Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 2, 2021 6:00pm-6:30pm BST

6:00 pm
this is bbc news, the headlines at 6... after days of queuing at the pumps, the army will begin delivering fuel to petrol stations across the uk from monday. an american private equity firm is set to take over i appreciate how infuriating it has been for people, the situation is stabilising, but it's a problem that has been driven really by demand, not by supply. an american private equity firm is set to take over morrisons, the uk's fourth largest supermarket group. the home secretary says police must "raise the bar", by taking the harassment of women more seriously. this is the scene live in washington at one of more than 600 abortion rights rallies being held
6:01 pm
across the united states, as people protest against recent efforts by states to restrict restrict abortion access. the queen officially opens the sixth session of the scottish parliament at holyrood. two new streams of lava pose a further threat of destruction as the la palma volcano forces more to flee. and coming up in sportsday, all the latest premier league action as everton hold manchester united to a 1-1 everton hold manchester united to a 1—1 draw at old trafford. good evening. the situation at petrol pumps across much of britain seems to be getting better. figures from the petrol retailers association, show more than two thirds of sites they contacted now have plenty of fuel.
6:02 pm
however, some filling stations in london and the south east remain dry. the military is due to help out, beginning deliveries to petrol stations from monday. our business correspondent, katy austin has the very latest. there were more queues to fill up again this morning. this is the first time i'm queuing up because my boy normally gets it for me, but today, oh, my gosh. it's like christmas came early. these drivers in newcastle weren't having issues. i think it's starting to pick up now. the organisation which represents independent forecourts says the supply picture has improved in the midlands, the north of england and into scotland. the body representing independent forecourts says availability across the country has improved. it thinks about two thirds of sites now have petrol and diesel while16% have run dry, but it's labelled the situation in london
6:03 pm
and the south—east as critical. all deliveries must now go i to london and the south—east and to the independent forecourts, which make up 65% of all- forecourts in the uk. 200 military personnel, including 100 drivers, have been called in to help boost supplies. they are being trained and will start on monday. the first big amount will really be working through this weekend, deploying on monday probably on their own more and then by the end of the week, another 60 to 70 will come online. amid a shortage of hgv drivers across the economy, 5,000 visas for foreign workers had already been announced, lasting until christmas eve. that includes 300 fuel tanker drivers. now we know they will be able to start immediately and the length of time they can stay for has been extended until the end of march. 4,700 of the visas are for food lorry drivers, and they will not be able
6:04 pm
to start until later this month, but their length of stay has also been extended up to the end of february. ministers insist the fuel situation will continue to improve if people only buy what they need. even when supply levels return to normal, motorists are being told they should expect to pay more at the pump as wholesale prices rise. the prime minister was asked about the continuing long queues in some parts of the country for fuel. i would say they should go about their business in the normal way, insofar as they possibly can. i appreciate how frustrating it has been, how infuriating it has been for people. the situation is stabilising, but it's a problem that has been driven really by demand, not by supply. though obviously we are taking all the precautions that we can. if it the precautions that we can. if it stabilising. _ the precautions that we can. if it stabilising, why do you need to bring the army in? you stabilising, why do you need to bring the army in?— stabilising, why do you need to bring the army in? you need to take
6:05 pm
u . bring the army in? you need to take u- a bring the army in? you need to take up a possible _ bring the army in? you need to take up a possible precaution _ bring the army in? you need to take up a possible precaution but - bring the army in? you need to take up a possible precaution but the - up a possible precaution but the supplies are getting to the forecourts, and peoplejust need supplies are getting to the forecourts, and people just need to be going about their business in their own normal way.— be going about their business in their own normal way. talking about hgv drivers — their own normal way. talking about hgv drivers still, _ their own normal way. talking about hgv drivers still, you _ their own normal way. talking about hgv drivers still, you have - their own normal way. talking about hgv drivers still, you have relaxed l hgv drivers still, you have relaxed the rules for visas slightly. will you rule out further relaxations on all this, in order to do thejob? we all this, in order to do the “ob? we have a all this, in order to do the job? - have a system that allows us to control immigration and that gives us flexibility we can open up markets if we need to and we will keep everything under review. but what we don't want to do is go back to a situation in which we basically allowed the road haulage industry to be sustained with a lot of low—wage emigration that meant that wages didn't go up and facilities, standards, the quality of the job did not go up. so the weird thing is now that people don't want to go in to the road haulage industry, don't
6:06 pm
want to be lorry drivers, precisely because we have had that massive emigration approach and help wages down, held the quantity, quality of the job done. down, held the quantity, quality of thejob done. we down, held the quantity, quality of the job done. we want to see investments in facilities and which are now starting to see is for the first time in over a decade, you are seeing wages going up around the country. that is fundamentally a good thing, that's what we mean and wages are going up faster for those on the lower incomes, that what we mean by levelling up. that on the lower incomes, that what we mean by levelling up.— on the lower incomes, that what we mean by levelling up. that leads me onto my leg — mean by levelling up. that leads me onto my leg next — mean by levelling up. that leads me onto my leg next question. - mean by levelling up. that leads me onto my leg next question. you - mean by levelling up. that leads me onto my leg next question. you arel onto my leg next question. you are helping with hgv drivers but there are other industries complaining, is the answer hi p? the are other industries complaining, is the answer hi p?— the answer hi p? the answer is for caettin the answer hi p? the answer is for getting talented _ the answer hi p? the answer is for getting talented people _ the answer hi p? the answer is for getting talented people in - the answer hi p? the answer is for getting talented people in from i getting talented people in from abroad is always a great thing, i have always been in favour of allowing people to who want to come make their lives here, work hard,
6:07 pm
have a lot to contribute, and the descendant of immigrants, many people are, but what i also want to see is standards ofjobs going up around the country, pay going up and investment in people, in their skills, in theirtraining. and investment in people, in their skills, in their training. and also in capital and equipment. facilities, because i think what the uk shouldn't do is continue to try to be a low—wage low skill, low productivity economy. this is the moment. i think people don't want to see that. the well skilled, highly productive economy, that's where we are going. productive economy, that's where we are anoin. . productive economy, that's where we areuaoin. . ~ , are going. that the prime minister, we will be speaking _ are going. that the prime minister, we will be speaking later— are going. that the prime minister, we will be speaking later to - are going. that the prime minister, we will be speaking later to chris i we will be speaking later to chris mason in manchester. the supermarket chain, morrisons, has been bought at auction by a us private equity firm. if approved by shareholders,
6:08 pm
clayton, dubilierand rice, which is advised by the former tesco boss, sir terry leahy, will pay almost £7 billion. joining me now is retail analyst, catherine shuttleworth. tell us more about this deal, a lot of money. it tell us more about this deal, a lot of mone . , , , ., tell us more about this deal, a lot of money-— of money. it is, this is a big business — of money. it is, this is a big business they _ of money. it is, this is a big business they are _ of money. it is, this is a big business they are buying i of money. it is, this is a big. business they are buying and of money. it is, this is a big - business they are buying and big opportunity. forthem business they are buying and big opportunity. for them to put their stamp on the business and really make a big difference in terms of british food industry. this is still one of the biggest supermarkets in the land. tell one of the biggest supermarkets in the land. , , , the land. tell us why morrisons needed to _ the land. tell us why morrisons needed to be _ the land. tell us why morrisons needed to be bought _ the land. tell us why morrisons needed to be bought in - the land. tell us why morrisons needed to be bought in this - the land. tell us why morrisons l needed to be bought in this way? the land. tell us why morrisons - needed to be bought in this way? it needed to be bought in this way? ut did not need to be bought but it became an acquisition target. there is certainly space in the uk food market for changes, we have seen that asda has changed ownership, the investments this business is making, too, who are the, was by a big
6:09 pm
business in the uk where they think they can make a big difference, invest in it and hopefully get greater returns than has been the case over the last few years. difficult time in the supermarket industry and we are saying right now, look lorry driver shortages leading to shortages on the shelf for one thing. leading to shortages on the shelf for one thing-— leading to shortages on the shelf for one thing. there has probably never been _ for one thing. there has probably never been a _ for one thing. there has probably never been a tougher— for one thing. there has probably never been a tougher time - for one thing. there has probably never been a tougher time to - for one thing. there has probably never been a tougher time to buy for one thing. there has probably i never been a tougher time to buy a supermarket in some ways because we are seeing a lot of inflation and there will be pressure on consumers and so it will be cut—throat as ever in the marketplace. also there are still opportunities, we are starting to shop differently as we come out of the pandemic. we are certainly looking for lots more convenient shopping and less is already earning 900 900 forecourts sure you can certainly see morrisons a smaller store formats alongside petrol stations and also there needs to be more investment in online, morrisons have already got a relationship with 0cado and amazon, but as we come out
6:10 pm
of the pandemic, doing less big drops in store, there is a huge change in consumer behaviour that perhaps the new owners can do more with. and bring morrisons into a new space for the future shopper. when two tell us more about the owners, they are an american private equity firm. interestingly advise hr; they are an american private equity firm. interestingly advise— firm. interestingly advise by sir ter lee firm. interestingly advise by sir terry lee he — firm. interestingly advise by sir terry lee he of— firm. interestingly advise by sir terry lee he of tesco _ firm. interestingly advise by sir terry lee he of tesco of - firm. interestingly advise by sir| terry lee he of tesco of course. firm. interestingly advise by sir i terry lee he of tesco of course. it terry lee he of tesco of course. ut looks like he will be chairman and he certainly is a seasoned professional very well respected and was the retailer that can morrisons use to really respect and i think perhaps that's a positive sign. somebody who knows the morrisons business and can steer it into the future and he knows the uk retail and the challenges of running such a big business every day with lots of sites across the uk and thousands of workers. pare sites across the uk and thousands of workers. �* , ., sites across the uk and thousands of workers. �* i. , . ., workers. are you predicting more takeovers like _ workers. are you predicting more takeovers like this _ workers. are you predicting more takeovers like this in _ workers. are you predicting more takeovers like this in the - workers. are you predicting more takeovers like this in the industry in this country?— in this country? name remain an interest and _
6:11 pm
in this country? name remain an interest and i _ in this country? name remain an interest and i don't _ in this country? name remain an interest and i don't think - in this country? name remain an interest and i don't think there i interest and i don't think there could not be another one, they have been to big ones and it seems to be an appetite for more. this has gone to auction because businesses were very interested in this country and sector, and our supermarket businesses which are some of the best run supermarkets in the world. i think you cannot think there might not yet be another bid for another retailer. ., ~ not yet be another bid for another retailer. ., ,, , ., the home secretary has said police must "raise the bar" by taking the harassment of women more seriously. priti patel said crimes such as indecent exposure and verbal abuse should not be taken lightly. she said women should feel confident to call out such offences. ministers have promised reform to the criminaljustice system, after the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer. simonjones reports. the death of sarah everard prompted
6:12 pm
an outpouring of public grief. now the government says it's determined her murder will bring about permanent change in how society deals with violence against women and girls. the prime minister says there are too few prosecutions and convictions for sexual violence. the time from report to referral, from referral to court proceedings, from court proceedings to the conclusion, all three of those segments, is far too long. and what you're seeing is the whole system snarled up with evidential problems, with data issues, mobile phones disclosure, all that kind of stuff, and it's a nightmare for the women concerned. wayne couzens kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard. he then dumped her body in woodland in kent. cars registered to him had previously been linked to two allegations of indecent exposure, but he wasn't identified as a potential sex offender. it's claimed couzens also used a whatsapp group to swap
6:13 pm
misogynistic messages with officers from the metropolitan police, the civil nuclear constabulary and the norfolk constabulary. we've also got to address the issues going on within the police force, and you'll have seen this stuff about the officers on the whatsapp group. we've got to come down very hard on them. the home secretary says the police must "raise the bar," by taking harassment and flashing more seriously. priti patel told the telegraph, they should not be considered low—level crimes. the met says it's putting more officers in places where people feel unsafe. we're absolutely committed to tackling violence against women and girls. that is going to be our focus. it is one of our priorities. so you will see us out on patrol in hot spots. but there are calls for more scrutiny of the police themselves. this has been going on for many, l many years and i'm rather tiredl of hearing police forces say "we are going to learn- lessons from some tragedy." the lessons don't seem to be - learned, and the lessons are that
6:14 pm
women's suffering of this kind of stuff has to stop. _ and women up and down. the country are saying that. and you have to listen, and police forces are not doing that. - and so it has to be listened - at a lower level, and i'm sorry that means resourcing and that means more police available _ and more money put into- policing and into the court system. but we also have to have much better processes of training police _ and those in the justice system. 0pposition politicians accused the government of starving the police and courts of resources, but there's a growing consensus that the death of sarah everard must act as a watershed moment. simon jones, bbc news. the health secretary sajid javid said says reforms of the police force are needed. what the metropolitan police have said about the reforms they will be looking at is absolutely right. we also need to look at what more government can do to build confidence.
6:15 pm
building on the violence against women and girls strategy. this is obviously an appalling, shocking case, and we must make sure that at least something that comes out of this is that we can give more confidence to more women about their own safety. an american private equity firm is set to take over morrisons. the home secretary says police must raise the bar by taking the harassment of women more seriously. chris mason is our political correspondence in manchester. we have heard from the prime minister about the lorry driver shortage,
6:16 pm
saying it's the road haulage industry that needs to pay british drivers more and we don't need cheap imports of foreign labour. that’s imports of foreign labour. that's riuht. he imports of foreign labour. that's right- he has— imports of foreign labour. that's right. he has been _ imports of foreign labour. that's right. he has been on _ imports of foreign labour. that's right. he has been on a - right. he has been on a preconference visit to leeds general infirmary, heading overfrom west church manchester, expected here shortly. as you say, the argument he is making is that this is a transition of a symptom of this transition of a symptom of this transition so he is looking at this through brexit, plenty of people back to brexit because they wanted lower immigration and higher domestic wages and that this is part of shifting what he sees as a low—wage, high emigration economy. into a lower immigration, higher wage economy. those sectors as those in government see it might be putting a little bit at the moment for the need for more immigration,
6:17 pm
the government position is, no, the brexit referendum is all about a demand for the opposite. coupled with the covid pressures at the moment, they say this is a transition period, through which the economy will work through and the outcome will be better conditions and wages in sectors like the haulage industry, but, what labour has the government pulled to try to mitigate —— it is one around immigration with a relaxation of the visa rules. they argue it's not anywhere near on the scale sir keir starmer was calling it, at their conference where he suggested up to 100,000 additional foreign lorry drivers should be allowed into the uk to meet the gap that currently exists as far as hgv drivers are concerned. government say there measures are much more limited because they want to see this broader transition towards
6:18 pm
higher wages. this broader transition towards higher wages-— this broader transition towards hiuher wares. ~ . . , higher wages. whatever the arguments in the ost higher wages. whatever the arguments in the post brexit _ higher wages. whatever the arguments in the post brexit eva, _ higher wages. whatever the arguments in the post brexit eva, of _ higher wages. whatever the arguments in the post brexit eva, of course - higher wages. whatever the arguments in the post brexit eva, of course a - in the post brexit eva, of course a lot of people are just very annoyed they have to queue for petrol, the rmt shelves, there could be shortages in the run—up to christmas. comparisons with the 70s. how nervous is that going to make poora how nervous is that going to make poor a party delegates? i how nervous is that going to make poor a party delegates?— poor a party delegates? i think it will leave people _ poor a party delegates? i think it will leave people nervous, - poor a party delegates? i think it l will leave people nervous, because as you say, it kind of peg that big as you say, it kind of peg that big a question of who is in concern? who governs britain in a situation like this where you have queues at the petrol station, prime minister insisting it's a demand problem, not a supply problem, in other words there is enough fuel but too many people trying to get too quickly, i had the same time, hence the queues. then you've got inflation, the cost of living going up, energy prices going up with lots of energy companies going under, at the same time, as you have got the end of the uplift to universal credit, that additional £20 added to people's benefits, to people's wages during
6:19 pm
the pandemic, that's coming to an end right now. coupled with the end of the furlough scheme as well. there is people here, gathering here, acutely aware of the collection, this coalition of problems coming down the track as far as people's day—to—day bills are concerned. plenty looking towards the government in terms of what is being done about it? so there will being done about it? so there will be some nervousness about that. one of the big missions and big messages of the big missions and big messages of this conference and government is this whole notion, this idea of so—called livening up, that slogan encounters the reality of everything we have just been talking about. —— levelling up. thousands of abortion rates advocates are protesting in the
6:20 pm
united states to, galvanised by opposition to a texas law that amounts to a virtual ban on abortions in the state. 0ur correspondent is at washington rally today. she has been telling us that the marchers now feel now is the moment to take to the streets. that has galvanised people. there is going to be a march towards the supreme court because that is the balance has shifted in the supreme court. donald trump appointed three justices from the republican party. the supreme court month ago allowed a very restrictive
6:21 pm
abortion law to go ahead in texas. this is a law that would ban abortion after only six weeks of pregnancy. also, the court is expected to hear a mississippi challenge to national abortion rights, those rights guaranteed by that 1973 roe v wade landmark decision. that's going to take place in a couple of months. people here are really focusing and giving up for a battle to protect the rights they have had for some five decades and they say this is not, these rallies are not about registering protest but also to try to improve activists over the next year. this is the scene _ activists over the next year. this is the scene live _ activists over the next year. this is the scene live in _ activists over the next year. this is the scene live in washington with those pro—abortion campaigners on the streets of the capital, as you can see. they are worried about what might happen in the supreme court. of course as we heard from barbara,
6:22 pm
three appointments of conservative justices to the supreme court changing the balance of the court very much and that's particularly crucial when it comes to abortion and possibly overturning that 1973 roe v wadejudgment. climate negotiators from around the world have been holding talks in italy, ahead of the crucial environmental summit known as cop26, in glasgow, next month. the meeting in milan with delegates from around 50 countries, is one of the final opportunities to shape the agenda for glasgow. from italy, here's our environment correspondent victoria gill. frustration on the streets... ..as young activists marched to the milan climate conference on friday. this is our future and we have to fight for our future! inside the conference today, a mood of quiet formality, as negotiators brought this meeting to a close.
6:23 pm
what's been discussed, though, could hardly be more urgent. the fires, the floods, the melting of the ice and the rising of the sea... the overall message from leaders here is one of cautious optimism, that it will be possible to reach a decisive climate agreement in glasgow, but that it won't be easy. glasgow is the starting point. people who are here in milan representing some of the most vulnerable and small island nations are really concerned that we are still a long way from the trajectory of keeping global temperature increase this century to within this key threshold of 1.5 celsius. we are already in a 1.1 world. we are facing increasing frequency. and severity of storms and flooding. a 1.5 world is very scary i to think about, especially for islands like us, - and what's even scarier is that we are still not there, in terms of ambition, - in terms of cutting down emissions.
6:24 pm
this vast coal mine in 0disha in india, a country that still depends heavily on coal for energy, is just a glimpse of what a challenge it is to slash carbon emissions. but leaders here agree that meeting that challenge is now urgent. by 2030, we need to reduce emissions globally by 45%, but what we need is everyone to come forward and if there is a gap we are going to have to set out how we will close this gap in this decisive decade. the true test, bringing the politics in line with the science, will be at the critical un climate conference in just one month's time. victoria gill, bbc news, milan. the queen has been addressing msps at holyrood, to mark the opening of the sixth session of the scottish parliament. this will be the snp's fourth consecutive term in government, following their election victory in may. alexandra mackenzie has the story. the queen was joined at holyrood by the duke and duchess of rothesay. they were greeted by party leaders, including the first minister.
6:25 pm
msps looked on as the mace and the crown of scotland were placed in the chamber, symbolising the challenges of this parliamentary term. marking this new session does indeed bring a sense of beginning and renewal. the scottish parliament has been at the heart of scotland's response to the pandemic, with people across this country looking to you for leadership and stewardship. due to the pandemic, much of the music was recorded around the country. here in plockton... and this group of asylum—seeking and refugee musicians in nicola sturgeon's glasgow constituency. we are a nation proud to call itself simply home for everyone who chooses to live here. and it is indeed fitting that the growing diversity of modern
6:26 pm
scotland is now reflected more clearly in this new parliament. the queen spoke of fond memories of time spent in scotland with her late husband, the duke of edinburgh. she also said it was a moment to look to a new generation. the government's latest coronavirus figures show there were 30,301 new infections recorded in the latest 2a hour period, which means on average there were 3a, 855 new cases recorded per day in the last week. 121 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid 19 test. on average in the past week,114 deaths were announced every day. the latest figures on those being treated in hospital
6:27 pm
and percentage of people vaccinated, haven't yet been made available. nhs doctors from tiktok have been encouraging people to get their vaccine. iaman i am an nhs surgeon with poor 11.3 million followers on tiktok. then;r million followers on tiktok. they are social media _ million followers on tiktok. they are social media superstars but doctors by day. the nhs is hoping they can help target young londoners.— they can help target young londoners. . , ., londoners. have you been vaccinated? both? unfortunately, _ londoners. have you been vaccinated? both? unfortunately, i— londoners. have you been vaccinated? both? unfortunately, i saw— londoners. have you been vaccinated? both? unfortunately, i saw a _ londoners. have you been vaccinated? both? unfortunately, i saw a lot - londoners. have you been vaccinated? both? unfortunately, i saw a lot of- both? unfortunately, i saw a lot of death from covid, iso how devastating it can be for patients and their families. devastating it can be for patients and theirfamilies. i thought it devastating it can be for patients and their families. i thought it was my duty to explain to people i have seen it. most people you speak to, a lot of people have not seen anyone
6:28 pm
who got very ill from covid, they have not been on the words, when you tell them, this is real. this have not been on the words, when you tell them, this is real.— tell them, this is real. this may seem highly _ tell them, this is real. this may seem highly unusual, _ tell them, this is real. this may seem highly unusual, but- tell them, this is real. this may seem highly unusual, but the i tell them, this is real. this may - seem highly unusual, but the uptake of the vaccine has been lower for younger people. the nhs says it has had to think of different ways to get that group through the doors. the time has come... the get that group through the doors. the time has come. . .— get that group through the doors. the time has come... the nhs hopes this doctors — the time has come. .. the nhs hopes this doctors will— the time has come... the nhs hopes this doctors will help _ the time has come... the nhs hopes this doctors will help reassure - this doctors will help reassure youngsters who may be hesitant because of concerns around side—effects and fertility. because of concerns around side-effects and fertility. there's lots of good _ side-effects and fertility. there's lots of good evidence _ side-effects and fertility. there's lots of good evidence to - side-effects and fertility. there's lots of good evidence to suggest | lots of good evidence to suggest there _ lots of good evidence to suggest there are — lots of good evidence to suggest there are not any significant long—term side—effects with regards to fertility. — long—term side—effects with regards to fertility, we have got real world data in _ to fertility, we have got real world data in addition to the science which — data in addition to the science which suggests there is no impact on fertility— which suggests there is no impact on fertility when it comes to the vaccine — fertility when it comes to the vaccine but we know that cave itself -- covid _ vaccine but we know that cave itself —— covid itself can have a huge impact — —— covid itself can have a huge impact on _ —— covid itself can have a huge impact on fertility. when two a lot of misinformation is on them, though — of misinformation is on them, though. tiktok has partnered with the nhs _ though. tiktok has partnered with the nhs to try and counter some of
6:29 pm
it. ~ the nhs to try and counter some of it. . ., , . , the nhs to try and counter some of it. . . , . , ., it. we have strict rules and misinformation. _ it. we have strict rules and misinformation. we - it. we have strict rules and misinformation. we have l it. we have strict rules and i misinformation. we have data it. we have strict rules and - misinformation. we have data so any time anyone — misinformation. we have data so any time anyone searches _ misinformation. we have data so any time anyone searches for _ misinformation. we have data so any time anyone searches for anything i time anyone searches for anything related _ time anyone searches for anything related to — time anyone searches for anything related to covid _ time anyone searches for anything related to covid on _ time anyone searches for anything related to covid on tiktok - time anyone searches for anything related to covid on tiktok they. time anyone searches for anything | related to covid on tiktok they will be directed — related to covid on tiktok they will be directed to _ related to covid on tiktok they will be directed to that _ related to covid on tiktok they will be directed to that information - related to covid on tiktok they will. be directed to that information hub. more than— be directed to that information hub. more than three _ be directed to that information hub. more than three quarters _ be directed to that information hub. more than three quarters of - be directed to that information hub. more than three quarters of 18—29 l more than three quarters of 18—29 —year—olds have had their first dose of the vaccine. these doctors hope to get those numbers up. the volcano that's been erupting for the past 11 days on the island of la palma is spewing out two new streams of lava. the river of red—hot lava snaked downhill from a new vent raising fears of further destruction. many homes and crops have been destroyed and thousands of people have been forced to evacuate since the eruption first began last month. let's take a look at the latest weather forecast. tomorrow should be a little bit warmer and drier as well. today, we have had the thick cloud rain across much of the country.
6:30 pm
still some wet weather this evening across the eastern side of the uk, it's been very windy in the south—east. the wind will ease here. the rain gets swept into the north sea up to shetland where by the end of the night, winds could be gusting to 60, 70 mph. blustery showers pushed west. clearer skies after the rain further east. we start with showers from the word "go" across western areas. the winds will blow them eastwards. they do take some time to reach east anglia and the south—east, but we've got some more persistent rain with strong winds in the far north of scotland. but it should be warmer during sunday, with temperatures up to 16 or 17 degrees. more sunshine and scattered showers as we head into monday. tuesday though, some wet and windy weather returns, particularly towards england and wales. hello this is bbc news with ben brown.
6:31 pm
the headlines...

15 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on