Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 4, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

1:00 pm
the chancellor announces half £1 billion to help people get back to work after the pandemic, amid concerns over living standards. rishi sunak says he will only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. 1 consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with _ economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you. _ economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you. our _ economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you. our recovery - be blunt with you. our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt is almost 100% of gdp. so we need to fix our public finances. the other headlines this lunchtime... the military is deployed to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in parts of england. more revelations from the leaked
1:01 pm
pandora papers which reveal how a prominent donor to the conservative party was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. a serving metropolitan police officer appears in court charged with rape. he denies the allegation. overseas travel becomes easier as the rules are simplified with the traffic light system scrapped in favour of a single red list. and coming up on the bbc news channel, premier league winning manager claudio ranieri looks set to become the new watford manager, after xisco munoz was sacked following their loss to leeds this weekend. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the chancellor rishi sunak has told the conservative party conference in manchester that he wants to make
1:02 pm
the uk the most exciting place on the planet. he says he wants to do whatever it takes to help britain recover from the pandemic. he defended tax rises and said he would like to cut taxes when public finances are on a sustainable footing. he insisted brexit was in the long—term interests of the uk economy, despite disruption to fuel supplies. the government is committing £500 million to renewed job support programmes, amid concerns about a rise in the cost of living on the scrapping of the £20 per week uplift in universal credit. the message from the prime minister and the chancellor is clear. the slogan is build back better. translated, this means the economy could be stronger after the pandemic than before. it takes time to train more workers, and right now, with the cost of living rising, they have to find a way to try to stop their political stock from falling.
1:03 pm
hogging attention outside the conference, pig farmers were complaining about labour shortages. their costs and our prices could be increasing. during the pandemic, he was the good guy, picking up plaudits for paying people's wagers. now, though, it is payback time. this tax—raising chancellor took on critics in his own ranks. this tax-raising chancellor took on critics in his own ranks.— critics in his own ranks. whilst i know tax rises _ critics in his own ranks. whilst i know tax rises are _ critics in his own ranks. whilst i know tax rises are unpopular, l critics in his own ranks. whilst i i know tax rises are unpopular, will even some say unconservative, i'll tell you what is unconservative, unfunded pledges, reckless borrowing and soaring debt. anyone who tells you that you can borrow more today, and tomorrow will simply sort itself out, just doesn't care about the future. , ., ,., out, just doesn't care about the future. , ., ., ., , future. he is also about to reverse a temporary _ future. he is also about to reverse a temporary increase _ future. he is also about to reverse a temporary increase in _ future. he is also about to reverse a temporary increase in universall a temporary increase in universal credit. but he wanted the conference to focus on the future, with a £500 millionjob fund and more investment in artificial intelligence. 0h,
1:04 pm
millionjob fund and more investment in artificial intelligence. oh, and the b where it was back. i in artificial intelligence. oh, and the b where it was back.- in artificial intelligence. oh, and the b where it was back. i was proud to back brexit, _ the b where it was back. i was proud to back brexit, proud _ the b where it was back. i was proud to back brexit, proud to _ the b where it was back. i was proud to back brexit, proud to back- the b where it was back. i was proud to back brexit, proud to back leave, | to back brexit, proud to back leave, because despite the challenges, i believe in the long term, the flex ability and freedom provided by brexit would be more valuable in a 21st—century, global economy. the 21st-century, global economy. the prime 215t—century, global economy. the prime minister also had his eye on the future, rather than current difficulties.— difficulties. looking at the progress _ difficulties. looking at the progress we _ difficulties. looking at the progress we are _ difficulties. looking at the progress we are making . difficulties. looking at the l progress we are making and difficulties. looking at the - progress we are making and wind power. _ progress we are making and wind power, where we lead the world in offshore _ power, where we lead the world in offshore wind, we think we can get to complete a clean energy production by 2035. you to complete a clean energy production by 2035. to complete a clean energy roduction b 2035. ., ., �* ., production by 2035. you won't hear much criticism _ production by 2035. you won't hear much criticism on _ production by 2035. you won't hear much criticism on the _ production by 2035. you won't hear much criticism on the conference i much criticism on the conference floor of the government's direction of travel, but around the conference there is what is best described as quiet concern among some of the grassroots. quiet concern among some of the grassroots-— quiet concern among some of the grassroots. there is a danger that in the rush _ grassroots. there is a danger that in the rush to _ grassroots. there is a danger that in the rush to embrace _ grassroots. there is a danger that in the rush to embrace the - in the rush to embrace the decarbonisation route, that actually working people's concerns are brushed under the table. we keep caettin brushed under the table. we keep getting told _ brushed under the table. we keep getting told that _ brushed under the table. we keep
1:05 pm
getting told that you _ brushed under the table. we keep getting told that you are - brushed under the table. we keep getting told that you are not - brushed under the table. we keepj getting told that you are not going to he _ getting told that you are not going to be worse off, everything is going to be worse off, everything is going to he _ to be worse off, everything is going to be fine — to be worse off, everything is going to be fine. actually, your day—to—day life you just see prices increasing — day—to—day life you just see prices increasing all the time. i think sometimes the message doesn't match up sometimes the message doesn't match up to the _ sometimes the message doesn't match up to the reality. sometimes the message doesn't match up to the reality-— up to the reality. obviously with the universal— up to the reality. obviously with the universal credit _ up to the reality. obviously with the universal credit situation, i up to the reality. obviously with the universal credit situation, itj the universal credit situation, it is not _ the universal credit situation, it is not ideal— the universal credit situation, it is not ideal for— the universal credit situation, it is not ideal for young _ the universal credit situation, it is not ideal for young people, i is not ideal for young people, especially— is not ideal for young people, especially on _ is not ideal for young people, especially on low _ is not ideal for young people, especially on low incomes. i is not ideal for young people, - especially on low incomes. however, we've _ especially on low incomes. however, we've also— especially on low incomes. however, we've also got — especially on low incomes. however, we've also got to _ especially on low incomes. however, we've also got to where _ especially on low incomes. however, we've also got to where you're - we've also got to where you're coming — we've also got to where you're coming out _ we've also got to where you're coming out of— we've also got to where you're coming out of a _ we've also got to where you're coming out of a pandemic. - coming out of a pandemic. applause _ so the prime minister and the chancellor will be hoping that people judge the government not by short—term difficulties, but by long—term vision. it was quite a short speech, did he achieve what he set out to do? it was a short speech. even a self—deprecating reference to his own stature in that speech. what he was trying to do, i think, was to take on internal and external critics. he made the case for short—term tax rises, although he has an ambition to reduce taxes in due course. that was a sideswipe at
1:06 pm
people wandering around here, criticising the national insurance increase. in fact, criticising the national insurance increase. infact, he criticising the national insurance increase. in fact, he said it was a moral to ratchet up debt. pretty strong words from him or not. he also had a go come in a roundabout way, at external critics, too. some of them are saying the problems we have with supplies and hgv drivers, that has all been made worse by brexit. he was unapologetic about brexit. he was unapologetic about brexit. the prime minister said previously, levers, remainers, we leave all that behind. no, no. he concentrated again, used the b word and said there were great opportunities to come from brexit. the bigger picture stuff was to concentrate on the future, so much so that he mentioned it 17 times in his speech. the idea there was, i think, to coin a phrase, to tell people things can only get better, there is a long—term vision for the country, post—pandemic, he was suggesting, so all the short—term difficulties people are having on the cost of living and so on, the idea that this was temporary, these are bumps on the road, they wanted us to look at the high way ahead. that said, there is still a lot of
1:07 pm
concern in the grassroots about the political difficulties caused by cost of living rises. not in terms of policy, because we have a budget and spending reviewjust a few weeks away, and he is one of the most popular people, usually, mowing the grass roots, but let's see if that holds when he delivers the fiscal events in a matter of weeks. many thanks, events in a matter of weeks. many thanks. iain _ events in a matter of weeks. many thanks, iain watson. _ events in a matter of weeks. many thanks, iain watson. our- events in a matter of weeks. many thanks, iain watson. 0ur economics editor faisal islam is with me. as he was saying, it was an upbeat message, but how would you characterise the challenges ahead? until now, he has been a big spending chancellor because of circumstance. this was a speech that sought to tell the nation, no, that's not what he is like. a sort of reintroduction, resetting of the baseline. he has a fiscal conservative, who believes that debt should not get out of control. public spending should be under control. and, if necessary, as we are right now, taxes need to rise to meet those gaps. he held out the possibility that there could be a reversal of some of those tax rises,
1:08 pm
if the public finances are in order. but i wouldn't hold too much by that right now. the message was that this is a time for tough decisions. there was relatively little mention, small mansion, the cost of living pressures that iain just talked about, not what we are seeing around us, the issues around supply shortages and the visible consequences we are seeing in the farming sector and in petrol supplies. so, a number of potential clouds, a focus on the long—term future, apprentices learning artificial intelligence technologies. but there are some immediate challenges which the government has to face, which he did not exactly play up in the speech. 0k, many thanks. the army has begun to help in the delivery of fuel, amid ongoing shortages in parts of the country. more than a fifth of petrol stations in london and the south east still do not have fuel, according to the petrol
1:09 pm
retailers association. it says it could be more than a week before things get back to normal. here's theo leggett. army drivers, getting ready to ferry fuel around the country. 200 military personnel are being deployed to help deliver petrol and diesel to forecourts. in many areas, the situation has eased dramatically, retailers say. but in london on the south—east, cues remain common. the london on the south-east, cues remain common.— london on the south-east, cues remain common. , , ., remain common. the news this morning is better than — remain common. the news this morning is better than bad. _ remain common. the news this morning is better than bad. it _ remain common. the news this morning is better than bad. it is _ remain common. the news this morning is better than bad. it is slightly - is better than bad. it is slightly positive. but our poll later in the day will confirm whether it is a real turning point today. and i think that the military drivers will add a little bit of confidence to that, but it is not a full policy. at the height of the crisis, some 65% of service station said they were running dry, as a wave of panic buying took hold across the country. but by the weekend, that figure had
1:10 pm
fallen to just 16%. the government is hoping that with the help of the military, a site like this, a petrol station that has run out of petrol, will become a thing of the past. but people within the industry are warning that the root causes of the crisis have yet to be addressed. the problem is a severe shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers, which is affecting other parts of the economy as well. ministers say that disruption to supply chains are not confined to the uk.— disruption to supply chains are not confined to the uk. there are things that we can — confined to the uk. there are things that we can do. _ confined to the uk. there are things that we can do, and _ confined to the uk. there are things that we can do, and it _ confined to the uk. there are things that we can do, and it is _ that we can do, and it is reasonable that we can do, and it is reasonable that people expect us to do what we can, whether that is short—term visas, speeding up testing for drivers, we should and are doing those things. but we cannot wave a magic wand and make a global supply chain challenge disappear overnight. there never was a shortage of fuel. there never was a shortage of fuel. the problem was getting to forecourts quickly enough to meet demand. the crisis has thrown a harsh spotlight once again on the challenges facing what were once the uk's carefully tuned supply chains.
1:11 pm
a bbc investigation has discovered how a major conservative party donor was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. leaked documents reveal how mohamed amersi — who's given half a million pounds to the tories — worked on a series of controversial deals for a swedish telecoms company. the swedish company was later fined almost a billion dollars for bribery. mr amersi denies any wrongdoing. richard bilton reports. mohamed amersi is wealthy and well—connected. here he is talking about the dangers of corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life. so where did his wealth come from? some of it comes from this company
1:12 pm
in sweden, a company fined almost $1 billion for bribery. it was prosecuted over a corrupt telecoms deal. the firm paid $220 million to an offshore company secretly controlled by gulnara karimova, the daughter of the then president of uzbekistan. the american authorities described it as a $220 million bribe. we have obtained documents showing how mr amersi was involved in the deal in one e—mail a telier boss writes... "i do not want to be involved in the day to day negotiations, so maybe you could handle it." mr amersi reponds... "sure, i agree." and here's mr amersi's invoice for his part in project uzbekistan. he got a success fee of $500,000 for his work. mr amersi's lawyers said the offshore company had been vetted and approved by telia and its involvement did not raise any red flags to mr amersi.
1:13 pm
all of these matters because he has given more than half a million to the conservative party. this morning borisjohnson gave his reaction. i see that story today but all i can say on that one is that all these donations are vetted in the normal way in accordance with rules that were set up under the labour government. so we vetted them the whole time. a conservative spokesman said government policy is in no way influenced by the donations the party receives. they are entirely separate. "we are motivated by the priorities of the british public acting in the national interest." richard bilton, bbc news. richard is here with me now. we have had major document leaks like this before. has anything ever changed as a result? ~ ., , before. has anything ever changed as a result? ~ ., , ., , a result? well, it has a bit. i think there _ a result? well, it has a bit. i think there have _ a result? well, it has a bit. i think there have been - a result? well, it has a bit. i think there have been a - a result? well, it has a bit. i think there have been a lot i think there have been a lot of leaks, panama, paradise, may be the viewers remember, at panorama we have been involved in quite a lot of
1:14 pm
those. i think this is a different league. it is significant for several reasons, 12 million files is an awful lot of files, the status of people involved. 35 current or past state leaders, 300 state officials. for minister of the czech republic, he bought two villas in the south of france, three, keita, secret structure and did not declare it. he is now standing for real and has to explain that to the voters. so it matters on a basic level. in terms of the journey, things matters on a basic level. in terms of thejourney, things have improved. managed offshore companies now do need to know their customers, which was not the case ten years ago. some overseas territories have changed and try to have registries of owners, that wasn't the case ten years ago. comes out the files is the way it evolves, one of the big stories is how much uk property is owned offshore. so, this leak is important. it shows how the world changes to help the wealthy hide their fortunes.
1:15 pm
a metropolitan police officer has appeared in court by video link, charged with rape. pc david carrick works in scotland yard's parliamentary and diplomatic protection command. he denies the allegation. 0ur correspondent graham satchell is at st albans magistrates' court. what happened this morning in court? david carrick was not in court. he appeared — david carrick was not in court. he appeared on a video link from stevenage police station. it was a procedural— stevenage police station. it was a procedural affair, stevenage police station. it was a proceduralaffair, so stevenage police station. it was a procedural affair, so very short. he spoke _ procedural affair, so very short. he spoke only— procedural affair, so very short. he spoke only a — procedural affair, so very short. he spoke only a couple of times to confirm — spoke only a couple of times to confirm his name, age and address. he is— confirm his name, age and address. he is charged with one count of rape _ he is charged with one count of rape he — he is charged with one count of rape. he emphatically denied that charge _ rape. he emphatically denied that charge. the alleged offences are said to _ charge. the alleged offences are said to have occurred in st albans
1:16 pm
last september, when david carrick was off— last september, when david carrick was off duty. he is, as you say, a police _ was off duty. he is, as you say, a police constable in the metropolitan police _ police constable in the metropolitan police serving in the parliamentary and protection command, so in the houses— and protection command, so in the houses of— and protection command, so in the houses of parliament, but currently suspended — houses of parliament, but currently suspended from duty. the metropolitan police commissioner, dame _ metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dig, has said she is deeply— dame cressida dig, has said she is deeply concerned that such a serious offence _ deeply concerned that such a serious offence should be associated with a serving _ offence should be associated with a serving police officer. she said she understood the public would be concerned as well. david carrick bowed _ concerned as well. david carrick bowed his — concerned as well. david carrick bowed his head as he was remanded in custody— bowed his head as he was remanded in custody by— bowed his head as he was remanded in custody by the sitting magistrate and he _ custody by the sitting magistrate and he will appear in court again at the beginning of next month. thank— the beginning of next month. thank you. graham satchell. meanwhile, the head of the metropolitan police has ordered an independent review into the force after its performance was strongly criticised following the murder of sarah everard. the commissioner said she wanted to restore public trust. today i am announcing that we will be doing a review. that will be led by
1:17 pm
a high—profile independent person, and the review will look at our internal culture and it will look at our professional standards, systems processes, leadership training, to make sure that we are the best possible met police we can be. and i am absolutely determined that we rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can. lucy manning is entrance to london. you interviewed the commissioner. what else did she say to you? well. what else did she say to you? well, this was the — what else did she say to you? well, this was the first _ what else did she say to you? well, this was the first interview - what else did she say to you? well, this was the first interview the - this was the first interview the commissioner has done since when cousins was charged with the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. we only got a quick four minutes. she was doing a couple of other interviews as well. but she was clear that things obviously need to
1:18 pm
change inside of the metropolitan police, because they have now pointed, orare police, because they have now pointed, or are going to appoint, somebody independent to look at what might be going wrong. we don't know who that person is, who will lead it. we understand it will last for a minimum of six months. we don't know what would happen with any recommendations made. we do know it is not the public enquiry some people have been calling for. that would have a lot more powers. and what i also asked her was, given that this officer, given that wayne cousins was an officer when she was his overall bass, it was on her watch that this has happened, shouldn't she take responsibility for it and resign? she said she knew it was on her watch what she intended to carry on and she had a job to do. we also talked a bit about inviting, how could wayne cousins have been a police officer? he had gone from the civil nuclear constabulary to kent, and then to the metropolitan police. the
1:19 pm
commissioner said she has asked for the national policing body to look at the vetting of police officers. and on the indecent exposure which he was accused of days before the murder of sarah everard, she confirmed as far as she was aware they had not known the person accused of the indecent exposure was accused of the indecent exposure was a police officer. accused of the indecent exposure was a police officer-— a police officer. lucy, thank you. lucy manning- — the time is 19 minutes past one. our top story this lunchtime. the chancellor has told the conservative party conference he will do whatever it takes to help britain recover from the will do whatever it takes to help britain recoverfrom the pandemic. the power of wind farms — how renewables are shaping the climate change debate. 0n the bbc news channel, we should know by the end of the week if england's ashes tour of australia will go ahead. players have concerns over strict covid restrictions in the country.
1:20 pm
the rules on foreign travel have changed, with the old traffic light system scrapped. there will now be just one list of so—called red countries, and anyone travelling to them will have to quarantine for ten days in a hotel when they return. but most fully vaccinated travellers coming from other destinations will no longer need to take a covid test before departure. airlines say the changes will make going abroad cheaper and easier. colletta smith reports. going abroad have just got cheaper, and a whole lot easier. the amber list has been scrapped. now there's just a red list of countries. those passengers still have to pay to quarantine in a hotel when they get home. but for everywhere else there is only one pcr test when you get back. as long as you are fully vaccinated, no other test is needed and no isolation. but for people who have not been jabbed, all the old rules still apply. a test before travelling home, self isolation and tests on day two and day eight.
1:21 pm
the changes are just in time for those desperate to escape for half term. plenty of families have been put off international travel because the system has been so complicated and so expensive. there are still some deals out there and definitely prices are still a little bit lower than they were pre—pandemic. but i think once we start to see the likes of the us opening up, which is happening sometime in november, then i think really we are going to see prices gradually start to creep up, as companies, you know these airlines, have had virtually no income for many months now, and they have to make up the billions of pounds of debt they have built up. the travel industry is delighted, even though we are well into the last remnants of the holiday season. we need to do more. you know, the requirement to do a test after arrival, particularly a pcr test, and they will change that to a rapid antigen, but i don't understand why they are waiting for some time to change that. i think the industry could adapt and introduce that change much quicker. but it is going on
1:22 pm
the right direction. there are still different rules for any country you are travelling to. these changes are only about what you have to do when you are coming home. the red list is to be reviewed again this week, and more countries may be given the green light at that stage. so whether it's for pleasure, for business or to see family, a simpler, cheaper system is now in place. colletta smith, bbc news. scientists who discovered how our bodies feel the warmth of the sun, or the touch of a loved one, have been awarded the nobel prize for medicine. david julius and ardem patapoutian share the prize for their work on the sense of touch, and temperature. they unpicked how our bodies convert physical sensations into electrical messages in the nervous system. their findings could lead to new ways of treating pain. dozens of religious leaders from around the world have appealed for politicians to agree a new deal to combat climate change. they were gathered at a ceremony in the vatican, where pope francis urged governments
1:23 pm
to raise their ambition ahead of the un climate conference in glasgow next month. the archbishop of canterbury was among those at the event. here's mark lowen. they came from across the planet, faith leaders urging politicians to save it. christian and jewish, buddhist and muslim, taoist and confucian, signing a joint appeal to world leaders who will meet at the cop26 in glasgow, to commit to net zero emissions, to limit the temperature rise degrees to support poorer countries. a pope who is focused on environmental concern and an archbishop with this warning. 0urabuse, ourwar against the climate, affects the poorest among us. reconciliation with creation, in obedience to our creator, proclaims the love of god.
1:24 pm
the world has just enough time to get this right. in return, the signatories say they will educate their faithful, spreading the message of climate awareness. the document was handed to alok sharma, the cop26 president, to take to next month's summit, telling us the faith leaders are an essential resource. the message from them has been very clear. this is a critical moment for the world. and the message was one of the head and the heart. the scientists telling us the message from the head is very clear — it is humanity that is creating climate change and we need to act now. and the message of the heart is about morality. the call is urgent. man—made climate change and fossil fuels have prompted the warmest decade on record, with floods, fires and heat waves. this may be the last chance to hold the damage. religion and science don't always go hand in hand. climate change deniers are sometimes fuelled by religious conservatives.
1:25 pm
but with research finding that 84% of people around the globe identify with a faith, world leaders know those meeting here today have a chance of getting their followers to change their behaviour. mark lowen, bbc news, at the vatican. the government wants all uk electricity to come from renewable sources by 2035. borisjohnson says the country is already a world leader in offshore wind power, and shouldn't rely on energy produced from fossil fuels overseas. ministers are under pressure to speed up the shift in how energy is produced, as our climate editor, justin rowlatt, reports. if you thought your commute to work was rough going, check this out. we're with a team trying to get out to service a wind turbine. so... ..the north sea is famous for its savage weather. but that's why they've put these wind turbines out here,
1:26 pm
because this is where the wind is. but, of course, it means they are very hard — oh! — to maintain. oh, god! 0h! the swell is up to three metres high today, making it too dangerous to climb the ladder. so it's back to the ship for us. this is where the team of engineers who keep the blades turning, live and work. these guys do 12 hours shifts out here for 1h straight days, and then get two weeks off. it can be tough, but the flourishing offshore wind industry is creating thousands of well—paid, skilled jobs, most of them in places like grimsby and east yorkshire, that have seen traditional industries decline. my grandad went to sea when he was 1a as a canon boy. for seafaring families like mine, offshore wind is really giving more options. and it is comfortable on the ship.
1:27 pm
right, so this is my cabin. pretty cushti, eh? and then, come and have a look at this. so this is the, eh — this is the lounge. sorry, lads. and this... ..this is the dining area. what's for tea? today it's fish, chips and mushy peas. and we've got pork chops with chausseur sauce. erm, bread—and—butter pudding and custard. oh, my god! sounds good, doesn't it? and you can work all that off down here. these monsters are almost 200 metres high. and each turn of the blades is reckoned to generate enough electricity to power an average uk home for a day. it's nice to know that your time and your energy is contributing to this world that runs on green energy, and it's something what's going to be a better future for everybody. 0rsted says this one wind farm can
1:28 pm
power up to one million homes. and they've almost finished another, even bigger one next to it. and there are plans for many more around the country. what's more, the wind revolution isn'tjust happening here in the uk. it's starting to take off all around the world. justin rowlatt, bbc news. it's feared the eruption of the volcano on the spanish island of la palma could continue for months. lava has now been flowing for 15 days, destroying more than a thousand homes. part of the volcano has collapsed, causing the lava to spread faster and in new directions. locals are wondering what future will hold when the eruption finally stops. danjohnson is on the island and sent this report. incredibly, this eruption is now into a third week and it keeps getting stronger. the volcano is producing even more lava with even more force. that's why all that lava, all that ash, is pouring up
1:29 pm
into the sky higher and higher, and that means more of a risk to a bigger area — the potential for more people to be evacuated on top of the 6,000 or so who have been out of their homes for a fortnight now. and i was talking to the director of the canary islands volcano institute, who said he expects this eruption to continue for at least another ten days, potentially another two months. and even then, when the volcanic eruption stops, when the lava stops flowing, that's not the end of the story. he said it could take years to recover from this because there are vast lava trails right across the landscape here. they have cut through towns and villages, destroyed over 1,000 homes, communication lines and infrastructure have been destroyed. so what to do with that lava — how to live with it — is a major question for the future here that is dominating the future potential of people's lives and their livelihoods, as well. but there are people still living here, right in the shadow of the volcano —
1:30 pm
some of them saying they've had enough now, after a fortnight of that thing thundering, rumbling right through their lives day and night. some have had enough, they can't get sleep, they want to leave. some are making the decision to get to safer places. but then i've also spoken to people who live with that volcano effectively in their back garden who say, "no, as long as the authorities will let me, i'm going to stay, i'm going to see it out." but this is already much worse than anybody has ever seen on this volcanic island — it's produced twice the amount of lava of the previous eruption 50 years ago, and it's still unknown how long that will continue, how much more lava it will produce, and how much more destruction it will cause. that was dan johnson that was danjohnson on la palma. time for the weather. here is susan powell. good afternoon. some pretty big showers rolling around out there for you to dodge. but between them there are also print — make some pretty
1:31 pm
generous spells of sunshine. quite a

35 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on