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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 2, 2021 5:00pm-5:31pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines at five... after days of queuing at the pumps, the army will begin delivering fuel to petrol stations across the uk from monday. the home secretary says police must "raise the bar", by taking the harassment of women more seriously a view echoed by health secretary, sajid javid. the queen officially opens the sixth session of the scottish parliament at holyrood. an experimental drug for severe covid which could cut the risk of hospitalisation or death by about half. and two new streams of lava pose a further threat of destruction as the la palma volcano forces more to flee.
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the group which represents most of the uk filling stations says the fuel situation is getting worse in london, the south east and parts of eastern england. but the petrol retailers�* association also says scotland, the north of england and parts of the midlands have seen what it calls a "distinct improvement". the government has announced that 100 military drivers will start delivering fuel to petrol stations from monday. i've been speaking to our political correspondent, nick eardley, who's in manchester, where the conservative party conference is due to begin on sunday. he says the ongoing difficulties with fuel supplies in some parts of the country is not the ideal backdrop for the event. there is the fact that you have these issues with fuel, you add into the mix the rising energy prices we are seeing,
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you add into the mix inflation, which many tory mps are really worried about, and you have this sort of nervous air that, although the conservative party is in quite a strong position electorally and in parliament, there are nerves about exactly what the next few months and weeks are going to look like. and specifically on the fuel point, i think there is a hope in downing street that we are past the worst of this, they have been saying that for a few days, but it has been a pretty consistent message that even if there are pockets of problems, like in the south—east of england, other parts of the country, like where i am, in manchester, are getting slightly better. that said, the government is doing some things that it didn't want to do. so, it didn't particularly want to send in the army to send petrol tankers around the country from monday, but it's also worth bearing in mind how the government's position has changed in terms to visas. we heard consistently from borisjohnson that he doesn't
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think immigration is the answer to supply chain issues, he wants people to get betterjobs and better pay and that will encourage more folk into the hgv driving industry, but overnight, the pressures are such, notjust in fuel, but in general that 300 emergency visas are being issued in the next few days and the 4,500 visas that the government is issuing more broadly for hgv drivers, the time for which they will apply has been extended as well. they were supposed to run till just before christmas, they will now run until the end of february, so there is also nervousness in government about those supply chains. we have heard it from various ministers and as you say, the backdrop to this conference, where borisjohnson wants to talk about the economy rebounding after covid, about getting some of his plans back on track, you can
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probably see it back there, "getting on with the job," that can be tricky when you have all those other pressures. the home secretary has said police must "raise the bar" by taking the harassment of women more seriously. priti patel said crimes such as indecent exposure and verbal abuse should not be taken lightly. she said women should feel confident to call out such offences. ministers have promised reform to the criminaljustice system, after the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer. simonjones reports. earlier i spoke to dr gillian harrop, a senior lecturer in forensic psychology at the university of worcester who runs the bystander intervention programme at the university. intervening may be calling a guard to check the person is ok, if you are in a group, you see a woman receiving sexual comments, say, do you want to sit with us? it might be asking that woman, are you 0k? do you need support?
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do you want me to come with you to report, i can be a witness. it doesn't mean you have to jump in and be loud in the moment. you feel confidentjumping in and saying stop, fantastic, but lots of us don't. but there are still some things we can do, bring someone else in, ask them if they want to sit by you, do something, just don't walk by. the point is that some of these smaller offences whether it's verbal abuse or harassment or indecent exposure, they can lead to more serious offences, and that is the real worry. absolutely. people do not generallyjust start their criminal career doing the kind of behaviour that wayne couzens, as people have seen, misogynistic whatsapp groups, if someone calls someone else when they show that behaviour, it may not make that person think that behaviour is wrong, but it may make them feel less comfortable engaging in that.
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they might think they can't do it. call people out and organisations should be called people out as well. when someone says someone in the organisation has said this, take it seriously and then people who were on the receiving end, who are often women and girls, don't have to keep repeating that trauma, reliving that trauma, simply to try and get someone to believe them. listen and believe the first time and when people hear it, believe it and do something about it. an american private investment company has won a bidding war for morrisons, the uk's fourth biggest supermarket. clayton, dubilierand rice offered almost £7 billion offered almost £7 billion for the group. it's advised by the former tesco boss, sir terry leahy. delegates at a meeting in the run up to next month's cop26 climate change summit have agreed that a £100 billion finance pledge has to be delivered on. the money is to help poorer countries cope with rising temperatures. alok sharma, the british minister in charge of cop26, was speaking in milan where climate ministers from around the world are holding talks.
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from the meeting in milan, here's our science correspondent victoria gill. as representatives drift away from this closing pre—cop meeting in milan, i think there's a sense of cautious optimism, that there is hope that we can really tackle climate change and get to an agreement at that crucial un climate conference in glasgow in just a month's time. but also that there is a lot of work still to be done. so, in his closing press conference, the us climate envoy, john kerry, said he didn't want to single out specific countries, he didn't want to target them, but there was a heavy intimation that china and india, the pressure really needs to be put on them to step up and deliver on what they promise. so, basically, to put in writing what they will do to limit emissions, and reach that climate agreement in glasgow. there's two major issues that have really stood out in this gathering, and that's that 1.5 celsius threshold. this is the critical number that scientists have said beyond which, we get to the much more dangerous impacts of climate change, and the more vulnerable nations really want us to stay on a trajectory to keep that
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target within reach. and also finance. developed nations, the richest nations that are responsible for most of the emissions, need to step up and deliver on a promise that they made a decade ago, to pay developing countries $100 billion every single year, to be able to mitigate, but also adapt to a changing climate. clive myrie is up next with more news. the volcano that's been erupting for the past 11 days on the island of la palma is spewing out two new streams of lava. the river of red—hot lava snaked downhill from a new vent raising fears of further destruction. many homes and crops have been destroyed and thousands of people have been forced to evacuate since the eruption first began last month.
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good afternoon. the situation at petrol pumps across much of britain seems to be getting better. figures from the petrol retailers association show more than two thirds of sites they contacted now have plenty of fuel. however, some filling stations in london and the south—east remain dry. the military is helping out, beginning deliveries to petrol stations from monday.
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our business correspondent, katy austin, has the latest. there were queues to fuel again this morning in parts of southern england. this is the first time i'm queuing up because my boy normally gets it for me, but today, oh, my gosh. it's like christmas came early. no issues in newcastle though. no problems at all, ijust put £100 in. a few days ago it was hard but i think it's picking up. i the body representing independent forecourts says availability across the country has improved. it thinks about two thirds of sites now have petrol and diesel while 16% have run dry, but it's labelled the situation in london and the south—east is critical. mil in london and the south-east is critical. �* , , ., ., critical. all deliveries must now go to london and _ critical. all deliveries must now go to london and the _ critical. all deliveries must now go to london and the south-east - critical. all deliveries must now go to london and the south-east and | critical. all deliveries must now go l to london and the south-east and to to london and the south—east and to the independent forecourts, which make up 65% of all forecourts in the
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uk. make up 6596 of all forecourts in the uk. 1: z: ., , make up 6596 of all forecourts in the uk. iii: ., , , uk. 200 military personnel, including — uk. 200 military personnel, including 100 _ uk. 200 military personnel, including 100 drivers, - uk. 200 military personnel, including 100 drivers, have l uk. 200 military personnel, - including 100 drivers, have been called in to help boost supplies. they are being trained and will start on monday. the they are being trained and will start on monday.— start on monday. the first big amount will— start on monday. the first big amount will really _ start on monday. the first big amount will really be - start on monday. the first big amount will really be working j amount will really be working through this weekend, deploying on monday on their own more and then by the end of the week another 60 to 70 will come online.— will come online. amid a shortage of hgv drivers — will come online. amid a shortage of hgv drivers across _ will come online. amid a shortage of hgv drivers across the _ will come online. amid a shortage of hgv drivers across the economy, - will come online. amid a shortage of i hgv drivers across the economy, 5000 visas for foreign workers had really been announced, lasting until christmas eve. that includes 300 fuel tanker drivers. we now know they will be able to start immediately and the length of time they can stay poor has been extended until the end of march. a700 of the visas are for food lorry drivers, and they will not be able to start until later this month but their length of stay has been extended up to the end of february. ministers insist the fuel situation will
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continue to improve if people only buy what they need, even when supply levels return to normal motorists are being told they should expect to pay more at the pump as wholesale prices rise. 0ur political correspondent, chris mason, is in manchester now, where the conservative party conference will begin tomorrow. do you think delegates will think this fuel crisis is under control? borisjohnson is on top of it? or could it be a real headache for him at conference?— at conference? there is a real bullishness _ at conference? there is a real bullishness in _ at conference? there is a real bullishness in government - at conference? there is a real- bullishness in government tonight. they see this, the prime minister sees this through the prism of brexit, and what he interprets as a demand notjust for lower demand not just for lower immigration but demand notjust for lower immigration but also for higher wages, and these are the bumps of a transition in the economy the queen a low—wage economy, as he sees it, and a higher wage economy. but what is the lever that the government has
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cranked to try and alleviate the short—term pressures? it's the leave of immigration, with a relaxation of visa restrictions to allow more foreign based drivers to come in to the country. the backdrop for this conference, that pressure on fuel, but also a spiralling cost of living question that's been asked by many, including by many conservatives, and that overhanging this conference at just the point that we are seeing prices going up and also the end of the furlough scheme, plus the end of the furlough scheme, plus the end of the upper left universal credit. so big questions and pressures on the government, as conservatives gather. the prime minister is expected in a bit. let's take a look at the latest government figures. there were 30,301 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 2a—hour period. on average, 3a,855 new cases were reported per day in the last week. 121 deaths were reported in the latest 2a—hour period — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test.
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on average in the past week, 11a deaths were announced every day. the latest figures on those being treated in hospital for coronavirus and percentage of people vaccinated haven't been made available. climate ministers from across the globe have held talks in milan before the crucial environmental summit cop26. many hopes for a proper solution to combatting climate change rest on that conference in november. from there, here's our environment correspondent, victoria gill. frustration on the streets... ..as young activists marched to the milan climate conference on friday. this is our future and we have to fight for our futures. inside the conference today, a mood of quiet formality, as negotiators brought this meeting to a close. what's been discussed though could hardly be more urgent. the fires, the floods, the melting of the ice and the rising of the sea...
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the overall message from leaders here is one of cautious optimism, that it will be possible to reach a decisive climate agreement in glasgow, but that it won't be easy. glasgow is the starting point. people who are here in milan representing some of the most vulnerable and small island nations are really concerned that we are still a long way from the trajectory of keeping global temperature increase this century to within this key threshold of 1.5 celsius. we are already in a 1.1 world. we are facing increasing frequency and severity of storms and flooding. a 1.5 world is very scary to think about, especially for islands like us, and what's even scarier is that we are still not there, in terms of ambition, in terms of cutting down emissions. this vast coal mine in india, a country that still depends heavily on coal for energy, is just a glimpse of what a challenge it is to slash carbon emissions.
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but leaders here agree that meeting that challenge is now urgent. by 2030, we need to reduce emissions globally by a5%, but what we need is everyone to come forward and if there is a gap we are going to have to set out how we will close this gap in this decisive decade. the true test, bringing the politics in line with the science, will be at the critical un climate conference in just one month's time. victoria gill, bbc news, milan. the supermarket chain morrisons has been bought at auction by a us private equity firm. if approved by shareholders, clayton, dubilierand rice, which is advised by former tesco boss sir terry leahy, will pay almost £7 billion for the group. the queen has been addressing msps at holyrood to mark the opening of the sixth session of the scottish parliament. this will be the snp�*s fourth consecutive term in government, following their election victory in may. alexandra mackenzie reports.
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the queen wasjoined the queen was joined at holyrood by the duke and duchess of rothesay. they were greeted by party leaders, including the first minister. msps looked on as the mace and the crown of scotland were placed in the chamber, symbolising the challenges of this parliamentary term. this chamber, symbolising the challenges of this parliamentary term.— of this parliamentary term. this new session brings _ of this parliamentary term. this new session brings a _ of this parliamentary term. this new session brings a sense _ of this parliamentary term. this new session brings a sense of— of this parliamentary term. this new session brings a sense of beginning | session brings a sense of beginning and renewal. the scottish parliament has been at the heart of scotland's response to the pandemic, with people across this country looking to you for leadership and stewardship.— to you for leadership and stewardshi -. , ., . stewardship. due to the pandemic, much of the _ stewardship. due to the pandemic, much of the music _ stewardship. due to the pandemic, much of the music was _ stewardship. due to the pandemic, much of the music was recorded i much of the music was recorded around the country. here in plockton... and this group of asylum seeking and refugee musicians in nicola sturgeon's glasgow
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constituency. irate nicola sturgeon's glasgow constituency.— nicola sturgeon's glasgow constituen .~ . ., ., ., constituency. we are a nation proud to call itself — constituency. we are a nation proud to call itself simply _ constituency. we are a nation proud to call itself simply home _ constituency. we are a nation proud to call itself simply home for - to call itself simply home for everyone who chooses to live here. and it is indeed fitting that the growing diversity of modern scotland is now reflected more clearly in this new parliament. the is now reflected more clearly in this new parliament. the queen spoke of fond memories _ this new parliament. the queen spoke of fond memories of _ this new parliament. the queen spoke of fond memories of time _ this new parliament. the queen spoke of fond memories of time spent - this new parliament. the queen spoke of fond memories of time spent in - of fond memories of time spent in scotland with her late husband, the duke of edinburgh. she also said it was a moment to look to a new generation. europe's first mission to mercury has sent back its first picture of the planet. the spacecraft came within 125 the planet. the spacecraft came within125 miles of mercury�*s surface. it was moving too fast to go into orbit but will begin more detailed organisations little observations in four years. finally, football, and six matches have been played in the premier league this afternoon.
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chelsea have moved to the top of the table with a win at home to southampton. in the early kick—off, manchester united hosted everton at old trafford. nesta mcgregor reports. 0ld old trafford and at 70,000 expected fans. 0ptimistic for the future, due fans. 0ptimistic forthe future, due to fans. 0ptimistic for the future, due to the present form of a legend from the past. although cristiano ronaldo started on the bench. the away side came closest to opening the scoring, demarai gray showing acceleration and speed, 0lympic demarai gray showing acceleration and speed, olympic champion usain bolt seemed impressed. the game's first goal, step forward anthony martial. playing in place of ronaldo. 1—0 martial. playing in place of ronaldo.1—0 at martial. playing in place of ronaldo. 1—0 at half—time and shortly after on came the man everyone was there to see. the portuguese striker is well known for his trademark goal celebration. the good news, united fans got to see it, the bad news, it came from everton's andros townsend. five minutes from the end, the visitors thought they had won the game but
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var ruled that yerry mina was offside. at the final whistle, a point each, but one team clearly happier with that result. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late news at 10:15. now on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are.
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hello. this is bbc news. it's a new academic year for university students across the uk, and many of them who are returning will get to sit in a lecture hall, and attend their classes in person, for the first time since they started their studies.
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at the university of bristol, they've been welcoming the return to normality while working to keep everyone safe, as fiona lamdin has been finding out. a new start, a new term. and for these students walking into this lecture theatre, it feels pretty special. it is still worth its weight in gold getting face—to—face teaching and being able to interact with other students. for the first time in 18 months, this lecture theatre is full. students are being asked to wear masks and this maths lecture is being recorded for students who aren't yet comfortable about being surrounded by so many people. dave has been cleaning here throughout the pandemic. the first time in two years i have seen so many students, it's lovely. i like seeing them. without them i haven't got a job, so it's lovely to see them. have them back. i'm pretty sure they
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are happy to be back. the second year students certainly are. today is the first time they have ever been into a lecture room. i didn't know where to go. we have already been here for a year and luckily today it was quite - relaxed, cos people are not stressing out about covid. i there aren't face masks and visors everywhere. i it was quite nice. how hard was it socialising last year? it was quite weird getting readyjust to go out to the kitchen rather than, now we can go clubbing, like now we are going to go to a coffee shop. things like that. bars and pubs. just around the corner these third—year veterinary students are out for lunch. we have missed a lot over the last year, not of sports, socials, just being able to sit and catch up with your friends or having friends over for dinner. we are all going to start going out
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again, i am going out clubbing - tomorrow might think. tomorrow i think. i think you're going on thursday? and while the university wants its students back, it needs to keep them and its staff safe. we have made sure the ventilation is adequate and ramped up ventilation in other rooms. we are sanitising, so in between sessions, touch points are cleaned and we are expecting and recommending that everyone wears a face covering indoors on campus because we know that protects people. the city once again full of students, hoping this term will be a very different from the last. thousands of abortion rates advocates are protesting in the united states to, galvanised by opposition to a texas law that amounts to a virtual ban on abortions in the state. in the next few months, a supreme court is set
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to hear a case that could overturn roe v wade, the 1973 decision that legalised abortion nationwide. let's go live to our washington correspondent. just talk to us about the protests this afternoon. figs correspondent. just talk to us about the protests this afternoon.- the protests this afternoon. as you said, this the protests this afternoon. as you said. this is — the protests this afternoon. as you said. this is a _ the protests this afternoon. as you said, this is a day _ the protests this afternoon. as you said, this is a day across _ the protests this afternoon. as you said, this is a day across the - said, this is a day across the country being observed by activists who are pro—abortion rights. they are very concerned about the threat to those rights, they feel this is the biggest challenge to those rights in nearly half—century. they are worried about the texas law you mention which is the strictest abortion ban in the country. it's one of the supreme court allowed to go forward, it did not stay it. ultimately that it allowed to go forward, even though the government said it violates the constitution. they are worried about the constitution that, challenge coming
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in the next three months to the supreme court in which mississippi is going to ask those national abortion rights under row versus wade be overturned, so that has really —— rovio wait, that has there is going to be a march towards there is going to be a march towards the supreme court because that is going to be the focus of what happens ultimately with these rights and that has people particularly concerned because the balance of power shifted in recent years, especially with donald trump appointing three conservative justices. cheering this is the focus here today, with activist speeches, music and ultimately converging on the supreme court. �* ,., ., ultimately converging on the supreme court. ~ ., .,, ultimately converging on the supreme court. ~ ., ., , ., court. abortion has long been a really polarising _ court. abortion has long been a really polarising issue _ court. abortion has long been a really polarising issue in - court. abortion has long been a really polarising issue in the - really polarising issue in the united states, hasn't it? but it is now rising back up the political and social agenda. now rising back up the political and social agenda-— social agenda. that's exactly right, when it comes _ social agenda. that's exactly right, when it comes to _ social agenda. that's exactly right, when it comes to issues _ social agenda. that's exactly right, when it comes to issues of - social agenda. that's exactly right, l when it comes to issues of american law, it's one of the most political
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issues, whether the constitution guarantees the right to abortion and it has come deeply polarised. it does not always be that way but it has come so so there is going to be a fierce battle over the next year or so, a fierce battle over the next year orso, republicans a fierce battle over the next year or so, republicans have been taking advantage of the changes in the supreme court, getting themselves ready to challenge roe v wade in whatever way they can. they pass abortion laws at the state level which restricted procedure then the courts have said you can't do that because it's unconstitutional. they keep doing it as a way to put pressure on the issue and eventually take it to the supreme court and thatis take it to the supreme court and that is something they feel they have momentum behind them. thank ou. let's take a look at the latest weather forecast. tomorrow should be a little bit warmer and drier as well.
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today we have had the cloud rain across much of the country. still some wet weather this evening across the eastern side of the uk, very windy in the south—east. the rain gets swept into the north sea up to shetland where by the end of the night, winds could be gusting to 60, 70 mph. clearer skies after the rain further east. we start with showers from the word go across western areas on sunday. the winds will blow them eastwards. they do take some time to reach east anglia and the south—east, but more persistent rain with strong winds in the far north of scotland. it should be warmer during sunday, with temperatures up to 16 or 17 degrees. more sunshine and scattered showers as we head into monday. tuesday though, some wet and windy weather returns, particularly towards england and wales.
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hello, this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines... after days of queuing at the pumps, the army will begin delivering fuel to petrol stations across the uk from monday. the home secretary says police must "raise the bar" by taking the harassment of women more seriously — a view echoed by health secretary, sajid javid. the metropolitian police have said about the reforms the queen officially opens the sixth session of the scottish parliament at holyrood. an experimental drug for severe covid which could cut the risk of hospitalisation or death by about half. and two new streams of lava pose a further threat of destruction, as the la palma volcano forces more to flee.

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