Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 3, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

1:00 pm
this is bbc news with the latest headlines. borisjohnson boris johnson declines borisjohnson declines to rule out further tax rises although he insists the uk will not be relying on immigration to boost the number of truck drivers to deal with the current fuel crisis. the of truck drivers to deal with the current fuel crisis.— of truck drivers to deal with the current fuel crisis. the way forward for our country _ current fuel crisis. the way forward for our country is _ current fuel crisis. the way forward for our country is not _ current fuel crisis. the way forward for our country is not to _ current fuel crisis. the way forward for our country is not to just - for our country is not to just pull the big lever marked uncontrolled immigration and allow in huge numbers of people.— immigration and allow in huge numbers of people. police scotland is to introduce _ numbers of people. police scotland is to introduce new _ numbers of people. police scotland is to introduce new verification - is to introduce new verification checks for loan officers following the rape kidnap and murder of sarah everard by metropolitan police officer. two new streams of lava threatened destruction as the la
1:01 pm
palma volcano forces more residents to flee. ., ~ , palma volcano forces more residents to flee. . ~ , ., ., to flee. takes the title in london 2021... to flee. takes the title in london 2021- -- just _ to flee. takes the title in london 2021... just outside _ to flee. takes the title in london 2021... just outside two - to flee. takes the title in london 2021... just outside two hours i to flee. takes the title in london i 2021... just outside two hours and 2021... just outside two hours and four minutes. 2021. .. just outside two hours and four minutes-_ 2021... just outside two hours and four minutes. cisse lamar wins the men's london _ four minutes. cisse lamar wins the men's london marathon _ four minutes. cisse lamar wins the men's london marathon on - four minutes. cisse lamar wins the | men's london marathon on sunday, kenya's joyciline men's london marathon on sunday, kenya'sjoycilinejepkosgei took men's london marathon on sunday, kenya's joyciline jepkosgei took the women's title. in all, 40,000 people have been aiming to complete the course. , ., ., course. this time we are leaving britain and _ course. this time we are leaving britain and heading _ course. this time we are leaving britain and heading to _ course. this time we are leaving britain and heading to the - course. this time we are leaving i britain and heading to the republic of ireland. the britain and heading to the republic of ireland. ., britain and heading to the republic of ireland. . , ., ., , ., of ireland. the travel show heads to ireland to see _ of ireland. the travel show heads to ireland to see the _ of ireland. the travel show heads to ireland to see the range _ of ireland. the travel show heads to ireland to see the range of - of ireland. the travel show heads to ireland to see the range of culturall ireland to see the range of cultural events for tours post— pandemic, thatis events for tours post— pandemic, that is in half an hour here on bbc news. —— for tourists post pandemic. good afternoon. let us go to
1:02 pm
manchester. the prime minister says the uk will not revert to what he has called �*the old model of uncontrolled immigration' to deal with worker shortages. speaking to the bbc ahead of the tory party conference in manchester, borisjohnson admitted there would be shortages for the rest of the year. mrjohnson also defended the government's record on the public finances�* and promised he would not implement further �*unnecessary tax rises', after increasing national insurance to pay for the nhs and social care. our political correspondent, nick eardley is in manchester. he nick eardley is in manchester. has been monitoring prime he has been monitoring what the prime minister had to say. good afternoon, borisjohnson wants to use this conference to start talking about his strategy for the uk after the pandemic, you can see it in all the pandemic, you can see it in all the signs plastered around this place, getting on with the job, the signs plastered around this place, getting on with thejob, as the conservatives put it, but at the same time there are still some
1:03 pm
real—life issues which are dominating the questions the prime minister is being asked ahead of this conference, big questions about the cost of living, big questions about the end of furlough and the universal credit uplift a big questions about how the prime minister is going to get the uk supply chain back in a place where we all know there is going to be fuel in petrol stations and all the food that we want in the shops. the prime minister is pretty adamant that he wants to see the answer being higher wages, encouraging that he wants to see the answer being higherwages, encouraging more people into, for example, the h gb driving industry rather than, as he puts it, uncontrolled immigration, have a listen to what he said this morning. the way forward for our country is not tojust pull the big lever marked uncontrolled immigration and allow in huge numbers of people to do... well, you have cranked it a bit of the way, haven't you?
1:04 pm
in a controlled way, that is entirely sensible, but what some people are saying is to have hundreds of thousands of people in. this is a very serious point, because our country, you know, has been running at a comparatively low rate of wage growth for a long time, basically stagnant wages, and totally stagnant productivity and not as much growth as this country can achieve. that is because, chronically, we have failed to invest in people, we have failed to invest in equipment and you have seen wages flatten. so, higher wages and so, higherwages and higher productivity are borisjohnson's productivity are boris johnson's ideal answer, productivity are boris johnson's idealanswer, but productivity are boris johnson's ideal answer, but they will of course take time and there are those immediate questions about how you make sure that shelves are properly stocked and that petrol stations can
1:05 pm
fuel up people to the extent that they need. it was interesting, boris johnson was also press this morning on whether he could guarantee that there would not be more disruption in the run—up to christmas and he could not do that. the line from downing street at the moment is very hard to rule anything out at the moment in this transition period, as they see it, when the uk is moving from the economy of old, which had immigration from europe to an economy of new, which they hope will be based on higher productivity and higher wages. another thing boris johnson was not able to rule out this morning was more taxes. the national insurance hike which will come in in the new year has left many tories a bit nervous about the pledges from the last manifesto that they have broken. the prime minister argues that after what he calls the fiscal meteorite of the pandemic, that some hard decisions are
1:06 pm
necessary, but there are some tories who are a bit nervous that there could be more of those hard decisions too, and the prime minister was asked by andrew marr if you could rule out more tax rises in coming months. let me tell you, you have no fiercer or more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises than me, but we have had to deal with the pandemic on a scale which this country has not seen before in our lifetimes and long before and we do not want to raise taxes, of course... are you going to do it again, though? what we will not do is be irresponsible with the public finances and you mention... are you going to do it again? you mention margaret thatcher... are you going to do it again? if i can possibly avoid it, i do not want to raise taxes again, of course not. all right. nor does rishi sunak. so that was i do not want to, but viewers will have noticed there was not a categorical know, i suspect we will hear a bit more of that issue over the next few days here in manchester and back on the broader
1:07 pm
news agenda, the prime minister was of course asked about the murder of sarah everard and the fact that this week we had a serving metropolitan police officers sentenced to a whole life jail sentence for her murder. big questions about the vetting process in the met and how that was allowed to happen, but also the broader question that a lot of people have been asking since sarah everard's murder about the safety of women and girls. the prime minister was asked several times whether he would hold a public enquiry into what had gone on with sarah everard, thatis what had gone on with sarah everard, that is something he would not commit to this morning, he did urge people to trust the police, despite some big issues about trust in the met over the last few days, but asked more broadly about what the government was going to do to try and tackle the issue of safety of women and girls, here is what the prime minister had to say. what i am saying to you is that
1:08 pm
i think that we do need to look systemically, not just at the wayne couzens case, but at the whole handling of rape, domestic violence, sexual violence... 0k. let's look at rape, you mentioned rape a couple of times. ..and complaints about harassment altogether, because it is a phenomenon. so the prime minister wants to do more about conviction rates and his opponents would point out that the conservatives have been in power since 2010 and they bear some of the responsibility for some of those low conviction rates. nick, the prime minister has been speaking this lunchtime and we ran an excerpt from the interview which said basically stop expecting the government to sort out every problem in the supply chain, it does sound sometimes that he is rather envious of the days when conservative prime ministers like stanley baldwin could practice masterly inactivity and that events
1:09 pm
just happened, but it is not really possible these days because the pressures and demands, whetherfrom his own party or the media, are constant. i his own party or the media, are constant. ~ ., , constant. i think that is right. boris johnson _ constant. i think that is right. boris johnson last _ constant. i think that is right. boris johnson last week - constant. i think that is right. boris johnson last week did i constant. i think that is right. i boris johnson last week did not borisjohnson last week did not want toissue borisjohnson last week did not want to issue extra visas for hgv drivers and we have seen thousands of them announced earlier this week and then extended in the last few days, the time period anyway, and i think mr johnson's hand has been forced a number of times on a number of issues, but it is worth pointing out, he may say that, he is quite an interventionist prime minister, particularly for a conservative and there have been a lot of things that may be some conservatives would not have liked to say, like that hike in national insurance country to the last tory manifesto, that is something that borisjohnson says he did not want to do but given the pandemic, he felt it was necessary to get the nhs back on its feet and
1:10 pm
particularly, in the run—up to christmas, and over the next few weeks, there are some short—term issues, as the prime ministers sees them, caused by the changes to the immigration system after bragg said, we heard him talk a lot about the h gb industry being too reliant, he believes, on cheap foreign labour and that has pushed down wages and standards and he wants to address that and that is a medium—term solution and many of our viewers will be sitting at home thinking, i get the point, but i also want to know that i can get a petrol when i go to the garage i know i can pick up go to the garage i know i can pick up a turkey in december. there are real pressures on the prime minister to make sure that there are some short—term solutions as well and i think we will hear more and more of them over the next few weeks and months. ,, , ., , ., , _ months. sunshine and showers by the look of it in manchester _ months. sunshine and showers by the look of it in manchester this _ months. sunshine and showers by the look of it in manchester this week,. . look of it in manchester this week,. have a good one, enjoy your week.
1:11 pm
nick eardley there, our political correspondent. the conference begins in just under two hours' correspondent. the conference begins injust under two hours' time, apart from the introductions, we will be getting a speech from the new foreign secretary, liz truss. we will bring you the highlights of all the main speeches during the course of the week. anyone approached by a lone police officer in scotland will now be offered the chance to speak with control room staff to check their identity. the new system has been introduced in the wake of the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer. helena wilkinson has more details. when wayne couzens kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard, he was a serving metropolitan police officer. he used his position to trick sarah into a car he had hired by showing her his warrant card and falsely arresting her. after he was sent to prison for life, the met commissioner spoke outside the old bailey. this man has brought shame on the met. speaking frankly,
1:12 pm
as an organisation, we have been rocked. i absolutely know that there are those who feel their trust in us is shaken. police forces across the country are now looking at ways to reassure the public and restore trust. the metropolitan police said people stopped by a lone plain—clothes officer should challenge their legitimacy, but many wonder why it should be up to the public to ask the questions. police scotland has now issued new advice for its force. under the new process, if a lone officer approaches a member of the public, they will proactively offer an identity check. the officer's personal radio will be put on loudspeaker, allowing control room staff to confirm they are who they say they are. and if a lone officer becomes involved in an incident, they will call 999 and allow the member of the public to speak directly to control room staff.
1:13 pm
police scotland said the force recognised the understandable public concern about the horrendous murder of sarah everard and the onus was on them to provide reassurance to women in particular. helena wilkinson, bbc news. the first ministers of northern ireland, scotland and wales have called on uk prime minister borisjohnson to reverse plans to end the top up to universal credit. people who claim the benefit have been getting an extra 20 pounds a week as a temporary measure to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. the uplift is due to come to an end this week. the first ministers say there is "no rationale" for stopping the payments at a time when millions of people are facing what they describe as an "unprecedented squeeze on household budgets." the government has announced a household support fund worth half a billion pounds to help those affected. a 15 year old girl from portsmouth has died from coronavirus on the day she was due to be vaccinated. jorja halliday, died in hospital on tuesday, four days after she received
1:14 pm
a positive pcr test. preliminary hospital results said she had heart inflammation caused by the virus. her mother, tracey said the gcse student was a �*loving girl, talented kickboxer and aspiring musician... she turned into a beautiful young lady, always wanting to help others, always there for everybody.�* cisse larmer won the men�*s london marathon and joycilinejepkosgei won marathon and joyciline jepkosgei won the woman�*s marathon and joycilinejepkosgei won the woman�*s one. 40,000 took part virtually. our correspondent laura scott is there with one of the successful athlete who has completed the race. absolutely. i will introduce you to james cracknell in a moment but this is a significant day, because we waited a long time for things like these at the london
1:15 pm
marathon, april 2019 the last time the mass participation event was run on the streets of london around the historic 26.2 mile course. last year the race was postponed because of covid and it ended up being an elite only event on a looked course around st james�*s park but today it returned and the sun is shining and it is uplifting to be at the finish line and see people crossing the line, many of them for good causes, charities close to their heart. one of the more than 36,000 runners running today is the double olympic championjames cracknell. running today is the double olympic champion james cracknell.- running today is the double olympic champion james cracknell. james, how was it? it was — champion james cracknell. james, how was it? it was an _ champion james cracknell. james, how was it? it was an amazing _ champion james cracknell. james, how was it? it was an amazing day. - champion james cracknell. james, how was it? it was an amazing day. just, i was it? it was an amazing day. just, people supporting in so many people running, people having to train on their own and then coming through, it was really special and also, a real sign that the country is getting back to normal. i real sign that the country is getting back to normal. i know you were running _ getting back to normal. i know you were running for— getting back to normal. i know you were running for headway, - getting back to normal. i know you were running for headway, a -
1:16 pm
getting back to normal. i know you were running for headway, a causei were running for headway, a cause close to your heart, how important was it for you to run for them? i worked closely with them and they have been incredibly helpful to me when i suffered a nasty accident and had a traumatic brain injury and helping victims and their families with any changes and how to move on and it helps so many people. and to run and rise a bit of awareness about it, it was fantastic. horse run and rise a bit of awareness about it, it was fantastic. how was the atmosphere _ about it, it was fantastic. how was the atmosphere on _ about it, it was fantastic. how was the atmosphere on the _ about it, it was fantastic. how was the atmosphere on the course, - about it, it was fantastic. how was the atmosphere on the course, i i about it, it was fantastic. how was - the atmosphere on the course, i know that participants were limited to one spectator each, but was there at the normal london marathon atmosphere?— the normal london marathon atmosphere? the normal london marathon atmoshere? , . . , atmosphere? yes, and what is really secial is atmosphere? yes, and what is really special is that _ atmosphere? yes, and what is really special is that people _ atmosphere? yes, and what is really special is that people come - atmosphere? yes, and what is really special is that people come down - atmosphere? yes, and what is really| special is that people come down and support their partner, there might or the charity that they are running for, but then people stay and cheer on every runner, and if they have a name on it, they shouted, it is a really positive experience. the new york marathon, it is nice to run around manhattan, but there is not the same atmosphere, there is a
1:17 pm
communal spirit.— communal spirit. brilliant, thank ou so communal spirit. brilliant, thank you so much- — communal spirit. brilliant, thank you so much. as _ communal spirit. brilliant, thank you so much. as james - communal spirit. brilliant, thank i you so much. as james mentioned, communal spirit. brilliant, thank - you so much. as james mentioned, it is an important boost for charities many of whom have been hit hard by the pandemic, but after 889 days away, the fun runners are back of the fancy dresses back, this world—famous mass participation event is back. laura scott, it certainly is, thank you for the update and we look forward to hearing for —— from you, plenty more runner still to complete the run and what a lovely day to do it. laura scott, thank you very much. an independent commission investigating sexual abuse has found that thousands of paedophiles have been operating within the roman catholic church over the past seventy years. the commission�*s head, jean marc sauve, told the french news agency they had uncovered between two thousand nine hundred and three thousand two hundred abusive priests or other church members, adding this was a minimum estimate. the inquiry was set up in 2018 by the french catholic church in response
1:18 pm
to a number of scandals. police investigating the murder of lara mckay have charged a 53 old man with riot, assault and throwing petrol bombs. she was shot dead in derry in 2019 during rioting in the creggan area of the city. the man is expected to appear in court on monday, the extremist group styling itself as the new iri previously claimed it was responsible for killing the journalist and author. three men have been charged with her murder and anotherfour three men have been charged with her murder and another four with rioting and associated offences. italians are voting in postponed local elections which are being watched for the strength of the far right. residents in more than a thousand cities and other municipalities will choose who�*ll run their town halls. it�*s the first test since mario draghi became prime minister earlier this year. one of the key contests will be the mayoral race in rome where rubbish has been pilling up
1:19 pm
and rotting on the streets. even wild boars have been spotted roaming the city. our correspondent mark lowen explained more about the vote. good afternoon, it is far too early to know about results, or i guess even turn out, but is it likely to be, notwithstanding the horrible things in rome, that there will be much desire to vote in these elections? it has been a rough old yearfor elections? it has been a rough old year for italy. elections? it has been a rough old yearfor italy. it elections? it has been a rough old year for italy-_ elections? it has been a rough old year for italy-— year for italy. it has been a rough old 18 months _ year for italy. it has been a rough old 18 months and _ year for italy. it has been a rough old 18 months and with _ year for italy. it has been a rough old 18 months and with covid - year for italy. it has been a rough old 18 months and with covid and | year for italy. it has been a rough - old 18 months and with covid and the economic crisis that has involved. i think that people will be interested in going out to vote, the turnout figures are largely similar to what we had four orfive figures are largely similar to what we had four or five years ago and there is a feeling here that local elections give a platform to parties
1:20 pm
to build support, to lay out the programme before national elections which could be about two years away and that is why they are important here and there are also a gauge of which way the country is going politically. just two years ago, the firebrand populist, quite anti— eu right winger looked on the brink of becoming prime minister and leading the first country in western europe to lurch to the far right, now his support has decreased significantly and his party is part of the national unity coalition government of mario draghi which is one of the reasons why his party is down in the polls and we will be looking closely to see how the right—wing does, because are hopes of snatching key cities, really, is fading and they may not succeed in these local elections. i5 may not succeed in these local elections-— may not succeed in these local elections. , . ., ., elections. is there a fear that he miaht elections. is there a fear that he might conceivably _ elections. is there a fear that he might conceivably trigger - elections. is there a fear that he might conceivably trigger the i might conceivably trigger the collapse of the coalition by walking away from it?—
1:21 pm
away from it? there is talk about his -a away from it? there is talk about his party splitting _ away from it? there is talk about his party splitting and _ away from it? there is talk about his party splitting and more - his party splitting and more centrist parts of the league party staying within the coalition and we will see if that happens. he has also been hit by a recent scandal, his spin doctor, social media man, was caught or there were revelations that he admitted to taking drugs and using male prostitutes, at six fuelled parties and then the other hard—line ultranationalist party, ha rd—line ultra nationalist party, brothers hard—line ultranationalist party, brothers of italy, there was an explosive undercover footage that emerged of their candidate supporting money laundering and illicit party funding and making hitler support salutes and pro— fascist pro homophobic and sexist remarks and i think that will all add to the pressure on the right and i think the centre—left is feeling quite confident going into these elections and hoping it will prove to be a springboard before the elections in 2023.— to be a springboard before the elections in 2023. what about mario dra . hi, the elections in 2023. what about mario draghi. the man _ elections in 2023. what about mario draghi, the man they _ elections in 2023. what about mario draghi, the man they used - elections in 2023. what about mario draghi, the man they used to - elections in 2023. what about mario draghi, the man they used to call. draghi, the man they used to call super mario at the european central
1:22 pm
bank, because he was seen as the man who stabilised eurozone, how is it caring for him? you who stabilised eurozone, how is it caring for him?— caring for him? you know, italy's olitical caring for him? you know, italy's political volatility _ caring for him? you know, italy's political volatility and _ caring for him? you know, italy's political volatility and change - caring for him? you know, italy's political volatility and change of. political volatility and change of governments are legendary. i have lost track, i think we are about 65 or 66 government since the second world war and it collapsed again earlier this year and then in came mario draghi and he was seen as a realfigure of mario draghi and he was seen as a real figure of authority, he has can�*t stabilise the country, and he has brought in this very broad national unity government from the left to the far right and he is kind of the only figure who could have persuaded the far right to swing behind the government in terms of pushing through very tough covid vaccination rose, you need proof of vaccination rose, you need proof of vaccination or a test in order to be a public or private worker, to go into venues, italy has some of the strictest pro— vaccination rules in europe and that is down to mario
1:23 pm
draghi and he is a figure of real authority and the other entry point to note is that as angular miracle bow out in germany and as emmanuel macron runs for real action runs, it is seen as mario draghi as the adult in the room. italy has to some extent punch below its weight politically in europe but i think he is seen as the person who can elevate italy to the political standing it deserves. aha, elevate italy to the political standing it deserves. a really important — standing it deserves. a really important role _ standing it deserves. a really important role he _ standing it deserves. a really important role he could - standing it deserves. a really important role he could end i standing it deserves. a really i important role he could end up playing. i hope, whoever becomes mayor of rome, you finally get your bins cleared. a fire has destroyed or damaged more than 200 homes and businesses and injured four people on a tourist resort off the coast of honduras. the honduran air force dropped water on the island of guanaja to contain the blaze, which is now under control. the island is popular with scuba divers because of its coral reef. secondary school pupils across the uk have started to get their covid jabs. the vaccine is being offered to 12 to 15 year olds. organisers expect well over half of them to take up the offer.
1:24 pm
our social affairs correspondent, fiona lamdin, went to a school in weston super mare to see the rollout in action. normally these i2—year—olds are here for pe. today they�*re here for their covid jabs. my whole family�*s done it. my mum and my stepdad�*s done it, so�*s my parents so it can be safer for them �*cause there�*s flu going round so itjust helps keep everyone else safe. the reason why i wanted to have the covid jab, 'cause my mum's already had two and she said it's not painful. and ijust wanted to make sure that i'm safe around everyone. to keep, like, my community safe lfrom, like, being hurt and stuff. i the team carrying out the vaccinations don�*t want us to film the actual process but the covid jabs are being given behind this screen. and for the first time ever over at this station, they�*re offering the nasal flu spray to older children in years eight, nine, ten and ii. yeah, we welcome anything that helps
1:25 pm
us keep schools open and keep children attending but we�*re clear that families need to make informed choices as to whether the vaccination is right for them. they only started vaccinations in mainstream schools this week. but already take up looks high. it's early days at the moment and the consent process allows us to get some idea of how many children are going to go forward for vaccination. we're aiming for 85% of children and at the moment we are really hopeful that we'll achieve that. take up is looking very good currently and more than we expected. back in school, these year eights have just had theirs. how was it? not too bad. it was good but it hurt a little bit when you get the needle in your arm, it only pinches a little bit and then you have to wait 15 minutes because that�*s just the rule. but you�*re pleased you�*ve had it done? yeah, so we can be with friends. mmhmm, very best friends. so we can go out and be more safe and if we do get it then we can
1:26 pm
have more chance of surviving. the team behind this rollout hopes these vaccinations will be finished by mid—november. fiona lamdin, bbc news. the french businessman, politician and football club owner, bernard tapie, has died at the age of seventy eight. he had been battling stomach cancer. he built up a retail empire, before moving into cycling, he was also beaten up back in the spring. he entered politics after beta football chief and he was previously a politician in the 19905. previously a politician in the 1990s. hugh schofield has been telling me more about his extraordinarily complicated life. his first appearance as a public figure was as a crooner in the mid— '605 figure was as a crooner in the mid— �*60s and he reincarnated himself into thousands becoming a soap actor and then appeared on stage, hosted his own television programmes as well, so he was a jack of all trades
1:27 pm
and very much the classic larger—than—life figure and a very interesting figure and an important figure i think in modern france. the story briefly is that he is a self—made man, made millions, came from nowhere, it became a politician on the left but reconciled, if you like, his left—wing instincts and background with the idea of being rich being ok and in that sense, was a very modern man, before that businesspeople had been on the right and catholics, but he was a man of the people who became rich, very rich, became a tycoon, but kept in touch with the masses from whence he came. the other important thing is the idea that television audiences needed him, he was a communicator, he represented the world that came after him, from the 1980s on, tele was all and he was a prime manipulator of television, communicating was his great asset and people loved him. as you said on
1:28 pm
the question, he was very successful but he had a number of brushes with the law, he always sailed very close to the wind on the law and they said at the end of his life he easily could have operated a law firm because he knew the law of business very well indeed with all its holes. despite all of that, he was actually quite well liked by people, it seems. , ~' quite well liked by people, it seems. , ~ , , seems. extremely well liked, because the ener: seems. extremely well liked, because the energy with _ seems. extremely well liked, because the energy with which _ seems. extremely well liked, because the energy with which he _ seems. extremely well liked, because the energy with which he bounced - the energy with which he bounced back, his constant good cheer, his resilience and in the later part of his life, his battle against cancer made him very popular. fourforfive years now, we had been seen him look very haggard on tv with white hair as opposed to his black hair which was the look which he had throughout the 1980s and 1990s, but he still kept appearing and went through every possible treatment to fight back and stomach cancer and would not give up and people really admire that. ., ., �* ., that. hugh schofield on bernard taie that. hugh schofield on bernard ta - ie who that. hugh schofield on bernard tapie who has — that. hugh schofield on bernard tapie who has died _
1:29 pm
that. hugh schofield on bernard tapie who has died at _ that. hugh schofield on bernard tapie who has died at the - that. hugh schofield on bernard tapie who has died at the age i that. hugh schofield on bernard | tapie who has died at the age of that. hugh schofield on bernard - tapie who has died at the age of 78. pedro sanchez has just announced an extra e200,000,000 emergency help for temporary. the volcano has got worse, two new streams of lava threatening disruption. thousands of people have been forced to evacuate since the eruption first began in september. our correspondent danjohnson dan johnson has been danjohnson has been giving us this update. there doesn�*t appear to be any sign of this eruption ending, two weeks on the only indication is that the volcano is even more active thanit that the volcano is even more active than it was when it started. there is more and more lava flowing from the events that have opened up and it is heading down to the sea, but putting more homes and properties, more villages at risk as it flows. what nobody knows is just how long this is going to go on, how much more lava will be produced and how much more ash will fall. this is the
1:30 pm
sort of stuff that covers absolutely everything here now, people are having to brush it every day from their roofs, pathways, cars, it covers everything, a thick layer of that and you can taste it in the air at times depending on which way the wind is blowing. the other big risk is gas and gas is being emitted therefrom the volcano crater but also at the point where the lava hits the sea and depending on the wind direction, different communities are under threat at different times and the police are driving around certain villages telling people to stay in and keep their doors and windows closed. there are bigger questions, even when this active phase of the disruption ends, what people do to live around this lava, it has eaten through roads, cut through communications and power lines and it is making daily life really difficult, but also putting at risk longer term livelihoods here. what about the banana farmers and fishermen and the tourist industry?
1:31 pm
how will people get

46 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on