshore oil rig. courtney bembridge reports. california is known for its beaches, but not like this. clumps of oil and tar the size of softballs scatter the shoreline, as well as dead birds and fish. more than 120,000 gallons of oil has leaked into the ocean from a broken pipeline five miles off the coast. we are in the midst of a potential ecological disaster here at huntington beach and as the exhibits and pictures we are in the midst of a potential ecological disaster here at huntington beach and as the exhibits and pictures here illustrate, the oil spill has significantly impacted our community.
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the broken pipeline is connected to an offshore oil platform run by a subsidiary of houston—based amplify energy. the company says the pipeline has now been shut off and the remaining oil suctioned out. it has been maintained. we are investigating, if the pipeline is the source of this, how this happened. a huge clean—up operation is under way to try to stop the oil reaching sensitive wetlands nearby and people are being urged to avoid the beaches. you can feel the vapour in the air. i saw what i'll describe as little pancake clusters of oil along the shoreline and i've described it as something like an egg yolk — if you push it, it kind of spreads out, so we don't want people to disturb those little clusters. local authorities say it is too soon to say whether the company responsible will face criminal charges. courtney bembridge, bbc news.
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let's ta ke let's take a look now at the weather with susan powell. we have seen some sunshine around to start the week, but as we go on it will be peppered with showers. tomorrow is a more widespread area of strong winds and intense rain that we are up against as we see this area of low pressure making its way in from the atlantic. it will arrive in the south—west even later that evening. many in the south—east tending to spread out during the evening, but the weather for the south—west and wales, strengthening winds as well, and this weather making its way north and east. the wind could be strong enough to do some damage. relatively mild to the south of the uk, lighter winds, clearer skies, could get close to freezing in some of the scottish glens. scotland and northern ireland pick up a few showers on tuesday, it will be windy here but the heaviest rain will be close to the centre of this area of low pressure,
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particularly wet into tuesday afternoon for northern and eastern england, and some strong gusts of wind to contend with as well. no surprises where we have the heavy and persistent rain it will feel pretty chilly, temperatures barely scraping into double figures. what a contrast for wednesday as this area of low pressure pulls off into the north sea, and we just briefly see a ridge of high pressure building, a very different day especially across england and wales, much lighter winds, a lot of sunshine and fine weather. come the afternoon, however, cloud will start to encroach on northern ireland and some rain by the end of the day. our next atlantic system edging its way in. warm up a wednesday, temperatures in the mid teens. for the end of the week, it could turn out to be unseasonably warm, particularly across the southern half of the uk. we will see some france working their way to the north—west, it will stay pretty breezy but it is a south—westerly breeze so that pulls air from a long way south is the name implies, and
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thatis way south is the name implies, and that is going to bump temperatures quite nicely for thursday and friday. even where we have some rain with these weather fronts across scotland and northern ireland, temperatures in the high teens, and we could be looking at the low 20s with sunny spells across england and wales. unseasonably warm, certainly for this point in the year, and it looks like we could continue with some warmer weather even on into next week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines — the chancellor announces half a billion pounds to help get people back to work after the pandemic, amid concerns over living standards. rishi sunak says he will consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you, our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt is almost a 100% of gdp, so we need to fix our public finances. more revelations from the leaked pandora papers say a second prominent donor to the conservative party was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. a serving metropolitan police officer appears in court
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charged with rape. he denies the allegation.

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