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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 4, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the secret wealth of dozens of world leaders — from the king ofjordan to the president of russia — is exposed in one of the biggest ever leaks of financial documents. they reveal how a uk conservative party donor — who contributed to borisjohnson�*s leadership campaign — was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. amid pressure on the government over living standards, the chancellor prepares to speak at the conservative party conference — he'll commit £500 million to renew job support programmes. with apprenticeships, we are giving businesses £3000 to take on a new apprentice, give them the skills and the opportunities they need. we've extended those apprenticeship incentives today.
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beaches are closed in southern california, as a large oil spill washes ashore — leaving dead wildlife on the sand. new travel rules come into force in the uk, with the traffic light system replaced by a single red list. as fuel supply issues persist — particularly in the south east of england — the military start delivering to petrol stations. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the secret dealings of hundreds of world leaders, politicians and billionaires have been exposed in one of the biggest investigations of leaked offshore documents in history. the files — dubbed
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�*the pandora papers�* — reveal that tony and cherie blair didn't have to pay more than £300,000 of stamp duty on a six million pound house because it was sold to them through an anonymous offshore company. and they reveal how a prominent donor to the conservative party was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. andy verity reports. the offshore dealings of presidents, prime ministers and royalty are revealed in almost 12 million files obtained by the international consortium of investigativejournalists. they reveal the secrets of world leaders, from the king ofjordan to vladimir putin, to tony blair. before he came to power, the then labour leader attacked the offshore system that allowed wealthy people to to gain tax advantages unavailable to most of us. millionaires with the right accountant pay nothing, whilst pensioners pay vat on fuel. 0ffshore trusts get tax relief while homeowners pay vat on insurance premiums. we will create a tax system that is fair, which is related to ability to pay.
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years later, in 2017, tony and cherie blair bought this townhouse in central london for £6.45 million. but rather than buy the house as you or i would, they bought the offshore company that owned it, saving more than £300,000 in stamp duty. that doesn't look great, and it partly doesn't look great because most people cannot do the same thing, and so even if what the blairs did was perfectly legal, perfectly legitimate in the business world, it feels instinctively really unfair because they got access to an advantage — a potential advantage — that the rest of us don't have. cherie blair told the bbc they didn't request to structure the transaction this way, and that after purchase they had brought the property under uk tax and regulatory rules. a spokesman added the couple will be liable for tax on capital gains on resale.
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the files also reveal how a prominent tory donor who supported borisjohnson�*s leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. the campaign is over and the work begins. thank you all very much. applause. a well—connected corporate lawyer, mohamed amersi has given £525,000 to the conservative party since 2018. here he is talking about corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life. but leaked documents show mr amersi was at the centre of a corruption scandal. he worked as a consultant to a swedish telecoms company, telia, helping it to expand its business in central asia. but an internal telia report describes the activities of a consultant referred to as mr xy, who was paid more than $65 million.
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the payments included expenses for lavish corporate entertainment, usually between $100,000 and $200,000 a month, that were not evidenced by receipts. it recommended that telia's relationship with mr xy be terminated. former telia executive michaela ahlberg, who was brought in to clean up the company, told panorama that mr amersi was the consultant referred to in the report. it is important that people around him that trust him, that listen to him, understand the whole context of his career and wealth. he has been involved closely in one of the biggest corruption scandals that we have seen in sweden in modern times. mr amersi's lawyer said it's entirely false to suggest his contract was terminated, and that his fees and expenses were entirely in keeping with industry practice. andy verity, bbc news.
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well i've been speaking to richard bilton from bbc panorama. i asked him how has the conservative party responded to the this latest line on one of their tory donors. 0ur programme tonight is about political donations, and as you saw, we have been looking at mohamed amersi's background, rishi sunak gave his reaction to bbc breakfast. this is a matter for the party, specifically. butt my understanding is that we carry out compliance checks in line with the referendum and political parties legislation that was put in place by the labour government. and those are the compliance checks that are required by law. those are the compliance checks that the party carries out. the conservatives saying they are operating under the regulations introduced by labour. these papers contain a huge amount of information. what would you pick out as being the headlines from that information? taking a step back, i think it is the scale and content, 12 million files is an enormous amount.
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that means 600 journalists around the world, bbc panorama, the guardian in the uk, looking at the stories. i've done a few of the sort of leaks now, and what marks this one out is the big names that are in there. 35 current or past leaders, 300 senior state officials. if you look at the prime minister of the czech republic, he is standing for election this week. he bought two villas in the south of france, using a complicated offshore structure to buy them, didn't tell parliament, now the people of the czech republic know that and can make their mind up. if you look at the path of those leaks, things have changed. 0ffshore companies need to know their customers, the did need to know that ten years ago.
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and some overseas companies are trying to draw up registries. but there are still areas that offshore companies use. they evolve. 0ffshore companies owning property here in the uk, what you see in the leak is the way that offshore helps the very wealthy hide their wealth. you can read more about today's expose on the bbc news app or website at bbc.co.uk/news. over the coming days, we will also be bringing you more revelations from the pandora papers including the financial dealings of three major donors to the uk governing conservative party. the chancellor rishi sunak will commit to spending an extra 500 million pounds on helping people into work when he addresses the conservative party conference in manchester today. his speech comes at a time of rising living costs and falling business confidence. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming gave us more details about what the chancellor is going to announce in his speech. well, we are going to get £500 million spent on some existing job schemes,
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the main one being the kickstart scheme, which is where employers are given money to take on a young person who is at risk of unemployment. the goal had been to get a quarter of a million people through that scheme by this point, but it is more like 100,000. so you can kind of see why they would be wanting to run it a bit longer. there will also be support, careers advice, cv building skills, interview practice, aimed particularly at the over 50s, and that is to help people get over the end of the furlough scheme, under rishi sunak would rather be putting money into that than keeping hold of the £20 increase in universal credit. here is how he spent what he will be talking about today. spent what he will be talking about toda . �* , , , ., , spent what he will be talking about toda. ,, ., today. business intention is to invest a very _ today. business intention is to invest a very strong, - today. business intention is to i invest a very strong, encouraged today. business intention is to - invest a very strong, encouraged by some _ invest a very strong, encouraged by some of— invest a very strong, encouraged by some of the — invest a very strong, encouraged by some of the things we put in place like the _ some of the things we put in place like the super deduction. and businesses are creating almost record — businesses are creating almost record numbers ofjobs. and we are doing _ record numbers ofjobs. and we are doing our— record numbers ofjobs. and we are doing our bit— record numbers ofjobs. and we are doing our bit to support those businesses. for example, with apprenticeships, we are giving
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businesses £3000 to take on a new apprentice. — businesses £3000 to take on a new apprentice, give them the skills and opportunities they need. we have extended — opportunities they need. we have extended those apprenticeship incentives today. kick—started a scheme — incentives today. kick—started a scheme where we fully fund the business — scheme where we fully fund the business for taking on the young person — business for taking on the young person so — business for taking on the young person. so we are working well in partnership— person. so we are working well in partnership with business to get people — partnership with business to get people into well—paid partnership with business to get people into well— paid work. partnership with business to get people into well-paid work. adam, the one hand. _ people into well-paid work. adam, the one hand, rishi _ people into well-paid work. adam, the one hand, rishi sunak- people into well-paid work. adam, the one hand, rishi sunak has - people into well-paid work. adam, l the one hand, rishi sunak has fellow cabinet members like liz truss and jacob rees—mogg saying be cautious about putting taxes up any further. jacob rees—mogg saying that the upper reaches of the reasonableness of the tax burden have been reached. 0n the other hand, the criticism continues over the decision to remove the £20 uplift to universal credit. what is he going to say about how he is going to balance the books, balance these competing demands? ~ ., ., demands? well, he would say that the conservative — demands? well, he would say that the conservative thing _ demands? well, he would say that the conservative thing to _ demands? well, he would say that the conservative thing to do _ demands? well, he would say that the conservative thing to do is _ demands? well, he would say that the conservative thing to do is to - demands? well, he would say that the conservative thing to do is to match i conservative thing to do is to match your spending with your tax rises, so that there is no alternative to putting taxes up. but he will do it in a responsible way, and he has just been on the radio saying that the reason he says people trust the
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conservatives is because of their sound stewardship of the public finances. but it is interesting that cabinet ministers have been quite explicit about how uncomfortable they are with the current level of taxation, which is why you then get the chancellor having to justify why he is introducing, from next year, the new health and social care levy, which will raise an extra £12 billion in taxes.— which will raise an extra £12 billion in taxes. , ., ._ ., billion in taxes. there is no way to raise £12 billion _ billion in taxes. there is no way to raise £12 billion without _ billion in taxes. there is no way to raise £12 billion without looking i billion in taxes. there is no way to raise £12 billion without looking at| raise £12 billion without looking at one of— raise £12 billion without looking at one of our— raise £12 billion without looking at one of our big tax levers. if you agree, — one of our big tax levers. if you agree, as — one of our big tax levers. if you agree, as you have said, that we need _ agree, as you have said, that we need to— agree, as you have said, that we need to invest more in the nhs and social— need to invest more in the nhs and social care, — need to invest more in the nhs and social care, there aren't many ways to do— social care, there aren't many ways to do it _ social care, there aren't many ways to do it all— social care, there aren't many ways to do it. all of the commentary, whether— to do it. all of the commentary, whether it — to do it. all of the commentary, whether it was from the institute for fiscai— whether it was from the institute for fiscal studies, respected, independent people, or the title resolution foundation, they all describe — resolution foundation, they all describe the tax rise as progressive. that is because those with the _ progressive. that is because those with the broadest shoulders, who are in the _ with the broadest shoulders, who are in the most, — with the broadest shoulders, who are in the most, will pay the most. the top 10% _ in the most, will pay the most. the top 10% or— in the most, will pay the most. the top 10% or 15% of taxpayers will end ”p top 10% or 15% of taxpayers will end up paying _ top 10% or 15% of taxpayers will end up paying over half of the bill. and there are up paying over half of the bill. fific there are certainly a up paying over half of the bill. fific there are certainly a lot of up paying over half of the bill. el"ic there are certainly a lot of wishful thinking in the air at the
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conservative party conference, in an ideal world, conservative party conference, in an idealworld, in conservative party conference, in an ideal world, in the build—up to the next election, which can only be two mercury as a way, that the chancellor and prime minister might have tax cuts up their sleeve. another striking bit of the chancellor's speech that we are going to get at lunchtime, he says his intention is to make the uk the most exciting place on the planet. quite an ambitious goal. a large oil slick has begun washing ashore in southern california. beaches in orange county — southeast of los angeles — have been closed, as oil and dead wildlife wash up on the sand. almost half a million litres of oil has leaked from a pipeline connected to an offshore oil rig. courtney bembridge reports. california is known for its beaches, but not like this. clumps of oil and tar the size of softballs scatter the shoreline, as well as dead birds and fish. more than 120,000 gallons of oil has leaked into the ocean from a broken pipeline five miles off the coast. we are in the midst of a potential ecological disaster here at huntington beach and as the exhibits and pictures here illustrate, the oil spill has significantly impacted our community.
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the broken pipeline is connected to an offshore oil platform run by a subsidiary of houston—based amplify energy. the company says the pipeline has now been shut off and the remaining oil suctioned out. it has been maintained. we are investigating, if the pipeline is the source of this, how this happened. a huge clean—up operation is under way to try to stop the oil reaching sensitive wetlands nearby and people are being urged to avoid the beaches. you can feel the vapour in the air. i saw what i'll describe as little pancake clusters of oil along the shoreline and i've described it as something like an egg yolk — if you push it, it kind of spreads out, so we don't want people to disturb those little clusters. local authorities say it is too soon to say whether the company responsible will face criminal charges.
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courtney bembridge, bbc news. the uk's coronavirus travel rules have been simplified from today. the red list is to remain, but the amber and green lists are now merged into a single "rest of world" category. in addition, people coming back from countries which aren't on the red list who can prove they're fully vaccinated — no longer have to take a pcr or lateral flow test before setting off for the uk. let's talk now to lisa minot, travel editor at the sun newspaper. hello. good to have you with us. is this leading to a big increase in holiday bookings? it this leading to a big increase in holiday bookings?— this leading to a big increase in holiday bookings? it definitely has made many _ holiday bookings? it definitely has made many peeple _ holiday bookings? it definitely has made many people think, - holiday bookings? it definitely has made many people think, yes, - holiday bookings? it definitely has. made many people think, yes, they can get away, now it is less hassle, less admin and less cost. i think it is going to be a really positive mood. but we still need to find out what is happening with the second stage of these restrictions are easing, which is the switch from a pcr test on des two, to a lateral
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flow on day two. that is a significant cost if you are a family, and we are told this will happen before the end of october. families looking to go away for the october half term still don't know 0ctober half term still don't know exactly what data that will be coming in. exactly what data that will be coming in-— exactly what data that will be cominu in. , ., , coming in. there is a very good oint coming in. there is a very good point you _ coming in. there is a very good point you make, _ coming in. there is a very good point you make, and _ coming in. there is a very good point you make, and will - coming in. there is a very good | point you make, and will prices, apart from the cost of testing, any testing that remains, will prices go up? we are notjust talking about people going on holiday, people might want to travel for a variety of reasons?— of reasons? yes, i think we are gradually _ of reasons? yes, i think we are gradually going _ of reasons? yes, i think we are gradually going to _ of reasons? yes, i think we are gradually going to see - of reasons? yes, i think we are gradually going to see prices i of reasons? yes, i think we are - gradually going to see prices going up. it has always been a case of supply and demand. usually the october half term is going to be a 0ctober half term is going to be a time when many people want to be travelling with their families. so, yes, prices are quite high for half term. there are still some deals out there, and definitely prices are a little bit lower than they were pre—pandemic. but i think once we start to see the likes of the us opening up, which is happening sometime in november, i think we are really going to start to see prices gradually creeping up, as these airlines, you know, they have had no
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income for many months now. and they have to make up the billions of pounds of debt they have built up. do travellers still need to do a lot of research here? because those countries that are on the rest of the world list, the old green and amber lists combined, they don't necessarily have reciprocal arrangements with the uk, do they? that's right, it's really important that you double—check any country or going to. we had some encouraging news at the end of last week, with both turkey and croatia, popular destinations, both of them dropping the requirement to have a pcr test to get into the country. every individual country has their own rules and regulations, so it's always a good idea to double—check the entry requirements, and notjust concentrate on what our requirements are when you are coming back. it's got to be both that you look at when you are going to make a decision as to when you are going to holiday. obviously the travel industry is usually thanked for this. they would have liked it to happen sooner and it is happening pretty late in the year. but given that the pretty large numbers of cases, covid cases we are seeing at the moment, do you
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feel that we are not going to go backwards, that now we are going forwards with the ability to travel again? or are there still rests? i don't then we can ever say that there are not going to be risks. things are not always as simple as they first seem. but i definitely think we are seeing a gradual turn in the right direction. we have the us coming on board, we are looking at australia saying that they are looking at are just australians being able to come back into start with, but we are heading in the right direction. numbers have pretty much flatlined, and i think there is still a large number of cases, but we are not seeing a very large increase. i think the best way to protect yourself, if you are going to be making a booking, is to make sure you are booking at an atoll protected tour operator, and then you have a level of protection should the worst happen. lots of really attractive deals around for
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next summer, with very low deposits. so you can book something now and have something to look forward to without having that financial outlay at the same time.— at the same time. lisa, thank you very much- _ leaked financial documents reveal how a conservative party donor who contribute to borisjohnson's leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. added pressure on the uk garment over living standards, the chancellor will commit £500 million to supportjob programmes. and beaches are closed in california as a large oil spill washes ashore. the military will begin delivering fuel supplies to forecourts hit by the petrol crisis today. the government insists the situation at the pumps is easing but troops
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will be deployed across london and the south east, where the worst shortages remain as charlotte gallagher reports. after more than a week of scenes like this, the military is being drafted in. troops here training for their next deployment — delivering to petrol stations across the uk. 200 servicemen and women are being called on. more than half will be focused in london and the south—east of england, where fuel stocks are at their lowest. borisjohnson says the measure is a precaution, but retailers say there are still severe shortages in some parts of the country. in the south—east, it was worse than we'd expected. and over 20% of sites were dry. this is really continuing to be a serious crisis for the 25 million or so people living in london and the home counties. as well as the military, up to 300 foreign tanker
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drivers will be allowed into the uk immediately — several weeks before the wider visa scheme comes into effect. this isn'tjust about petrol stations and panic—buying fuel — the shortage of hgv and tanker drivers could impact other essential services and products, with borisjohnson refusing to rule out supply chain problems continuing until christmas. temporary working permits are also being offered to more than 4,500 food haulage drivers who could deliver to supermarkets. another 5,500 will be given to foreign poultry workers. the uk government are obviously keen to avoid more chaotic scenes, and negative headlines. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. a metropolitan police officer will appear before magistrates today charged with rape. david carrick — who is 46 and from stevenage in hertfordshire — is accused of attacking a woman
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in september of last year. he'll appear at hatfield magistrates court via videolink. north korea has restored communication hotlines with south korea — at the same time as urging seoul to step up efforts to improve ties. pyongyang cut off the lines in early august — just days after reopening them for the first time in a year — in protest againstjoint military exercises involving south korea and the united states. laura bicker is following events from seoul. these hotlines are on and off again. they were switched on just briefly in august as a gesture of goodwill according to a state media release and then they were cut off again when south korea took part in those joint military exercises. today at 9am local time communication between north and south korea was once again restored. there are many of these hotlines that include fax lines and they go between various different departments.
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the point of them is to avoid rising tension and accidental clashes between the military and there are two calls, one in the morning and one at night, but they have not been happening regularly for over a year. in the state media release which was put out today from north korea it quotes them saying this is a gesture towards durable peace but he has also said that he wants to see active changes towards inter—korean policies. this is something we are looking at here and that is because this is an auspicious date when it comes to inter—korean relations. an historic agreement was signed to work towards peace, economic and military cooperation. it could be while restoring the hotlines today kim jong—un is dangling the prospect of inter—korean talks at a special time because here in south korea we are going towards a presidential election.
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there will be a new leader come march and kim jong—un cannot guarantee that the new leader of south korea will be as happy to talk to him as the current one. a former facebook employee has accused herformer a former facebook employee has accused her former employer of favouring profit over challenging extremism. she says that facebook prioritised growth over safety. facebook said that the leaks were misleading and glossed over positive research taken by the company. you have our research taken by the company. i'm, have your phone, you might see 100 pieces of content if you sit and scroll for five minutes. it pieces of content if you sit and scroll forfive minutes. it facebook has thousands of options it could show you, how facebook is picking out that content today is it is optimising for content that gets engagement, or reaction. but its own
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research is showing that content thatis research is showing that content that is hateful, that is divisive, that is hateful, that is divisive, thatis that is hateful, that is divisive, that is polarising, it's easier to inspire people to anger than it is to other emotions. misinformation, an: to other emotions. misinformation, angry content. _ to other emotions. misinformation, angry content. is— to other emotions. misinformation, angry content, is enticing _ to other emotions. misinformation, angry content, is enticing to - to other emotions. misinformation, angry content, is enticing to people and keeps — angry content, is enticing to people and keeps them on the platform? yes. facebook has — and keeps them on the platform? iszs facebook has realised that and keeps them on the platform? eijezs facebook has realised that if and keeps them on the platform? eies facebook has realised that if they change the algorithm to be safer, people spend less time on the site, they will click on less adverts, they'll make less money. after decades of war afghanistan's children are continuing to pay the price of the conflict as unemployment rates and poverty soar. to avoid hunger, hundreds of afghan children are travelling to neighbouring countries, hidden under lorries, carrying goods to sell to try and make money for theirfamilies. shumaila jaffrey reports from the torkham border crossing between pakistan and afghanistan. this little afghan girl has just entered pakistan holding baggage heavier than her own weight. and while she is trying to run
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before she is caught by the border guards, another lorry has arrived with more afghan children carrying luggage. this practice is not new, but many believe that now its scale is much bigger than before. translation: we are forced to do this because of poverty. _ my father is unwell. it's better to earn something than stay idle and waste time. we deal with suppliers who give us the goods and tell us where to drop them. when we deliver the stuff, we take receipts from shopkeepers and get paid for it when we return. the children bring small items like sweets, cigarettes and fabric to sell on the side. they are constantly searched and chased by the pakistani border guards, who worry for their safety and keep sending them back. but the children usually return in the next vehicle. afghan children are the most tragic victims of decades of conflict in the country.
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they understand the dangers of illegally crossing the border, hiding in undercarriages and mudguards of such lorries, and while doing so, some of them have even got injured in the past. but they still feel it's worth taking the risk instead of dying of starvation. most of these children are under 15. the smaller the better, because they can fit under the trucks easily. still, there have been numerous accidents in the past. but the taliban guarding on the other side don't seem to mind. translation: i have never gotten hurt, but a girl did some time ago. j she died because she was sitting on the engine. i never sit near the engine. i always sit at the back. in afghanistan, unemployment is soaring to the roof. and unlike in the past, pakistan is tightly regulating the border. adults can only enter with proper documents for trade. so these children are used instead as they can smuggle things without immigration and customs.
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the unhcr says this exploitation of children is appalling. these images should make us realise that afghanistan's future, afghanistan's children, everything is at stake right now. and this is a call on everyone, on the international community, but people who will be watching these images, that this is a time to help and support to these desperate individuals. this is not a time to walk away from afghanistan. on average, these children earn around $10 a trip. but there are days when their goods are confiscated by the guards and after enduring all the trouble and hurt, they have no option but to return empty—handed. shumaila jaffrey, bbc news, torkham border.
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spain's prime minister has promised millions of dollars in reconstruction aid to la palma because of the ongoing volcanic eruption there. danjohnson has this update. incredibly, this eruption is now into a third week and it keeps getting stronger. the volcano is producing even more lava with even more force. that's why all that lava, all that ash, is pouring up into the sky higher and higher, and that means more of a risk to a bigger area — the potential for more people to be evacuated on top of the 6,000 or so who have been out of their homes for a fortnight now. and i was talking to the director of the canary islands volcano institute, who said he expects this eruption to continue for at least another ten days, potentially another two months. and even then, when the volcanic eruption stops, when the lava stops flowing, that's not the end of the story. he said it could take years to recover from this because there are vast lava trails
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right across the landscape here. they have cut through towns and villages, destroyed over 1,000 homes, communication lines and infrastructure have been destroyed. so what to do with that lava — how to live with it — is a major question for the future here that is dominating the future potential of people's lives and their livelihoods, as well. but there are people still living here, right in the shadow of the volcano — some of them saying they've had enough now, after a fortnight of that thing thundering, rumbling right through their lives day and night. some have had enough, they can't get sleep, they want to leave. some are making the decision to get to safer places. but then i've also spoken to people who live with that volcano effectively in their back garden who say, "no, as long as the authorities will let me, i'm going to stay, i'm going to see it out." but this is already much worse than anybody has ever seen on this volcanic island — it's produced twice the amount of lava of the previous eruption 50 years ago, and it's still unknown how long that will continue,
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how much more lava it will produce, and how much more destruction it will cause. sheet the headlines on bbc news... leaked financial documents reveal how a uk conservative party donor who contributed to borisjohnson's leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. amid pressure on the uk government over living standards, the chancellor prepares to speak at the conservative party conference he'll commit five hundred million pounds to renewjob support programmes. beaches are closed in southern california, as a large oil spill washes ashore leaving dead wildlife on the sand. new travel rules come into force in the uk, with the traffic light system replaced by a single red list. as fuel supply issues persist particularly in the south east of england the military start
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delivering to petrol stations. we can cross live to stockholm. we are awaiting the we can cross live to stockholm. we are awaiting the announcement we can cross live to stockholm. we are awaiting the announcement of we can cross live to stockholm. we are awaiting the announcement of the 2021 nobel prize in physiology or medicine. that is conference and with the winner of the 2021 nobel prize in medicine or physiology and we will try to bring that to you exactly as it happens. after decades of war... i do apologise, we havejust run after decades of war... i do apologise, we have just run that story in the last couple of minutes we will go to a different story. the uk chancellor rishi sunak will set out his plan to spend half a billion pounds on helping more people into work when he addresses the conservative party conference today. it comes as the government
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is cutting the universal credit payment by £20 a week ending a temporary uplift introduced at the start of the pandemic. 0ur correspondent zoe conway has been looking into this for us. at the thomas a becket church in ramsay, you'll find a harvest of kindness and compassion. they are concerned here that the families they feed are going to be even more in need this winter as fuel bills are set to rise, and the universal credit uplift comes to an end. it's about human beings, families that can't afford to pay their energy bills, they turn the heating off, their kids get chest infections. when parents are working double shifts, their children don't see them, they don't see each other and families start to disintegrate with all the horrible things that happen then. it's about people, and, yeah, i'm worried. coming in from the cold are dave and charlotte. dave works six days a week as a floor fitter. paid the minimum wage, he relies on universal credit to provide for his family.
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from this week, they'll lose the £20 per week universal credit uplift. it doesn't sound like a lot, but it is to a family. like, it helps buy the nappies for the children, milk, fruit, it helps spread the money. so it's going to be a big loss, £80 per month. what do you say to the argument that the countryjust can't afford this £20 uplift? it's costing taxpayers £6 billion. going to the nobel prize committee in stockholm. we can listen. daeid in stockholm. we can listen. david julius. it in stockholm. we can listen. david julius it is— in stockholm. we can listen. david julius- it is in _ in stockholm. we can listen. david
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julius. it is in swedish. _ in stockholm. we can listen. david julius. it is in swedish. we - in stockholm. we can listen. david julius. it is in swedish. we are - julius. it is in swedish. we are awaitin: julius. it is in swedish. we are awaiting the — julius. it is in swedish. we are awaiting the announcement i julius. it is in swedish. we are awaiting the announcement of| julius. it is in swedish. we are i awaiting the announcement of the winner of the nobel prize in medicine or physiology. david julius and ar'en medicine or physiology. david julius and arjen for _ medicine or physiology. david julius and arjen for the _ medicine or physiology. david julius and arjen for the discovery - medicine or physiology. david julius and arjen for the discovery of- medicine or physiology. david julius and arjen for the discovery of the i and arjen for the discovery of the receptors for temperature and touch. david julius was born in 1955 in new york. he performed his studies in san francisco. 0ur dam was born in lebanon. he performed his prize—winning work in california where he is still active. i will
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turn to a member of the committee who will describe the discovery. this year's nobel prize concerns our senses. 0ur senses allowed us to perceive and interpret the world around us. specialised sense organs such as our eyes, ears, nose and mouth vision, hearing smell and taste. this year's nobel prize has to do with their ability to feel temperature and touch.
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imagine that you are walking barefoot across a field on a summer morning. it can feel the warmth of the sun, the coolness of the morning, caressing summer breeze and the fine texture of blades of grass underneath your feet. these impressions of temperature, touch and movement are feelings relying on this sensation. it is what gives us the ability to fill liability surface and internal and monitors temperature, pain and movement of her body. such information continues to flow from the skin and other deep
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tissues and connects us with the external and the internal world. it is also essential for tasks that we perform effortlessly and without much thought. for example, when taking coffee on the go a flow of information from sensors in legs and arms keeps track on their position in space, sensors in the skin registers the texture, size and shape of the coffee cup, how warm it is and corrects the grip strength to keep a hold on the cup. physical stimuli such as heat and touch can be registered and how they can be registered has fascinated humankind for thousands of years. a french philosopher in the 17th century envisaged how this could work, evoking a thread between the skin and the brain. moving particles of
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fire on the skin cooled the thread and opened the valve in the brain. the citation being delivered in stockholm for the winners of the 2021 nobel prize for medicine and physiology, goingjointly to 2021 nobel prize for medicine and physiology, going jointly to david julius and ardem patapoutian for their work on receptors went to temperature and touch. the citation rightly saying this is all about our senses, how we perceive and interpret the world. today the biden administration unveils the first part of its long awaited china trade policy. relations between the us and china have remained strained and president biden has kept the trump administration's tariffs in place on around 360 billion dollars in chinese goods as well as adding further sanctions in response to human rights abuses.
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with me now is professor shirley yu, director of the china africa initiative at the london school of economics. good to have you with us today. what do you think we are going to hear by way of strategy own trade with china? , ., ., way of strategy own trade with china? ,., ., ., , , . china? good morning. it is expected to announce — china? good morning. it is expected to announce that _ china? good morning. it is expected to announce that china _ china? good morning. it is expected to announce that china did _ china? good morning. it is expected to announce that china did not i to announce that china did not fulfil the purchase agreement but it also makes no sense for china to try to rush into selling that by december 31. any announcement is out of the question of tariff—free movement but it is possible that there might be punitive measures for china to comply but the two sides have nearly three months to come to a substantial trade deal. this is highly unlikely given the complexity and the urgency and tariffs are not good for your us inflation or chinese employment. taste
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good for your us inflation or chinese employment. we mentioned that president _ chinese employment. we mentioned that president biden _ chinese employment. we mentioned that president biden has _ chinese employment. we mentioned that president biden has kept - chinese employment. we mentioned that president biden has kept somel that president biden has kept some of the trump administration's tariffs in place. but more broadly how do you think the us approach under biden is going to differfrom the trump administration? it is really likely _ the trump administration? it is really likely that _ the trump administration? it 3 really likely that biden will continue essentially the trump policy going into the future. it would be too late for biden to reverse course at this point. china is prepared for a longer struggle against the united states when the president made a protection in january about the rise of the eastern decline of the west. he did not mean... (inaudible)... 0n (inaudible)... on the (inaudible)... 0n the opposite sides. but the fundamental issue for biden is that any us president would
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not want to be remembered as the us president that the united states from the global economy. that would be a very embarrassing thing to be remembered as and from this perspective either trump, biden or any future us president the ambition for china is aligned in a way. we are having _ for china is aligned in a way. we are having a few issues with the line. we will try one more question and hopefully it will stay good. what we are seeing play out with these discussions over trade is a much bigger picture of the power struggle between the superpowers, frankly. struggle between the superpowers, frankl . ~ , struggle between the superpowers, frankl. ~ , , frankly. absolutely. i was 'ust about to say i frankly. absolutely. i was 'ust about to say that i frankly. absolutely. i was 'ust about to say that china i frankly. absolutely. i was 'ust about to say that china is i frankly. absolutely. i wasjust i about to say that china is prepared for a prolonged struggle against the united states. when the president made the prediction about the rise of the east and the decline of the west he didn't mention the rise of the east and the rise of the west that we have to be clear this is not about forming global consensus or any us china reconversion. china fundamentally sees itself in the us
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on opposite sides of the global destiny but very interestingly when it comes to trade the us china position have completely swapped in over two years. in 2019 it was the trump administration that demanded a comprehensive approach in addressing the china trade issues and china said why don't we just address the trading balance first and leave the thorny issues for later and therefore we saw the culmination of therefore we saw the culmination of the us china trade deal but today china has two months and the chinese foreign minister said unless every single item is addressed we are really not interested in discussing any other subjects including climate change. this was made very clear during a visit to china. 0n the other hand it is the biden administration going for a piecemeal approach to china, engaging in sun, confronting the rest, and i think this policy is really bringing
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together the relationship at this moment. ., .. together the relationship at this moment. ., ,, , ., together the relationship at this moment. ., ,, y., together the relationship at this moment. ., «e . ., together the relationship at this moment. ., . ., moment. thank you so much for your time today- — moment. thank you so much for your time today- in — moment. thank you so much for your time today. in the _ moment. thank you so much for your time today. in the last _ moment. thank you so much for your time today. in the last winner- moment. thank you so much for your time today. in the last winner is i time today. in the last winner is borisjohnson has been speaking to journalists and talking about fears of rising prices and cuts to universal credit. i of rising prices and cuts to universal credit.— of rising prices and cuts to universal credit. «e ., , ., universal credit. i think what you are seeing _ universal credit. i think what you are seeing in _ universal credit. i think what you are seeing in the _ universal credit. i think what you are seeing in the uk _ universal credit. i think what you are seeing in the uk at _ universal credit. i think what you are seeing in the uk at the i are seeing in the uk at the moment and over the last year or so you have seen for the first time in more than a decade increases in wages, which is what we wanted to see, and when you talk about some of the supply chain issues that usually function of the world economy, the uk economy, coming back to life after virus night. a shortage of lorry drivers around the world from poland to the united states and even in china and what we want to see is
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a high wage, high skill economy where we invest in people, invest in fantastic infrastructure like this behind me and try high productivity growth. that is the model we are going for. growth. that is the model we are auoin for. �* ,. growth. that is the model we are auoin for. . y., ., growth. that is the model we are auoin for. �* ,. ., ., going for. are you worried about the ain and going for. are you worried about the pain and argue _ going for. are you worried about the pain and argue not _ going for. are you worried about the pain and argue not blaming - going for. are you worried about the | pain and argue not blaming business for of this? ~ ., pain and argue not blaming business for of this? ~ . ., , , for of this? what we are seeing is the recovery _ for of this? what we are seeing is the recovery of — for of this? what we are seeing is the recovery of the _ for of this? what we are seeing is the recovery of the economy, i for of this? what we are seeing is the recovery of the economy, the | the recovery of the economy, the fastest growing economy in the g7, and you have unemployment way lower than people forecast, you havejobs being created the whole time, and what we want to see our high wage, high skilljobs and businesses doing a fantasticjob of investing in apprentices and investing in skills and that is the way to go for the uk. on and that is the way to go for the uk. 0n things like the road haulage industry the thing to do is make the job more attractive and invest in the truck stops and invest in higher
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wages as well. ii the truck stops and invest in higher wages as well-— wages as well. if all electricity is auoin to wages as well. if all electricity is going to come — wages as well. if all electricity is going to come by _ wages as well. if all electricity is going to come by renewables i wages as well. if all electricity is going to come by renewables by| wages as well. if all electricity is i going to come by renewables by 2035 does that mean you are saying there will be no new coal and no new oil and gas from now? i will be no new coal and no new oil and gas from now?— will be no new coal and no new oil and gas from now? i am saying we can do thorough — and gas from now? i am saying we can do thorough entire _ and gas from now? i am saying we can do thorough entire energy _ and gas from now? i am saying we can do thorough entire energy production l do thorough entire energy production by 2035 what we are doing with internal combustion engine vehicles by 2030, so from 2030 you will not be able to buy a new hydrocarbon field internal combustion engine car and we are going to move to electronic vehicles or clean powered or hydrogen powered, one or another, and that will make a huge difference to our c02 output, controlling climate change, to the planet, but it will also put the uk at the forefront of this amazing new industry of clean vehicles and what we are also seeing as by 2035 looking at the progress we are
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making in wind power, where we lead the world in offshore wind, looking at what we can do with other renewable sources, carbon capturing and storage, with hydrogen potentially, we think we can get to complete clean energy production by 2035. the advantage of that, to go back to your earlier question, is it will mean that for the first time the uk is not dependent on hydrocarbons coming from overseas with all the vagaries and hydrocarbon prices and the risk that poses for people's pockets and for the consumer. we will be reliant on our own clean power generation which will open also help us keep costs down. the headlines on bbc news... leaked financial documents reveal how a conservative party donor who contributed to borisjohnson's leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing.
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amid pressure on the uk government over living standards, the chancellor prepares to speak at the conservative party conference he'll commit five hundred million pounds to renewjob support programmes. and beaches are closed in southern california, as a large oil spill washes ashore leaving dead wildlife on the sand. world space week begins today with the theme women in space. the aim is to encourage more women to become astronauts women are still under represented in careers in technology and science, an inbalance that begins at the earliest school days. joining me now is dr nicol caplin, a deep space exploration scientist from the european space agency, and you've got a novel way of approaching this, haven't you? good morning. yes. tell us about the
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novel where — good morning. yes. tell us about the novel where you _ good morning. yes. tell us about the novel where you are _ good morning. yes. tell us about the novel where you are trying _ good morning. yes. tell us about the novel where you are trying to - novel where you are trying to encourage girls to get interested in space from the very beginning of their school days.— their school days. mattel are releasing _ their school days. mattel are releasing a _ their school days. mattel are releasing a barbie _ their school days. mattel are releasing a barbie in - their school days. mattel are releasing a barbie in the i their school days. mattel are i releasing a barbie in the likeness of our currently serving female astronaut. she is going to be the first european female commander of the international space station and barbie are producing this model in her likeness to hopefully capture the imagination of young women at an early age, which is important so that they do not miss out later in life. ~ ., . . life. we are 'ust chewing our viewers life. we are just chewing our viewers energies _ life. we are just chewing our viewers energies of- life. we are just chewing our viewers energies of the i life. we are just chewing our| viewers energies of the door, life. we are just chewing our i viewers energies of the door, but life. we are just chewing our - viewers energies of the door, but do you think this is the right way to engage girls at all? it is you think this is the right way to engage girls at all?— engage girls at all? it is one of the ways- _
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engage girls at all? it is one of the ways. maybe _ engage girls at all? it is one of the ways. maybe you - engage girls at all? it is one of the ways. maybe you and i, i l engage girls at all? it is one of- the ways. maybe you and i, i think most young girls had dolls growing up, i certainly did, i had barbie dolls, and this is creative play for children to show them that there are ways that you can explore different carriers. barbie has a range of different careers that she has come a very long way. back in our day, barbie would be tall and slender and have long blonde hair and this is fine but it is not representational of women so having a barbie doll in this likeness, which is very true to house a month looks, is a really positive step forward. that house a month looks, is a really positive step forward.— house a month looks, is a really positive step forward. that is one asect of positive step forward. that is one aspect of world _ positive step forward. that is one aspect of world space _ positive step forward. that is one aspect of world space week i positive step forward. that is one aspect of world space week and l aspect of world space week and women in space. what else is being done and what else needs to be done to get girls interested in careers in
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technology and science and studying the subjects that can read then into this area? it the subjects that can read then into this area? ., , . «e ., , this area? it goes back to capturing them at a young — this area? it goes back to capturing them at a young age. _ this area? it goes back to capturing them at a young age. in _ this area? it goes back to capturing them at a young age. in my - this area? it goes back to capturing them at a young age. in my case i l them at a young age. in my case i didn't come into space until quite late on in my studies. it was only at university i started to get interested in space as a career. i had always been interested in space as a subject but i never saw myself doing that as a carrier until quite late. ~ , ., doing that as a carrier until quite late. ~ , . , ., doing that as a carrier until quite late. ~ ,~ ., doing that as a carrier until quite late. ., , , late. why are you doing completely different subjects _ late. why are you doing completely different subjects or _ late. why are you doing completely different subjects or was _ late. why are you doing completely different subjects or was it - late. why are you doing completely different subjects or was it related | different subjects or was it related in terms of the subjects of were studying? i in terms of the sub'ects of were stud in: ? . ., , ., ., studying? i started my undergraduate decree in studying? i started my undergraduate degree in environmental— studying? i started my undergraduate degree in environmental science, i degree in environmental science, which was incredibly broad, and that was everything from renewable energy to climate change. climate change was on the back and i wanted to be part of that change and as part of
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that study i then started focusing on radiation and the effects that that has on the environment and eventually that turned into space radiation and i got bitten by the space back and started to explore careers in that area and here i am a few years later working for the european space agency as a biologist. european space agency as a biologist-— european space agency as a biolouist. ., , , ., biologist. really interesting to hear our biologist. really interesting to hear your story _ biologist. really interesting to hear your story and _ biologist. really interesting to hear your story and about i biologist. really interesting to l hear your story and about space biologist. really interesting to - hear your story and about space week and the theme of women in space. thank you so much. it's exactly four weeks until world leaders will gather in glasgow for crucial talks on how to manage the climate crisis. 0ur climate editor, justin rowlatt, is in hull for us looking at the role wind power could have in our move towards renewable energy. it's actually much smoother than it looks. 0h! if you thought your commute to work was rough going, check this out.
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we're with a team trying to get out to service a wind turbine. so, the north sea is famous for its savage weather. but that's why they put the wind turbines out here, because this is where the wind is. but of course, it means they are very hard — whoa — to maintain. whoa! the swell is up to three metres high today, making it too dangerous to climb the ladder. so it's back to the ship for us. this is where the team of engineers who keep the blades turning live and work. coming through. these guys do 12—hour shifts out here, for 1h straight days, and then get two weeks off. it can be tough but the flourishing offshore wind industry is creating thousands of well—paid skilled jobs — most of them in places like grimsby, that have seen traditional industries decline.
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my grandad went to sea when he was 1a, as a cabin boy. for seafaring families like mine, offshore wind has really given more options. 80% of our workforce in the east coast come from within an hour of our operational hub. so it's really opened up a world of opportunities that, for seafaring families like mine, really didn't exist 15 years ago. and it is comfortable on the ship. so let me take you on a little tour. right, so, this is my cabin. pretty cushty, hey? come and have a look at this. so this is the lounge. sorry, lads. and this — this is the dining area. and let me tell you, the food is really good. let's see what's on the menu.
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jill, jill? hi. what's for tea? today is fish, chips and mushy peas, and we've got pork chops with chasseur sauce. bread—and—butter pudding and custard. oh, my god, sounds good, doesn't it? and you can work all that off down here. a day later, and the sea is calmer. this time we do get to the ladder. it's quite a climb and this is just to the bottom of the thing. but there's bad news. so we've managed to get onto the turbine, but the crane isn't working, which means we can't get our gear up off the boat, which means we can't go up the turbine. but i can give you a sense of this — look at this. just how huge these wind turbines are. these monsters are almost 200 metres high, and each turn of the blades is reckoned to generate enough electricity to power
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an average uk home for a day. it's nice to know that your time and your energy is contributing to this world running on green energy, which will be a better future for everybody. and it's growing up in the north—east in your hometown. yeah, we're really lucky to have it on our doorstep, i don't take that for granted at all. we got up as far as the platform but we couldn't go any further because of the broken crane. what does that tell you about the challenges you face in your daily work? just that you've got to remain open and ready for whatever could arise. i think being adaptable just in general is a good thing, yeah, because life's always full of surprises. as we head back, we get a fantastic view. 0rsted says this one wind farm can power up to a million homes and they have almost finished another even bigger one next to it. and there are plans for many more around the country. what's more, the wind revolution isn'tjust happening here in the uk — it's starting to take off all around the world.
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0ur climate editor there. the weather will be unsettled with heavy rain at times and strong winds. the low pressure that brought the wet and windy weather at the weekend has moved away from us but later in the day we have this next system coming our way which is going to introduce heavy rain and squally winds. continuing through the rest of the day with some sunny spells, areas of cloud floating around and showers coming in from the west, some of those drifting eastwards and some of those drifting eastwards and some of those drifting eastwards and some of them will be heavy with some hail and thunder embedded in as
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well. temperatures ranging from 12 in the north to 17 as be pushed down towards the south. as we head through this evening and overnight here comes the rain across the south—west of england and wales, moving north, north eastwards. the bright colours indicating where we are going to see some torrential downpours. parts of southern and south—eastern england could have 30 to 40 south—eastern england could have 30 to a0 millimetres of rain accompanied by squally winds. a cold night in scotland and northern ireland. you could see a touch of frost. sunshine and showers tomorrow with the rain continuing to rotate around the centre of the low pressure bringing heavy across cumbria and northern england. you can see we are still looking at brisk winds with temperatures 11 and the north to about 15 in the south. as we know from tuesday onwards, the weather remains unsettled. we say goodbye to low pressure on wednesday. a transient ridge of high pressure builds on and then the next
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system comes in and that means we will see more vain and attain stronger winds. starting on wednesday with brisk winds down the east coast. possibly the old spot of rain first and before that players and then it dries up, many of us seeing sunshine, but the weather front comes in bringing rain across northern ireland and western scotland and the winds will pick up as well. 0vernight you can see how that drifts across scotland ranging into northern england and the second weather front comes in into northern england and the second weatherfront comes in bringing more vain. windy is well across the north has become further something drier but a few showers for wales and south—west england.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11am... med pressure on the government about living standards, the chancellor is to speak at the conservative party conference. to speak at the conservative party conference-— to speak at the conservative party conference. ~ . , , . , , , conference. with apprenticeships, we are aaivin conference. with apprenticeships, we are giving businesses _ conference. with apprenticeships, we are giving businesses a _ conference. with apprenticeships, we are giving businesses a £3000 - conference. with apprenticeships, we are giving businesses a £3000 to i are giving businesses a £3000 to take on any apprentice, give them the skills and the opportunities they need. we have extended that today. new travel rules come into force in the uk, with the traffic light system replaced by a single red list. as fuel supply issues persist — particularly in the south east of england — the military start delivering to petrol stations. leaked finanical documents reveal how a conservative party donor — who contributed to borisjohnson's
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leadership campaign — was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. and four weeks before world leaders meet in glasgow for talks on the climate crisis, we look at the role wind power could have in our move towards renewable energy. good morning. welcome. the chancellor rishi sunak will commit to spending an extra £500 million pounds on helping people into work when he addresses the conservative party conference in manchester in the next hour. his speech comes at a time of rising living costs and falling business confidence. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is at the conference in manchester. what is the message of his speech
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expected to be? what is the message of his speech expected to be?— what is the message of his speech expected to be? good morning to you from a slightly — expected to be? good morning to you from a slightly drizzly _ expected to be? good morning to you from a slightly drizzly manchester. i from a slightly drizzly manchester. he will be on his feet and a5 minutes' time at ten minutes to midday. the essence of the speech is the backdrop to which you refer, we are at the end of the furloughs scheme, the uplift to universal credit, that £20 per week top up that was added to the benefit during the pandemic, with plenty of people, including plenty of people here at the conference very nervous about that. the government has always argued it was a temporary measure in an emergency. it is expensive, £6 billion per year. a lot of conservative former ministers think it is a mistake. the furlough scheme is ending, but as you say, what he will say is a package of measures that will help keep people into work and get people to stay in jobs once
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they have managed to get them. for instance, the kick—start scheme, financial... there is a sense of the specifics on jobs financial... there is a sense of the specifics onjobs and... financial... there is a sense of the specifics on jobs and... taste financial... there is a sense of the specifics on jobs and. . ._ specifics on 'obs and... we have some specifics on jobs and. .. we have some technical— specifics on jobs and... we have some technical issues. - specifics on jobs and... we have some technical issues. chris, i specifics on jobs and... we have | some technical issues. chris, can you hear me?— some technical issues. chris, can you hear me?- yes, - some technical issues. chris, can you hear me?- yes, i i some technical issues. chris, can you hear me?- yes, i got i some technical issues. chris, can i you hear me?- yes, i got you. you hear me? hello. yes, i got you. we lost you — you hear me? hello. yes, i got you. we lost you for— you hear me? hello. yes, i got you. we lost you for a _ you hear me? hello. yes, i got you. we lost you for a bit. _ you hear me? hello. yes, i got you. we lost you for a bit. it _ you hear me? hello. yes, i got you. we lost you for a bit. it was - we lost you for a bit. it was breaking up before that. if you do not mind rewinding about one minute and we can pick up on there. let not mind rewinding about one minute and we can pick up on there.- and we can pick up on there. let me rewind. it and we can pick up on there. let me rewind- it was _ and we can pick up on there. let me rewind. it was all _ and we can pick up on there. let me rewind. it was all waffle _ and we can pick up on there. let me rewind. it was all waffle anyway. i and we can pick up on there. let me rewind. it was all waffle anyway. he | rewind. it was all waffle anyway. he did not miss very much. let's hear from the chancellor himself. he has been doing interviews ahead of his speech at ten to 12. here is what he has been saying about the job schemes. he has been saying about the 'ob schemes. �* . . . . he has been saying about the 'ob schemes. �* , , , , ., he has been saying about the 'ob schemes. �* , ,, , ., ., , schemes. businesses are advertising for 'ob schemes. businesses are advertising forjob vacancies- — schemes. businesses are advertising forjob vacancies. they _ schemes. businesses are advertising forjob vacancies. they are _ schemes. businesses are advertising forjob vacancies. they are not i forjob vacancies. they are not getting people into thejobs, are they? getting people into the “obs, are the ? ., ,, getting people into the “obs, are the? ., ., they? encouraged by some of the thins they? encouraged by some of the thin . s we they? encouraged by some of the things we put _ they? encouraged by some of the things we put in _
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they? encouraged by some of the things we put in place, _ they? encouraged by some of the things we put in place, likely i things we put in place, likely separate _ things we put in place, likely separate deduction. businesses are creating _ separate deduction. businesses are creating record numbers ofjobs. we are doing _ creating record numbers ofjobs. we are doing our bit to support those businesses. for example, with apprenticeships, we are giving businesses £3000 to take on any apprentice, give them the skills and the opportunities they need. we have extended _ the opportunities they need. we have extended those incentives today. kick-start — extended those incentives today. kick—start is a scheme where we fully— kick—start is a scheme where we fully fund — kick—start is a scheme where we fully fund the business by taking on the young _ fully fund the business by taking on the young person. we are working well with— the young person. we are working well with business to get people into well—paid work. in well with business to get people into well-paid work.— well with business to get people into well-paid work. in the spirit of keeping _ into well-paid work. in the spirit of keeping my — into well-paid work. in the spirit of keeping my answer— into well-paid work. in the spirit of keeping my answer is - into well-paid work. in the spirit of keeping my answer is short, i into well-paid work. in the spirit i of keeping my answer is short, let's talk about tax. that is i was essential for chancellors. we are not going to get any bigger policy around tax. conservatives here are falling over themselves to call themselves a low tax party, atjust themselves a low tax party, atjust the time national insurance is going up the time national insurance is going up and corporation tax is going up. on national insurance, what is a 0n national insurance, what is a justification for that? it will be bumped up to pay for social care in england.
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there is no way to raise £12 billion without _ there is no way to raise £12 billion without looking at our big tax lever~ — without looking at our big tax lever~ if— without looking at our big tax lever. if you agree we need to invest— lever. if you agree we need to invest more, there are not many ways to do— invest more, there are not many ways to do it _ invest more, there are not many ways to do it all— invest more, there are not many ways to do it. all the commentary, the institute — to do it. all the commentary, the institute of— to do it. all the commentary, the institute of fiscal studies are independent people, or the resolution foundation, a think tank, i'll resolution foundation, a think tank, i'll describe — resolution foundation, a think tank, i'll describe the tax rise as progressive. the top 10%, 15% of taxpayers — progressive. the top 10%, 15% of taxpayers will pay almost half of the bill — taxpayers will pay almost half of the bill. �* taxpayers will pay almost half of the bill. . ., ._ taxpayers will pay almost half of the bill. . . ., , ,, ., «e the bill. and away from rishi sunak, larae the bill. and away from rishi sunak, [an e frost the bill. and away from rishi sunak, large frost has _ the bill. and away from rishi sunak, large frost has been _ the bill. and away from rishi sunak, large frost has been speaking - the bill. and away from rishi sunak, large frost has been speaking about| large frost has been speaking about the tricky northern ireland protocol. what has he been seeing. —— lord frost. he will be talking about the northern ireland protocol. the compromise reached to make sure a brexit deal could happen. northern ireland remains any closer economic relationship with the eu than the rest of the uk. net result of which
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is there is a border in the irish sea, irritating for those of a unionist background and makes trade much more tricky. the government has tried to come to a further arrangement with the eu. lord frost saying he is willing to trigger article 16 of the brexit deal, suspending the protocol, allowing the uk to behave as it sees fit. the government says the conditions have been met but are not yet doing it. lord frost is restating what he said before. he thinks keeping the pressure up on the eu. the eu made the argument, you signed up to this deal, live with it. here is lord frost. i urge the eu to be ambitious- _ is lord frost. i urge the eu to be ambitious. we _ is lord frost. i urge the eu to be ambitious. we need _ is lord frost. i urge the eu to be ambitious. we need significant l ambitious. we need significant change — ambitious. we need significant change. if we can agree something better, _ change. if we can agree something better, as — change. if we can agree something better, as i — change. if we can agree something better, as i would like us to do, we can get— better, as i would like us to do, we can get back— better, as i would like us to do, we can get back to where we wanted to be, an— can get back to where we wanted to be, an independent britain, with
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friendly— be, an independent britain, with friendly relations with the eu, based — friendly relations with the eu, based on _ friendly relations with the eu, based on free trade. we cannot wait forever~ _ based on free trade. we cannot wait forever. without an agreed solution sooni _ forever. without an agreed solution soon. we _ forever. without an agreed solution soon, we will need to act using the article _ soon, we will need to act using the article 16— soon, we will need to act using the article 16 safeguard mechanism to address— article 16 safeguard mechanism to address the impact the protocol is having _ address the impact the protocol is having in— address the impact the protocol is having in northern ireland. the very essence therefore _ having in northern ireland. the very essence therefore of _ having in northern ireland. the very essence therefore of an _ having in northern ireland. the very essence therefore of an unresolved | essence therefore of an unresolved issue. we have not heard the end of this. ? issue. we have not heard the end of this.? around brexit and the northern ireland protocol. a sense of defiance they are from lord frost and the eu saying back exactly what it has always said. the and the eu saying back exactly what it has always said.— it has always said. the lo “am remains. i it has always said. the lo “am remains. yet fl it has always said. the lo “am remains, yet to i it has always said. the lo “am remains, yet to be i it has always said. the logjam remains, yet to be resolved. l it has always said. the logjam i remains, yet to be resolved. thank you, chris. thank sorry about the technical problem but we got through it. and we'll bring you the chancellor's speech in full on the bbc news channel, that's at 11:50 this morning. the military will begin delivering fuel supplies to forecourts hit by the petrol crisis today. the government insists the situation at the pumps
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is easing but troops will be deployed across london and the south east, where the worst shortages remain, as charlotte gallagher reports. after more than a week of scenes like this, the military is being drafted in. troops here training for their next deployment — delivering to petrol stations across the uk. 200 servicemen and women are being called on. more than half will be focused in london and the south—east of england, where fuel stocks are at their lowest. borisjohnson says the measure is a precaution, but retailers say there are still severe shortages in some parts of the country. in the south—east, it was worse than we'd expected. and over 20% of sites were dry. this is really continuing to be a serious crisis for the 25 million or so people living in london and the home counties. as well as the military, up to 300 foreign tanker drivers will be allowed into the uk immediately — several weeks before the wider visa
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scheme comes into effect. this isn'tjust about petrol stations and panic—buying fuel — the shortage of hgv and tanker drivers could impact other essential services and products, with borisjohnson refusing to rule out supply chain problems continuing until christmas. temporary working permits are also being offered to more than ii,500 food haulage drivers who could deliver to supermarkets. another 5,500 will be given to foreign poultry workers. the uk government are obviously keen to avoid more chaotic scenes, and negative headlines. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. changes to the traffic light system for international travel come into force today. the amber and green lists will be merged into a single "rest of the world" category while the red list will remain. travellers who are fully vaccinated and returning from a country not
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on the red list, will no longer need a pre—departure test. our business correspondent katy austin has more. since international travel started to open up again we've got used to a traffic light system of rules. today it's changing. there will still be a red list of countries, meaning passengers must pay to quarantine in a government—approved hotel when they return to the uk, but from today there are no green and amber lists. fully vaccinated passengers returning from more than 15 non—red—list countries no longer have to take a covid test before setting off for the uk. they don't have to self—isolate or take a test on day eight after arriving, either. for now, everyone except under—fives must still pay for a pcr test two days after they arrive. people who haven't been jabbed still have to take a test before travelling to the uk. when they get here they must self—isolate for ten days and take the day—two and day—eight tests. the travel industry have complained the old testing regime
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was deterring passengers. as the pandemic has continued, it's been another extremely turbulent year for global aviation. willie walsh leads the international air transport association, a trade body for airlines. i think this is a big positive development, particularly for families who will now be able to avoid the cost associated with testing. we need to do more. you know, the requirement to do a test after arrival — particularly a pcr test, and they will change that to a rapid antigen — but i don't understand why they are waiting for some time to change that. i think the industry could adapt and introduce that change much quicker. but it's going in the right direction. industry group airlines uk said travel would now be easier and cheaper, and next they hope to see more countries come off the red list. katie austin, bbc news. we can talk now to alan french, the chief executive of the travel firm thomas cook. welcome. thank you forjoining us.
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what do you think the impact of these changes will be? i what do you think the impact of these changes will be?- what do you think the impact of these changes will be? i think it is aood these changes will be? i think it is good news — these changes will be? i think it is good news for _ these changes will be? i think it is good news for the _ these changes will be? i think it is good news for the travel - these changes will be? i think it is good news for the travel business | these changes will be? i think it is l good news for the travel business in general, with a travel becoming cheaper and simpler. i think as customers look forward into what their holiday plans are, the october half term which i think it was the last time travellers can get away to experience travel son this year, there will be more options for them. there will be cheaper and simpler. i think as people look towards what they do it next year, and historically the dietary plan that at the end of the year, they will be more confident that if the book a holiday they will be able to travel safely they are and be able to return any transparent way, something we have not been able to do before. ~ ., ., i” something we have not been able to do before. ~ ., ., ,, , . do before. what would you expect four bookings _ do before. what would you expect four bookings for _ do before. what would you expect four bookings for the _ do before. what would you expect four bookings for the october - do before. what would you expect four bookings for the october half| four bookings for the october half term? what has been the pattern when
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restrictions have eased before? in the last three weeks when the government announced, the bookings almost triple as families look to take advantage of the changing rules. with the remote running around there will be more destinations they can travel to, suspicion that will be announced on thursday, i think their choices will increase yet again for the october half term and the deals will get better. , ., ., ., ., better. there is no guarantee though that the rules — better. there is no guarantee though that the rules want _ better. there is no guarantee though that the rules want change _ better. there is no guarantee though that the rules want change again - better. there is no guarantee though that the rules want change again to l that the rules want change again to become more restrictive. is that something that you think might weigh on people when they make their choices? i on people when they make their choices? . ., , ~ ., , ., choices? i certainly think that is a consideration. _ choices? i certainly think that is a consideration. the _ choices? i certainly think that is a consideration. the direction - choices? i certainly think that is a consideration. the direction of. consideration. the direction of travel we are going in, nearly three weeks ago we had the announcement as to when the traffic light system would be simplified, that has happened today. later this week, we are expecting an announcement. i think all of these will add
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confidence to the consumer that they can book their holidays, confident they can take place and they can come back. i think it is also good to see that the uk is starting to coordinate activity with other destinations so that we are notjust talking about what the rules are for going out, the reels are likely to be in destination. find going out, the reels are likely to be in destination.— be in destination. and that is obviously _ be in destination. and that is obviously something - be in destination. and that is obviously something people | be in destination. and that is - obviously something people have to bearin obviously something people have to bear in mind. it is potentially a complicated picture for travel. it is, but now with the nhs app, they can prove they were vaccinated here, across europe it is widely accepted. that is helpful in making it easier for people to go on holiday and i think as people have been on holiday and told these stories as they return, there is more confidence that people will travel. if. return, there is more confidence that people will travel.— that people will travel. is there an art that people will travel. is there any part of _ that people will travel. is there any part of you _ that people will travel. is there any part of you that _ that people will travel. is there any part of you that is - that people will travel. is there l any part of you that is concerned that these restrictions are easing at a time when covid has not gone
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away and we could see a greater number of cases, which could take us back to where we wear with all the restrictions. back to where we wear with all the restrietions-_ restrictions. certainly, there is a risk of that- _ restrictions. certainly, there is a risk of that. it _ restrictions. certainly, there is a risk of that. it doesn't _ restrictions. certainly, there is a risk of that. it doesn't look - restrictions. certainly, there is a risk of that. it doesn't look like l risk of that. it doesn't look like with the vaccination programme and is excess of that, mortality rate dropping and other indications coming through that, for instance, children and school age children are getting vaccinated, there is a lot of activity in place to try and keep that risk to a minimum.— of activity in place to try and keep that risk to a minimum. thank you very much — that risk to a minimum. thank you very much for— that risk to a minimum. thank you very much forjoining _ that risk to a minimum. thank you very much forjoining us, - that risk to a minimum. thank you very much forjoining us, ceo - that risk to a minimum. thank you very much forjoining us, ceo of i very much forjoining us, ceo of thomas cook. the headlines on bbc news... amid pressure on the government over living standards, the chancellor prepares to speak at the conservative party conference — he'll commit five hundred million pounds to renew job support programmes. leaked financial documents reveal how a conservative party donor — who contributed to borisjohnson's leadership campaign — was involved in one of europe's
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biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. and as fuel supply issues persist — particularly in the south east of england — the military start delivering to petrol stations. a metropolitan police officer will appear before magistrates today charged with rape. david carrick — who is 46 and from stevenage in hertfordshire — is accused of attacking a woman in september of last year. he'll appear at court via video link. the secret dealings of hundreds of world leaders, politicians and billionaires have been exposed in one of the biggest investigations of leaked offshore documents in history. the files — dubbed �*the pandora papers' — reveal that tony and cherie blair didn't have to pay more than £300,000 of stamp duty on a £6 million house because it was sold to them through an anonymous offshore company. and they reveal how a prominent donor to the conservative party
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was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. andy verity reports. the offshore dealings of presidents, prime ministers and royalty are revealed in almost 12 million files obtained by the international consortium of investigativejournalists. they reveal the secrets of world leaders, from the king ofjordan to vladimir putin, to tony blair. before he came to power, the then labour leader attacked the offshore system that allowed wealthy people to to gain tax advantages unavailable to most of us. millionaires with the right accountant pay nothing, whilst pensioners pay vat on fuel. offshore trusts get tax relief while homeowners pay vat on insurance premiums. we will create a tax system that is fair, which is related to ability to pay. years later, in 2017, tony and cherie blair bought this townhouse in central london for £6.45 million.
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but rather than buy the house as you or i would, they bought the offshore company that owned it, saving more than £300,000 in stamp duty. that doesn't look great, and it partly doesn't look great because most people cannot do the same thing, and so even if what the blairs did was perfectly legal, perfectly legitimate in the business world, it feels instinctively really unfair because they got access to an advantage — a potential advantage — that the rest of us don't have. cherie blair told the bbc they didn't request to structure the transaction this way, and that after purchase they had brought the property under uk tax and regulatory rules. a spokesman added the couple will be liable for tax on capital gains on resale. the files also reveal how a prominent tory donor who supported borisjohnson's leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals.
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the campaign is over and the work begins. thank you all very much. applause. a well—connected corporate lawyer, mohamed amersi has given £525,000 to the conservative party since 2018. here he is talking about corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life. but leaked documents show mr amersi was at the centre of a corruption scandal. he worked as a consultant to a swedish telecoms company, telia, helping it to expand its business in central asia. but an internal telia report describes the activities of a consultant referred to as mr xy, who was paid more than $65 million. the payments included expenses for lavish corporate entertainment, usually between $100,000 and $200,000 a month, that were not evidenced by receipts. it recommended that
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telia's relationship with mr xy be terminated. former telia executive michaela ahlberg, who was brought in to clean up the company, told panorama that mr amersi was the consultant referred to in the report. it is important that people around him that trust him, that listen to him, understand the whole context of his career and wealth. he has been involved closely in one of the biggest corruption scandals that we have seen in sweden in modern times. mr amersi's lawyer said it's entirely false to suggest his contract was terminated, and that his fees and expenses were entirely in keeping with industry practice. andy verity, bbc news. i see that story today. all i can say on that point is all these
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donations are vetted in the normal way, in accordance with rules that are set out by the labour government. panorama's richard bilton says the size and scale of the revelations in the papers is staggering. 12 million files isjust an enormous amount. 600 journalists around the world, bbc panorama and the guardian here in the uk, looking at these stories. i have done a few of these leaks now and what marks this one out is the big names that are in there. 35 current or past leaders, 300 senior state officials. so if you look for example at andrej babis, the prime minister in the czech republic, he is standing for election this week. he bought two villas in the south of france. he used a complicated offshore structure to buy them and did not tell parliament. if you look at the
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path of those leaks, things have changed. you now have to come off know their customers, they did not need to know that ten years ago and some overseas territories are trying to draw up registries. what comes out of the data as there are still areas that offshore companies use, the evolve. offshore companies own property here in the uk, what you see in the week is the way offshore helps the very wealthy hide their wealth. —— what you see in the league. you can read more about today's expose on the bbc news app or on our website. over the coming days, we will also be bringing you more revelations from the pandora papers including the financial dealings of three major donors to the conservatives. north korea has restored communication hotlines with south korea — at the same time as urging seoul to step up efforts to improve ties. pyongyang cut off the lines in early august — just days after reopening them for the first time in a year — in protest againstjoint military exercises involving south korea and the united states. laura bicker is following
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events from seoul. these hotlines are on and off again. they were switched on just briefly in august as a gesture of goodwill according to a state media release, and then they were cut off again when south korea took part in those joint military exercises. today at 9am local time, communication between north and south korea was once again restored. there are many of these hotlines that include fax lines and they go between various different departments. the point of them is to avoid rising tension and accidental clashes between the military and there are two calls, one in the morning and one at night, but they have not been happening regularly for over a year. in the state media release which was put out today from north korea it quotes them saying this is a gesture
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towards durable peace but he has also said that he wants to see active changes towards inter—korean policies. this is something we are looking at here and that is because this is an auspicious date when it comes to inter—korean relations. in 2007 an historic agreement was signed to work towards peace, economic and military cooperation. it could be that by restoring the hotlines today kim jong—un is dangling the prospect of inter—korean talks at a special time because here in south korea we are going towards a presidential election. there will be a new leader come march and kim jong—un cannot guarantee that the new leader of south korea will be as happy to talk to him as the current one. it's exactly four weeks until world leaders will gather in glasgow for crucial talks on how to manage the climate crisis.
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our climate editor, justin rowlatt, is in hull for us this morning looking at the role wind power could have in our move towards renewable energy. i am in what i consider an absolutely fabulous location. i'm at an offshore wind factory, as you see in hull, in east yorkshire. just take a look at the scale of what they are doing here. huge turbine blades are lined up by the humber estuary here. look at those huge turbine columns there. absolutely enormous. this is a wonderful place to be. being the bbc�*s climate editor can be, genuinely, depressing. every morning i go into my inbox and it is bulging with e—mails about environmental devastation. so coming to a place like this is really exciting because this is at the epicentre of a new industrial revolution, an industrial revolution designed to tackle the main project of the 21st century,
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humanity's effort to move away from fossil fuels. this is all about making low carbon energy. i have been right out, 120 kilometres out, the north sea is over there, 75 miles away to see what it takes to maintain, to keep the blades of these turbines turing in the north sea, delivering clean, green energy to british homes. it's actually much smoother than it looks. 0h! if you thought your commute to work was rough going, check this out. we're with a team trying to get out to service a wind turbine. so, the north sea is famous for its savage weather. but that's why they put the wind turbines out here, because this is where the wind is. but of course, it means they are very hard — whoa — to maintain. whoa!
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the swell is up to three metres high today, making it too dangerous to climb the ladder. so it's back to the ship for us. this is where the team of engineers who keep the blades turning live and work. coming through. these guys do 12—hour shifts out here, for 1h straight days, and then get two weeks off. it can be tough but the flourishing offshore wind industry is creating thousands of well—paid skilled jobs — most of them in places like grimsby, that have seen traditional industries decline. my grandad went to sea when he was 1a, as a cabin boy. for seafaring families like mine, offshore wind has really given more options. 80% of our workforce in the east coast come from within an hour of our operational hub. so it's really opened up a world of opportunities that, for seafaring families like mine, really didn't exist 15 years ago.
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and it is comfortable on the ship. so let me take you on a little tour. right, so, this is my cabin. pretty cushty, hey? come and have a look at this. so this is the lounge. sorry, lads. and this — this is the dining area. and let me tell you, the food is really good. let's see what's on the menu. jill, jill? hi. what's for tea? today is fish, chips and mushy peas, and we've got pork chops with chasseur sauce. bread—and—butter pudding and custard. oh, my god, sounds good, doesn't it? and you can work all that off down here. a day later, and the sea is calmer.
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this time we do get to the ladder. it's quite a climb and this is just to the bottom of the thing. but there's bad news. so we've managed to get onto the turbine, but the crane isn't working, which means we can't get our gear up off the boat, which means we can't go up the turbine. but i can give you a sense of this — look at this. just how huge these wind turbines are. these monsters are almost 200 metres high, and each turn of the blades is reckoned to generate enough electricity to power an average uk home for a day. it's nice to know that your time and your energy is contributing to this world running on green energy, which will be a better future for everybody. and it's growing up in the north—east in your hometown. yeah, we're really lucky to have it on our doorstep, i don't take that for granted at all. we got up as far as the platform but we couldn't go any further
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because of the broken crane. what does that tell you about the challenges you face in your daily work? just that you've got to remain open and ready for whatever could arise. i think being adaptable just in general is a good thing, yeah, because life's always full of surprises. as we head back, we get a fantastic view. 0rsted say this one wind farm can power up to a million homes and they have almost finished another even bigger one next to it. and there are plans for many more around the country. what's more, the wind revolution isn'tjust happening here in the uk — it's starting to take off all around the world. justin rowlatt reporting. scientists who discovered how our bodies feel the warmth of the sun or the hug of a loved one have been awarded the nobel prize for medicine. they
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shared the prize for their work on sensing touch and temperature. they unpicked how our bodies convert physical sensations into electrical messages in the nervous system. their findings could lead to new ways of treating pain. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. for many of us, the forecast is one of sunshine and cloud. the breeze will blow the showers in from the west, pushing them towards the east, and some will be heavy and thundery. in between we should see a little bit of sunshine with ties between 12 and 17 degrees north to south. through this evening and overnight, this next batch of rain moves in from the south—west, pushing north and east, the bright colours telling you there will be torrential downpours across parts of southern and eastern england, as much as 30410 millimetres of rain, and squally winds. whereas for
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scotland and northern ireland, something drier and cooler. it does mean for scotland and northern ireland, a lot of dry weather, whereas we continue with the rain across england and wales, brisk winds, torrential downpours across the north and highs up to 15. hello. this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines:
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amid pressure on the government over living standards, the chancellor prepares to speak at the conservative party conference. he will commit £500 million to renew job support programmes. new travel rules come into force in the uk, with the traffic light system replaced by a single red list. as a fuel supply issues persist, particularly in the south—east of england, the military start delivering to petrol stations. leaked financial documents reveal how a conservative party donor who contributed to borisjohnson's leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. and four weeks before world leaders meet in glasgow for talks on the climate crisis, we look at the role wind power could have in the move towards renewable energy. sport, and for a full round—up, let's go to the bbc sport centre.
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good morning. a decision on whether england will go ahead with this winter's ashes tour in australia will be made this week, the ecb have anoucned. england players were presented with the proposed conditions for the tour on sunday. there have been concerns over whether their families can travel with them, quarantine arrangements and any potential bubble they may have to live in. australia has some of the strictest covid—19 protocols in the world, a situation complicated by the fact its different states have their own regulations. the first test is due to begin on 8 december. claudio ranieri has arrived at watford. he is there to discuss becoming their new manager. they sacked xisco munoz afterjust ten months. watford have won two of their opening seven premier league games and sit in 15th. ranieri is understood to be the owners first choice — he of course won the premier league with leicester city in 2016.
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but the 69—year—old was sacked the following season, and has since had short spells with nantes, fulham, roma and sampdoria. what a game we had in the premier league yesterday as manchester city twice came from behind to grab a dramatic draw at anfield. it looks like this brilliant run from mo salah might have won the game. but inside the final ten minutes, this deflected shot from kevin de bruyne kept the honours even and kept chelsea at the top ot the table. kind of lucky in the first half. i was really happy that we had half—time. the second half was the game we wanted to see, the game everybody wanted to see. the beauty of football, both teams really going for it, nobody gave up, bam, bam, bam. we should have scored a third. i love the premier league. so congratulations liverpool and, of course, my players, and all of the staff, backroom staff. that is why these both teams are always fighting to win the premier league. what a game, ups and downs, highs and lows.
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a happy pep guardiola there. so, from salah to son. he was the tormentor in chief for spurs as they put a difficult few weeks behind them. he had a hand in theirfirst and then did all the hard work for their second, forcing aston villa to put the ball into their own net. 2—1 it finished, a much needed win after three league defeats in a row for spurs. leicester's sticky spell continues. they were two up against crystal palace, but gave away their lead. michael olise first. and thenjeff schlupp, who'd only been on the pitch for 48 seconds, with the equaliser. brentford are loving life in the premier league. a 94th minute winner over west ham from yoane wissa sees them move up to seventh. cameron norrie's brilliant run at the san diego open ended in last night's final. the british number two was beaten by casper ruud, who'd earlier knocked out andy murray. he went down 6—0 in the first before losing the second 6—2 to the second seed.
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and finally, how about dealing with these conditions on your ride into work? this was the men's paris roubaix race yesterday — one of cycling's oldest bike races, the perils of racing on the old cobblestones laid bare. the riders absolutely covered from head to toe in mud. it was won in the end by sonny colbrelli, who mastered the route from northern paris to the belgian border. i suppose it is always nice to finish in the velodrome away from all the mud! that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. throughout october as part of our coverage of black history month, we are going to feature people who feature on bbc radio 1xtra's future list. swimmer alice dearing, co—founder of the black swimming association which she founded in
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2020, joins us now. what does making black history now mean to you? to me, it black history now mean to you? if? me, it means inspiring people to do something which they wouldn't otherwise normally want to do. swimming is a great example of that. i have spoken to a lot of black people in the last few years who feel that it isn't something for them, and a whole load of issues that this has stemmed from, but we have arrived at a place where a lot of black people don't swim regularly, and it is giving them those opportunities to learn to swim and can you tell me more about the perceived barriers for black people to swim? , , ., , , to swim? yes, there is load of stuff like the stereotypical—
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to swim? yes, there is load of stuff like the stereotypical ideas, - to swim? yes, there is load of stuff like the stereotypical ideas, that i like the stereotypical ideas, that we are too dense to float, our bones are too dense, these quite racist stereotypes of ideas, and it leads to a lot of black people not learning to swim or thinking the best form of water safety is to stay away from water. and we want to help turn this around and help people realise that swimming is for them and their family.— and their family. where are you havin: to and their family. where are you having to change _ and their family. where are you having to change minds? - and their family. where are you having to change minds? is - and their family. where are you having to change minds? is at l and their family. where are you j having to change minds? is at a perception people have of themselves, or a perception that others have that is a barrier as well? ., , ., , others have that is a barrier as well? . , . , , ., , well? that is a deep question, but i think it is a — well? that is a deep question, but i think it is a bit — well? that is a deep question, but i think it is a bit of _ well? that is a deep question, but i think it is a bit of both, _ well? that is a deep question, but i think it is a bit of both, to - well? that is a deep question, but i think it is a bit of both, to be - think it is a bit of both, to be honest. i'm not going to lie, there are comments which you see on articles in the media where people say, tragic events have happened,
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and people say, what you expect, they are black, they can't swim, and thatis they are black, they can't swim, and that is the wrong mindset to have towards swimming. the water doesn't discriminate, the water doesn't know what your skin colour is, and i reallyjust what your skin colour is, and i really just want to know that —— i want people to know that everybody can swim, and it is so important, it isa can swim, and it is so important, it is a life—saving skill, and you never know when you might need it. when you do it is important to be able to have it at your fingertips. and it is a joy to get into the water in the right circumstances. so you have an audience watching at home. convince people to learn to swim. ,, , . , , swim. swimming is incredible. it is the reason — swim. swimming is incredible. it is the reason i _ swim. swimming is incredible. it is the reason i am _ swim. swimming is incredible. it is the reason i am on _ swim. swimming is incredible. it is the reason i am on the _ swim. swimming is incredible. it is the reason i am on the future - the reason i am on the future figures in the first place. i have got to travel the world from it. i have met the most amazing people on
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the way. i'm operating at the part of it being a career, even if it is just so that you can go in the pool on holiday, go to the beach and feel comfortable in the water. learning to surf. ijust comfortable in the water. learning to surf. i just want everybody to know that you can do it, and there are people there who can help guide you towards a pool, or if not, go out, ask questions, check online, there will be lessons you can do for all ages and i really hope that you want to take it up. find all ages and i really hope that you want to take it up.— all ages and i really hope that you want to take it up. and a question then about _ want to take it up. and a question then about you. _ want to take it up. and a question then about you. what _ want to take it up. and a question then about you. what does - want to take it up. and a question then about you. what does it - want to take it up. and a question | then about you. what does it mean want to take it up. and a question - then about you. what does it mean to be on this list, and where are you right now in your own personal development on what you want to achieve? , , , , achieve? yes, this list is incredible. _ achieve? yes, this list is incredible. i _ achieve? yes, this list is incredible. i didn't - achieve? yes, this list is| incredible. i didn't realise achieve? yes, this list is - incredible. i didn't realise there were so many amazing people on it. i really honoured to be included, and to celebrate black talent and black
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success in black history month is just incredible, and i'm really grateful. i came off the back of quite a disappointing games in tokyo, so ijust want quite a disappointing games in tokyo, so i just want to quite a disappointing games in tokyo, so ijust want to keep pushing through, and hopefully keep inspiring people along the way. i’m inspiring people along the way. i'm absolutely sure that you are doing that. alice, thank you so much for joining us, and congratulations. thank you for having me. the chancellor rishi sunak will set out his plan to spend half a billion pounds on helping more people into work when he addresses the conservative party conference shortly. it comes as the government cuts the universal credit payment by 20 pounds a week ending a temporary uplift introduced at the start of the pandemic. our correspondent zoe conway reports. at the thomas a becket church in ramsay, you'll find a harvest of kindness and compassion. they are concerned here that the families they feed
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are going to be even more in need this winter as fuel bills are set to rise, and the universal credit uplift comes to an end. it's about human beings, families that can't afford to pay their energy bills, they turn the heating off, their kids get chest infections. when parents are working double shifts, their children don't see them, they don't see each other and families start to disintegrate with all the horrible things that happen then. it's about people, and, yeah, i'm worried. coming in from the cold are dave and charlotte. dave works six days a week as a floor fitter. paid the minimum wage, he relies on universal credit to provide for his family. from this week, they'll lose the £20 per week universal credit uplift. it doesn't sound like a lot, but it is to a family. like, it helps buy the nappies for the children, milk, fruit, it helps spread the money. so it's going to be a big
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loss, £80 per month. what do you say to the argument that the countryjust can't afford this £20 uplift? it's costing taxpayers £6 billion. i'm torn, really, because obviously i work, i pay tax and stuff like that. but... and we do pay a lot of people out as well. so it's... i'm torn between both sides. charlotte is a care worker. she says she's looked into going back to work, but it's the cost of childcare that's holding her back. people in receipt of universal credit do get government help with paying for childcare, but for this family it still doesn't add up. there are a lot of staff shortages in the country at the moment. wages are having to go up to attract staff. couldn't you get a better—paid job? i could, but living in such a rural town with no transport and me personally not driving myself, i can't go further afield to find a betterjob.
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in nearby peterborough, you'll discover that the quietest part of the city is where the recruitment agencies are. their windows might be crammed full of adverts forjobs in local factories and warehouses, but there's not exactly a queue here to apply for them. could the end of the universal credit uplift give people an incentive to re—enter the workforce and fill these vacancies? that's certainly the view of the leader of the council and head of the local conservative association. finances, for many, are at critical. but there are other ways that you can go and generate some money for yourfamily. i think i would be one of the first to say here that families should take responsibility for themselves, the way they live their lives, how many children they have. what they do with their cash, whatjobs they have. and there is a wealth ofjobs available here in peterborough. i could take you to any restaurant,
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cafe or bar, just a stone's throw from where we're standing now, they are really desperate for people. nowhere is the staffing shortage more desperate than here at the light box cafe. customers are greeted with this warning. the owner has tried to fill the gaps by asking her staff to work more hours. we have had lots of staff that have been on universal credit, and would dearly love to take on more hours, but feel that the advantages that they would get in the pay that they would receive from us are outweighed by what they would lose in terms of their universal credit. many people on universal credit are subject to what's known as a taper. it means that for every extra pound they earn 63p is taken away. it's this taper, plus the issue of childcare, which eve says is proving insurmountable for some of her staff. could ending the uplift give people an extra
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incentive to up their hours? i don't think that it will. i think that the barriers will still be there. for the money, again, that people will be potentially losing, the incentive to come back to work is still not enough. so i think that the people that are losing that money willjust be worse off. the government says that further help is at hand for families in need. hardship grants of £500 will be available from local councils to help people through the winter. zoe conway, bbc news. the prime minister has been speaking to journalists this morning about the economy ahead of rishi sunak�*s speech at the conservative party conference. borisjohnson sought to address people's fears about the squeeze on the cost of living. i think what you are seeing in the uk at the moment and over the last year
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or so, you've seen for the first time in more than a decade you're seeing increases in wages, which is what we wanted to see, and when you talk about some of the supply chain issues, that is really a function of the world economy, particularly the uk economy coming back to life after covid, sucking in gas in particular, massive demand for that in asia, there is a shortage of lorry drivers around the world from poland to the united states, even in china they are short of lorry drivers. and what we want to see is a high wage, high skill economy where we invest in people, invest in fantastic infrastructure like this behind me, and drive high productivity growth. that is the model we should be going for. but that is the model we should be going for. �* . , ., that is the model we should be going for. �* . i. ., that is the model we should be going for. �* ., y., ., ., for. but are you worried about the ain? a for. but are you worried about the pain? a 90 _ for. but are you worried about the pain? a 90 really _ for. but are you worried about the pain? a 90 really blaming - for. but are you worried about the l pain? a 90 really blaming business for all of this? i pain? a 90 really blaming business for all of this?— for all of this? i think that what we are seeing _ for all of this? i think that what we are seeing is _ for all of this? i think that what we are seeing is the _ for all of this? i think that what we are seeing is the recovery i for all of this? i think that what | we are seeing is the recovery of for all of this? i think that what - we are seeing is the recovery of the economy, we've now got the
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fastest—growing economy in the g7, and i think that you have got unemployment way lower then people forecast, jobs being created the whole time, and what we want to see our high wage, high skilljobs, and i think businesses are doing a fantasticjob of now investing in apprentices, investing in skills, and that is the way to go for the uk. things like the road haulage industry, the thing to do is make thejob more industry, the thing to do is make the job more attractive, industry, the thing to do is make thejob more attractive, invest industry, the thing to do is make the job more attractive, invest in the job more attractive, invest in the truck stops, and invest in higher wages as well. if the truck stops, and invest in higher wages as well.- higher wages as well. if all electricity _ higher wages as well. if all electricity is _ higher wages as well. if all electricity is going - higher wages as well. if all electricity is going to - higher wages as well. if all electricity is going to come from renewables by 2035, does that mean you are saying there will be no new coal and no new oil and gas from now? ~ . �* coal and no new oil and gas from now? . �* , ., now? what i'm saying is we can do for our entire _ now? what i'm saying is we can do for our entire energy _ now? what i'm saying is we can do for our entire energy production i now? what i'm saying is we can do for our entire energy production by 2035 what we are doing with internal combustion engine vehicles by 2030, so from 2030, you won't be able to
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buy any more new hydrocarbon fuelled internal combustion engine car, and we are going to move either to electric vehicles or vehicles powered by hydrogen or clean power of one kind or another. and that will make a huge difference to our c02 will make a huge difference to our co2 output, to controlling climate change, to the planet. but it will also put the uk at the forefront of this amazing new industry of clean vehicles, and what we are also saying is that by 2035, looking at the progress that we're making in wind power where we lead the world now in offshore wind, looking at what we can do with other renewable sources, carbon capture and storage, with hydrogen potentially, we think we can get to complete clean energy production by 2035. the advantage of that, to go back to your earlier question, is that it will mean for the first time, the uk is not
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dependent on hydrocarbons coming from overseas with all the vagaries in hydrocarbon prices and the risk that poses for people's pockets and for the consumer. we will be reliant on our own clean power generation which will help us also to keep costs down. which will help us also to keep costs down-— which will help us also to keep costs down. 1, _., , a costs down. boris johnson picking this morning- _ let's go to manchester and the conservative party conference where the chancellor rishi sunak is due to deliver his speech shortly. the hall is packed as delegates wait to hear from the chancellor, due to speak any moment. and while we wait for to appear, i can't hear the music, but i'm told that is bruno mars. listening to bruno mars while they wait to hear from the chancellor. our political correspondent chris mason is there.
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i was thrown momentarily by the thought of bruno martin rishi sunak at what is going on there. i don't know how they pick the music. while they wait to hear from him, know how they pick the music. while they wait to hearfrom him, tell us about what you are expecting. you miiht about what you are expecting. you might prefer— about what you are expecting. you might prefer to — about what you are expecting. wm. might prefer to listen to bruno mars! i will fill the gap he doesn't while we wait for the chancellor. it is going to happen any moment now, the prime minister has just walked past, he has got rid of his orange fluorescent jacket and past, he has got rid of his orange fluorescentjacket and is heading into the hall, as is the thing when the chancellor gives his conference speech, traditionally one of the set piece events of a conservative governing party conference hearing from the chancellor. i don't think we are going to get very much, i don't think anything sparkling new or anything that is a big shift of one of the big levers at a chancellor's control, income tax or anything like that. instead it will be picking up the baton of the conversation you are having a few moments ago around the economic context at the moment at the furloughs scheme coming to an end, the end of the uplift to universal
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credit, that additional £20 a week offered to recipients of universal credit in the pandemic. i think we will hear quite a bit from the chancellor about additional support for people to get into jobs and stay injobs, particularly younger for people to get into jobs and stay in jobs, particularly younger people but also the over 50s. i think we will also get a bit of rishi sunak doing the, this is who i am thing. he has only been chancellor for 18 months, and what in 18 months. within weeks of getting the job, he was having to splurge vast quantities of taxpayers money on the fellow scheme and other such schemes. i think what we will get him saying is, that was an emergency, in his view he was reacting pragmatically to that emergency, but he will make the case that he is a traditional conservative and wants to be fiscally responsible, that his instincts are for low tax and careful spending of taxpayers money and that can motivate the decision. and while that is his political philosophy, it is an insight of how things get hard of him politically.
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a lot of activists like rishi sunak, but it's quite easy to be a lot of activists like rishi sunak, but it's quite easy to he liked by the party faithful and the broader electorate when you are splurging lots of money, a little tougher when you are having to make much tougher decisions, the likes of which are likely to come. i think what we are going to get in the next moment or two, i think the gentlemen we are hearing from now is a recipient of kick—start support, this is one of the job scheme is that the chancellor launched during the pandemic that is being extended, it is where the taxpayer picks up the bill for six months of a young employee's wages, meaning that the company doesn't have to shoulder that burden, in the hope that over the six months they develop the necessary skill to be taken on as a full—time employee afterwards, so i think within a few minutes we will have the chancellor doing his thing. we think he is going to speak for around half—an—hour, and i think it will be a mix of the personal, the specific around jobs and then the
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broader economic context in which we find ourselves, and we will tease out and see i think the character differences between the prime minister and the chancellor. the chancellor instinctively pretty serious of mind in his public presentations, doesn't go for the kind of rhetorical flourishes that we get from the prime minister, and no doubt an insight into the tough conversations going on within government ahead of a spending review on a budget around the whole business of financing in a post—pandemic era after a huge amount of public spending, and a huge amount of ratcheting up of borrowing and debt as a result, and the beginnings of the difficult decisions to come, we are seeing them around universal credit, for instance, where some of those spending taps have to be eased, which is not an easy thing for a chancellor to do. it is very easy in an emergency to add money to people's benefits, very difficult even when economic conditions improve, to take that money away. so
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after an extraordinary 18 months for the chancellor, his first 18 months in the job, the chancellor, his first 18 months in thejob, in many the chancellor, his first 18 months in the job, in many senses the chancellor, his first 18 months in thejob, in many senses perhaps the more difficult time, less extraordinary but more difficult, is still to come as we emerge out of the economy and those tough decisions tumble towards him. chris, is it fair to say _ decisions tumble towards him. chris, is it fair to say there _ decisions tumble towards him. chris, is it fair to say there is _ decisions tumble towards him. chris, is it fair to say there is a _ decisions tumble towards him. chris, is it fair to say there is a bit - decisions tumble towards him. chris, is it fair to say there is a bit of- is it fair to say there is a bit of a narrative becoming clear that is defining a difference between labour and the tories right now around immigration and jobs and what has paid forjobs in this country? there paid for 'obs in this country? there is, and paid forjobs in this country? there is. and the — paid forjobs in this country? there is, and the argument _ paid forjobs in this country? there is, and the argument being - paid forjobs in this country? ii—urr is, and the argument being made here about the shortages, whether it being petrol stations, abattoir workers, you name it, is there is this is a transition driven by brexit and the desire of people who backed brexit to see a lower level
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of immigration and a higher level of domestic wage rates, but this is an economy in transition and these are the symptoms of that. and i think the symptoms of that. and i think the political calculation the government is making is that they hope that people will say, these are necessary changes that private sector employers need to make, and if they haven't made them up until now, that is their fault not the governments. the big test is going to be in the coming months, depending on how long these bombs continue, is to what extent people blame the haulage industry for not offering better terms and conditions, but not employing more british staff, versus blaming the government because the occupier of number 10 tends to get blamed for a lot of stuff whether they are directly responsible for it or not. that is the political dynamic there. we saw last week sir keir starmer in brighton saying he would be much more liberal in allowing more visas foreign lorry drivers to meet that gap as far as drivers are concerned, about 100,000 at the moment. the government is talking around 5000, so much smaller number, because the
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government makes that argument that we in this economic transition re—period between what they see as a high immigration low wage economy and a lower immigration high wage economy, but in order to mitigate against the worst effects of this current shortage, for instance, among hgv drivers, what has the government done? it has actually use the immigration lever, albeit temporarily and with a low number, so there is a definite difference there and the prime minister is determined to see this current series of economic bumps and inconveniences through that prism of brexit in terms of delivering something that in his view the majority of people actually want to see, even if in the short term that causes inconveniences and difficult headlines for individual industries andindeed headlines for individual industries and indeed for the government. chris, here comes the chancellor.
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applause this thank you. whatever it takes. that phrase and those press conferences where my introduction to so many of you as chancellor. it was daunting to face such a challenge in my first days in office. and what it also meant is that more than one year has gone by before i would have the chance to meet you all properly, and that is why these last few days have been such a joy, meeting you all face—to—face and hearing so many of you say to me, wow, you are even
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shorter in real life. nothing can ever prepare you to become chancellor, especially in recent times. there have been occasions when it really did feel like the world was collapsing. in those moments, there are certain things i fell back on. yes, my family. yes, my colleagues. yes, my tremendous treasury team. and, yes, the person who made all this possible, the person who delivered a thumping conservative majority, my friend, our leader, the country's prime minister, borisjohnson. applause
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but the other thing i fell back on is something we all have in this room, ourvalues. is something we all have in this room, our values. ilililr is something we all have in this room, our values. our conservative values. i believe _ room, our values. our conservative values. i believe in _ room, our values. our conservative values. i believe in some _ values. i believe in some straightforward things. i believe that mindless ideology is dangerous. i am a pragmatist. i care about what works, not about the purity of any dogma. i believe in fiscal responsibility. just borrowing more money and stacking up hills responsibility. just borrowing more money and stacking up bills for future generations to pay is not just economically irresponsible, it is immoral. because it is not the state's money, it is your money. i believe that the only sustainable route out of poverty comes from having a good job. it is notjust
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the power and it puts in your pocket, it is the sense of worth and self confidence it gives you. i will do whatever i can to protect people's livelihoods and create new opportunities, too. and when it comes to those new opportunities, i am very much a child of my time. i spent my formative years of my career working in technology companies in california, and i believe the world is at the beginning of a new age of technological progress, which can bring jobs, wealth and transform lives. so, pragmatism, fiscal responsibility, a belief in work and an unshakeable optimism about the future. this is who i am. this is what i stand for. this is what it will take. and we will do whatever it takes.
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applause and there can be no prosperous future unless it is built on the foundation of strong public finances. i have to be blunt with you, our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt is almost 800% of gdp. we need to fix our public finances. because strong public finances. because strong public finances don't happen by accident, they are a deliberate choice, they are a legacy for future generations and a safeguard against future threats. i am grateful. we should all be grateful to my predecessors and the ten years of the sound conservative management of our economy. they believed in fiscal
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responsibility. i believe in fiscal responsibility. i believe in fiscal responsibility. and everyone in this hall does, too. and whilst i know that tax rises are unpopular, some will even say i'm conservative, i will even say i'm conservative, i will tell you what is not conservative. unfunded pledges, reckless borrowing and soaring debt. anyone who tells you that you can borrow more today and tomorrow will simply sort itself outjust does not care about the future. so, yes, i want tax cuts, but in order to do that our public finances must be put back on a sustainable footing. now, labour's track record on public finances speaks for itself. since 2010, we have had five labour leaders, seven shadow chancellors and innumerable spending pledges. and in all that time, they still
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have not got the message. the british people would trust a party that isn't serious with their money. and that is why they vote conservative. we must never forget that the fundamental economic differences between us and labour run very deep. differences notjust about debt between us and labour run very deep. differences not just about debt and borrowing, but about how to deal with the real pressures people face in their lives. and right now we are facing challenges to supply chains, not just facing challenges to supply chains, notjust here, but right around the world. and we are determined to tackle them head on. but tackling the cost of living isn'tjust a political sound bite. it is one of the central emissions of this
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conservative government. picture this, you are a young family, you work hard, saving a bit each month, but it is tough. you have ambitions for your careers, your children, you want to give them the best, more than you had. now, you tell me, is the answer to their hopes and dreams just to increase their benefits? is the answer to tell that young family the answer to tell that young family the economic system is rigged against you and the only way you stand a chance is to lean ever more on the state? be in no doubt, that is the essence of the labour answer. and not only is labour's approach not work in practice, it is a desperately sad vision for our future. but there is an alternative. an approach focused on good work, better skills, and higher wages. an approach that says, yes, we believe
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in you. we will help you and you will succeed. and better still, it is more than words, a plan in action, a conservative plan and, conference, it is working. governments rarely get to set the test by which they will ultimately be judged. test by which they will ultimately bejudged. and our test isjobs. remember, as economies around the world pulled the shutters down, forecasters were predicting unemployment to reach 12%, millions of people were on the press of losing theirjobs, livelihoods, homes. well, the forecasts were wrong. the unemployment rate is at less than 5%, and falling. that is lower than france, america, canada,
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italy and spain. and we now have one of the fastest recoveries of any economy in the world. now, it wasn't that the forecasters had bad models. no, it isjust that the forecasters had bad models. no, it is just the that the forecasters had bad models. no, it isjust the models did not take account of one thing. and that was this conservative government, our will to act and our plan to deliver. an increased national living wage, the restart programme, sector —based work academies, job of finding support, traineeships, apprenticeship incentives, skills and boot camps and the lifetime skills guarantee, are things we are doing that won'tjust help people, but give them the means and opportunities to help themselves. i believe in good work and better skills and higher wages, believe in good work and better
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skills and higherwages, i believe in good work and better skills and higher wages, i believe that every person in this country has the potential to become something greater, and i note that we, and only we, the conservative party are the ones that can make that happen. applause and our economy cannot be what we need it to be without the courage, creativity and sheer force of will that each new generation brings. yet, at its peak, just under one in three workers under 25 where on furlough. one in three. that is1 million people who did not have the fallback of a career history or a network of contacts, and in many cases, had not even moved into their first realjob. what did we do? we
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created the kick—start scheme, up and running and working in a matter of months. a landmark programme that is helping young people start exciting new careers. and thanks to our plan, young people, just like john who introduced me today, i was starting those newjobs in their thousands. so to give more people at the same chance asjohn, we are expanding it into next year, the kick—start scheme, extra support through the youth offer, and our apprenticeship incentive all extended because we believe in the awesome power of opportunity and we are going to make sure that no young person in our country is left without it.
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but what we do today means little if we don't also have a plan for tomorrow. a plan for the future. if future economy shaped by the forces of science, technology and imagination. the years i spent in california left a lasting mark on me, working with some of the most innovative and exciting people in finance and technology, watching ideas become reality, seeing entrepreneurs build new teams. it is notjust entrepreneurs build new teams. it is not just about the money. entrepreneurs build new teams. it is notjust about the money. i saw entrepreneurs build new teams. it is not just about the money. i saw a culture, a mindset, which was unafraid to challenge itself, reward hard work and was open to all of those with a talent to achieve. i look across the united kingdom and that culture is here, too. in the young people i have already spoken about today, unencumbered by
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orthodoxy and it is they are in our willingness to take risks, notjust on companies but on people, people with the raw potential to create a wave of the most dynamic high—growth companies, in wave that will reach the farthest corners of the world. that optimism, that unshakeable belief that the future can be different and better was also at the heart of brexit. i remember over five years ago being told that if i backed brexit, my political career would be over before it had even begun. well, i put my principles are first and i always will. i was proud to back brexit, proud to back leave. that is despite the challenges come in the long term i
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believe the agility, flexibility and freedom provided by brexit would be more valuable in a 21st century global economy than just proximity to a market. in a long time, a renewed culture of enterprise, willingness to take risk and be imaginative would inspire changes in the way we do things at home. brexit was neverjust about the way we do things at home. brexit was never just about the things the way we do things at home. brexit was neverjust about the things we couldn't do, it was also about the things we didn't do. that is why we have introduced the super deduction, uk first in tax policy, triggering an explosion in capital investment. that is why we created the help to grow scheme, another uk first, to help small and medium—sized companies scale up. that is why we launched the future fund, a government investment, backing high potential start—ups. my point is this, even if you cannot see it yet,
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i assure you the future is here. last year alone, ..._ last year alone, you are watching — last year alone, you are watching rishi _ last year alone, you are watching rishi sunak- last year alone, you are - watching rishi sunak addressing the conservative party conference in manchester. good buy if you are watching on bbc two. —— goodbye. we watching on bbc two. -- goodbye. we are watching on bbc two. —— goodbye. e are going to make this country not just a science superpower, notjust the best place in the world to do business. i believe we are going to make the united kingdom the most exciting place in the planet. take artificial intelligence. once the stuff of science fiction, now it is reality. we are a global leader. the steam engine kicked off the industrial revolution. computers delivered automation. the internet
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brought information exchange. as the latest general purpose technology, artificial intelligence has the power to transform whole economies and societies. if artificial intelligence were to contribute just the average productivity increase of those three technologies, that would be worth around £200 billion per year to our economy. and so today, i am announcing that we will create 2000 elite artificial intelligence scholarships for disadvantaged young people and double the number of world leading fellows. helping to assure the exciting opportunities are open to all parts of our society. new policy focused on innovative technology, supporting jobs for the next generation, a sign of our ambition for the future. because
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thatis ambition for the future. because that is why we are here. all of us. that is why we became members of the conservative party. that is why you all gave up so much of your time, sacrificing things that are reported to you in order to help build a better future. to you in order to help build a betterfuture. you know, the longer i spend in thisjob, the more i realise that the worst parts of politics are driven by fear. fear of change. fear of losing. the fear of being wrong, even fear of the future. and when people get scared, the create divisions. they say you are either with us or you are with them. but you cannot make progress if you are pitting people against each other. that is what you get from a tired, fearful side of politics. we saw it last week in
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brighton. it is notjust that labour don't like us, they don't even like each other. whereas we, the conservatives, are now, and always will be, the party of business and the party of the worker. the party of the private sector and the public sector. a party for the old, and the young. the british people want a party that can get things done. so, atjust the moment when it feels like we have done enough, that we have gotten through it, that we can take a rest, we must not stop. now is the time to show them that our plan will deliver and now is the time. at last, at long last, to finally turn to the future. thank you.
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applause the chancellor's speech to the conservative party conference. let's go to chris mason who was listening in along with us. it was quite short, wasn't it? what did you take from that speech? you short, wasn't it? what did you take from that speech?— from that speech? you are right. it was short- — from that speech? you are right. it was short- a _ from that speech? you are right. it was short. a little _ from that speech? you are right. it was short. a little under— from that speech? you are right. it was short. a little under half- from that speech? you are right. it was short. a little under half an . was short. a little under half an hour, by my reckoning. pretty short for what is seen as one of the flagship speeches, hearing from the chancellor of the exchequer. i think a good element of it was a kind of first draft of the philosophy, the ideals and the background of the chancellor of the exchequer. he has only being doing thejob chancellor of the exchequer. he has only being doing the job for 18 months, a relatively young chap for doing thatjob. i write in the cake and weeks later was plunged into the
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economic chaos of covid and many demanding a splurge in government spending, which was atypical. as we emerged out of that, he wanted the time to introduce himself to the country and conservative faithful, set out his own political philosophy. on one point there, one of the dominating themes of this conference, tax, he wanted to show where he stood and defend why he is responsible for the high tax burden. the increase in national insurance that will come in next year, we are going to see the rise in corporation tax, too. he argued that while some people will tell him it is not conservative to put up tax, in his view it is also not conservative to borrow without generating enough revenue to pay for whatever it is that government spending, if you
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like, the electorate demands. social care is expensive to sort out, so we have to tax. he is making the argument, as conservatives have been, that their instinct is a low tax, despite the realities of those tax, despite the realities of those tax increases. a couple of other things, there was the specific stuff, stuff that was trailed overnight and rishi sunak refer to this morning, thejob support schemes that he was talking about. the end of furlough, but he argues the renewal of the schemes to help younger people get into work and stay in work and also help the over 50s, older people, do the same is going to be crucial in this next phase of economic recovery. in overall terms, let's be blunt here, there was no wild moment, there was no rabbit out of the hat, no dominating headline, instead a broad brush of where he has come from and
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what he stands for and where he hopes to go as chancellor, to a hall as a potential future hopes to go as chancellor, to a hall as a potentialfuture prime minister, many people view him as. going back to the richey syn rishi sunak idea, there is a blurring in policy terms that something coming out of one party might sound like it came from the mouths of another party. how to get to grips with that and what does that mean? when you talk about his popularity, how much is the party going along with that? it is a really good question and an interesting observation of that blurring. there are lots of people who will look at the contemporary conservative party and its instincts, notjust as a result of the pandemic, and see it actually seems quite left on the economy and write on cultural issues. where does
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that leave labour when borisjohnson seems comfortable spending a lot of public money and being willing to borrow. i think what we got there from the chancellor was subtly a setting out of the distinction between him and the prime minister, the chancellor's political instincts in normal times is to be conservative, to be very careful around public spending, very conscious, he would see it being sensible, spending our money, and be rather keen on tax cuts. the prime minister seems rather more relaxed on government spending and if necessary bothering. we will see how that pans out into the post—pandemic era. what you always get in party conferences because there are two audiences, those in the room and then there was more broadly around then there was more broadly around the country, was a bit of the tribal party political knock—about. you saw quite a lot they are of gentle
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political sledging in the direction of the labour party, during those dividing lines between the two parties and trying to infuse activists in the room who, to use the cliche, a cliche because it is true, i willing to stuff envelopes and deliver them on a wet, soggy october thursday afternoon because they believe in the philosophy of they believe in the philosophy of the party. to hearfrom the they believe in the philosophy of the party. to hear from the leaders distinctions that exist between them and their political opponents as classic party conference fodder, even if, as you say, particularly on some of the economic questions, if you take a step back you can see overlap blurring between the instincts of labour and the conservatives at the moment. thank ou, conservatives at the moment. thank you. chris. — the military have begun delivering fuel supplies to forecourts hit by the petrol crisis today. the government insists the situation at the pumps is easing but troops will be deployed across london and the south east, where the worst shortages remain as charlotte
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gallagher reports. after more than a week of scenes like this, the military is being drafted in. troops here training for their next deployment — delivering to petrol stations across the uk. 200 servicemen and women are being called on. more than half will be focused in london and the south—east of england, where fuel stocks are at their lowest. borisjohnson says the measure is a precaution, but retailers say there are still severe shortages in some parts of the country. in the south—east, it was worse than we'd expected. and over 20% of sites were dry. this is really continuing to be a serious crisis for the 25 million or so people living in london and the home counties. as well as the military, up to 300 foreign tanker drivers will be allowed
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into the uk immediately — several weeks before the wider visa scheme comes into effect. this isn'tjust about petrol stations and panic—buying fuel — the shortage of hgv and tanker drivers could impact other essential services and products, with borisjohnson refusing to rule out supply chain problems continuing until christmas. temporary working permits are also being offered to more than li,500 food haulage drivers who could deliver to supermarkets. another 5,500 will be given to foreign poultry workers. the uk government are obviously keen to avoid more chaotic scenes, and negative headlines. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. we have got some pictures to bring now of tankers leaving the oil depot in hertfordshire. it is not clear whether that particular tanker is being driven by a soldier, but we know that around 200 military
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personnel are being deployed as part of the... to try and deliver fuel this morning. the military are getting involved to help and deal with the supply issues. it is not an issue of supply of fuel, as you will no doubt be aware, but the issue is there not being enough drivers for there not being enough drivers for the fuel tankers and so the military is being drafted in. they have been training with a petroleum logistics company in thurrock in essex. as they prepare for thisjob company in thurrock in essex. as they prepare for this job to get petrol flowing back into the petrol stations that has been running dry as a result of panic buying because of the shortage of tanker drivers.
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the military in operation today. changes to the covid traffic light system for international travel come into force today. the amber and green lists will be merged into a single "rest of the world" category while the red list will remain. travellers who are fully vaccinated and returning from a country not on the red list, will no longer need a pre—departure test. our business correspondent, katy austin has more. since international travel started to open up again we've got used to a traffic light system of rules. today it's changing. there will still be a red list of countries, meaning passengers must pay to quarantine in a government—approved hotel when they return to the uk, but from today there are no green and amber lists. fully vaccinated passengers returning from more than 15 non—red—list countries no longer have to take a covid test before setting off for the uk. they don't have to self—isolate or take a test on day eight after arriving, either. for now, everyone except under—fives must still pay for a pcr test two days after they arrive. people who haven't been jabbed
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still have to take a test before travelling to the uk. when they get here they must self—isolate for ten days and take the day—two and day—eight tests. the travel industry have complained the old testing regime was deterring passengers. as the pandemic has continued, it's been another extremely turbulent year for global aviation. willie walsh leads the international air transport association, a trade body for airlines. i think this is a big positive development, particularly for families who will now be able to avoid the cost associated with testing. we need to do more. you know, the requirement to do a test after arrival — particularly a pcr test, and they will change that to a rapid antigen — but i don't understand why they are waiting for some time to change that. i think the industry could adapt and introduce that change much quicker. but it's going in the right direction. industry group airlines uk said travel would now be easier and cheaper, and next they hope to see more countries come off the red list.
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katie austin, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. for many of us today, the weather forecast is one of sunshine and flowers and clouds. some of them will be heavy and thundery, heel in between. in between, sunshine. highs of 12 and 17 celsius north to south. overnight, this next batch of rain moves in from the south—west, pushing northwards and eastwards. torrential downpours and places. as much as a0 millimetres of rain in northern england. for scotland and northern ireland, drier and cooler. in the glens of scotland, a touch of frost tomorrow morning. for scotland
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and northern ireland, dry weather with a few showers. rain across england and wales. brisk winds. torrential downpours across the north. highs up to 15 celsius. hello. this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: amid pressure on the government over living standards, the chancellor
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commits £500 million to supportjob creation programmes. as a fuel supply issues persist, particularly in the south—east of england, the military start delivering to petrol stations. new travel rules come into force in the uk, with a single red list replacing the traffic light system. leaked financial documents reveal how a conservative party donor who contributed to borisjohnson's leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. and four weeks before world leaders meet in glasgow for talks on the climate crisis, we look at the role wind power could have in the move towards renewable energy. the secret dealings of hundreds of world leaders, politicians and billionaires have been exposed in one of the biggest investigations of leaked offshore documents in history. the files, dubbed the pandora papers, reveal that tony and cherie blair did not
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have to pay more than £300,000 of stamp duty on a £6 million house because it was sold to them through an anonymous offshore company. under prominent doughnut other conservative party was involved in one of europe's biggest scandals. secrets of world leaders from the king ofjordan to vladimir putin to tony blair have been revealed. before he came to power, the labour leader attacked the offshore system that allowed wealthy people to gain tax advantages to most of us. millionaires with the right account and pay nothing, while pensioners pay vat on fuel. we will create a
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tax system that is fair, which is related to ability to pay.- related to ability to pay. years later, in 2017, _ related to ability to pay. years later, in 2017, tony _ related to ability to pay. years later, in 2017, tony and - related to ability to pay. yearsj later, in 2017, tony and cherie blair bought this town house in central london for £6.45 million. but rather than buy it as you or i would, they bought the offshore company that owned it, saving more than £300,000 in stamp duty. that doesnt than £300,000 in stamp duty. that doesn't look — than £300,000 in stamp duty. trust doesn't look great, and it partly doesn't look great, and it partly doesn't look great because most people cannot do the same thing. so evenif people cannot do the same thing. so even if what they did was perfectly legal and legitimate in the business world, it feels instinctively really unfair because they got access to an advantage, a potential advantage, that the rest of us don't have. cherie blair told the bbc they didn't structure the purchase this way. the spokesman added the couple
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will be liable for tax on capital gains on the resale. the files also reveal how a prominent tory donor who supported borisjohnson's leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. the campaign is over and the work begins. thank you all very much. applause. a well—connected corporate lawyer, mohamed amersi has given £525,000 to the conservative party since 2018. here he is talking about corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor of an equal opportunity in life. but leaked documents show mr amersi was at the centre of a corruption scandal. he worked as a consultant to a swedish telecoms company, telia, helping it to expand its business in central asia. but an internal telia report describes the activities of a consultant referred to as mr xy, who was paid more than $65 million.
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the payments included expenses for lavish corporate entertainment, usually between $100,000 and $200,000 a month, that were not evidenced by receipts. it recommended that telia's relationship with mr xy be terminated. former telia executive michaela ahlberg, who was brought in to clean up the company, told panorama that mr amersi was the consultant referred to in the report. it is important that people around him that trust him, that listen to him, understand the whole context of his career and wealth. he has been involved closely in one of the biggest corruption scandals that we have seen in sweden in modern times. mr amersi's lawyer said it's entirely false to suggest his contract was terminated, and that his fees and expenses were entirely in keeping with industry practice. andy verity, bbc news. the prime minister says the government is operating under
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regulations introduced by the previous labour government. i see that story today. — previous labour government. i see that story today, but _ previous labour government. i see that story today, but what - previous labour government. i see that story today, but what i - previous labour government. i see that story today, but what i can say on that _ that story today, but what i can say on that one — that story today, but what i can say on that one is all these donations are vetted — on that one is all these donations are vetted in the normal way in accordance _ are vetted in the normal way in accordance with rules that were set ”p accordance with rules that were set up under— accordance with rules that were set up under a — accordance with rules that were set up undera labour government, so. a up undera labour government, so. metropolitan police officer has been remanded in custody after appearing before magistrates charged with rape. graham satchell is outside the court in st albans. what can you tell us? ~ g . , ., tell us? well, joanna, this was the first hearing _ tell us? well, joanna, this was the first hearing in _ tell us? well, joanna, this was the first hearing in this _ tell us? well, joanna, this was the first hearing in this case, - tell us? well, joanna, this was the first hearing in this case, largely . first hearing in this case, largely procedural, so david carrick appeared via video link from stevenage police station. he spoke only once, to confirm his name, age and address, and the outline of the case was put to him. he is charged with one count of rape, an offence thatis with one count of rape, an offence that is alleged to have taken place in st albans in hertfordshire in
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september of last year. he said through his lawyer that he emphatically denied that charge, and then there was a very lengthy discussion about whether he should be given bail or held in custody. in the end, the magistrate said that he will be remanded in custody. mr carrick is a 46—year—old metropolitan police constable who has worked in the houses of parliament in the parliamentary and it at a command unit, and he is currently suspended from duty. the met police commissioner dame cressida dick has said she is concerned that an officer would be charged with such an offence, and she recognised that the public would also be concerned, and as i say, 46—year—old mr carrick has been remanded in custody and will appear in court again next month. thank
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ou. you. the brexit minister, lord ross, has renewed his threat to suspend part of the brexit deal affecting northern ireland. the northern ireland protocol was designed to avoid a high border on the island of ireland, but has meant new checks on some products going from great britain. lord ross told the conservative party conference in manchester that the arrangements agreed with the eu have begun to come apart even more quickly than feared. ., . feared. the northern ireland -rotocol feared. the northern ireland protocol is — feared. the northern ireland protocol is not _ feared. the northern ireland protocol is not working, - feared. the northern ireland protocol is not working, and| feared. the northern ireland - protocol is not working, and needs to change. yes, we agreed the protocol in that difficult autumn two years ago. we knew we were taking a risk. but a worthy one, in the cause of peace, in the cause of protecting the belfast good friday agreement. it was the right thing to do. it ended our constitutional crisis. it meant our country could leave the eu, hole, free. if not for
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the madness of the surrender act, we could have done so. so we worried right from the start that the protocol could not take the strain if not handled sensibly. as it turned out, we were right. the arrangements have begun to come apart even more quickly than we feared. thanks to the eu's heavy—handed actions, cross community political support for the protocol has collapsed. the protocol itself is now under mining the good friday agreement. political institutions in northern ireland now face instability. we can still solve these problems. i set out injuly a set of proposals that would establish a new balance for a lasting future for northern ireland, and i will soon be sending a new set of legal texts to the eu to support them. we still await a formal response from the eu to our
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proposals, but from what i hear, i worry that we will not get a response which enables the significant change we need. sol urge the eu to be ambitious. it is no use tinkering around the edges. we need significant change. if we can agree something better, as i would like us to do, we can get back to where we wanted to be, an independent britain with friendly relations with the eu, based on free trade. but we cannot wait forever. without an agreed solution soon, we will need to act using the article 16 safeguard mechanism to address the impact the protocol is having in northern ireland. brexit minister lord frost. an update on the headlines colon amid pressure on the government over living standards, the chancellor commits £500 million to a a newjob support programme. as fuel supply
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issues persist, particularly in the south—east of england, the military start delivering to petrol stations. and new travel rules come into force in the uk, with the traffic light system replaced by a single medallist. as we have been hearing, the chancellor, rishi sunak, has insisted that brexit is in the long—term interests of the uk despite current disruption to fuel and food supplies. in his speech to the conservative party conference, he also committed £500 million to a newjob support programmes. let's go to pauljohnson, director of the institute for fiscal studies. he is in manchester and listened to the speech. thank you forjoining us. what is your reaction to the speech? it was pretty light on detail, and i think— it was pretty light on detail, and i think it _ it was pretty light on detail, and i think it is — it was pretty light on detail, and i think it is rather good to see a chancellor— think it is rather good to see a chancellor not using the conference speech— chancellor not using the conference speech as _ chancellor not using the conference speech as an opportunity to pre—empt his own _ speech as an opportunity to pre—empt his own budget or make policy
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announcements. i think most of what i took— announcements. i think most of what i took from _ announcements. i think most of what i took from that was a warning really— i took from that was a warning really that the time for giving out lots of— really that the time for giving out lots of money is over, we have given out vast _ lots of money is over, we have given out vast amounts of money over the last 18 _ out vast amounts of money over the last 18 months, and the time for a retrenchment is upon us, so i think i would _ retrenchment is upon us, so i think i would expect that to mean that we will get _ i would expect that to mean that we will get the budget in three weeks, and the _ will get the budget in three weeks, and the spending review announcement at that— and the spending review announcement at that point, he is going to be making — at that point, he is going to be making some fairly tough decisions, getting _ making some fairly tough decisions, getting back to a more normal period of spending control on top of what have been— of spending control on top of what have been some really pretty enormous tax increases that he announced over the budget back in march _ announced over the budget back in march and — announced over the budget back in march and a few weeks ago alongside the health— march and a few weeks ago alongside the health and social package. i think— the health and social package. i think he — the health and social package. i think he really, i took it as providing _ think he really, i took it as providing a warning to the party in the country— providing a warning to the party in the country that he is going to stop chucking _ the country that he is going to stop chucking money around and start being _ chucking money around and start being a _ chucking money around and start being a bit— chucking money around and start
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being a bit more austere, i suppose. and we _ being a bit more austere, i suppose. and we have — being a bit more austere, i suppose. and we have already of course seen the national insurance increase that is coming through to pay for social care and the nhs, and in his speech he said the tory party is the party of the private sector, and the public sector. so, how do you think, what might that mean for financial decisions going forward? ihell. what might that mean for financial decisions going forward?— decisions going forward? well, we have had the _ decisions going forward? well, we have had the biggest, _ decisions going forward? well, we have had the biggest, you - decisions going forward? well, we have had the biggest, you didn't i have had the biggest, you didn't 'ust have had the biggest, you didn't just see — have had the biggest, you didn't just see the announcement on the health— just see the announcement on the health and — just see the announcement on the health and social levy a few weeks a-o. health and social levy a few weeks ago we _ health and social levy a few weeks ago. we saw corporation tax arising from _ ago. we saw corporation tax arising from 19% _ ago. we saw corporation tax arising from 19% and the increasing of the from19% and the increasing of the personal— from 19% and the increasing of the personal allowance of income tax. so this has— personal allowance of income tax. so this has been the biggest tax raising — this has been the biggest tax raising year in terms of allowances in the _ raising year in terms of allowances in the last— raising year in terms of allowances in the last 50, with the exception of 1985 — in the last 50, with the exception of1983. so in the last 50, with the exception of 1983. so he really has been quite busy in _ of 1983. so he really has been quite busy in terms of bringing money back
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into the _ busy in terms of bringing money back into the coffers, or he will have been _ into the coffers, or he will have been and _ into the coffers, or he will have been. and not all of that has been about— been. and not all of that has been about the — been. and not all of that has been about the response to covid. the improvement to the social care levy which _ improvement to the social care levy which he _ improvement to the social care levy which he announced was nothing to do with the _ which he announced was nothing to do with the pandemic, and it was always going _ with the pandemic, and it was always going to _ with the pandemic, and it was always going to be _ with the pandemic, and it was always going to be needed because if we are lloii'i going to be needed because if we are going to _ going to be needed because if we are going to fund social care properly and keep— going to fund social care properly and keep up with demand for the health— and keep up with demand for the health service, we would always need to be bringing more money in, so i think— to be bringing more money in, so i think that — to be bringing more money in, so i think that is — to be bringing more money in, so i think that is a recognition of the long-term — think that is a recognition of the long—term pressures that we are facing _ long—term pressures that we are facing. and a combination of that and the _ facing. and a combination of that and the corporate tax rises that we saw announced back in march are going _ saw announced back in march are going to — saw announced back in march are going to put significant additional pressure — going to put significant additional pressure on to companies and indeed household _ pressure on to companies and indeed household budgets as we take the tax burden— household budgets as we take the tax burden up— household budgets as we take the tax burden up to the highest level it has ever— burden up to the highest level it has ever been in the uk. 30
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burden up to the highest level it has ever been in the uk. so bearing that in mind. _ has ever been in the uk. so bearing that in mind, and _ has ever been in the uk. so bearing that in mind, and also _ has ever been in the uk. so bearing that in mind, and also the - has ever been in the uk. so bearing that in mind, and also the taking i that in mind, and also the taking away of the £20 uplift in universal credit, how does that square with his line in his speech to say, we will always be the party of business and the party of the worker? its, and the party of the worker? a number of points there. he also said they were _ number of points there. he also said they were going to be the party of fiscal— they were going to be the party of fiscal responsibility, so they have certainly — fiscal responsibility, so they have certainly been putting that high on the agenda. on business, it really has been — the agenda. on business, it really has been a — the agenda. on business, it really has been a remarkable about turn in terms _ has been a remarkable about turn in terms of— has been a remarkable about turn in terms of corporation tax, taking down _ terms of corporation tax, taking down all— terms of corporation tax, taking down all the way from 26% to 19% and then very— down all the way from 26% to 19% and then very quickly taking it back up to 25%~ _ then very quickly taking it back up to 25%~ it — then very quickly taking it back up to 25%. it will clearly be something of a blow _ to 25%. it will clearly be something of a blow for some businesses, particularly when you take account of the _ particularly when you take account of the fact — particularly when you take account of the fact that the base for corporation tax, the amount of money that we _ corporation tax, the amount of money that we pay—
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corporation tax, the amount of money that we pay corporation tax on, has gone _ that we pay corporation tax on, has gone up _ that we pay corporation tax on, has gone up it— that we pay corporation tax on, has gone up it is— that we pay corporation tax on, has gone up. it is towards its highest level— gone up. it is towards its highest level ever— gone up. it is towards its highest level ever in the uk in terms of the raises _ level ever in the uk in terms of the raises 0t— level ever in the uk in terms of the raises. of course that is by no means— raises. of course that is by no means the _ raises. of course that is by no means the only or even the most important — means the only or even the most important issue in terms of working in the _ important issue in terms of working in the uk, _ important issue in terms of working in the uk, the economy, the structure. _ in the uk, the economy, the structure, the rule of law and all of those — structure, the rule of law and all of those things, and that is something that they will be taking into account. and when it comes to households. — into account. and when it comes to households, the reduction in universal— households, the reduction in universal credit, two bits of context _ universal credit, two bits of context are imported. this is a reduction _ context are imported. this is a reduction on what was always meant to be _ reduction on what was always meant to be a _ reduction on what was always meant to be a temporary uplift. on the other— to be a temporary uplift. on the other hand, we also had significant cuts in _ other hand, we also had significant cuts in the — other hand, we also had significant cuts in the generosity of the welfare _ cuts in the generosity of the welfare system over the last six years. _ welfare system over the last six years. and — welfare system over the last six years, and you rememberthat welfare system over the last six years, and you remember that 2015 conservative manifesto which promised 12 billion of welfare cuts, which _ promised 12 billion of welfare cuts, which i _ promised 12 billion of welfare cuts, which i frankly never thought would
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happen, _ which i frankly never thought would happen, but they indeed did happen, and they— happen, but they indeed did happen, and they are not being undone now, because _ and they are not being undone now, because of— and they are not being undone now, because of this decision not to keep this temporary uplift in universal credit _ this temporary uplift in universal credit. . ., credit. pauljohnson of the institute — credit. pauljohnson of the institute for _ credit. pauljohnson of the institute for fiscal - credit. pauljohnson of the| institute for fiscal studies, credit. pauljohnson of the i institute for fiscal studies, thank you. the metropolitan police will carry out a review into the culture of the force amid allegations of misogyny and sexism following the conviction of serving officer wayne couzens for the murder of sarah everard. speaking for the first time since that conviction, the commission of the met police, dame cressida dick, has told the bbc that she will not resign. has told the bbc that she will not resi . n. , , . , resign. these events have been absolutely _ resign. these events have been absolutely dreadful. _ resign. these events have been absolutely dreadful. they i resign. these events have been absolutely dreadful. they have | resign. these events have been i absolutely dreadful. they have made everybody in the met furious, and we depend on public trust. in this country, policing is done by consent, and undoubtedly the killing of sarah and other events has damaged public trust. so today i am
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announcing that we will be doing a review that will be led by a high—profile independent person, and the review will look at our internal culture and our professional standards, systems, processes, leadership, training, to make sure that we are the best possible met police we can be. and i am absolutely determined that we will rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can. rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can-— rebuild public trust as soon as we possibly can. some people will say that that is — possibly can. some people will say that that is not _ possibly can. some people will say that that is not enough, _ possibly can. some people will say that that is not enough, that i possibly can. some people will say that that is not enough, that you l that that is not enough, that you should resign.— should resign. people will be entitled to _ should resign. people will be entitled to their _ should resign. people will be entitled to their opinion, i i should resign. people will be i entitled to their opinion, i have a job to do, i need to get on with it and myjob now is to lead the met through a difficult time and rebuild public trust, which i am redoing through bringing in an independent person to do a review of our standards and culture. did person to do a review of our standards and culture. did you offer to resin? standards and culture. did you offer to resign? it — standards and culture. did you offer
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to resign? it did _ standards and culture. did you offer to resign? it did happen _ standards and culture. did you offer to resign? it did happen on - standards and culture. did you offer to resign? it did happen on my- to resign? it did happen on my watch, to resign? it did happen on my watch. i'm _ to resign? it did happen on my watch, i'm public— to resign? it did happen on my watch, i'm public servant, ii to resign? it did happen on my| watch, i'm public servant, i will watch, i'm public servant, iwill carry on doing myjob. a large oil slick has begun washing ashore in southern california. beaches in orange county have been closed as oil and dead wildlife wash up closed as oil and dead wildlife wash up on the sand. almost half a million litres of oil has leaked from a pipeline connected to an offshore oil rig. california is known for its beaches, but not like this. clumps of oil and tar the size of softballs scatter the shoreline, as well as dead birds and fish. more than 120,000 gallons of oil has leaked into the ocean from a broken pipeline five miles off the coast. we are in the midst of a potential ecological disaster here at huntington beach and as the exhibits and pictures here illustrate, the oil spill has significantly impacted our community. the broken pipeline is connected
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to an offshore oil platform run by a subsidiary of houston—based amplify energy. the company says the pipeline has now been shut off and the remaining oil suctioned out. it has been maintained. we are investigating, if the pipeline is the source of this, how this happened. a huge clean—up operation is under way to try to stop the oil reaching sensitive wetlands nearby and people are being urged to avoid the beaches. you can feel the vapour in the air. i saw what i'll describe as little pancake clusters of oil along the shoreline and i've described it as something like an egg yolk — if you push it, it kind of spreads out, so we don't want people to disturb those little clusters. local authorities say it is too soon to say whether the company responsible will face criminal charges. courtney bembridge, bbc news. its exactly four weeks until world
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leaders gather in glasgow for crucial talks on how to manage the climate crisis. our climate editor justin rowlatt is in hull for us today looking at the role wind power could have in our move towards renewable energy. iamat iam atan i am at an offshore wind turbine factory in hull in yorkshire, and just look at the scale of what they are doing here. huge turbine blades lined up by the humber estuary here, and look at those huge turbine columns, absolutely enormous. and this is a wonderful place to me, because being the bbc�*s climate editor can be, and i mean this genuinely, very depressing. every morning i go into my inbox and it is bulging with e—mails about environmental devastation. so coming to a place like this is really exciting, because this is at the
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epicentre of a new industrial revolution, an industrial revolution designed to tackle the main project of the 21st—century, humanity's effort to move away from fossil fuels. so this is all about making low carbon energy, and i have been 120 kilometres out, the north sea is over there, out into the north sea, 75 miles away, to see what it takes to maintain, to keep the blades of these turbines turning on the north sea, delivering clean, green energy to british homes. it's actually much smoother than it looks. 0h! if you thought your commute to work was rough going, check this out. we're with a team trying to get out to service a wind turbine. so, the north sea is famous for its savage weather. but that's why they put the wind turbines out here, because this is where the wind is. but of course, it means they are very hard — whoa — to maintain.
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whoa! the swell is up to three metres high today, making it too dangerous to climb the ladder. so it's back to the ship for us. this is where the team of engineers who keep the blades turning live and work. coming through. these guys do 12—hour shifts out here, for 14 straight days, and then get two weeks off. it can be tough but the flourishing offshore wind industry is creating thousands of well—paid skilled jobs — most of them in places like grimsby, that have seen traditional industries decline. my grandad went to sea when he was 14, as a cabin boy. for seafaring families like mine, offshore wind has really given more options. 80% of our workforce in the east coast come from within an hour of our operational hub. so it's really opened up a world of opportunities that,
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for seafaring families like mine, really didn't exist 15 years ago. and it is comfortable on the ship. so let me take you on a little tour. right, so, this is my cabin. pretty cushty, hey? come and have a look at this. so this is the lounge. sorry, lads. and this — this is the dining area. and let me tell you, the food is really good. let's see what's on the menu. jill, jill? hi. what's for tea? today is fish, chips and mushy peas, and we've got pork chops with chasseur sauce.
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bread—and—butter pudding and custard. oh, my god, sounds good, doesn't it? and you can work all that off down here. a day later, and the sea is calmer. this time we do get to the ladder. it's quite a climb and this is just to the bottom of the thing. but there's bad news. so we've managed to get onto the turbine, but the crane isn't working, which means we can't get our gear up off the boat, which means we can't go up the turbine. but i can give you a sense of this — look at this. just how huge these wind turbines are. these monsters are almost 200 metres high, and each turn of the blades is reckoned to generate enough electricity to power an average uk home for a day. it's nice to know that your time and your energy is contributing to this world running on green energy, which will be a better future for everybody. and it's growing up in the north—east in your hometown.
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yeah, we're really lucky to have it on our doorstep, i don't take that for granted at all. we got up as far as the platform but we couldn't go any further because of the broken crane. what does that tell you about the challenges you face in your daily work? just that you've got to remain open and ready for whatever could arise. i think being adaptable just in general is a good thing, yeah, because life's always full of surprises. as we head back, we get a fantastic view. 0rsted say this one wind farm can power up to a million homes and they have almost finished another even bigger one next to it. and there are plans for many more around the country. what's more, the wind revolution isn'tjust happening here in the uk — it's starting to take off all around the world. scientist who discovered how our bodies feel the warmth of the son of a hug for a loved one — and awarded
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—— have been awarded the nobel prize for medicine. they unpicked how our bodies convert physical sensations into electrical messages in the nervous system. their findings could lead to new ways of treating pain. the first contestant has left this year's the first contestant has left this yea r�*s strictly the first contestant has left this year's strictly come dancing after the first public vote of the series. eastenders star nina wadya lost out to kate mclean after what was called one of the closest dance—off battles in the programme's history. it has been so incredible, _ in the programme's history. it has been so incredible, thank- in the programme's history. it has been so incredible, thank you. i in the programme's history. it has i been so incredible, thank you. what would ou been so incredible, thank you. what would you like _ been so incredible, thank you. what would you like to _ been so incredible, thank you. what would you like to say? _ been so incredible, thank you. what would you like to say? it _ been so incredible, thank you. what would you like to say? it has - been so incredible, thank you. what would you like to say? it has been i would you like to say? it has been so much fun _ would you like to say? it has been so much fun together. _ would you like to say? it has been so much fun together. you - would you like to say? it has been so much fun together. you have i so much fun together. you have worked — so much fun together. you have worked so — so much fun together. you have worked so hard, you said you wanted to dance _ worked so hard, you said you wanted to dance and — worked so hard, you said you wanted to dance and you have done two fantastic — to dance and you have done two fantastic dances and i'm really proud — fantastic dances and i'm really proud of— fantastic dances and i'm really proud of your. fantastic dances and i'm really proud of your-— fantastic dances and i'm really proud of your._ in i fantastic dances and i'm really proud of your._ in aj proud of your. thank you. in a moment. _ proud of your. thank you. in a moment. the _ proud of your. thank you. in a moment, the bbc— proud of your. thank you. in a moment, the bbc news i proud of your. thank you. in a moment, the bbc news at i proud of your. thank you. in a | moment, the bbc news at one proud of your. thank you. in a i moment, the bbc news at one with reeta chakrabarti, but now it is time for the weather with susan
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powell. we have seen some sunshine across the uk to start the week, but it will be interspersed with heavy and squally showers for the rest of the day. they will fade through the evening but that is because they will be usurped by this area of low pressure rolling into the south—west, injecting lots of energy into the atmosphere in terms of bringing strong winds, and also dropping some heavy rain through the evening and across the south—west and wales, carrying that rain further north and east into england through the small hours. a relatively mild to the south of the uk, perhaps close to a frost in some of the scottish glens early on tuesday. scotland and northern ireland keep a bit of sunshine, a few showers around, windy across the board but heavy rain across much of northern and eastern england on and off throughout the day, it will brighten towards the west with strong gusts of wind to contend with, potentially doing some damage, and no surprises in the wind and the rain, it is going to feel quite chilly.
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the chancellor announces half £1 billion to help people get back to work after the pandemic, amid concerns over living standards. rishi sunak says he will only consider cutting taxes when the economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with _ economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you. _ economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you. our _ economy is back on track. i have to be blunt with you. our recovery i be blunt with you. our recovery comes with a cost. our national debt is almost 100% of gdp. so we need to fix our public finances. the other headlines this lunchtime... the military is deployed to help distribute fuel to petrol stations as shortages continue in parts of england. more revelations from the leaked
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pandora papers which reveal how a prominent donor to the conservative party

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