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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 3, 2021 11:00am-11:30am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson pledges to improve the economy on rules are relying on immigration to boost the number of truck drivers to deal with the fuel crisis, as the party conference of his ruling conservatives gets under way. his ruling conservatives gets under wa . u, his ruling conservatives gets under wa . ”i a, a, his ruling conservatives gets under wa . a, a, a, his ruling conservatives gets under wa. a, a, a, a, , way. the way forward for our country is not to just — way. the way forward for our country is not to just pull _ way. the way forward for our country is not to just pull the _ way. the way forward for our country is not to just pull the big _ way. the way forward for our country is not to just pull the big lever - is not tojust pull the big lever marked uncontrolled immigration and allowing huge numbers of people. police scotland introduce new verification checks for loan officers in the wake of the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. marching for abortion rights across the us this weekend, pro—choice supporters fear the us supreme court
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could impose further restrictions. hundreds forced to evacuate on a resort island in honduras as fire destroys dozens of homes. two new streams of lava threaten further destruction as the lap volcano forces more residents to flee. and the wait is over for more than 40,000 runners taking part in london's marathon. —— la power nap volcano. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the british prime minister says the uk will not revert to what he has called �*the old model of uncontrolled immigration�* to deal with worker shortages. speaking to the bbc ahead of the conservativer party conference in manchester, borisjohnson says the conservatives will "change and improve"
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the economy after covid. he also defended the record on the public finances and promised he would not implement further what he called unnecessary tax rises after he decided to increase national insurance this year to pay for the nhs and social care. live to manchester and our political correspondent nick eardley. goad correspondent nick eardley. good morninu. correspondent nick eardley. good morning- good — correspondent nick eardley. good morning. good morning. - correspondent nick eardley. (13cm morning. good morning. it is an interesting backdrop to this conservative conference because borisjohnson is in a pretty commanding position politically, but in terms of everyday life, there are some pretty significant issues here that he is facing, the biggest of which we have covered a lot in the last week or so is questions over how resilient the uk's supply chain is at the moment. we have seen shortages of hgv drivers and that has led to questions about demand and supply when it comes to food on the shelves in some parts of the country. within the last few days,
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in particular, few will and people panic buying petrol because of fears it might run out in certain parts of the country. one of the big question is the prime minister is facing is what is he going to do about it and this was part of his answer to andrew marr this morning. the way forward for our country is not tojust pull the big lever marked uncontrolled immigration and allow in huge numbers of people to do... well, you have cranked it a bit of the way, haven't you? in a controlled way, that is entirely sensible, but what some people are saying is to have hundreds of thousands of people in. this is a very serious point, because our country, you know, has been running at a comparatively low rate of wage growth for a long time, basically stagnant wages, and totally stagnant productivity and not as much growth as this country can achieve. that is because, chronically, we have failed to invest in people,
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we have failed to invest in equipment and you have seen wages flatten. so, to summarise, pay, not immigration is what the prime minister wants to be the solution to some of these issues. the problem he has is that improving paying conditions does not happen overnight and at the moment the government is having to do things it did not want to do, like issue thousands of phases for hgv drivers and poultry workers to make sure that there are not shortages on the shelves and in a petrol station forecourts. it is interesting, looking at this conference as well, because although you can see behind me, to getting on with thejob message you can see behind me, to getting on with the job message that boris johnson wants to talk about, there is not a particular way in which the government is on the front foot here, things it is selling and a lot
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of what the prime minister was asked about buy andrew marr this morning was reactive, about things he is having to play catch up with because of challenges in the economy and challenges in the supply chain. 0ne challenges in the supply chain. one other area where the prime minister is facing questions from tory delegates is well is on tax, you remember that in the uk we are seeing a manifesto busting rise in national insurance coming then in a few months to pay for the nhs. the prime minister's argument is because of the pandemic, the health service needs more money in the uk. that has made some conservatives quite uncomfortable and we have even heard cabinet ministers making none too subtle warnings that there cannot be any more tax rises. would the prime minister ruled him out? have a listen. let me tell you, you have no fiercer or more zealous opponent of unnecessary tax rises than me, but we have had to deal with the pandemic on a scale which this country has not seen
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before in our lifetimes and long before and we do not want to raise taxes, of course... are you going to do it again, though? what we will not do is be irresponsible with the public finances and you mention... are you going to do it again? you mention margaret thatcher... are you going to do it again? if i can possibly avoid it, i do not want to raise taxes again, of course not. all right. nor does rishi sunak. so, does not want to but you will notice there was not a categorical know and i suspect that will make some conservatives a bit nervous over the next few days. aside from the daily politics, there is the big issue that has been dominating a lot of mines in the uk over the past few daysis of mines in the uk over the past few days is the murder of sarah everard by a serving metropolitan police officer. that has raised questions about the met and the vetting process for police and also much wider questions about violence
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against women and girls and what the government can do to tackle that. the prime minister was asked about this this morning, firstly could people trust the police, his argument was yes, absolutely, despite some of the concerns that have been raised recently, he does want people to retain their trust in the police. he was asked several times whether he would agree to a public enquiry into what had gone wrong and how a police officer had managed to be in that position despite some warning signs. he would not commit to that, but this was his broader message on how to tackle that issue of violence against women and girls. what i am saying to you is that i think that we do need to look systemically, not just at the wayne couzens case, but at the whole handling of rape, domestic violence, sexual violence... 0k. let's look at rape, you mentioned rape a couple of times. ..and complaints about harassment altogether, because it is a phenomenon.
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so, that is the prime minister's view, he wants to tackle the rape conviction rate, also to talk more about getting the justice to sister moving faster although i suspect his critics would point out that the conservatives have been in powerfor ii conservatives have been in powerfor 11 years and many of the issues in the justice system, 11 years and many of the issues in thejustice system, his 11 years and many of the issues in the justice system, his opponents would say, are as much the fault of the conservative party in government as anybody else. it is difficult for the conservatives meeting this way, they are trying to project, as you can see from the slogans, an image of energy and ideas and new thinking, all of that was supposed to happen 18 months ago, until covid hit and parliament is in a sense slipping away, often prime ministers are told to do stuff early otherwise events get in the way and you suddenly run out of time.
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absolutely. there is this big question about when the fixed term parliament act goes in the uk which mandates how often elections are, we could face an election in as little as 18 months, and because of that, borisjohnson wants to spend the next few days laying out his plans for the economy, for the nhs, what we can see here, build back better after the pandemic, but they are struck about the fact that although thatis struck about the fact that although that is the message, putting meat on those bones has been quite a slow process and on the first day of the conference when the prime minister does his big set piece interview, you expect there to be a big message, may be some policies, something the prime minister will come out to grab the agenda and say, here is the thing we want to do. instead of that, borisjohnson although he is in a powerful position with his party and in parliament without significant
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majority, he is facing different, what some people describe as crisis is, regarding energy, the fuel supply, is, regarding energy, the fuel supply, added cost of living, at a time when the universal credit uplift is going on wednesday, the furlough scheme, inflation expected to go up significantly in the next few weeks and months and all that means, no tories are talking about anyone other than borisjohnson anyone other than boris johnson being anyone other than borisjohnson being leader, but there are a number of tory is really nervous about the cost of living and whether the party is really on top of that and whether the government has understood the scale of the challenge some people are going to face. borisjohnson, in are going to face. borisjohnson, in a really commanding position, half an eye on when the next election will be and many tories, slightly worried that the next few months are going to be bumpy. hick worried that the next few months are going to be bumpy-— going to be bumpy. nick eardley, in manchester. _ going to be bumpy. nick eardley, in manchester, thank _ going to be bumpy. nick eardley, in manchester, thank you _ going to be bumpy. nick eardley, in manchester, thank you so _ going to be bumpy. nick eardley, in
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manchester, thank you so much. i manchester, thank you so much. coverage of the conservative party conference begins at three o'clock this afternoon on the bbc news channel and we will bring you some of the highlights of the speeches today and the rest of the week. anyone approached by a lone police officer in scotland will now be offered the chance to speak with control room staff to check their identity. the new system has been introduced in the wake of the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer. helena wilkinson has more details. when wayne couzens kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard, he was a serving metropolitan police officer. he used his position to trick sarah into a car he had hired by showing her his warrant card and falsely arresting her. after he was sent to prison for life, the met commissioner spoke outside the old bailey. this man has brought shame on the met. speaking frankly, as an organisation, we have been rocked. i absolutely know that there are those who feel their trust
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in us is shaken. police forces across the country are now looking at ways to reassure the public and restore trust. the metropolitan police said people stopped by a lone plain—clothes officer should challenge their legitimacy, but many wonder why it should be up to the public to ask the questions. police scotland has now issued new advice for its force. under the new process, if a lone officer approaches a member of the public, they will proactively offer an identity check. the officer's personal radio will be put on loudspeaker, allowing control room staff to confirm they are who they say they are. and if a lone officer becomes involved in an incident, they will call 999 and allow the member of the public to speak directly to control room staff. police scotland said the force recognised the understandable public concern about the horrendous murder
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of sarah everard and the onus was on them to provide reassurance to women in particular. helena wilkinson, bbc news. the first ministers of northern ireland, scotland and wales have called on uk prime minister borisjohnson to reverse plans to end the top up to universal credit. people who claim the benefit have been getting an extra 20 pounds a week as a temporary measure to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. the uplift is due to come to an end this week. the first ministers say there is "no rationale" for stopping the payments at a time when millions of people are facing what they describe as an "unprecedented squeeze on household budgets." the government has announced a household support fund worth half a billion pounds to help those affected. fire has destroyed businesses in a tourist resort off the coast of honduras. the honduran air force
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dropped water on the island to contain the blaze which is now under control. the island is popular with scuba divers because of its coral reef. an independent commission investigating sexual abuse found that thousands of paedophiles have been operating within the roman catholic church over the past 70 years. the head of the commission told a french news agency they had uncovered between 2,900 and 3,200 abuse of praise or other church members, adding this was a minimum estimate. the enquiry set up in 2018 was set up in response to a number of scandals there. tens of thousands of scandals there. tens of thousands of people in the us have taken part in rally supporting abortion rights. they are opposed to a new texan law that limits access to abortion in the state. pro—choice supporters fear constitutional rights may be rolled back. our correspondent reports. this is a moment when
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abortion rights faced the most significant challenge in nearly half a century, from conservative lawmakers and judges. i a century, from conservative lawmakers and judges.- a century, from conservative lawmakers and judges. lawmakers and 'udges. i am very worried. i — lawmakers and 'udges. i am very worried. ithink— lawmakers and judges. i am very worried. i think it _ lawmakers and judges. i am very worried. i think it is _ lawmakers and judges. i am very worried. i think it is time - lawmakers and judges. i am very worried. i think it is time for - lawmakers and judges. i am very worried. i think it is time for a i worried. i think it is time for a course correction, we have been doing this for more than 50 years. now we are back here again and it is like, now we are back here again and it is like. when_ now we are back here again and it is like, when will this end? they are going _ like, when will this end? they are going to _ like, when will this end? they are going to keep putting on attacks and we will_ going to keep putting on attacks and we will keep fighting. no going to keep putting on attacks and we will keep fighting.— we will keep fighting. no one wakes u . we will keep fighting. no one wakes u- and we will keep fighting. no one wakes up and says — we will keep fighting. no one wakes up and says i _ we will keep fighting. no one wakes up and says i want _ we will keep fighting. no one wakes up and says i want to _ we will keep fighting. no one wakes up and says i want to get _ we will keep fighting. no one wakes up and says i want to get an - up and says i want to get an abortion— up and says i want to get an abortion today, _ up and says i want to get an abortion today, it _ up and says i want to get an abortion today, it is - up and says i want to get an abortion today, it is the - up and says i want to get an- abortion today, it is the hardest decision— abortion today, it is the hardest decision a — abortion today, it is the hardest decision a woman _ abortion today, it is the hardest decision a woman will _ abortion today, it is the hardest decision a woman will have - abortion today, it is the hardest decision a woman will have to l abortion today, it is the hardest - decision a woman will have to make and we _ decision a woman will have to make and we should — decision a woman will have to make and we should trust _ decision a woman will have to make and we should trust women - decision a woman will have to make and we should trust women to - decision a woman will have to make| and we should trust women to make that decision — and we should trust women to make that decision for— and we should trust women to make that decision for themselves. - that decision for themselves. women's _ that decision for themselves. women's rights! _ that decision for themselves. women's rights! in _ that decision for themselves. women's rights! in texas, i that decision for themselves. - women's rights! in texas, protesters have been fired up by a strict new abortion law. it bans the procedure after only six weeks of pregnancy. millions of children lose their right to life every year, because of abortion. and in texas we want to save those lives. the
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abortion. and in texas we want to save those lives.— abortion. and in texas we want to save those lives. the supreme court allowed the — save those lives. the supreme court allowed the extreme _ save those lives. the supreme court allowed the extreme texas - save those lives. the supreme court allowed the extreme texas law - save those lives. the supreme court| allowed the extreme texas law to go into effect, saying to protesters that the balance of power on the bench has shifted, conservative control strengthened by the appointment of donald trump and they will take up a challenge to national abortion rights injust a will take up a challenge to national abortion rights in just a few months. 0rganisers are hoping this will help to recruit new activist the fight ahead and it is a deeply political one, perhaps more than any other issue in american law, divided along bitterly battle lines. a confrontation just outside the supreme court, but the future of abortion rights will be decided inside. barbara plett usher, bbc news, washington. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson rules are relying on immigration to boost the number of truck driver to do with the fuel crisis as the conservative party conference gets under way in manchester. police scotland introduced new verification checks for loan officers in the wake of the kidnap rape and murder of sarah
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everhart by a serving police officer and this weekend people are marching for abortion rights across the us. protesters fear that the us supreme court could soon rollback whether constitutional protections. thousands of people have been taking part in the london marathon in the course of sunday morning. another 40,000 are running the event virtually. this was the first full—scale stage of the race in more than two years, the last time amateurs competed in london was in april, 2019. let us talk to our correspondent at the finish line, laura scott. what has been happening?— laura scott. what has been hauenina? ., �*, happening? well, the women's event is 'ust happening? well, the women's event is just about — happening? well, the women's event isjust about to _ happening? well, the women's event isjust about to finish _ happening? well, the women's event isjust about to finish and _ happening? well, the women's event isjust about to finish and it is - is just about to finish and it is looking like a debut when for jocelyn, the kenyan competitor, she won the new york marathon in 2019 and this is herfirst time in london, she isjust about and this is herfirst time in london, she is just about to cross
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the line. she is clearly delighted. there is a huge amount of emotion today in london, because this marks the return of the mass participation event alongside the elite races which are being run on the historic course, taking in the capital landmarks. last year, of course, the event was cancelled because of covid and it had to be run as an elite only race on a looped course in st james's park behind me, but today marks a really meaningful return to the mass participation event. more than 36,000 fun runners taking part, many of them for good causes, which will provide a much—needed boost for charities that have suffered a lot during the pandemic and in addition to those running on the streets of london, there are about 40,000 expected to run virtually wherever they are in the world and that would make it the biggest marathon ever staged, anywhere in history. there are still signs of covid at the event, not least the fact it is
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running in october rather than april, runners have had to prove that they are negative on a lateral flow covid test and only allowed one spectator each to avoid overcrowding. 0rganisers are hoping that this event will be the most meaningful in its history and the fun runners are back, the fancy dresses back, this world—famous mass participation event is back. dresses back, this world-famous mass participation event is back.— participation event is back. better than tokyo- _ participation event is back. better than tokyo- i _ participation event is back. better than tokyo. i came _ participation event is back. better than tokyo. i came back, - participation event is back. better than tokyo. i came back, trained | than tokyo. i came back, trained hard, _ than tokyo. i came back, trained hard. i_ than tokyo. i came back, trained hard. i never— than tokyo. i came back, trained hard, i never know if it is my last race and — hard, i never know if it is my last race and i— hard, i never know if it is my last race and i train as hard as i can and— race and i train as hard as i can and i_ race and i train as hard as i can and i gave— race and i train as hard as i can and i gave it— race and i train as hard as i can and i gave it all today. i was a little — and i gave it all today. i was a little bit — and i gave it all today. i was a little bit slow at the beginning. it was a _ little bit slow at the beginning. it was a little bit cold, i was not warmed — was a little bit cold, i was not warmed up. ijust lost daniel and marcel. — warmed up. ijust lost daniel and marcel, but the other group,, induding _ marcel, but the other group,, including brent and i felt comfortable with them and felt pretty— comfortable with them and felt pretty strong. it was nice to come first, — pretty strong. it was nice to come first, definitely.— first, definitely. what was it like beinu first, definitely. what was it like being back _ first, definitely. what was it like being back on — first, definitely. what was it like being back on the _ first, definitely. what was it like being back on the normal - first, definitely. what was it like| being back on the normal course first, definitely. what was it like i being back on the normal course as opposed to the looped course? it suits me, i love a bit of climbing
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and the — suits me, i love a bit of climbing and the rough roads, even though i moan _ and the rough roads, even though i moan when — and the rough roads, even though i moan when i am on them! the loops was definitely a race for sprinters, i did was definitely a race for sprinters, i did my— was definitely a race for sprinters, i did my best. it was lovely to come back on— i did my best. it was lovely to come back on the — i did my best. it was lovely to come back on the same course and do my 22nd _ back on the same course and do my 22nd marathon in a row. i love it. well, _ 22nd marathon in a row. i love it. well, that— 22nd marathon in a row. i love it. well, that was david weir who finished third in the men's wheelchair race and in both wheelchair race and in both wheelchair events to date there have been course records and two wins for switzerland with marcel hoog in the men's event. and in the men's race, that will finish in about 15 minutes' time and it is looking like it will be a 1st—time winner in that race as well as the kenyan in the women's race. today, it is hugely emotionalfor a lot of women's race. today, it is hugely emotional for a lot of people. emotionalfor a lot of people. we have heard of many of the fun runners taking part for charities very close to their hearts and a lot of them defer their places from last yearin of them defer their places from last year in april to run today. you do
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get a sense of speaking to people around the finishing line that it could be a more emotional and uplifting event than it ever has been before and we will find out laterjust how many people have finished the race, the first few finishers in the mass participation event will finish in the next hour orso event will finish in the next hour or so and as i have said before, it is said to be the biggest marathon ever staged and of course, a hugely important return of the london marathon to the streets. laura, with new winners. — marathon to the streets. laura, with new winners, 1st-time _ marathon to the streets. laura, with new winners, 1st-time winners i marathon to the streets. laura, with new winners, 1st-time winners as i new winners, 1st—time winners as well. laura scott, we will talk to you later, thank you. the french businessman, politician and football club owner, bernard tapie, has died at the age of seventy eight. he had been battling stomach cancer. he built up a retail empire, before moving into cycling, football and politics serving briefly as a minister. i'm joined now by our paris correspondent, hugh schofield. i could have added various other things including a couple of brushes
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with the law. he things including a couple of brushes with the law— things including a couple of brushes with the law. he was imprisoned for a few months _ with the law. he was imprisoned for a few months back _ with the law. he was imprisoned for a few months back in _ with the law. he was imprisoned for a few months back in the _ with the law. he was imprisoned for a few months back in the early i with the law. he was imprisoned forl a few months back in the early 1990s for max fixing. it was following huge success with his football club, but throughout his career, he sailed a pretty fine line, as far as the law is concerned. he fell foul once. that affair, he basically was found guilty of trying to fix a match in order to spare his players for a more important match and after that he never served as a football chief again. the great thing about bernard tapie was his resilience, his charm, his ability to come back and his communication skills. whatever he did, was loved by the public. we are havin: did, was loved by the public. we are having some — did, was loved by the public. we are having some problems _ did, was loved by the public. we are having some problems with - did, was loved by the public. we are having some problems with your- did, was loved by the public. we are. having some problems with your line, we will try and get you up again in the next hour, if that is ok and do
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it in a bit more detail. apologies. hugh schofield talking about bernard tapie, he is a fascinating man and hugh has lots to tell us. i am sorry about the problems with the microphone. the volcano that has been erupting for the past 14 days on the spanish island of la palma is spewing out further elaborate threatening further destruction, homes and crops have been discussed joyed and thousands of people have been forced to evacuate since the eruption began in september. dan johnson is on the island. the volcano is even more active now than it was when it started. there is more and more lava flowing from new verbs that have opened up and it is heading down to the sea, but putting more homes, more properties, more villages at risk as it flows. what
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no one knows isjust villages at risk as it flows. what no one knows is just how long this is going to go on, how much more lava will be produced and how much more ash will fall. this is the sort of stuff that covers absolutely everything here now. people are having to brush it every day from their roofs, pathways, cars, it covers everything, a thick layer of that and you can taste it in the air at times depending on what way the wind is blowing. the other big risk here is gas and there is gas being emitted therefrom the volcano crater, but also at the point where the lava hits the sea and depending on the wind direction, different communities are under threat at different times and police are driving around certain villages telling people to stay inside and keep their doors and windows closed. there are bigger questions, even when there active phase ends, about what people do to live around this larva, it has eaten through roads, cut through communications and power lines, it is making daily life
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really difficult, but also putting at risk longer term livelihoods here, what about the banana farmers and fishermen and the tourist industry? how will people get around, this whole site of le palma has been cut off by the massive black lava that has scarred and disfigured the landscape here. the big unknown isjust how much longer that volcano will keep rumbling and how much more lava it will produce, it has already generated twice the lava of the last eruption here which was in 1971. that is why so many people here are now fearful of what else this volcano might be about to do. danjohnson. italians are voting on sunday which is being watched for the strength of the far right, residents are more than 1,000 cities and municipalities will choose who runs the town halls, the first nationwide test since mario jaggi first nationwide test since mario jaggi became prime minister earlier this year. one of the key contest will be the mayoral race in rome were rubbish has been piling up and
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rotting in the streets and even wild boar have been spotted roaming in the city, something for the politicians to explain. you're watching world news from the bbc. the former children's commissioner from england has warned that as many as 135,000 pupils in the uk have not returned to school this term. the figures do not include normal absences or children staying at home because of the covid infection, so what has happened? i put this question earlier to an longfield. no one knows. these are children, as far back in the summer, this centre for socialjustice had suggested were missing from school, ghost children, if they were attending, they did not attend for more than 50% of the time.— 50% of the time. with the new fi . ures
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50% of the time. with the new figures coming _ 50% of the time. with the new figures coming out _ 50% of the time. with the new figures coming out this - 50% of the time. with the new. figures coming out this september with children returning in the autumn, the figures, albeit a snapshot, are showing that that figure looks to be the same as it was back in the summer. these are young people who are not attending school on a regular basis, they are not taking part in their learning and they may be outside the home, they may be at home, we do not know. it is quite disturbing, i can remember in the wake of the fred west case where there was concern that one of his children had vanished from the school roll and there was a tightening up of regulations require quick —— requiring schools to pursue cases, is that not happening?— is that not happening? these are children who _ is that not happening? these are children who may _ is that not happening? these are children who may be _ is that not happening? these are children who may be did - is that not happening? these are children who may be did not i is that not happening? these are l children who may be did not attend on a regular basis before school, they may be vulnerable before the pandemic. they may be vulnerable before the andemic. , ., ,. ., ., they may be vulnerable before the andemic. , ., ,. ., , pandemic. they were on school rolls, that is the point. _ pandemic. they were on school rolls, that is the point. absolutely. - pandemic. they were on school rolls, that is the point. absolutely. they i that is the point. absolutely. they are the children _ that is the point. absolutely. they are the children who _ that is the point. absolutely. they are the children who potentially i are the children who potentially have been awful, they have gone off
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the school, they may be being home—schooled and there is a worry, thatis home—schooled and there is a worry, that is increasing, but also there is this group that we simply do not know anything my concern and i am working with the commission i am sharing on young lives over the next year to look at these children, who are potentially much more vulnerable to those who want to exploit them. if they are not in school, they do not have protective factors, they do not have protective factors, they do not have protective factors, they do not have positive adult relationships with teachers and they are not learning all of the things which will have a diminishing impact on their lives, not only as children, but throughout their lives. it children, but throughout their lives. , ., , ., ., ., lives. it is not 'ust an obligation on the lives. it is notjust an obligation on the schools, _ lives. it is notjust an obligation on the schools, there _ lives. it is notjust an obligation on the schools, there are i lives. it is notjust an obligation on the schools, there are other| on the schools, there are other partnership organisations that have a responsibility, duty of care towards children, whether it is local authorities or the police, what is being done to try and join up what is being done to try and join up all these groups to ensure that these kids do not slip through the cracks? . , ., ., ., ., cracks? the ambition for all of them will be that they _ cracks? the ambition for all of them will be that they will _ cracks? the ambition for all of them will be that they will try _ cracks? the ambition for all of them will be that they will try to _ cracks? the ambition for all of them will be that they will try to join i will be that they will try to join in and co—ordinate what they are
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doing and certainly teachers are doing and certainly teachers are doing huge amounts and i would say they cannot do it all themselves, but with tightening budgets, increasingly high levels of threshold, the child usually has to have gone through quite an extensive experience to be able to get onto the radars of people in the first place. what we need is to have people who are going out and looking for these children to identify them early and get them involved in activities around the school and in their communities, youth workers you can build relationships with them and mental health support workers who can help them re—engage with school. who can help them re-engage with school. ., . �* , school. the former children's commissioner _ school. the former children's commissioner for _ school. the former children's commissioner for england. i now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. you may have to dodge the odd downpour through the day but overall compared with yesterday a lot more in the way of drier and sunnier weather around. certainly into the afternoon, a good part of eastern england will see plenty sunshine, although some heavy showers in the north—east of england. not too bad in the north—east of scotland, but some strong to gale force, if not severe
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gale force winds, continue in shetland, and a blustery day elsewhere. showers a little bit more frequent in the west as the breeze picks up. but some sunshine in between, as i said, some of you avoiding the downpours altogether. nice enough when you're in sunshine, a little bit on the cool side out of it and in the breeze. still a bit breezy through tonight. the showers keep going as well and there could be some heavy and thundery ones towards southern counties of england and south wales and into tomorrow morning. we won't get clear skies for any length of time. temperatures down into single figures, maybe lower single figures across parts of scotland, northern england and northern ireland. but it will be, while a fresh start, a dry and bright start for many. more showers towards the south east corner to begin with for monday, compared with today. showers still there in the west, pushing away eastwards on the breeze. persistent rain towards south wales before the day's out. the headlines this hour, boris johnson pledges to improve the economy.

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