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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 3, 2021 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at apm: borisjohnson declines to rule out further tax rises, but insists britain won't rely on immigration to boost the numbers of truck drivers to deal with the fuel crisis. the way forward for our country is not tojust pull the big lever marked "uncontrolled immigration", and allow in huge numbers of people. police scotland introduces new verification checks for lone one in five petrol forecourt is still dry in london and the south—east, but the petrol retailers association says the crisis is virtually at an end in scotland, the north and the midlands. police scotland introduces new verification checks for lone
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officers in the wake of the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. at least eight people have been killed in an explosion outside a mosque in cobble. it's the first major blast since the withdrawal of international troops dash—mac kabul. ethiopia's sisay lemma wins men's london marathon. kenya's joyciline jepkosgei took the women's title. in all, 40,000 are aiming to complete the course. on the first day of the conservative party conference in manchester, borisjohnson has declined to rule out further tax rises. he said the country had been hit by a pandemic,
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the like of which had not been seen in our lifetimes, and that the government wouldn't be irresponsible with the public finances. asked about the shortage of lorry drivers threatening supplies of food and fuel, he said the country couldn't simply reach for the lever of uncontrolled immigration — and suggested firms pay more to attract more staff. here's our deputy political editor, vicki young a lot has happened since the last time conservatives were here in manchester. an election victory, brexit and a pandemic. is the country in crisis, sir? now the prime minister has a petrol crisis on his hands. he is not keen to speculate on how long all this disruption will last. is rishi sunak right in saying these problems, these delays, could go on until christmas, or is he wrong? i think what you're seeing... just right or wrong. ithink... rishi is right, invariably, in everything he says. i right. but what you're seeing, - it depends how you interpret what he's saying, andrew.
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borisjohnson said britain is going through a period of adjustment. when people voted for change in 2016 and when people voted _ for change again in 2019, - as they did, they voted for the end of a broken model of the uk economy that relied on low wages and low- skill and chronic low productivity. what we can't do is reach for the lever called - uncontrolled immigration. the government has been forced, though, to issue thousands of extra visas for foreign lorry drivers and workers in meat—processing. the argument you'll hear all week from ministers is that wages are rising. but taxes are too, that's not something many tories welcome. mrjohnson said covid was a fiscal meteorite and billions had to be spent to look after people. i can tell you you have no fiercer and more zealous opponent - of unnecessary tax rises than me, but we have had to deal _ with a pandemic on a scale - which this country has not seen before in our lifetimes,
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and long before. - we don't want to raise taxes, of course we don't... - are you going to do it again, though? but what we will not i do is be irresponsible with the public finances. and you mention margaret thatcher... are you going to do it again? if i can possibly avoid it, - i do not want to raise taxes again. ministers talk about the british economy being in a transition phase. they hope that businesses will stop being dependent on cheap foreign labour and that workers here will start to feel better off, but costs are rising and taxes are going up, and nobody knows how long the disruption to the supply chain will go on for, or how bad it's going to get. opponents say borisjohnson has a habit of not preparing properly. he'll need a watertight plan for the months ahead. vicki young, bbc news, manchester. nick eardley is in manchester.
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hello, thank you. let'sjust hello, thank you. let's just chew over some of what was in that piece with the foreign secretary liz truss, who i'm pleased to sayjoins us now. the prime minister this morning was a big equivocal on tax, he doesn't want to raise taxes anymore, but is not quite rolling it out. do you he should just be giving people a bit of certainty? the out. do you he should just be giving people a bit of certainty?— people a bit of certainty? the per minister is— people a bit of certainty? the per minister is clear _ people a bit of certainty? the per minister is clear that _ people a bit of certainty? the per minister is clear that we - people a bit of certainty? the per minister is clear that we don't - people a bit of certainty? the per. minister is clear that we don't want to put— minister is clear that we don't want to put additional tax burden on working — to put additional tax burden on working people dash—mac prime minisien — working people dash—mac prime minister. the best way to do that is to grow— minister. the best way to do that is to grow the — minister. the best way to do that is to grow the economy. that's what we are determined to do. we are working hard to— are determined to do. we are working hard to strike more trade deals, we are working — hard to strike more trade deals, we are working hard to innovate, to get rid of— are working hard to innovate, to get rid of regulation in our economy and to enable _ rid of regulation in our economy and to enable people to get back to work after covid _ to enable people to get back to work after covid and we have already got some _ after covid and we have already got some of— after covid and we have already got some of the fastest growth in the g7, some of the fastest growth in the g7. and _ some of the fastest growth in the g7, and that's ultimately the way we will be _ g7, and that's ultimately the way we will be able — g7, and that's ultimately the way we will be able to pay the bill from
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covid — will be able to pay the bill from covid ii— will be able to pay the bill from covid. �* ., ., , .,, will be able to pay the bill from covid. ., ., , ., ., covid. a lot of people are worried about the next _ covid. a lot of people are worried about the next few _ covid. a lot of people are worried about the next few months, - covid. a lot of people are worried about the next few months, the l covid. a lot of people are worried i about the next few months, the cost of living, rises prices, rising bills at the same time we have furlough ending and the universal uplift ending, so you could give them some certainty by saying we will not raise taxes for the next year, apart from the national insurance rise that we have already had. ~ . ., ., , had. well, what we are doing is workin: had. well, what we are doing is working really _ had. well, what we are doing is working really hard _ had. well, what we are doing is working really hard to - had. well, what we are doing is working really hard to make - had. well, what we are doing is. working really hard to make sure that we _ working really hard to make sure that we deal with the immediate economic— that we deal with the immediate economic issues we are facing, which are all— economic issues we are facing, which are all about — economic issues we are facing, which are all about covid and these are global— are all about covid and these are global issues concerning the supply chain. _ global issues concerning the supply chain, concerning the issues around hgv drivers — chain, concerning the issues around hgv drivers. so we are able to grow the economy. none of us want to see taxes _ the economy. none of us want to see taxes rise _ the economy. none of us want to see taxes rise. we are a low tax party, we understand that it is enterprise they are _ we understand that it is enterprise they are going to deliver the opportunities and we need to keep the tax _ opportunities and we need to keep the tax burden low. at the same time as continuing to grow our economy. you have _ as continuing to grow our economy. you have just been giving your speech to the conference where you talked about britain being at its best when it is optimistic. are you
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optimistic about this winter or do you think it will be hard for a lot of people? you think it will be hard for a lot of maple?— you think it will be hard for a lot of people? there are immediate issues that _ of people? there are immediate issues that we _ of people? there are immediate issues that we face _ of people? there are immediate issues that we face with - of people? there are immediate issues that we face with supply i issues that we face with supply chains — issues that we face with supply chains that are being faced across the world — chains that are being faced across the world and in the us, and across the world and in the us, and across the european continent but i am optimistic— the european continent but i am optimistic about the future of britain — optimistic about the future of britain. we are positive, we have huge _ britain. we are positive, we have huge opportunities. i saw that in my role as— huge opportunities. i saw that in my role as trade secretary, striking trade _ role as trade secretary, striking trade deals and we now have a deal with australia and america which will mean — with australia and america which will mean more jobs and opportunity here in_ will mean more jobs and opportunity here in britain. i think this outward _ here in britain. i think this outward facing approach is going to reap huge — outward facing approach is going to reap huge dividends for the uk over the coming — reap huge dividends for the uk over the coming years. of course there are issues— the coming years. of course there are issues as the world recovers from _ are issues as the world recovers from covid — are issues as the world recovers from covid and supply chains have been _ from covid and supply chains have been damaged. it has been difficult to recruit _ been damaged. it has been difficult to recruit hgv drivers, but we will -et to recruit hgv drivers, but we will get through that and we will get hetter~ — get through that and we will get hetter~ i— get through that and we will get better. i think people fundamentally understand that boris johnson better. i think people fundamentally understand that borisjohnson is a prime _ understand that borisjohnson is a prime minister who is positive, outward — prime minister who is positive, outward facing and he will make that difference _ outward facing and he will make that difference. you outward facing and he will make that difference. ., ., ., ., difference. you are women and equalities _ difference. you are women and equalities minister _ difference. you are women and equalities minister as - difference. you are women and equalities minister as well - difference. you are women and
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equalities minister as well as i equalities minister as well as foreign secretary, everyone has been shocked by the sarah everard case. what concrete action do you want the government to take to address violence against women and girls? it violence against women and girls? it is appalling what happened in the sarah _ is appalling what happened in the sarah everard case, and it is wrong that women— sarah everard case, and it is wrong that women don't feel safe on our streets. _ that women don't feel safe on our streets, you know, i personally very much _ streets, you know, i personally very much understand that and i have huge sympathy— much understand that and i have huge sympathy for the family and friends of sarah _ sympathy for the family and friends of sarah and what they have all been through _ of sarah and what they have all been through. we are working on our violence — through. we are working on our violence against women strategy, making _ violence against women strategy, making our streets safer, but also we need _ making our streets safer, but also we need to— making our streets safer, but also we need to get the rape conviction rate up— we need to get the rape conviction rate up and — we need to get the rape conviction rate up and make sure that more perpetrators are brought to justice for these _ perpetrators are brought to justice for these appalling crimes. perpetrators are brought to 'ustice for these appalling crimes._ for these appalling crimes. should women feel— for these appalling crimes. should women feel safe _ for these appalling crimes. should women feel safe on _ for these appalling crimes. should women feel safe on the _ for these appalling crimes. should women feel safe on the streets? l women feel safe on the streets? absolutely, and we will only have a truly equal— absolutely, and we will only have a truly equal society when women feel as safe _ truly equal society when women feel as safe as— truly equal society when women feel as safe as men on the streets, and when _ as safe as men on the streets, and when they— as safe as men on the streets, and when they are able to go about their business _ when they are able to go about their business without fear. do when they are able to go about their business without fear.— business without fear. do you think that is the case _ business without fear. do you think that is the case now? _ business without fear. do you think that is the case now? i _ business without fear. do you think that is the case now? i certainly -
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that is the case now? i certainly think it is _ that is the case now? i certainly think it is the — that is the case now? i certainly think it is the case _ that is the case now? i certainly think it is the case that - that is the case now? i certainly think it is the case that women | think it is the case that women don't _ think it is the case that women don't feel— think it is the case that women don't feel safe enough on our streets. — don't feel safe enough on our streets, and absolutely, we need the criminal— streets, and absolutely, we need the criminaljustice system to change, we need _ criminaljustice system to change, we need the culture in the police to change. _ we need the culture in the police to change, and we do need women to be able to— change, and we do need women to be able to feel— change, and we do need women to be able to feel safer. may change, and we do need women to be able to feel safer.— able to feel safer. may i ask you a ruestion able to feel safer. may i ask you a question about _ able to feel safer. may i ask you a question about your _ able to feel safer. may i ask you a question about yourjob _ able to feel safer. may i ask you a question about yourjob as - able to feel safer. may i ask you a | question about yourjob as foreign secretary, one of the biggest stories of the year has been afghanistan and many people look at the way that the taliban took over afghanistan so quickly in the west, what would you have done differently to your predecessor? the what would you have done differently to your predecessor?— to your predecessor? the united states decided _ to your predecessor? the united states decided they _ to your predecessor? the united states decided they wanted - to your predecessor? the united states decided they wanted to i states decided they wanted to withdraw and it is unrealistic in those — withdraw and it is unrealistic in those circumstances for britain to have _ those circumstances for britain to have stayed in afghanistan. i think the public— have stayed in afghanistan. i think the public understand that, and we are working round the clock at the foreign— are working round the clock at the foreign office to bring people home, to help _ foreign office to bring people home, to help people in afghanistan. my focus _ to help people in afghanistan. my focus is _ to help people in afghanistan. my focus is now on making sure that we maintain _
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focus is now on making sure that we maintain stability in that country. we don't — maintain stability in that country. we don't want it becoming a hotbed for terrorism. we don't want it to descend — for terrorism. we don't want it to descend into a humanitarian crisis, so we _ descend into a humanitarian crisis, so we are — descend into a humanitarian crisis, so we are working very hard on that. was dominic— so we are working very hard on that. was dominic raab wrong to go on holiday? he was dominic raab wrong to go on holida ? . , ., ., , was dominic raab wrong to go on holida ? . , . ., , ., holiday? he has already said that with hindsight _ holiday? he has already said that with hindsight he _ holiday? he has already said that with hindsight he would - holiday? he has already said that with hindsight he would have - holiday? he has already said that. with hindsight he would have done things— with hindsight he would have done things differently, but the fact is, the americans withdrew from afghanistan, we had no choice but to follow _ afghanistan, we had no choice but to follow suit— afghanistan, we had no choice but to follow suit in those circumstances, and what _ follow suit in those circumstances, and what we have to do now is focus on the _ and what we have to do now is focus on the future. i am working closely with our— on the future. i am working closely with our overseas counterparts, like the americans, to hold the taliban to account, — the americans, to hold the taliban to account, to do what we can to stop— to account, to do what we can to stop any— to account, to do what we can to stop any deterioration in afghanistan and protect the stability of the wider region. foreign— stability of the wider region. foreign secretary, thank you. i think you are busy around this conference. i spoke to someone earlier who mentioned your name as a potential future leader. i earlier who mentioned your name as a potentialfuture leader. i am potentialfuture leader. i am focused entirely _ potentialfuture leader. i am focused entirely on - potentialfuture leader. i am focused entirely on being . potential future leader. i am focused entirely on being foreign
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secretary. focused entirely on being foreign secreta . . ~ focused entirely on being foreign secreta . ., ,, , ., focused entirely on being foreign secreta . ., ,, . ,, focused entirely on being foreign secreta . ., ., focused entirely on being foreign secreta . ., ,, ., focused entirely on being foreign secreta . ., ~ secretary. thank you, back to you. a aood secretary. thank you, back to you. a ood t , secretary. thank you, back to you. a good try. nick. _ good try, nick. we have had the latest tap in figures dash—mac covid figures from the government. another 43 people have died within 28 days of testing positive for covid, as of today, and that brings the uk total to 136,953. as of 9am today, there have been another 30,439 laboratory confirmed covid cases in the uk. retailers are saying that petrol supplies are still not getting to london and the south—east of england, with more than a fifth of forecourts still dry. the petrol retailers association says it hopes the army driving tankers will help to increase fuel deliveries, but it
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also said the crisis is virtually at an end in scotland, in the north, and in the midlands. the taliban in afghanistan say several people have been killed in a blast outside a mosque in the capital kabul. 20 others were injured as a memorial service was taking place for a taliban deputy minister. it is the first major explosion in the city since the final withdrawal of international troops back in august. caliban officials say this explosion happened outside or very close to one of the biggest mosques in afghanistan as there were plans to hold a memorial service for the late mother of the taliban spokesperson and the deputy information minister and the deputy information minister and culture, who passed away last week. in fact, the taliban had
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announced this memorial service a day earlier. this has come as a big shot, even for taliban officials because it is a major attack on a gathering called by the taliban, and we understand that several people have been killed and injured. a number of people have been taken to hospital, and some eyewitness accounts said there was gunfire soon after this blast. so this has come as a big surprise and shock for the taliban, who have been trying to assert their authority over afghanistan in the last 6—7 weeks after they seized power in mid—august. and now, it is a wake—up call even for the temper macro, even though no group has admitted responsibility for this blast. in the past, the islamic state group militants have carried out similar attacks. more now on the fallout of the murder of sarah everard and the sentencing of her killer wayne couzens, and in scotland anyone approached by a lone police officer will now be offered the chance to speak with control room staff to check their identity.
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helena wilkinson has more details. when wayne couzens kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard, he was a serving metropolitan police officer. he used his position to trick sarah into a car he had hired by showing her his warrant card and falsely arresting her. after he was sent to prison for life, the met commissioner spoke outside the old bailey. this man has brought shame on the met. speaking frankly, as an organisation, we have been rocked. i absolutely know that there are those who feel their trust in us is shaken. police forces across the country are now looking at ways to reassure the public and restore trust. the metropolitan police said people stopped by a lone plain—clothes officer should challenge their legitimacy, but many wonder
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why it should be up to the public to ask the questions. police scotland has now issued new advice for its force. under the new process, if a lone officer approaches a member of the public, they will proactively offer an identity check. the officer's personal radio will be put on loudspeaker, allowing control room staff to confirm they are who they say they are. and if a lone officer becomes involved in an incident, they will call 999 and allow the member of the public to speak directly to control room staff. police scotland said the force recognised the understandable public concern about the horrendous murder of sarah everard and the onus was on them to provide reassurance to women in particular. helena wilkinson, bbc news.
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eight people have been killed after a private plane crashed into northern italy. it came down soon after ta ke—off northern italy. it came down soon after take—off on the outskirts of the city. several nearby parked cars were set alight. police say all those on board were killed. local media are reporting that one of those was a child. emergency services are at the scene. police investigating the murder of the journalist lyra mckee in londonderry have charged a 53—year—old man with riot, assault and throwing petrol bombs. ms mckee was shot dead in derry in april 2019 as she observed rioting in the creggan area of the city. three men have already been charged with her murder and another four with rioting and associated offences. a 15—year—old girl from portsmouth has died from coronavirus on the day she was due to be vaccinated. jorja halliday died in hospital on tuesday, four days after she received
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a positive pcr test. her mother tracey said the gcse student was a "loving girl, talented kickboxer and aspiring musician. she turned into a beautiful young lady, always wanting to help others, always there for everybody." an independent commission investigating sexual abuse has found that thousands of paedophiles have been operating within the french roman catholic church over the past 70 years. the commission's head, jean marc sauve, told the french news agency they had uncovered between 2,900 and 3,200 abusive priests or other church members, adding this was a minimum estimate. the inquiry was set up in 2018 by the church in response to a number of scandals about priests. borisjohnson declines to rule out further tax rises, but insists britain won't rely on immigration to boost the numbers of truck drivers to deal with the fuel crisis. one in five petrol forecourt is still dry in london and the south—east, according to the petrol retailers association. it says the
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crisis is virtually at an end in scotland, the north and the midlands. police scotland introduces new verification checks for lone officers in the wake of the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. now, a full ruond—up of sport from the bbc sport centre. i'm really busy day of sport with the marathon and all the football. yes, indeed. crystal palace came from 2— 02 draw at home to leicester. the visitors opened the scoring against the run of play. it ended 2—0 to leicester and it looks like a long way back for crystal palace from there. but patrick vieira made some canny substitutions. 48 seconds after
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coming on, former leicester man equalised for crystal palace and thatis equalised for crystal palace and that is how it stayed. and there was drama in east london when brentford snatch a late winner to beat west ham 2—1, and tottenham picked up a much—needed victory at home to aston villa. ollie watkins grabbed an equaliserfor home to aston villa. ollie watkins grabbed an equaliser for aston villa. the teams were level for less than five minutes as an own goal proved to be the difference. manchester city 's poor started the season continued in the women's super city as they lost at home to west ham. there were away for everton and for. celtic earned their first away win in the scottish premiership since february after a late 2—1 victory over aberdeen at pittodrie.
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some of the 40,000 runners are still coming over the line at the london marathon but the elite field has long since finished. there was a surprise winner in the men's race as ethiopia's sisay lemma triumphed. in the women's marathon, kenyanjoycilinejepkosgei beat compatriot and world—record holder brigid kosgei. joe wilson reports. the mass start of the london marathon. it was back. over 36,000 began, a little down on recent years, but a great street—filling expression of normal. our annual view returned of everyday people taking on the extraordinary. g i raffes have giraffes have been very popular this year. of course there are those who make the distance appears simple. marcel hug of switzerland out on his own in the men's wheelchair race winning
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in a course record time. but now have a look at this sprint finish. that's david weir in the grey helmet, taking third place in yet another london marathon, looking as committed as ever, although retirement, he admitted, had been on his mind. it is my 22nd marathon in a row and it is my 22nd marathon in a row and i don't know how many more i will do now. but yes, it must be a record out there for me to keep on going. manuela schar, the other swiss star, was a clear winner, breaking her own course record. the weather was kind, cool, dry and still. for all the elite, that meant quick. joycilinejepkosgei of kenya shook off her rivals at two hours and kept going, to finish in her personal best time, sub 2:18. the men's race teased world record pace for a while — not quite. ethiopian's sisay lemma's winning time was two hours, four minutes in the second. not bad at all.
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the title goes to ethiopia again. for some, pace was irrelevant — just get there when you can, joe wilson, bbc news. there was a huge shock in the prix de l�*arc de triomphe as the 66/1 shot torquator tasso claimed victory. with all eyes on the favourites, the german horse made a late charge. they claim the upset in the 100th edition of the race. the winner of the derby could only finish fourth. and not long now until the big league match, liverpool against manchester city. more for you in around an hour. fingers crossed for liverpool. thank you. more on the marathon, by the way.
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around 40,000 people have been pounding the streets in the last few hours, and another 40,000 completing virtually. the event was cancelled last year because of coronavirus. earlier, i correspond and spoke to charlotte perdue, who cross the line in 10th place, setting the third fastest time ever for a british woman. it fastest time ever for a british woman. , ., ., , ., woman. it feels great. i was going for the second _ woman. it feels great. i was going for the second fastest _ woman. it feels great. i was going for the second fastest time - woman. it feels great. i was going for the second fastest time but. woman. it feels great. i was going for the second fastest time but it | for the second fastest time but it was windy out there and i just tried my best today, i'm really happy with my best today, i'm really happy with my time. my best today, i'm really happy with m time. ., ., , . ,, my time. how did it feel to be back on this historic _ my time. how did it feel to be back on this historic course? _ my time. how did it feel to be back on this historic course? amazing, l on this historic course? amazing, the last time _ on this historic course? amazing, the last time i— on this historic course? amazing, the last time i ran _ on this historic course? amazing, the last time i ran a _ on this historic course? amazing, the last time i ran a marathon - on this historic course? amazing, | the last time i ran a marathon was 2019, i knew i was in good shape and i had to miss a lot of the last year. being able to come back and actually run a marathon and show that i'm still on top is the best. by, that i'm still on top is the best. a lot of people are saying that this proves a point to the selectors about tokyo, but what do youse have to say on the matter? i about tokyo, but what do youse have to say on the matter?—
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to say on the matter? i always like to say on the matter? i always like to rove to say on the matter? i always like to prove people — to say on the matter? i always like to prove people wrong. _ to say on the matter? i always like to prove people wrong. i— to say on the matter? i always like to prove people wrong. i did - to say on the matter? i always like to prove people wrong. i did feel. to prove people wrong. i did feel like i deserve a spot on the team, but it has been and gone now, so i'm moving on to hopefully getting on the team in paris. congratulations to her. the team in paris. congratulations to her- and _ the team in paris. congratulations to her. and all— the team in paris. congratulations to her. and all those _ the team in paris. congratulations to her. and all those who - the team in paris. congratulations to her. and all those who took - the team in paris. congratulationsl to her. and all those who took part in the london marathon. the french businessman bernard tapie has died at the age of 78. he moved into cycling after building up a retail empire. our paris correspondent has been telling us more about his life. he reincarnated himself in 2000 and became a soap actor and hosted his own television programmes as well, so he was a jack of all trades and a larger than life figure. a very interesting figure, and an important figure in modern france. the story
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briefly is that he is a self—made man who made millions, having come from nowhere. he managed to reconcile if you like the left—wing instincts and background with the idea of being rich being ok, and in that sense was a very modern man. before that, business people had been on the right, but he was a man of the people who became very rich, became a tycoon, and yet kept in touch with the masses from where he came. the other important thing about him is the idea that television was his medium, he was a communicator. he represents very much the world that came after him from 80s and 90s onwards, tele was all and he was a prime manipulator of television and communicating was his great asset. people loved him. he was a very successful businessman, but had a number of brushes with the law. he always
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sailed very close to the wind on the law. he knew the law of business very well with all its holes. the spanish prime minister has said the government will give $230 million in reconstruction aid to the island of la palma because of the volcano there. overnight, scientists recorded eight new earthquakes and say activity in the area remains intense. as almost two weeks after the first eruption on la palma. dan johnson reports now from the island. the weekend chores now begin with clearing endless volcanic dust. ramon only moved here four months ago, but he's not letting this relentless eruption weigh too heavily. translation: it's true there's uncertainty now, but this - will be over and people will be stronger, and they'll start again and push this island forward. la palma's coastline is pushing forward — into the atlantic,
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as lava hits the sea and sets hard. satellite pictures show how it sliced through this island. and some of the british scientists here as part of the international team are monitoring gas levels and tracking fresh streams of lava from new vents that have opened up. that's why thousands of people are still being kept from their homes, while many thousands more have been told to stay in and keep windows closed, safe from the gases. i am afraid, very, very much. and at night it always makes like "boom, boom, boom," and i'm afraid to sleep here. will you stay? no. the volcano is still really active. there's more lava flowing and more ash too. and look at the effect that is having on these, the nearest homes. just look at the amount of volcanic dust there is in the bottom of the swimming pool there. a really big effort for people here to keep their homes safe and to keep them clean. over this side, you get
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a real perspective on the trail of lava. all that black steaming mound flowing down the hillside. this eruption has already produced twice as much lava as the last one here 50 years ago, and after an intense, amazing fearful fortnight, the signs are there's more to come. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. hello, we have still got a blustery wind out there, which has been bringing a mixture of sunshine and showers. a few showers reaching eastern areas, but most are in the west. more showers continuing this evening and overnight, particularly across more southern parts of england and wales. keeping it mild. where we have clearer skies further north in north—eastern scotland, temperatures will be down to four or five celsius. more sunshine to come, but also more showers tomorrow and not as windy yesterday. the bulk of the showers will be in the west with the showers will be in the west with the sunny skies towards the east.
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temperature wise the numbers look similar across many parts of the country to today, but across wales and the south—west it will be cooler because the cloud will increase in the afternoon and by the evening it is much wetter. an area of low pressure will bring wet and windy weather across many parts of the uk on tuesday. you may brighten up across more southern parts of england and we are missing most of the rain in northern ireland. quite cool underneath the wind and rain.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... further tax rises are not ruled out by borisjohnson, but he insists britain won't rely on immigration to boost the numbers of truck drivers to deal with the fuel crisis. the way forward for our country is not tojust pull the big lever marked "uncontrolled immigration" and allow in huge numbers of people. one in five petrol forecourts are still dry in london and the south east, according
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to the petrol retailers association, but it says the "crisis is virtually at an end in scotland, the north and midlands". police scotland introduce new verification checks for lone officers in the wake of the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. at least eight peoople have been killed in an explosion outside a mosque in kabul, in the first major blast since the withdrawl of international troops. spain's prime minister approves 200 million euros of support for the island of la palma, as two new streams of lava threaten further destruction forcing more residents to flee. ethiopia's sisay lemma wins men's london marathon. kenya's joyciline jepkosgei took the women's title. in all, 40,000 are aiming to complete the course.
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more now on the conservative party conference in manchester. the prime minister has promised that he's opposed to any "unnecessary" tax rises, but wouldn't rule out any further increases. earlier, my colleague shaun ley discussed borisjohnson's comment in more details with sebastian payne from the financial times, and sam lister from the daily express. the public wants to see the fuel sorted and the food shortages resolved, but i think what we have seen from the prime minister today, he is trying to push this back onto business. he has been talking about a period of adjustment while businesses adapt to the new reality. he is trying to put the blame back on to the businesses, saying it is time for them to pay higher wages to attract the staff and that is the way forward. it's curious this relationship that
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has developed with business, from a conservative prime minister, we had him saying quite a while ago when we were talking about brexit effects, he used an expletive deleted about business and at the same time he is trying to say that we love business and it is very important, but he seems to be saying, stop blaming whitehall for problems that should be sorted out in the free market economy. i think when you heard the prime minister's comments this morning, it is very clear what he is saying, he's saying we are not going back to the economic model we had before, which was very reliant on low skilled, cheap labour coming from across europe. that has buttressed large parts of the uk economy, from hospitality to farming, including hgv drivers as well, and his message is that what needs to happen is wages need to go up, and that is probably a message that is popular with voters, but as sam was just saying,
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the crucial thing is the disruption here. the chancellor said in an interview on saturday that this could take several months to get better and we could see disruptions throughout christmas, and i think people at the conference here today will be happy to see that, but the people in the outside world, i do not know how long they will stomach this. the prime minister has made it very clear, he is not going to put more visas or have more migration and toughing that out as a way of putting it is interesting strategy. he thinks he has got the political space, the conservatives are eight points ahead in the polls, he is still the most popular person ahead of keir starmer, to be prime minister, he is in a strong political position to try and do this. what do you think is his task and the task of other conservatives this week, sam? particularly in the light of the labour conference last week. yes, steady as she goes, we are at least two years out from an election and so it is a bit of a steady as she goes. but i think certainly, the prime minister, he has got three things he wants to focus on this week, that is crime, climate and the economy.
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that is what he will be focusing on. he wants to set the agenda ahead of the cop26 climate conference in glasgow, he wants to show that the tories are the party, still the party that is tough on crime and tomorrow you will see the chancellor give his main speech, and they certainly want to set the agenda in terms of the economy, talking about how britain is set to be the fastest—growing economy in the g7, and talking about the plan for jobs and that is their focus this week anyway. seb, there are noises, not least from mps who represent constituencies not so very far from manchester, closer to them than london, you have written a book about the impact the conservatives have made in swathes of the country where at least at a parliamentary level, they have been absent for decades, if it ever existed, certainly not in modern times. how big a challenge is that now that he is facing,
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from his own backbenchers, the people in a sense who gave him his majority at westminster? the key thing for boris johnson is about delivery, we know what the vague vision is, to pour money into the so—called red wall of the places that voted tory for the first time in living memory, and backed brexit and you heard that in his comments when he was talking about wages, he said in 2016 and in 2019, people voted for change and he has now got to deliver that. we have gone through the pandemic and brexit and people need to see stuff happening, new projects delivered and for me the most crucial person is michael gove, who was designated the secretary of state for levelling up, this is one of these great catchall phrases that politicians love, it could mean anything to anyone, but the task is to put meat on that. if you look behind us, the slogan is "getting the job done," and any political conference that says that, you might think has run out of ideas. it's quite workmanlike. that is the task for ministers, to say we are going to deliver change, this is what it looks like and what success in levelling up looks like as well, so hopefully we will get some policy
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announcements, some meat on those ideas, but as sam says, it is steady as she goes, not like the labour conference last week, when keir starmer had a big challenge, it is not as big a challenge here for boris at all.
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of the uk adjusting away from a broken economic system. is the country in crisis, sir? as the conservative party conference opens in manchester he's been pressed on fuel, lorry drivers and other skilled workers. what we can't do is in all these sectors simply go back to the tired, failed old model and reach for the lever called, "uncontrolled immigration". fuel retailers say supplies have normalised in many places. two new streams of lava erupt from the la palma volcano as activity intensifies. and they're back — and off —
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the london marathon returns as a mass event. good afternoon. the conservative party conference is underway in manchester, with the prime minister insisting the economy is "bouncing back" following the pandemic. but with drivers still facing problems re—fuelling in some parts of southern england, there's continuing concern that delivery issues could affect food supplies in the coming months. speaking to the bbc, boris johnson couldn't say whether shortages would end before christmas or rule out further tax rises. here's our deputy political editor, vicki young. a lot�*s happened since the last time conservatives were in manchester, an election victory, brexit and a
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pandemic. i5 election victory, brexit and a pandemic-— election victory, brexit and a andemic. , , . , , pandemic. is the country in crisis. now the prime _ pandemic. is the country in crisis. now the prime minister _ pandemic. is the country in crisis. now the prime minister has - pandemic. is the country in crisis. now the prime minister has a - pandemic. is the country in crisis. i now the prime minister has a petrol crisis. i5 now the prime minister has a petrol crisis. , , ,, ., ,, crisis. is rishi sunak right in sa in: crisis. is rishi sunak right in saying these _ crisis. is rishi sunak right in saying these problems - crisis. is rishi sunak right in| saying these problems could crisis. is rishi sunak right in . saying these problems could go crisis. is rishi sunak right in - saying these problems could go on until christmas? right or wrong? saying these problems could go on until christmas? right orwrong? he until christmas? right or wrong? he is until christmas? right or wrong? is invariably until christmas? right orwrong? he is invariably right in everything he says. _ is invariably right in everything he says. but— is invariably right in everything he says. but what _ is invariably right in everything he says, but what you're _ is invariably right in everything he says, but what you're seeing - is invariably right in everything he says, but what you're seeing is i is invariably right in everything he i says, but what you're seeing is a... it says, but what you're seeing is a... it depends— says, but what you're seeing is a... it depends how— says, but what you're seeing is a... it depends how you _ says, but what you're seeing is a... it depends how you interpret - says, but what you're seeing is a... it depends how you interpret whatl says, but what you're seeing is a... l it depends how you interpret what he is saying _ it depends how you interpret what he issa inc. , it depends how you interpret what he issa inc. , is saying. boris johnson says britain is _ is saying. boris johnson says britain is going _ is saying. boris johnson says britain is going through - is saying. boris johnson says britain is going through a - is saying. boris johnson says . britain is going through a period is saying. boris johnson says - britain is going through a period of adjustment. britain is going through a period of ad'ustment. ~ , ., , britain is going through a period of adjustment-— britain is going through a period of ad'ustment. ~ , ., , ., ., adjustment. when people voted for chan . e in adjustment. when people voted for change in 2016 _ adjustment. when people voted for change in 2016 and _ adjustment. when people voted for change in 2016 and voted _ adjustment. when people voted for change in 2016 and voted again - adjustment. when people voted for change in 2016 and voted again in l change in 2016 and voted again in 2019 as _ change in 2016 and voted again in 2019 as they— change in 2016 and voted again in 2019 as they did, _ change in 2016 and voted again in 2019 as they did, they— change in 2016 and voted again in 2019 as they did, they voted - change in 2016 and voted again in 2019 as they did, they voted for. change in 2016 and voted again in l 2019 as they did, they voted for the end of— 2019 as they did, they voted for the end of a _ 2019 as they did, they voted for the end of a broken _ 2019 as they did, they voted for the end of a broken model— 2019 as they did, they voted for the end of a broken model of— 2019 as they did, they voted for the end of a broken model of the - end of a broken model of the uk economy — end of a broken model of the uk economy that— end of a broken model of the uk economy. that relied _ end of a broken model of the uk economy. that relied on- end of a broken model of the uk economy. that relied on low- end of a broken model of the uk . economy. that relied on low wages and low— economy. that relied on low wages and low skill — economy. that relied on low wages and low skill and _ economy. that relied on low wages and low skill and chronic _ economy. that relied on low wages and low skill and chronic low - and low skill and chronic low productivity _ and low skill and chronic low productivity. what _ and low skill and chronic low productivity. what we - and low skill and chronic low productivity. what we can't i and low skill and chronic low i productivity. what we can't do and low skill and chronic low - productivity. what we can't do is reach _ productivity. what we can't do is reach for — productivity. what we can't do is reach for the _ productivity. what we can't do is reach for the lever— productivity. what we can't do is reach for the lever called - reach for the lever called uncontrolled _ reach for the lever called i uncontrolled immigration. reach for the lever called - uncontrolled immigration. the government — uncontrolled immigration. the government has _ uncontrolled immigration. government has been forced uncontrolled immigration.- government has been forced to uncontrolled immigration.— government has been forced to issue thousands of extra visas for foreign lorry drivers and workers in meat
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processing, the argument you will hear from processing, the argument you will hearfrom ministers is wages processing, the argument you will hear from ministers is wages are rising. but taxes are too and that is not something many tories welcome. but borisjohnson said covid was a problem and billions had to be spent. you covid was a problem and billions had to be spent-— to be spent. you have no fiercer and more zealous _ to be spent. you have no fiercer and more zealous opponent _ to be spent. you have no fiercer and more zealous opponent of— to be spent. you have no fiercer and i more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises _ more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises than _ more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises than me. _ more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises than me, but— more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises than me, but we _ more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises than me, but we have - more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises than me, but we have had - tax rises than me, but we have had to deal— tax rises than me, but we have had to deal with — tax rises than me, but we have had to deal with a — tax rises than me, but we have had to deal with a pandemic on - tax rises than me, but we have had to deal with a pandemic on a - tax rises than me, but we have had to deal with a pandemic on a scalel to deal with a pandemic on a scale which _ to deal with a pandemic on a scale which this— to deal with a pandemic on a scale which this country— to deal with a pandemic on a scale which this country has _ to deal with a pandemic on a scale which this country has not - to deal with a pandemic on a scale which this country has not seen i to deal with a pandemic on a scale which this country has not seen in| which this country has not seen in our lifetimes _ which this country has not seen in our lifetimes and _ which this country has not seen in our lifetimes and long _ which this country has not seen in our lifetimes and long before. - which this country has not seen in our lifetimes and long before. we don't _ our lifetimes and long before. we don't want — our lifetimes and long before. we don't want the _ our lifetimes and long before. we don't want the raise _ our lifetimes and long before. we don't want the raise taxes. - our lifetimes and long before. we don't want the raise taxes. of - don't want the raise taxes. of course — don't want the raise taxes. of course we _ don't want the raise taxes. of course we don't. _ don't want the raise taxes. of course we don't.— don't want the raise taxes. of course we don't. will you do it auain? course we don't. will you do it again? we _ course we don't. will you do it again? we won't _ course we don't. will you do it again? we won't be _ course we don't. will you do it i again? we won't be irresponsible with the public finances. - again? we won't be irresponsible with the public finances. are - again? we won't be irresponsible with the public finances. are i - again? we won't be irresponsible| with the public finances. are i you auoin to with the public finances. are i you going to do _ with the public finances. are i you going to do it _ with the public finances. are i you going to do it again? _ with the public finances. are i you going to do it again? if— with the public finances. are i you going to do it again? if i - with the public finances. are i you going to do it again? if i possibly| going to do it again? if i possibly avoid it i want _ going to do it again? if i possibly avoid it i want don't _ going to do it again? if i possibly avoid it i want don't want - going to do it again? if i possibly avoid it i want don't want to - going to do it again? if i possibly| avoid it i want don't want to raise taxes _ avoid it i want don't want to raise taxes. ., , ., . ., taxes. thousands marched through the ci an: at taxes. thousands marched through the city angry at the _ taxes. thousands marched through the city angry at the conservative - city angry at the conservative government. some tories are worried too about the cost of living and those on universal credit will see
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their payments drop from this weekend as emergency support is withdrawn. supply and labour problems could cause more problems. borisjohnson has to show he has a plan to deal with it. vicki joins us now. we heard the prime minister's analyst of what is going, what political difficulties will he now face? i political difficulties will he now face? ~ . , . face? i think at this conference he is facin: face? i think at this conference he is facing two _ face? i think at this conference he is facing two things. _ face? i think at this conference he is facing two things. one - face? i think at this conference he is facing two things. one is - face? i think at this conference he is facing two things. one is what l face? i think at this conference he | is facing two things. one is what is going outside of this hall and he and other ministers talk about the british economy being in a ran sigs phase. what they want to do —— transition phase they want to stop britain relying on foreign workers and they hope that wages will go up. but that takes time and the question is, what happens in the meantime? we have seen that shortage of labour and what that can do and i think people want to know what the plan is for that in the coming months and how long it is going to last. the other issue for borisjohnson is
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more of an internal debate, particularly about cost covid and how th —— post covid and one cabinet said we are about at the limit of what taxes we can raise. i think thatis what taxes we can raise. i think that is going to be a very contentious debate here over the next few days. they are showing videos of the moments where the prime minister realised he had won the general election, that peoples like a long time ago and the reality of governing has been tough since. thank you. so what is the latest on the fuel situation? there's been an update from some of the retailers this afternoon. our business correspondent, katie austin, is here. what are they saying? well, we have heard from the _ what are they saying? well, we have heard from the petrol _ what are they saying? well, we have heard from the petrol petrol - heard from the petrol petrol retailers association, they say the situation is as yesterday, two third
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of their members said they had petrol and diesel. 17% said they had gone dry. they say the crisis is virtually over in the midland, the north and scotland, but there are issues in london and the south—east. the chairman said it was disappointing and he said it was hard to see what benefits there has been from suspending competition law a week ago that was meant to help those in the distribution share more information. tomorrow the first cohort of army drivers are expected to help with deliveries to boost the supply of fuel where it is still needed. . ~ supply of fuel where it is still needed. ., ,, , ., there've been more calls today for an independent inquiry into sarah everard's murder at the hands of a serving police officer. the prime minister said today he wanted to hear first from the police watchdog's review and he told women they should trust the police. graham satchell reports.
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sarah everard was just walking home when she was arrested and then murdered by a police officer. it has led to questions about the trust in the police and the behaviour of men and the whole criminaljustice system. the prime minister has committed to in his words getting more rapist behind bar, despite the budget for the department ofjustice being cut by 25%. it is budget for the department of 'ustice being cut by mi being cut by 25%. it is not 'ust a iuestion being cut by 25%. it is not 'ust a question «i being cut by 25%. it is not 'ust a question of money. * being cut by 25%. it is not 'ust a question of money. you h being cut by 25%. it is notjust a question of money. you need i being cut by 25%. it is notjust a l question of money. you need the three parts of system, the police, the prosecutors, thejudiciary, they need to work better together. and people and rape victims, violence victims need to get a better service. , , ., ., , , service. only 296 of reported rapes in england and _ service. only 296 of reported rapes in england and wales _ service. only 296 of reported rapes in england and wales end - service. only 296 of reported rapes in england and wales end in - service. only 296 of reported rapes in england and wales end in a - in england and wales end in a prosecution. convictions are at an all time low. campaigners and charities say there needs to be change at every level. lgrgfe charities say there needs to be change at every level. we have a
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s stem change at every level. we have a system that _ change at every level. we have a system that fails _ change at every level. we have a system that fails to _ change at every level. we have a system that fails to respond - change at every level. we have a system that fails to respond to i system that fails to respond to crimes— system that fails to respond to crimes of— system that fails to respond to crimes of rape. we need to create a culture _ crimes of rape. we need to create a culture where that behaviour is being _ culture where that behaviour is being challenged and not tolerated. in scotland, one concrete change following the death of sarah everard, people are told they can verify the identitieses of lone police officers bying can to speak to the control room. it is police officers bying can to speak to the control room.— to the control room. it is not requiring _ to the control room. it is not requiring women _ to the control room. it is not requiring women to - to the control room. it is not requiring women to be - to the control room. it is not - requiring women to be proactive, the police _ requiring women to be proactive, the police have _ requiring women to be proactive, the police have to — requiring women to be proactive, the police have to be _ requiring women to be proactive, the police have to be proactive. - requiring women to be proactive, the police have to be proactive. a- requiring women to be proactive, the police have to be proactive. a lone i police have to be proactive. a lone officer— police have to be proactive. a lone officer should _ police have to be proactive. a lone officer should provide _ police have to be proactive. a lone officer should provide the - officer should provide the verification _ officer should provide the verification as— officer should provide the verification as to - officer should provide the verification as to who - officer should provide the verification as to who he i officer should provide the i verification as to who he is. officer should provide the - verification as to who he is. iinfill verification as to who he is. will sarah everard's _ verification as to who he is. sarah everard's murder lead to change in the safety of women and the way allegations are prosecuted? the government said it is pledging to provide better services for women. let's take a look at the latest government figures. there were 30,439 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24 hour period.
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another 43 deaths have been recorded, that is people who died within 28 days of a positive covid test. on average in the past week there were 112 deaths per day. the latest figures for those in hospital and the percentage vaccinated haven't yet been made available. raise let's take a look at some of today's other news. a small plane has crashed into an empty building in italy. eight people were killed. witnesses heard a loud crash. in france, an independent commission investigating sexual abuse in the catholic church has said that paedophiles have been operating there for more than 70 years. the commission's head said at least 2,900 abusive priests or other church members had been uncovered. the inquiry was set up in 2018
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in response to a number of scandals. the taliban say an explosion out side a mosque in kabul has killed a number of people. no group has admitted responsibility. it is the first major blast in kabul since the withdrawal of international troops. the authorities on the spanish canary island of la palma say the cumbre vieja volcano has blown open two more fissures. in the last 24 hours, scientists recorded eight new earthquakes and say activity in the area remains "intense" almost two weeks after the first eruption. our correspondent danjohnson reports from la palma. the weekend chores now begin with clearing endless volcanic dust. ramon only moved here four months ago, but he's not letting this relentless eruption weigh too heavily. translation: it's true there's uncertainty now, but this will be over and people will be stronger, and they'll start again and push this island forward.
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la palma's coastline is pushing forward — into the atlantic, as lava hits the sea and sets hard. satellite pictures show how it sliced through this island. and some of the british scientists here as part of the international team are monitoring gas levels and tracking fresh streams of lava from new vents that have opened up. that's why thousands of people are still being kept from their homes, while many thousands more have been told to stay in and keep windows closed, safe from the gases. i am afraid, very, very much. and at night it always makes like "boom, boom, boom," and i'm afraid to sleep here. will you stay? no. the volcano is still really active. there's more lava flowing and more ash too. and look at the effect that is having on these, the nearest homes. just look at the amount of volcanic dust there is in the bottom of the swimming pool there. a really big effort for people here to keep their homes safe
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and to keep them clean. over the side, you get a real perspective on the trail of lava. all that black steaming mound flowing down the hillside. this eruption has already produced twice as much lava as the last one here 50 years ago, and after an intense, amazing fearful fortnight, the signs are there's more to come. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. time for the sport now withjane dougall — good afternoon. in an emotional return to the streets of the captial, the london marathon was back as a mass event for the first time in two years with runners in a range of costumes all rasing money for good causes. two years with runners in a range of costumes all raising money for good causes. the elite races were among the quickest on record, while virtual runners also joined the participants on the course. joe wilson reports. the mass start of the london marathon. it was back. over 36,000 began, a little
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down on recent years, but a great street filling expression of normal. our annual view returned of everyday people taking on the extraordinary. of course there are those who make the distance appears simple. marcel hug of switzerland out on his own in the men's wheelchair race winning in a course record time. but now have a look at this sprint finish. that's david weir in the grey helmet, taking third place in yet another london marathon, looking as committed as ever — although retirement, he admitted, had been on his mind. it is my 22nd in a row, i don't know how many more i will do. it must be a record for me to keep on going. manuela schar, the other swiss star, was a clear winner, breaking her own course record. the weather was kind, cool, dry and still. for all the elite, that meant quick. joycilinejepkosgei of kenya shook off her rivals at two
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hours and kept going, to finish in her personal best time, sub 2:18. the men's race teased world record pace for a while — not quite. ethiopian's sisay lemma's winning time was two hours, four minutes in the second. not bad at all. the elite races are only part of the story. tens of thousands were doing the virtual london marathon in their own space and time. on the official course, well, many were going to distance in their own way! time is an abstract concept, just get there when you can and if the last few steps seem almost impossible, there is someone to help you, even to carry you. it is not where you start, it is how you finish, what is
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that toddlers record? four matches in the premier league today with manchester city travelling to anfield to take on liverpool in the late game. in the early kick offs, tottenham beat aston villa 2—1, while brentford continued their good start to the season with a 2—1 win over west ham. crystal came from 2—0 down to get a point against leicester city. in scotland hibs are losing 2—1 to rangers. while glasgow rivals celtic got a late winner against aberdeen for a first away premiership win this season. celtic scored late on with a close range finish from jota. celtic remain sixth. aberdeen ninth. there was a shock winner in europe's richest race the prix de l�*arc de triomphe with "torquator tasso" taking the prize after starting with odds of 80—1. the outsider beat the favourites to
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win the 100th edition of the race. they take home more than £2.4 million. there's more on the bbc sport website. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late news at 10pm. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. goodbye. a mixture of sunshine and showers today. blustery wind, as well, particularly across the far north of scotland. where we have got longer spells of rain. most showers into the western side of the uk, plenty of sunshine, at least earlier on today, across eastern parts of england. more cloud and a few showers have been working their way into these areas. overnight, we are keeping showers going across a large part of the country, it may get wetter across southern parts of england and wales
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and with those gusty winds it should be quite a bit milder. clearer skies further north. away from the showers in the north of scotland, temperatures down to four or five. monday is going to be another day of sunshine and showers, again, the best of the sunshine likely to be across eastern parts of the uk. most showers further west, not as windy on monday, temperatures likely to be similar to those today except in wales and the south—west of england. cloud increasing here in the afternoon and by the evening it will be much wetter. we have got this next weather system arriving, an area of low pressure set to deepen as it moves into the uk, the wind is going to strengthen and around the low, we have the area wrapped around it, that could push into scotland, affecting england and wales although more southern parts of england and wales could turn brighter and showery and across northern ireland it will be a mixture of sunshine and showers. strong wind likely tuesday, around coastal areas and that
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will make it feel cold coupled with the rain. large parts of the country looking at maximum temperatures of 13 on tuesday. once the area of low pressure arrives, it will continue into the evening and push away slowly towards continental europe on wednesday. still looking like quite a windy start across eastern parts of england with cloud left over and a few showers, that will move through, wind starts to drop and sunshine coming through in many areas before the cloud increases in northern ireland, the next weather system looming large by the end of the day. with sunshine around and the wind dropping, it gets warmer, temperatures back up to 14—17. further into the week, high pressure towards the south—east, some rain across northern and western parts of the uk, coupled with a south—westerly wind, temperatures should be on the rise.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at five... as the conservative party conference opens in manchester, the prime minister insists britain won't rely on immigration to boost the numbers of truck drivers to deal with the fuel crisis. the way forward for our country is not just to the way forward for our country is notjust to pull the big lever marked uncontrolled immigration and allowing huge numbers of people. fuel retailers say supply problems are continuing in london and parts of south eastern england but they suggest the "crisis is virtually at an end in scotland, the north and midlands". police scotland introduce new verification checks for lone officers in the wake of the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard.

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