Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 3, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

10:00 pm
changing the uk's economic model — the prime minister says the supply chain problems are part of an adjustment after brexit. is the country in crisis, sir? as the conservative party conference opens in manchester — he's faced questions about shortages of fuel and skilled workers. what we can't do in all these sectors, simply go back to the tired, failed, old model, reach for the lever called uncontrolled immigration. and he has not ruled out further tax increases. we'll be live in manchester
10:01 pm
with the latest. also tonight: the hidden wealth of public figures revealed in one of the biggest leaks of financial documents. it's far from over — two more lava streams emerge as new fissures open in the la palma volcano. and the runner back in their thousands for the london marathon. good evening. the prime minister has described the disruption to fuel supplies and the shortages of some skilled workers as part of an adjustment to the uk's economic model after brexit. as the conservative party conference began in manchester, borisjohnson said his plan was for a high wage high skill economy. but in a bbc interview today he wouldn't say whether the supply chain issues would be over by christmas and he didn't rule
10:02 pm
out further tax rises. here's our political editor, laura kuenssberg. here they are, the tories, together like this for the first time in two years. our world has changed and so has theirs. the pandemic ushered in an era of big spending and high tax. so many traditional tory instincts simply not the order of the day. why won't the government rule out further tax rises? and, given what's happened, the man in the big chair... i've warmed the seat for you. ..won�*t rule out asking you to pay more again. i can tell you that you have no fiercer and more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises than me. we don't want to raise taxes, of course we don't. are you going to do it again though? what we will not do is be irresponsible with the public finances. in other words, he'd love not to, but there's pressure to spend as well. they might not be holding placards,
10:03 pm
but there are conservatives in manchester worried about family budgets and benefit changes and the ways in which some of the nuts and bolts of the economy are out of shape. but the prime minister is using the disruption to make a political case. what we can't do is, in all the sectors, simply go back to the tired, failed, old model, reach for the lever called uncontrolled immigration. there will be a period of adjustment, but that is, i think, what we need to see. he defends short—term pain, but for precisely what and who in the long run? does the tory outfit really match after brexit? there's the striped shirt and watch chain ofjacob rees—mogg. we are at the upper reaches of the reasonableness of the tax burden. not the only cabinet minister today to warn against higher tax. the hoodie of the 41—year—old chancellor, reluctantly perhaps presiding over historic borrowing and spending. and, remember, the cabinet has to try to please the legions
10:04 pm
of voters who chose their party for the first time, and there are new faces here, impatient for them to keep their promises to make life just as good in every postcode. i want to see the government really step up and start to deliver on the levelling up agenda that we were elected on in 2019. we've obviously had a pandemic that's got in the way, but now that we are hopefully out of the back of covid and are starting to open up the economy again, we really need to put some rocket boosters under the levelling up agenda. is there any room for complacency? it sounds a bit like you are trying to say, "get on with it." 100%. we have got to get on with levelling up. there is no complacency, and people at the next general election will be judging us on how far we've gone. now, levelling up is not going to be completed by the next general election, even if it's in may 2024, but people need to see progress towards it. this is getting very sticky now. borisjohnson enjoys the wisecracks of campaigning, the need to entertain. he has proposed by saying he is having his cake and eating it. yet the real life of running the country
10:05 pm
and a party is not the same. fantastic. nothing can go wrong. politics isn'tjust for show. and laura's with us now live from manchester. what are the expectations for what this conference will be like for the conservatives? thank you. it is a strange moment in a way, this conference. party conferences are always for the leaders, a better celebration, parties like to get together and grapple in a bit of a group hug. but it is about reaching an accommodation with that party at that particular moment. for boris johnson, so much has changed since the last time he appeared before the party faithful. the last time in 2019, yes, he was the leader but we hadn't left the european union, he hadn't left the european union, he hadn't won a general election and secured an enormous majority. and who then, at that point, ever imagined that the country and the
10:06 pm
world would be hit by a global pandemic. so much has changed, both in terms of our lives and in terms of the politics. he comes here this week almost to test the coalition the tories built over brexit. maybe to see if it really can hold. but it's notjust about to see if it really can hold. but it's not just about what will happen in the bubble here in manchester this week. there are, as we have heard in the last few days, very serious issues the country is grappling with. very serious fears that some families have tonight about whether or not they will be able to afford to pay the bills in the coming months. the test for borisjohnson this week and in the next coming days, is not whether he can keep his party happy, but can he show to the country that he is really in touch with what is going on and can he deal with the problems of now, rather than having political discussions about the problem that went before him? laura, thank you very much.
10:07 pm
the latest from fuel retailers is that large parts of the uk are now free of the long queues to fill up and the supply issues they'be been facing but signiicant problems remain in some areas. our business correspondent katy austin is here. where are the problems now, katie? the petrol retailers association which represents independent forecourts, said the crisis was all but over in the midlands, the north and scotland. however, it said there were still supply issues in parts of southern england. this evening, the government has confirmed that the sprite brought improvements across the uk, stocks have not recovered as quickly in london and the south—east. from tomorrow, army fuel tanker drivers will start to help with deliveries and it has been confirmed that of those who have completed their training and ready to go on monday, more than half of them will be deployed to serve the terminals which supply to london and the south—east to try and quickly ease the shortages that have built up ease the shortages that have built up in those areas and remain. katie,
10:08 pm
thank ou up in those areas and remain. katie, thank you very _ up in those areas and remain. katie, thank you very much. _ the financial affairs of political leaders and royalty are among what has been revealed in a massive leak of documents that are being called the pandora papers. more than 300 prominent individuals are featured in the files including the king ofjordan, who secretly bought properties in london, washington, and malibu. his lawyers have said the information is not accurate or up today. as part of his bbc panorama investigation, richard bilton reports. it's one of the world's most glamorous addresses. so this is david beckham's place, up on our right. this is david beckham's place? uh-huh. home to the stars. that's simon cowell�*s place right there. just there? but even the guides don't know who owns one imposing villa on malibu's cliffs. who lives here, on this house on the left, just here? who lives here? i have no idea. extremely impressive.
10:09 pm
the secret owner has bought the properties on either side, too. we know his identity because of a huge leak of offshore documents. they were obtained by the international consortium of investigativejournalists and shared with more than 600 reporters, including the guardian in the uk. the documents show the malibu property was held through a company called nabisco holdings. but the real owner is abdullah bin al—hussein, the king ofjordan. king abdullah�*s country isn't rich. jordan is getting over five years £650 million of uk aid. but we found the king owned properties in washington and london as well, 15 in total. he spent £70 million. it's just very, very difficult for the averagejordanian to achieve just a home and family and a good job.
10:10 pm
to have it really thrown injordanians' faces that he's just been funnelling money abroad all this time... that would look really bad. the king ofjordan's lawyers said there is nothing improper about his ownership of properties and the source of funds is personal wealth, which he also uses to fund projects forjordan�*s citizens. closer to home, the files show a property deal involving a former uk prime minister. this isn't about hiding wealth offshore, but tony blair did benefit from a loophole. 0ffshore trusts get tax relief while homeowners pay vat on insurance premiums. we will create a tax system that is fair, which is related to ability to pay. on his way to power, tony blair promised tax reform, but he and his wife saved money
10:11 pm
when they bought this place in central london in 2017. it cost them £6.5 million. the stamp duty on a property like this would be more than £300,000. that's what you or i would pay if we bought this property direct from somebody else. but the blairs didn't pay it. that's because the property was owned by an offshore company and the blairs bought that company rather than the property itself. no rules were broken, no stamp duty to pay. that doesn't look great, and so, even if what the blairs did was perfectly legal, perfectly legitimate in the business world, it feels instinctively unfair, because they got access to an advantage, a potential advantage that the rest of us don't have. cherie blair told the bbc they didn't request to structure the transaction this way and that, after purchase, they had brought the property under uk tax and regulatory rules.
10:12 pm
a spokesman added, the couple will be liable for capital gains tax on resale. richard bilton, bbc news. you can watch the first part of that investigation in full on the bbc iplayer now and the second part is on bbc one tomorrow night at 7:30. the prime minister has acknowledged there are problems in how the criminaljustice system handles victims of rape and sexual violence. speaking to the bbc he promised to "stop at nothing" to "get more rapists behind bars" and said victims needed a better service from the police. however he stopped short of backing an independent inquiry into sarah everard's murder by a serving officer saying he wanted to hear first from the police watchdog's review. graham satchell reports. sarah everard was just walking home when she was falsely arrested and then murdered by a serving met police officer.
10:13 pm
it has led to serious questions about trust in the police and the behaviour of men and the whole criminal justice system. the prime minister has committed to in his words getting more rapists behind bars, despite the budget for the department ofjustice being cut by 25% in the last decade. it's notjust a question of money. you need the three parts of the criminaljustice system — the police, the prosecutors, the judiciary, they need to work better together. and rape victims, domestic violence victims, need to get a better service. only 2% of reported rapes in england and wales end in a prosecution. convictions are at an all—time low. campaigners and charities say there needs to be change at every level across the uk. we have a criminaljustice system that fails to respond to crimes of rape. we really need to create a culture where that
10:14 pm
behaviour is being challenged and not being tolerated. in scotland, one concrete change following the death of sarah everard — people are being told they can now verify the identitieses of lone police officers by asking to speak to the force control room. i it is not requiring women to bel proactive, the police themselves have to be proactive. a lone officer should provide i the verification as to who he is. will sarah everard's murder lead to change in the safety of women and the way rape and sexual assault allegations are prosecuted? the government says it is pledging to provide better services for women. graham satchell, bbc news. it has emerged tonight at serving metropolitan police officer has been charged with rape. he has been suspended from his role. he is alleged to have attacked a woman in
10:15 pm
september last year. he will appear before magistrates tomorrow. let's take a look at the latest official figures on coronavirus which show 30,439 new infections in the latest 2a hour period. that means an average 34,572 cases per day in the last week. another 43 deaths have been recorded of people had a positive test result within the previous 28 days. on average in the past week there were 112 deaths per day. the latest figures on those being treated in hospital and percentage of people vaccinated, haven't yet been made available. the volcano on la palma in the canary islands which began erupting two weeks ago has entered a new phase of intense activity with two more fissures blowing open. its now thought the eruptions could continue for the next two months. let's join our correspondent danjohnson in la palma. incredibly, in the last hour, this
10:16 pm
eruption has got even stronger and there is a risk even more areas will have to be evacuated, potentially this area now is at risk because this area now is at risk because this volcano just seems to keep getting more and more powerful. there has been a fantastic response from the community and the authorities to keep people safe so far. the spanish prime minister was here today pledging 200 million euros to help this island recover. two weeks on, that volcano is still capable of producing fantastic images and a deafening sound. it is posing some major questions about the future of this island. haw posing some major questions about the future of this island.— the future of this island. how can life return _ the future of this island. how can life return to _ the future of this island. how can life return to a _ the future of this island. how can life return to a landscape - life return to a landscape disfigured like this. the larva still churning up this hillside and burning through more of these homes. so at its source, i asked the main volcano expert here how long it will take to recover? the
10:17 pm
volcano expert here how long it will take to recover?— take to recover? the lava flows will kee the take to recover? the lava flows will keep the heat _ take to recover? the lava flows will keep the heat inside _ take to recover? the lava flows will keep the heat inside for _ take to recover? the lava flows will keep the heat inside for years. - take to recover? the lava flows will keep the heat inside for years. it i keep the heat inside for years. it is going to depend on the thickness of the lava flow. that is going to depend on the thickness of the lava flow.— of the lava flow. at times, the scorched _ of the lava flow. at times, the scorched earth _ of the lava flow. at times, the scorched earth resembles - of the lava flow. at times, the scorched earth resembles a i scorched earth resembles a battlefield. and it sounds like one, too. how is it to live near to this? i am afraid. very, very much. it always— i am afraid. very, very much. it always makes loud noises and i am afraid _ always makes loud noises and i am afraid to _ always makes loud noises and i am afraid to sleep here. will always makes loud noises and i am afraid to sleep here.— afraid to sleep here. will you stay? no. and afraid to sleep here. will you stay? no- and we — afraid to sleep here. will you stay? no. and we found _ afraid to sleep here. will you stay? no. and we found gert, _ afraid to sleep here. will you stay? no. and we found gert, retired - afraid to sleep here. will you stay? | no. and we found gert, retired here from germany _ no. and we found gert, retired here from germany in _ no. and we found gert, retired here from germany in the _ no. and we found gert, retired here from germany in the last _ no. and we found gert, retired here from germany in the last house - from germany in the last house before the exclusion zone. if from germany in the last house before the exclusion zone. if you don't have _ before the exclusion zone. if you don't have to _ before the exclusion zone. if you don't have to live _ before the exclusion zone. if you don't have to live here, - before the exclusion zone. if you don't have to live here, it - before the exclusion zone. if you don't have to live here, it is - don't have to live here, it is marvellous. but the noise, it will come in the night, maybe it comes nearer, i don't know. do you feel safe? at the moment, yes. the volcano is _ safe? at the moment, yes. the volcano is still _ safe? at the moment, yes. the volcano is still really _ safe? at the moment, yes. the volcano is still really active, more lava is flowing and more ash. look at the effect it is having on the
10:18 pm
nearest homes, look at the amount of volcanic dust that is at the bottom of the swimming full. a big effort for people here to keep their homes safe and clean. 0n for people here to keep their homes safe and clean. on this site, you get a real perspective on the trail of lava, all that black, steaming mound flowing down the hillside. that is where all those homes have been destroyed. the satellite picture shows clearly how it has sliced through the island. the most im ortant sliced through the island. the most important thing _ sliced through the island. the most important thing is _ sliced through the island. the most important thing is that _ sliced through the island. the most important thing is that this - important thing is that this eruption cannot generate loss of human lives. it is impossible. impossible? human lives. it is impossible. impossible?— human lives. it is impossible. impossible? impossible, if we behave. but _ impossible? impossible, if we behave. but it _ impossible? impossible, if we behave. but it is _ impossible? impossible, if we behave. but it is the _ impossible? impossible, if we| behave. but it is the behaviour impossible? impossible, if we i behave. but it is the behaviour of nature's most volatile forces dictates when this incredible show comes to an end and how much more is lost in the process. dan comes to an end and how much more is lost in the process.— lost in the process. dan johnson, bbc news- _ marathon runners were back en—masse on the streets of london today. jane dougall has that in the sports
10:19 pm
news now. there may be some tired feet tonight as the london marathon returned as a mass event for the first time in two years. records were broken in the elite races, while virtual runners also joined to raise money for good causes. joe wilson reports. the london marathon, it was back. over 36,000 began, a little down on recent years, but a great street filling expression of normal. our annual view returned of everyday people taking on the extraordinary. of course there are those who make the distance appears simple. marcel hug of switzerland out on his own in the men's wheelchair race winning in a course record time. but now have a look at this sprint finish. that's david weir in the grey helmet, taking third place in yet another london marathon, looking as committed as ever — although retirement, he admitted, had been on his mind.
10:20 pm
it is my 22nd in a row, i don't know how many more i will do. it must be a record for me to keep on going. manuela schar, the other swiss star, was a clear winner, breaking her own course record. the weather was kind, cool, dry and still. for all the elite, that meant quick. joycilinejepkosgei of kenya shook off her rivals at two hours and kept going, to finish in her personal best time, sub 2:18. the men's race teased world record pace for a while — not quite. ethiopian's sisay lemma's winning time was two hours, four minutes in the second. not bad at all. the elite races are only part of the story. tens of thousands were doing the virtual london marathon in their own space and time. 0n the official course, well, many were going the distance in their own way!
10:21 pm
time is an abstract concept, just get there when you can and if the last few steps seem almost impossible, there is someone to help you, even to carry you. it is not where you start, it is how you finish, what is that toddler's record? joe wilson, bbc news. a packed day in the premier league, if you want to wait for the results on match of the day and sportscene for the scottish scores, you know what to do. both liverpool and manchester city missed out on the chance to go top of the table after drawing 2—2, with an impressive goal from mo salah. kevin de bruyne got the equaliser for city late on. elsewhere crystal palace drew with leicester, there were wins for brentford and tottenham. in scotland, rangers are top of the premiership after beating hibs 2—1, while glasgow rivals celtic got a late winner against aberdeen. it was level at 84 minutes, but celtic�*sjota put them 2—1 up with a close range finish. that result keeps them sixth, aberdeen are ninth.
10:22 pm
in the women's super league, struggling manchester city lost to west ham. tottenham beat leicester, while reading lost to everton. manchester united beat second bottom birmingham city. leah galton with the first, ella toone tapped in for the second. now, a horse with odds of 80—1 might not peak your interest, but "torqator tasso" was the shock winner of europe's richest race — the prix de l�*arc de triomphe. with jockey rene piechulek on board, the outsider won the 100th edition of the race. trainer marcel weiss, who takes home more than £2.4 million. there's more on the bbc sport website, including british number two cameron norrie taking on casper ruud in the san diego 0pen final. that's all your sport. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. goodbye.
10:23 pm
this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. more now on the conservative party conference in manchester. the prime minister has promised that he is opposed to any unnecessary tax rises, but would not rule out any further increases. earlier, my colleague
10:24 pm
shaun ley discussed boris johnson's comment in more detail with sebastien payne from the financial times and sam lister from the daily express. the public wants to see the fuel sorted and the food shortages resolved, but i think what we have seen from the prime minister today, he is trying to push this back onto business. he has been talking about a period of adjustment while businesses adapt to the new reality. he is trying to put the blame back on to the businesses, saying it is time for them to pay higher wages to attract the staff and that is the way forward. it's curious this relationship that has developed with business, from a conservative prime minister, we had him saying quite a while ago when we were talking about brexit effects, he used an expletive—deleted about business and at the same time he is trying to say that we love business and it is important, but he seems to be saying, stop blaming whitehall for problems that should be sorted out
10:25 pm
in the free market economy. i think when you heard the prime minister's comments this morning, it is clear what he is saying, he's saying we are not going back to the economic model we had before, which relied on low—skilled, cheap labour coming from across europe. that buttressed large parts of the uk economy, from hospitality to farming, including hgv drivers as well, and his message is that what needs to happen is wages need to go up, and that is probably a message that is popular with voters, but as sam was just saying, the crucial thing is the disruption here. the chancellor said in an interview on saturday that this could take several months to get better and we could see disruptions throughout christmas, and i think people at the conference here today will be happy to see that, but people in the outside world, i do not know how long they will stomach this. the prime minister has made it very clear, he is not going to put more visas or have more migration and toughing that out as a way of putting it is interesting strategy. he thinks he has got the political space,
10:26 pm
the conservatives are eight points ahead in the polls, he is still the most popular person ahead of keir starmer, to be prime minister, he is in a strong political position to try and do this. what do you think is his task and the task of other conservatives this week, sam? particularly in the light of the labour conference last week. yes, steady as she goes, we are at least two years out from an election and so it is a bit of a steady as she goes. but i think certainly, the prime minister, he has got three things he wants to focus on this week, that is crime, climate and the economy. that is what he will be focusing on. he wants to set the agenda ahead of the cop26 climate conference in glasgow, he wants to show that the tories are the party, still the party that is tough on crime and tomorrow you will see the chancellor
10:27 pm
give his main speech, and they certainly want to set the agenda in terms of the economy, talking about how britain is set to be the fastest—growing economy in the g7, and talking about the plan for jobs and that is their focus this week anyway. seb, there are noises, not least from mps who represent constituencies not so very far from manchester, closer to machester than london, you have written a book about the impact the conservatives have made in swathes of the country where at least at a parliamentary level, they have been absent for decades, if ever existed, certainly not in modern times. how big a challenge is that now that he is facing, from his own backbenchers, the people in a sense who gave him his majority at westminster? the key thing for boris johnson is about delivery, we know what the vague vision is, to pour money into the so—called red wall of the places that voted tory for the first time in living memory, and backed brexit and you heard that in his comments when he was talking about wages,
10:28 pm
he said in 2016 and in 2019, people voted for change and he has now got to deliver that. we have gone through the pandemic and brexit and people need to see stuff happening, new projects delivered and for me the most crucial person is michael gove, who was designated the secretary of state for levelling up, this is one of these great catch—all phrases that politicians love, it could mean anything to anyone, but the task is to put meat on that. if you look behind us, the slogan is "getting the job done," and any political conference that says that, you might think has run out of ideas. it's quite workmanlike. that is the task for ministers, to say we are going to deliver change, this is what it looks like and what success in levelling up looks like as well, so hopefully we will get some policy announcements, some meat on those ideas, but as sam says, it is steady as she goes, not like the labour conference last week, when keir starmer had a big challenge, it is not as big a challenge
10:29 pm
here for boris at all. you are watching bbc news. and we will be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers, the parliamentary journalist tony grew, and broadcaster and journalist caroline frost. that is coming up after the headlines. here's nick with the weather. hello there. a spell of wet and windy weather will hit parts of the uk overnight from monday into tuesday. we start with heavy, possibly thundery showers across east anglia, clearing away, the eastern side of the uk largely drive with the odd hit and miss shah. sunny spells, highs of around 13—17 celsius, breezy with lighter wins in scotland and northern ireland, with rain pushing into south—west england and wales, pushing eastwards across england into tuesday with showers following
10:30 pm
on behind, with a slow—moving band of wet weather sitting on tuesday close to parts of northern england, perhaps running into southern and eastern areas of scotland. something to watch for in the detail. around this, strong winds with the risk of gales and places. 0n this, strong winds with the risk of gales and places. on tuesday it could be north—west scotland and northern ireland missing most of the rain from this weather system, staying largely drive, with sunny spells. —— staying largely dry. hello, this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment.
10:31 pm
first, the headlines.

35 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on