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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 4, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. amid pressure on the government over living standards, the over living standards, chancellor propose to speak the the chancellor propose to speak at the conservative party conference. he will commit £500 million to drop support programs. with apprenticeships, we are giving businesses £3000 to take on a new apprentice, give them the skills and the opportunities they need. we've extended those apprenticeship incentives today. as supply issues persist in the south east of england, the military start delivering fuel to petrol stations. new travel rules come into force in the uk, with the traffic light system replaced by a single red list.
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what will these changes mean for you? will you travel abroad for the first time since the start of the pandemic? get in touch to let me know. the secret wealth of dozens of world leaders — from the king ofjordan to the president of russia — is exposed in one of the biggest ever leaks of financial documents. they reveal how a conservative party donor who contributed to borisjohnson�*s leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. speak and four weeks before world leaders meet in glasgow for talks on the climate crisis, we look at the role wind power could have on our move towards renewable energy.
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good morning and welcome to bbc news. the chancellor rishi sunak will commit to spending an extra £500 million on helping people into work when he addresses the conservative party conference in manchester today. his speech comes at a time of rising living costs and falling business confidence. from manchester, our political correspondent chris mason reports. not the traditional uniform of a chancellor of the exchequer. rishi sunak turned up here yesterday in a hoodie. before long he'd found his suit — and his fans. plenty of conservatives think he might be prime minister one day. i spotted rishi sunak last night rehearsing here in the auditorium. it's a pretty big moment for him — his first in—person address as a chancellor at a conservative party conference cos he's only been in the job for a little over 18 months. but what an 18 months it's been with the pandemic.
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almost as soon as he got the job he was announcing an unprecedented splurge in public spending on things like the furlough scheme. expect him today, though, to say his instinct is to be cautious with taxpayers�* money and cut taxes where possible — even though he's had to put them up, and that isn't going down well with some people here. we must always be looking to ensure the money spent by the state is spent officially — efficiently, and the tax burden is reasonable, and we are at the upper reaches of the reasonableness of the tax burden. none of us want to see taxes rise. you know, we are a low—tax party, we understand that it's enterprise that are going to deliver the opportunities and we need to keep the tax burden low at the same time as continuing to grow our economy. and all this as energy bills go up for many, there are bottlenecks getting supplies to some shops, and plenty of us have had to queue for petrol. 0njobs, rishi sunak will say the existing kickstart scheme in england,
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scotland and wales helping young people into work is to be extended, and there'll be support, too, for the over—50s to help them stay in and return to work. chris mason, bbc news, in manchester. adam fleming joins us from the conference in manchester now. good morning. tell us more about what the chancellor will be unveiling today. well, we are going to get £500 million spent on some existing job schemes, the main one being the kickstart scheme, which is where employers are given money to take on a young person who is at risk of unemployment. the girl had been to get a quarter of a million people through that scheme by this point, but it is more like 100,000. so you can kind of see why they would be wanting to run it a bit longer. there will also be support, careers advice, cv building skills, interview practice, aimed particularly at the over 50s, and
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thatis particularly at the over 50s, and that is to help people get over the end of the furllough scheme, and also for british rishi sunak, he would rather hold onto that. incentives to invest a very strong, encouraged by some of the things we have put in place, like the super deduction. and businesses are creating, i think, almost record numbers of jobs. and we are doing our bit to support those businesses. so, for example, with apprenticeships, we are giving businesses £3000 to take on a new apprentice, give them the skills and the opportunities they need. we've extended those apprenticeship incentives today. kickstart is a scheme whereby we fully fund the business were taking on the young person. so, actually, we are working well, in partnership with business, to get people into well—paid work. 0n the one hand, rishi sunak has a fellow cabinet members like liz truss and jacob rees—mogg saying be
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very cautious about putting taxes up further, jacob rees—mogg saying the upper reaches of the reasonableness of the tax burden had been reached. 0n the other hand, the criticism continues of the decision to remove that £20 uplift to universal credit. what is he going to say about how he is going to balance the books, balance these competing demands? well, he will say the conservative thing to do is to match your spending with your tax rises, so there is no alternative to putting taxes up. but he will do it in a responsible way, and he hasjust been on the radio saying that the reason he says people trust the conservatives is because of their sound stewardship of public finances. but it's interesting that cabinet ministers have been quite explicit about how uncomfortable they are with the current level of taxation, which is why you then get the chancellor having to justify why he is introducing, from next year, that new health and social care levy, which will raise an extra 12 billion in taxes.— levy, which will raise an extra 12 billion in taxes. there is no way to raise £12 billion _
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billion in taxes. there is no way to raise £12 billion without _ billion in taxes. there is no way to raise £12 billion without looking i billion in taxes. there is no way to raise £12 billion without looking at| raise £12 billion without looking at one of— raise £12 billion without looking at one of our— raise £12 billion without looking at one of our big tax levers. if you agree _ one of our big tax levers. if you agree that _ one of our big tax levers. if you agree that we need to invest more in the nhs _ agree that we need to invest more in the nhs and social care, there aren't— the nhs and social care, there aren't many ways to do it. all of the commentary, whether it was from the commentary, whether it was from the institute for fiscal studies, andrew— the institute for fiscal studies, andrew dill not, respected, independent people, or the resolution foundation described the tax rise _ resolution foundation described the tax rise as _ resolution foundation described the tax rise as progressive. that is because — tax rise as progressive. that is because there was with the broadest shoulders. _ because there was with the broadest shoulders, he will earn the most, will pay— shoulders, he will earn the most, will pay the — shoulders, he will earn the most, will pay the most. so 15% of taxpayers will end up paying over half of _ taxpayers will end up paying over half of the bill.— half of the bill. there are certainly _ half of the bill. there are certainly a _ half of the bill. there are certainly a lot _ half of the bill. there are certainly a lot of- half of the bill. there are certainly a lot of wishfull half of the bill. there are - certainly a lot of wishful thinking on the air at this conservative party conference, that in an ideal world, in the buildup to the next election, which can only be two mega years away, the chancellor and the prime minister might have some tax cuts up their sleeve. another really striking bit of the chancellor's speech that we are going to get at lunchtime, he says his intention is to make the uk the most exciting place on the planet. quite an ambitious goal!— place on the planet. quite an ambitious goal! definitely a big one. ambitious goal! definitely a big one- thank _ ambitious goal! definitely a big one. thank you _ ambitious goal! definitely a big one. thank you very _ ambitious goal! definitely a big one. thank you very much, - ambitious goal! definitely a big i
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one. thank you very much, adam. we are going to bring you the chance's speech in full on the bbc news channel at 11.50 this morning. the secret dealings of hundreds of world leaders, politicians and billionaires have been exposed in one of the biggest investigations of leaked offshore documents in history. the files — dubbed the pandora papers — reveal that tony and cherie blair didn't have to pay more than £300,000 of stamp duty on a £6 million house because it was sold to them through an anonymous offshore company. and they reveal how a prominent donor to the conservative party was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. andy verity reports. the offshore dealings of presidents, prime ministers and royalty are revealed in almost 12 million files obtained by the international consortium of investigativejournalists. they reveal the secrets of world leaders, from the king ofjordan to vladimir putin, to tony blair. before he came to power, the then labour leader attacked the offshore system that allowed
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wealthy people to to gain tax advantages unavailable to most of us. millionaires with the right accountant pay nothing, whilst pensioners pay vat on fuel. 0ffshore trusts get tax relief while homeowners pay vat on insurance premiums. we will create a tax system that is fair, which is related to ability to pay. years later, in 2017, tony and cherie blair bought this townhouse in central london for £6.45 million. but rather than buy the house as you or i would, they bought the offshore company that owned it, saving more than £300,000 in stamp duty. that doesn't look great, and it partly doesn't look great because most people cannot do the same thing, and so even if what the blairs did was perfectly legal, perfectly legitimate in the business world, it feels instinctively really unfair because they got access to an advantage —
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a potential advantage — that the rest of us don't have. cherie blair told the bbc they didn't request to structure the transaction this way, and that after purchase they had brought the property under uk tax and regulatory rules. a spokesman added the couple will be liable for tax on capital gains on resale. the files also reveal how a prominent tory donor who supported borisjohnson's leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. the campaign is over and the work begins. thank you all very much. applause. a well—connected corporate lawyer, mohamed amersi has given £525,000 to the conservative party since 2018. here he is talking about corruption. corruption is a very, very heinous crime. every stolen dollar robs the poor
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of an equal opportunity in life. but leaked documents show mr amersi was at the centre of a corruption scandal. he worked as a consultant to a swedish telecoms company, telia, helping it to expand its business in central asia. but an internal telia report describes the activities of a consultant referred to as mr xy, who was paid more than $65 million. the payments included expenses for lavish corporate entertainment, usually between $100,000 and $200,000 a month, that were not evidenced by receipts. it recommended that telia's relationship with mr xy be terminated. former telia executive michaela ahlberg, who was brought in to clean up the company, told panorama that mr amersi was the consultant referred to in the report. it is important that people around him that trust him, that listen to him, understand the whole context of his career and wealth. he has been involved closely in one
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of the biggest corruption scandals that we have seen in sweden modern times. mr amersi's lawyer said it's entirely false to suggest his contract was terminated, and that his fees and expenses were entirely in keeping with industry practice. andy verity, bbc news. richard bilton from bbc panorama joins us now live from our newsroom. what are the conservatives been saying about the latest line about one of their donors? fiur saying about the latest line about one of their donors? our programme toniuht is one of their donors? our programme tonight is about _ one of their donors? our programme tonight is about political _ tonight is about political donations, and as you saw, we have been looking at his background, rishi sunak gave his reaction to bbc breakfast. . . rishi sunak gave his reaction to bbc breakfast. , , ., ., rishi sunak gave his reaction to bbc breakfast. , , . ., ., breakfast. this is a matter for the -a breakfast. this is a matter for the party specifically- _ at my understanding is that we carry out compliance checks in line with the referendum on political parties legislation that was put in place by the labour government. and those are the compliance checks that are required by law. those are the compliance checks
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that the party carries out. of the conservative saying they are operating under the regulations introduced by labour. these papers contain a huge amount of information. what would you pick out as being the headlines from that information?— as being the headlines from that information? w . , , information? taking a step back, i think it is the — information? taking a step back, i think it is the scale _ information? taking a step back, i think it is the scale and _ information? taking a step back, i think it is the scale and content, l think it is the scale and content, 12 million files is an enormous amount. that means 600 journalists around the world, bbc panorama, the guardian in the uk, looking at the stories. i've done a few of the sort of leaks now, and what marks this one out is the big names that are in there. 35 current or past leaders, 300 senior state officials. if you look at andre babich, the prime minister of the czech republic, he is standing for election this week. he bought two pillows in the south of france, using a complicated offshore structure to buy them, didn't tell parliament, now the people of the czech republic know
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that i can make their mind up. if you look at the path of those leaks, things have changed. 0ffshore companies need to know their customers, and some overseas companies are trying to draw up registries. but there are still areas that offshore companies use. they evolve. 0ffshore companies owning property here in the uk, what you see in the leak is the way that offshore helps the very wealthy hide their wealth. offshore helps the very wealthy hide their wealth-— their wealth. richard, thank you very much- _ and panorama is on bbc1 tonight at 7.30. you can read more about today's expose on the bbc news app or website at bbc.co.uk/news.
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the uk's coronavirus travel rules have been simplified from today. the red list is to remain, but the amber and green lists are now merged into a single "rest of world" category. in addition, people coming back from countries which aren't on the red list who can prove they're fully vaccinated — no longer have to take a pcr or lateral flow test before setting off for the uk. t's talk now to laura lindsay who is the consumer travel expert at the flight comparison site, skyscanner. very good to have you with us. thanks forjoining us. tell us, how much of a difference is this making to consumers on the travel industry? is it really giving a big boost in confidence?— is it really giving a big boost in confidence? ~ , , , , ., confidence? absolutely, this is a hu . e confidence? absolutely, this is a huge boost _ confidence? absolutely, this is a huge boost for _ confidence? absolutely, this is a huge boost for travellers, - confidence? absolutely, this is a huge boost for travellers, from | confidence? absolutely, this is a j huge boost for travellers, from a confidence perspective, the measures are easier to understand. as a result, we are expecting to see huge increased demand, which the travel industry will welcome. it is increased demand, which the travel industry will welcome.— industry will welcome. it is coming re late industry will welcome. it is coming pretty late in _ industry will welcome. it is coming pretty late in the _ industry will welcome. it is coming pretty late in the year. _ industry will welcome. it is coming pretty late in the year. everybody. pretty late in the year. everybody involved in the travel industry would have loved to have this happen at the start of the summer season, all before. is it too late for some
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travel businesses? i all before. is it too late for some travel businesses?— all before. is it too late for some travel businesses? i think what we are seeint travel businesses? i think what we are seeing is _ travel businesses? i think what we are seeing is that _ travel businesses? i think what we are seeing is that october - travel businesses? i think what we are seeing is that october half - travel businesses? i think what we l are seeing is that october half term are seeing is that 0ctober half term is going to be a huge peakfor us and many others in the travel industry. since the announcement, we have seen over 100% increase in searches in the first half an hour. so, travellers are really leaping to take advantage of the new measures, and it is accounting for a huge amount of those bookings. that might make u- for amount of those bookings. that might make up for some _ amount of those bookings. that might make up for some of _ amount of those bookings. that might make up for some of the _ amount of those bookings. that might make up for some of the lost - amount of those bookings. that might make up for some of the lost revenue | make up for some of the lost revenue from earlier in the year? absolutely. it is well documented it has been a hard yearfor absolutely. it is well documented it has been a hard year for travel. there is no doubt there is pent—up demand for travellers that are really keen to get back out to see loved ones or take a break. seeing as those measures are easier to understand, and people can travel safely and within the rules, they are doing so. so i think there is a reason to feel confident and positive. 50 reason to feel confident and ositive. . ., , reason to feel confident and ositive. , ., ., positive. so countries are on the red list or— positive. so countries are on the red list or not, _ positive. so countries are on the red list or not, but _ positive. so countries are on the red list or not, but if— positive. so countries are on the red list or not, but if it - positive. so countries are on the red list or not, but if it is - positive. so countries are on the red list or not, but if it is on - positive. so countries are on the red list or not, but if it is on the | red list or not, but if it is on the rest of the world list, there is a note of caution, just because the uk says it is on the rest of the world
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list, it doesn't mean those are the countries you might want to travel to, and they might not have restrictions for people coming from the uk? ., ,.., . restrictions for people coming from the uk? ., , _, . ., the uk? that is correct, there are considerations _ the uk? that is correct, there are considerations on _ the uk? that is correct, there are considerations on both _ the uk? that is correct, there are considerations on both sides, - considerations on both sides, inbound and outbound. that said, there is a huge number of destinations you can go to relatively easily. somewhere like spain, for example, for an unvaccinated traveller, that would be two forms, going forward. and then to mecca when they return, which will be a lateral flow, which is much cheaper and easier. it is fair to say that some destinations will have more difficult restrictions for entry. we do have a map on sky scanner which enables you to see restrictions for every country in the world, whether you are vaccinated or unvaccinated. same are vaccinated or unvaccinated. some viewers have — are vaccinated or unvaccinated. some viewers have been _ are vaccinated or unvaccinated. some viewers have been getting _ are vaccinated or unvaccinated. some viewers have been getting in - are vaccinated or unvaccinated. some viewers have been getting in touch, i don't know if you will have the answer immediately to hand. louise halford says it is still difficult to travel with teenagers, as there is no way to prove vaccination
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status for under 16 is. having to get tests to travel abroad and come home, despite being vaccinated. is that the case, that it will be tricky around the status of teenagers? mr; tricky around the status of teenaters? g , ., , tricky around the status of teenaters? g , . , ., teenagers? my understanding is that the government _ teenagers? my understanding is that the government is _ teenagers? my understanding is that the government is really _ teenagers? my understanding is that the government is really keen - teenagers? my understanding is that the government is really keen to - the government is really keen to enable school holidays to be taken advantage of. so whilst it is a little bit difficult at the moment to understand the restrictions, for those underage vaccinated status individuals, it is something that they are looking to make it clearer. i would say watch this space on that. but it is absolute be paramount to enable families to get away in the school holidays, so it should hopefully get easier. fit, should hopefully get easier. a couple of specific countries being mentioned, one viewer is talking about travelling to iceland at the end of the month, and cycle bunny, you get interesting names on twitter, needs to travel to greece for ivf treatment. what is the situation is with those destinations?-
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situation is with those destinations? , . , ., situation is with those destinations? . , destinations? greece should be relatively straightforward, - destinations? greece should be relatively straightforward, i - destinations? greece should bej relatively straightforward, i was there a couple of weeks ago, and it is now in the go list, as we are calling it, not on the red list. so that will be a test when you return, depending on when it is in october, it could be pcr or lateral flow, depending on when it is in october, it could be pcr or lateralflow, but it could be pcr or lateralflow, but it is a vaccination status on arrival and a passenger form for both directions. those are available on the websites. i believe iceland is the same setup, but i would advise checking government restrictions before any travel, just to make absolutely sure, in case there are any last—minute changes. finally and briefly, do you think that enough measures are in place to protect public health? i do that enough measures are in place to protect public health?— protect public health? i do believe that we are _ protect public health? i do believe that we are in _ protect public health? i do believe that we are in a _ protect public health? i do believe that we are in a situation - protect public health? i do believe that we are in a situation where i protect public health? i do believe | that we are in a situation where we have tried and tested many different measures to enable safe travel, and vaccination status is at a place now where we should feel confident with these measures that are in place. we have seen similar measures in europe, throughout the summer, working successfully. the likes of
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germany have been travelling throughout the summer and have done so safely, and so this is a good situation and everybody should feel positive about notjust the winter sun period, but travel next year, too. . . . ~' sun period, but travel next year, too. . . . ~ i., sun period, but travel next year, too. . . ., ~ ., sun period, but travel next year, too. . . . ., too. laura, thank you for your thoughts _ too. laura, thank you for your thoughts on — too. laura, thank you for your thoughts on that. _ too. laura, thank you for your thoughts on that. laura - too. laura, thank you for your i thoughts on that. laura lindsay, from skyscanner. thank you for your time. if you would like to get in touch about whether the traffic light system changes will make a difference to you, you can do that on twitter. the military will begin delivering fuel supplies to forecourts hit by the petrol crisis today. the government insists the situation at the pumps is easing but troops will be deployed across london and the south east, where the worst shortages remain as charlotte gallagher reports. brian, we spoke last week, good to get an update on the situation.
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would you agree with that assessment that the situation is easing around much of the uk, but not so much yet in london and the south—east? yes. much of the uk, but not so much yet in london and the south-east? yes, i would add a — in london and the south-east? yes, i would add a caveat _ in london and the south-east? yes, i would add a caveat to _ in london and the south-east? yes, i would add a caveat to the _ would add a caveat to the chancellor's spin he has been putting up to the media this morning about areas outside london and the south—east, yes, they are open for business, but their stock levels are very fragile. they have had a huge stock depletion, and whilst they are getting fuel back, they are not yet up getting fuel back, they are not yet up to their normal stock levels. so, any delivery outages, any stronger than usual demand, and we could see issues. so, a caveat there. but improving, definitely. haste issues. so, a caveat there. but improving, definitely. how long do ou think, improving, definitely. how long do you think, brian, _ improving, definitely. how long do you think, brian, it _ improving, definitely. how long do you think, brian, it will— improving, definitely. how long do you think, brian, it will be - improving, definitely. how long do you think, brian, it will be before i you think, brian, it will be before we see the deliveries with the army involved, making a real difference? they won't make a massive difference, because there isjust not enough of them, and there are
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too many, particularly in london on the south—east, too many forecourts which have been completely depleted of stock. for four or five days now. so this is a really serious outage, which the government should be addressing. the news this morning is better than bad, it is slightly positive. but the poll later in the day will confirm if it is a real turning point today. i think that the military drivers will add a little bit of confidence to that. it is not a full panacea. the little bit of confidence to that. it is not a full panacea.— little bit of confidence to that. it is not a full panacea. the news is better than _ is not a full panacea. the news is better than bad, _ is not a full panacea. the news is better than bad, that _ is not a full panacea. the news is better than bad, that is - is not a full panacea. the news is better than bad, that is an - better than bad, that is an interesting turn of phrase, it is not wholly enthusiastic about the situation, clearly. in the slightly longer term, what are you going to do to stop this happening again? what needs to happen? i do to stop this happening again? what needs to happen?- do to stop this happening again? what needs to happen? i think the indust , what needs to happen? i think the industry. the _ what needs to happen? i think the industry, the hauliers, _ what needs to happen? i think the industry, the hauliers, the - what needs to happen? i think the industry, the hauliers, the oil- industry, the hauliers, the oil companies, need to sort out what they are doing about specialised hgv tanker drivers. the government is
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trying to assist by extending a temporary visa. they are looking for 300 hgv tanker drivers from europe, and they have extended the visa permit from the end of the year to the end of march, which hopefully might encourage more to come across. there are other issues with training and the testing, it was well behind because of the pandemic. now the military are helping them to do more hgv driving tests. there were problems with paperwork not being properly processed at the dvla. i am in regular contact with grant shapps, who is responsible. the government tells me they are trying to fix that as well. so, there are lots of small levers which government and industry together are trying to fix, to make sure as we go into the winter rush, when a lot of
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heating oil has to be delivered, when we go into the winter rush, we are better positioned than we are today. are better positioned than we are toda . a, are better positioned than we are toda . �* ., ., ~ are better positioned than we are toda . �* . . ~' i., , today. okay, brian, thank you very much for that. _ today. okay, brian, thank you very much for that. ryan _ today. okay, brian, thank you very much for that. ryan morrison - today. okay, brian, thank you very much for that. ryan morrison fromj much for that. ryan morrison from the petrol retailers association. a metropolitan police officer will appear before magistrates today charged with rape. david carrick — who is 46 and from stevenage in hertfordshire — is accused of attacking a woman in september of last year. he'll appear at hatfield magistrates court via video link. it's exactly four weeks until world leaders will gather in glasgow for crucial talks on how to manage the climate crisis. the bbc�*s climate editor, justin rowlatt, is in hull for us this morning looking at the role wind power could have in our move towards renewable energy. letsjoinjustin lets join justin live in letsjoinjustin live in hull now. lets joinjustin live in hull now. what can you tell is about what is happening there?— what can you tell is about what is happening there? well, i am in what
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i consider happening there? well, i am in what i consider an — happening there? well, i am in what i consider an absolutely _ happening there? well, i am in what i consider an absolutely fabulous - i consider an absolutely fabulous location, the offshore wind turbine factory. as you say, it is in hull, east yorkshire. just take a look at the scale of what they are doing here. huge turbine blades, lined up by the humber estuary. look at those huge turbine columns there. absolutely enormous. this is a wonderful place to be for me, because being the bbc�*s climate editor can be really... i mean this genuinely, it can be really depressing. every morning i go to my inbox and it is bulging with emails about environmental devastation. so coming to a place like this is really exciting, because this is at the epicentre of a new industrial revolution, an industrial revolution designed to tackle the main project of the 21st century, humanity's effort to move away from fossil fuels. so this is all about making low carbon energy. and i've been
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right out, 120 kilometres out, the north sea is over there, out into the north sea, 75 miles away, to see what it takes to maintain, to keep the blades of the turbines turning on the north sea, delivering clean, green energy to british homes. it's actually much smoother than it looks. 0h! if you thought your commute to work was rough going, check this out. we're with a team trying to get out to service a wind turbine. so, the north sea is famous for its savage weather. but that's why they put the wind turbines out here, because this is where the wind is. but of course, it means they are very hard — whoa — to maintain. whoa! the swell is up to three metres high today, making it too dangerous to climb the ladder. so it's back to the ship for us.
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this is where the team of engineers who keep the blades turning live and work. coming through. these guys do 12—hour shifts out here, for 1h straight days, and then get two weeks off. it can be tough but the flourishing offshore wind industry is creating thousands of well—paid skilled jobs — most of them in places like grimsby, that have seen traditional industries decline. my grandad went to sea when he was 1a, as a cabin boy. for seafaring families like mine, offshore wind has really given more options. 80% of our workforce in the east coast come from within an hour of our operational hub. so it's really opened up a world of opportunities that, for seafaring families like mine, really didn't exist 15 years ago. and it is comfortable on the ship. so let me take you on a little tour. right, so, this is my cabin.
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pretty cushty, hey? come and have a look at this. so this is the lounge. sorry, lads. and this — this is the dining area. and let me tell you, the food is really good. let's see what's on the menu. jill, jill? hi. what's for tea? today is fish, chips and mushy peas, and we've got pork chops with cheshire sauce. bread—and—butter pudding and custard. oh, my god, sounds good, doesn't it? and you can work all that off down here. a day later, and the sea is calmer. this time we do get to the ladder. it's quite a climb and this is just to the bottom of the thing. but there's bad news.
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so we've managed to get onto the turbine, but the crane isn't working, which means we can't get our gear up off the boat, which means we can't go up the turbine. but i can give you a sense of this — look at this. just how huge these wind turbines are. these monsters are almost 200 metres high, and each turn of the blades is reckoned to generate enough electricity to power an average uk home for a day. it's nice to know that your time and your energy is contributing to this world running on green energy, which will be a better future for everybody. and it's growing up in the north—east in your hometown. yeah, we're really lucky to have it on our doorstep, i don't take that for granted at all. we got up as far as the platform but we couldn't go any further because of the broken crane. what does that tell you about the challenges you face in your daily work? just that you've got to remain open and ready for whatever could arise.
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i think being adaptable just in general is a good thing, yeah, because life's always full of surprises. as we head back, we get a fantastic view. this one wind farm can power up to a million homes and they have almost finished another even bigger one next to it. and there are plans for many more around the country. what's more, the wind revolution isn'tjust happening here in the uk — it's starting to take off all around the world. they have stopped the pile drivers, huge pile drivers extending the factory. they are doubling the size of this place they also have plans to the turbines even bigger. so, expansion here. what that is telling you is how this industry is flourishing. if you look around the world, there are many places in the world, there are many places in the world where wind and solar are now
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the cheapest form of energy. what do i mean by that? i mean they are cheaper than fossil fuel, cheaper than coal, cheaper than gas. what does that mean? well, it is basic economics. if you are the person wanting to invest in new, renewable power, you are going to invest in the green technology, not necessarily because you care about the climate, although i hope you do, investors out there, but you are going to do it because it is the cheapest thing to do under the most profitable. that is a really optimistic and positive place for the world to be. it is just beginning, this is the beginning of a new industrial revolution, but it is happening, and in the run—up to glasgow, in the run—up to this big climate conference in glasgow, i think it is important, as well as all the doom and gloom, distrust of these really positive messages on climate.
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we do get a lot of thoughts worrying about this, and of course it is right to be worrying about this. just it weeks to go until cop26, the climate conference in glasgow. we can close over the nation for the weather. what we have today is a right old mixture of weather. it is going to be sunny at times with areas of clyde. we have that combination at the moment. there will be some sunshine in between the showers, some of those heavy and thundery and breezy. the showers being blown from the west towards the east. highs 12 to 17. as we head through this evening and overnight the system coming on across the southwest will push slowly northwards and north—eastward and there are going to be torrential downpours of rain across southern and eastern parts of england, as much as 30 to a0 millimetres
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accompanied by squally winds. for scotland and northern ireland, clear skies, saw a colder night, especially in sheltered grains, where it could be called enough for a touch of frost. there will be sunshine and a few showers. for england and wales we still have the rain, heaviest across northern england, especially cumbria, when we could have 30 or a0 millimetres of rain and brisk winds. tomorrow's temperature ranging from 11 to 15. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: amid pressure on the government over living standards, the chancellor prepares to speak at the conservative party
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the conservative party conference. he'll commit five hundred million pounds to renew job support programmes. as fuel supply issues persist particularly in the south east of england the military start delivering to petrol stations. new travel rules come into force in the uk, with the traffic light system replaced by a single red list. leaked financial documents reveal how a conservative party donor who contributed to borisjohnson's leadership campaign was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. and four weeks before world leaders meet in glasgow for talks on the climate crisis, we look at the role wind power could have in our move towards renewable energy. good morning. it is becoming the great modern rivalry in english football, a game that had everything yesterday, a brilliant goal from mo salah, the man of the match award shared between him and phil foden in the two all draw at anfield. the only sour note, liverpool now investigating
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reports of a fan spitting towards the city bench. as austin halewood reports. the first weekend of october. the days getting shorter, the layers getting thicker. and already this felt like it could be a crucial game in deciding the title. the current holders came to merseyside with their minds set on three points. they dominated early on and the best chance of the first half fell to kevin de bruyne. a free header straight over the bar, a let off for liverpool. but the reds' early—season form has been enough to convince plenty of their title credentials. after the break, they finally clicked into gear. and with a forward line like this one, they don't need too many chances. sadio mane with the opener, and city thinking what should have been. but they weren't left to ponder that for too long. because if you give phil foden that much space, he doesn't often miss. city deservedly back level. but that was only the start because often the best players produce the biggest of moments. and they don't come much better than mo salah.
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the trickiest of runs complemented by the neatest of finishes. but city have one or two big—game players of their own and this time de bruyne didn't let them down. what a game, and what a title race it looks like we're going to have. austin halewood, bbc news. i love the premier league, so. the premier league is it. so, i congratulate liverpool and of course my players, my staff, my backroom staff. that's why these both teams, last year, they were fighting to win the premier league. so what a game, ups and downs, highs and lows. what a game we had in the premier league yesterday. so from salah to son. he was the tormentor for spurs as they looked to put a difficult few weeks behind them. he had a hand in theirfirst and then did all the hard
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work for their second, forcing aston villa to put the ball into their own net. 2—1 it finished, a much—needed win after three league defeats in a row for spurs. leicester's sticky spell continues. they were two up against crystal palace but gave away their lead. jeff schlupp, who'd only been on the pitch for 48 seconds, with the equaliser. brentford are loving life in the premier league, a 94th minute winner over west ham from yoane wissa sees them move up to seventh. celtic have been waiting a long time for their first away win, but it's come at long last. jota giving them a 2—1win over aberdeen at pittodrie. the victory leaves them 6th, still six points behind leaders rangers, who came from a goal down to beat 10 man hibernian at ibrox. alfredo morelos getting the winner for steven gerrard's side, 2—1 it finished as rangers return to the top of the league. and in the women's super league, manchester city slumped to their third straight defeat. west ham's yui hasegawa
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latched on to this poor backpass to chip the keeper from forty yards as the hammers wrapped up a 2—0 win. city have now lost back to back home league games for the first time since 2014. british number two cameron norrie's brilliant run at the san diego 0pen ended in last night's final. he was beaten by casper ruud, who'd earlier knocked out andy murray, he went down 6—0 in the first before losing the second 6—2 to the second seed. and finally... how about dealing with these conditions on your ride into work? this was the men's paris roubaix race bikes going everywhere on the cobbled roads. the riders absolutely covered from head to toe in mud. it was won in the end by sonny colbrelli. a case of mud, sweat and gears.
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tough conditions. tough physically and mentally. the chancellor rishi sunak will set out his plan to spend half a billion pounds on helping more people into work when he addresses the conservative party conference today. it comes as the government is cutting the universal credit payment by 20 pounds a week ending a temporary uplift introduced at the start of the pandemic. 0ur correspondent zoe conway has been looking into this for us. at the thomas a becket church in ramsay, you'll find a harvest of kindness and compassion. they are concerned here that the families they feed
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are going to be even more in need this winter as fuel bills are set to rise, and the universal credit uplift comes to an end. it's about human beings, families that can't afford to pay their energy bills, they turn the heating off, their kids get chest infections. when parents are working double shifts, their children don't see them, they don't see each other and families start to disintegrate with all the horrible things that happen then. it's about people, and, yeah, i'm worried. coming in from the cold are dave and charlotte. dave works six days a week as a floor fitter. paid the minimum wage, he relies on universal credit to provide for his family. from this week, they'll lose the £20 per week universal credit uplift. it doesn't sound like a lot, but it is to a family. like, it helps buy the nappies for the children, milk, fruit, it helps spread the money. so it's going to be a big loss, £80 per month.
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what do you say to the argument that the countryjust can't afford this £20 uplift? it's costing taxpayers £6 billion. i'm torn, really, because obviously i work, i pay tax and stuff like that. but... and we do pay a lot of people out as well. so it's... i'm torn between both sides. charlotte is a care worker. she says she's looked into going back to work, but it's the cost of childcare that's holding her back. people in receipt of universal credit do get government help with paying for childcare, but for this family it still doesn't add up. there are a lot of staff shortages in the country at the moment. wages are having to go up to attract staff. couldn't you get a better—paid job? i could, but living in such a rural town with no transport and me personally not driving myself, i can't go further afield to find a betterjob.
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in nearby peterborough, you'll discover that the quietest part of the city is where the recruitment agencies are. their windows might be crammed full of adverts forjobs in local factories and warehouses, but there's not exactly a queue here to apply for them. could the end of the universal credit uplift give people an incentive to re—enter the workforce and fill these vacancies? that's certainly the view of the leader of the council and head of the local conservative association. finances, for many, are at critical. but there are other ways that you can go and generate some money for yourfamily. i think i would be one of the first to say here that families should take responsibility for themselves, the way they live their lives, how many children they have. what they do with their cash, whatjobs they have. and there is a wealth ofjobs available here in peterborough. i could take you to any restaurant, cafe or bar, just a stone's throw
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from where we're standing now, they are really desperate for people. nowhere is the staffing shortage more desperate than here at the light box cafe. customers are greeted with this warning. the owner has tried to fill the gaps by asking her staff to work more hours. we have had lots of staff that have been on universal credit, and would dearly love to take on more hours, but feel that the advantages that they would get in the pay that they would receive from us are outweighed by what they would lose in terms of their universal credit. many people on universal credit are subject to what's known as a taper. it means that for every extra pound they earn 63p is taken away. it's this taper, plus the issue of childcare, which eve says is proving insurmountable for some of her staff. could ending the uplift give people an extra incentive to up their hours? i don't think that it will.
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i think that the barriers will still be there. for the money, again, that people will be potentially losing, the incentive to come back to work is still not enough. so i think that the people that are losing that money willjust be worse off. the government says that further help is at hand for families in need. hardship grants of £500 will be available from local councils to help people through the winter. zoe conway, bbc news. lord frost has renewed his threat to suspend parts of the exit—mac deal affecting northern ireland. it was supposed to avoid a heart border but has meant new checks on some products. he told the conservative conference in manchester that the
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arrangements had become to come apart even more quickly than we feared. ., ., feared. the northern ireland trotocol feared. the northern ireland protocol is — feared. the northern ireland protocol is not _ feared. the northern ireland protocol is not working - feared. the northern ireland protocol is not working and l feared. the northern ireland - protocol is not working and needs to change. yes, we agreed the protocol in that difficult autumn 2 years ago, we know we were taking a risk, but anywhere they won in the cause of peace and the cause of protecting the good friday agreement. it was the good friday agreement. it was the right thing to do. attended a constitutional crisis and meant our country could leave the eu with real choices. of course we wanted to negotiate something better. if it had not been for the madness of the surrender act we could have done so. we worried that the protocol would not take the strain if not handled sensitively. as it has turned out, we were right. they arrangements have begun to come apart even more quickly than we feared. thanks to
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the eu's heavy—handed actions support has collapsed. the protocol itself is undermining the belfast good friday agreement. businesses, political parties, institutions and all in northern ireland face instability and disruption. we can still solve these problems. i set out in july a still solve these problems. i set out injuly a set of proposals that would establish a new balance for a lasting future for northern ireland. i will soon be sending in a set of legal texts to the eu to support them. we still await a formal response from the eu to our proposals. from what i hear, i worry that we will not get a response which enables the significant change we need. so i urge the eu to be ambitious. it is no use tinkering around the edges. we need significant change. if we can agree something better, as i would like us to do, we can get back to where we
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wanted to be, an independent brexit with friendly relations with the eu based on free trade. but we cannot wait forever. without an agreed solution soon, we will need to act using the article 60 safeguard mechanism to address the impact the protocol is having on northern ireland. take farmers say they could have 2 carry out a cull of pigs if the government does not take action. we canjoin protesters government does not take action. we can join protesters outside the midland hotel in manchester with 50 people working in the industry. 1 of them dressed up as a pig. tell us what the situation is on your farm. the pig industry is in a bit of a
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dire situation. we have enrolled about 25% of our contract number for approximately 10 weeks so it is a realjuggling act for us trying to make sure that we keep the welfare to a high standard so that we can keep them moving, basically. what keep them moving, basically. what are abattoirs _ keep them moving, basically. what are abattoirs saying _ keep them moving, basically. what are abattoirs saying to _ keep them moving, basically. what are abattoirs saying to farmers right now? what are they saying to you? a couple of weeks ago we had theissue you? a couple of weeks ago we had the issue of the c02 shortage and thatis the issue of the c02 shortage and that is used to stun the animals and abattoirs, but at the moment it seems to be about a shortage of workers in the food processing plants. workers in the food processing lants. . ,., workers in the food processing lants. . , , workers in the food processing lants. . , plants. yeah, so basically they are 'ust plants. yeah, so basically they are just seeing — plants. yeah, so basically they are just seeing that — plants. yeah, so basically they are just seeing that they _ plants. yeah, so basically they are just seeing that they could - plants. yeah, so basically they are just seeing that they could only . just seeing that they could only take 75% of our contracts and that is nonnegotiable. we have no idea how long this issue is going to last and it is up to us to basically make sure we arejuggling and it is up to us to basically make sure we are juggling and it will get to a situation where we will have to
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cull pigs on the farm and incinerate them and they were not go into the food chain, which is criminal. what food chain, which is criminal. what did ou food chain, which is criminal. what did you think— food chain, which is criminal. what did you think of— food chain, which is criminal. what did you think of what _ food chain, which is criminal. what did you think of what boris johnson did you think of what borisjohnson had to say yesterday when he spoke to andrew marr and he said, i hate to andrew marr and he said, i hate to break it to you, but our food processing industry does involve killing a lot of animals. i processing industry does involve killing a lot of animals.— killing a lot of animals. i think it was really _ killing a lot of animals. i think it was really insulting _ killing a lot of animals. i think it was really insulting what - killing a lot of animals. i think it was really insulting what he - killing a lot of animals. i think it| was really insulting what he said. it showed his lack of knowledge for our industry. the fact that he doesn't understand that killing pigs on the farm and incinerating them means they will not go into the virgin. it was disgraceful, to be quite honest. —— the food chain. [30 quite honest. -- the food chain. do ou quite honest. —— the food chain. do you think any temporary visas to work in the food processing plants, is that only a short—term answer to the edges you are talking about? are people not in the right places for these jobs i suppose people not in the right places for thesejobs i suppose is people not in the right places for these jobs i suppose is the question i am asking? this is something that was put to the chancellor earlier today when he talked about the huge
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number ofjob vacancies there are available and he was asked are the people might want to work in these jobs in the right places? i people might want to work in these jobs in the right places?— jobs in the right places? i think that it is definitely _ jobs in the right places? i think that it is definitely a _ jobs in the right places? i think| that it is definitely a short-term that it is definitely a short—term answer. we need to make sure that we attract some skilled people into the industry. they get paid well. i know he said we need to pay better but actually if you compare it to other sectors the pig industry and the agricultural industry and abattoirs do actually pay very well, so yes it is a short—term answer and we do have to come up with our long—term answers definitely. tbs, have to come up with our long-term answers definitely.— answers definitely. a spokesperson for the department _ answers definitely. a spokesperson for the department for _ answers definitely. a spokesperson for the department for food - answers definitely. a spokesperson for the department for food and - for the department for food and rural affairs says we understand the challenges the pig industry has faced in recent months because of the covid—19 pandemic, labour shortages, accessing c02 supplies and production and exports to the chinese market. we are keeping the market situation under review and working closely with the sector. what is your response to that? i do
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what is your response to that? i do not think they _ what is your response to that? i if not think they are working that closely with us. we have had a really tough time when you put it like that. all we are asking for is short—term health. it is only the pig producers that are losing money at this moment. the processors and retailers maintain their margin all the time and so it is as much suffering once again. need to go forward and get a better supply chain and we need to stick up for the british produce. retailers have to step up and start putting uk products on the shelf instead of eu products. products on the shelf instead of eu roducts. . ~' , ., products on the shelf instead of eu roducts. ., ,, , ., ., ., ., products. thank you. part of that t-rou of products. thank you. part of that group of farmers _ products. thank you. part of that group of farmers protesting - products. thank you. part of that i group of farmers protesting outside the conservative party conference in manchester.
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north korea has restored communication hotlines with south korea at the same time as urging seoul to step up efforts to improve ties. pyongyang cut off the lines in early augustjust days after reopening them for the first time in a year in protest againstjoint military exercises involving south korea and the united states. laura bicker is following events from seoul. these hotlines are on and off again. they were switched on just briefly in august as a gesture of goodwill according to a state media released and then they were cut off again when south korea took part in those joint military exercises. today at 9 en local time communication between north and south korea was once again restored. there are many of these hotlines that include fax lines and the go between various different departments. the point of them is to avoid rising tension and accidental clashes between the military and there are 2 calls, 1 in the morning and 1 at night, but they have not been happening regularly for over a year. in the state media release
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which was put out today from north korea the quote then seeing this as a gesture towards durable peace but he has also said that he wants to see active changes towards inter— korean policies. this is something we are looking at here and that is because this is an auspicious date when it comes to inter— korean relations. an historic agreement was signed to work towards peace, economic and military cooperation. it could be while restoring the hotlines today kim jong—un is dangling the prospect of inter— korean talks at a special time because here in south korea we are going towards a presidential election. there will be a new leader come march and kim jong—un cannot guarantee that a new leader of south korea will be as happy to talk to him as the current 1.
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a large oil slick has begun washing ashore in california. beaches have been closed as oil washes up on the sand. almost 500,000 litres of oil has leaked from a pipeline connected to an offshore oil rig. california is known for its beaches, but not like this. clumps of oil and tar the size of softballs scatter the shoreline, as well as dead birds and fish. more than 120,000 gallons of oil has leaked into the ocean this from a broken pipeline five miles off the coast. we are in the midst of a potential ecological disaster here at huntington beach and as the exhibits and pictures here illustrate, the oil spill has significantly impacted our community. the broken pipeline is connected to an offshore oil platform run by a subsidiary of houston—based amplify energy. the company says the pipeline has now been shut off
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and the remaining oil suctioned out. it has been maintained. we are investigating, if the pipeline is the source of this, how this happened. a huge clean—up operation is under way to try to stop the oil reaching sensitive wetlands nearby and people are being urged to avoid the beaches. you can feel the vapour in the air. i saw what i'll describe as little pancake clusters of oil along the shoreline and i've described it as something like an egg yolk — if you push it, it kind of spreads out, so we don't want people to disturb those little clusters. local authorities say it is too soon to say whether the company responsible will face criminal charges. courtney bembridge, bbc news. time for the weather. today we have a lot of other going on in the sense that we have sunshine and showers,
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next wednesday, hail and thunder. as if that was not enough there is also going to be a breeze but nowhere nearas going to be a breeze but nowhere near as windy or wet at the week as it was at the weekend. weekend weather has now moved away. next system will come in and that will in some torrential rain and squally winds. as we go through the rest of today we have the combination of sunny spells, various amounts of cloud rolling around and also again those sellers being blown in on the brisk wind coming in from the west drifting eastwards, some of those heavy and thundery with some heel. temperatures between 12 and 17 . you can see the next band of rain waiting to come our way later. fishing north, north eastwards through the course of the night, and whenever you can see those colours you can expect heavy downpours. as much as 30 to a0 millimetres of rain fell and squally winds around this
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band as well. for scotland and northern ireland it is a different story with some clear skies, a cold night, particularly in sheltered clients were locally it will be cold enough for a touch of frost. tomorrow for scotland and northern ireland a fair bit of sunshine and dry weather and just a few showers whereas in england and wales we have this band of rain, the heaviest of which will be across northern england, especially cumbria. brisk winds. behind it you can see we are looking at sunshine and showers. temperatures 11 in the north to about 15 in the south. as we move from tuesday night into wednesday that area of low pressure bringing that area of low pressure bringing that rain moves away. we have high pressure following on behind and then the next area of low pressure comes our way. we start in the east with brisk winds and a bit of cloud, possibly a bit of rain before it melts away. under the high pressure ridge things will remain settled
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with some sunshine. as the next system comes and it will introduce some rain across northern ireland and scotland and the wind will strengthen as well. temperatures 11 to 17 . into thursday, and friday, we have weather fronts coming in across the north west, the wind will pick up so it is going to be wet and windy whereas further south and east it will be drier, brighter and temperatures will be a little bit higher.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the secret wealth of dozens of world leaders — from the king ofjordan to the president of russia — is exposed in one of the biggest ever leaks of financial documents. they reveal how a uk conservative party donor — who contributed to borisjohnson's leadership campaign — was involved in one of europe's biggest corruption scandals. he denies any wrongdoing. amid pressure on the government over living standards, the chancellor prepares to speak at the conservative party conference — he'll commit £500 million to renew job support programmes. with apprenticeships, we are giving businesses £3000 to take on a new apprentice, give them the skills and the opportunities they need. we've extended those apprenticeship incentives today.
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beaches are closed in southern california, as a large oil

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