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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 2, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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good afternoon. the group which represents most of the uk filling stations has said the availability of fuel in london, the south east and parts of eastern england is getting worse. but the petrol retailers�* association said scotland, the north of england and parts of the midlands had seen a "distinct improvement". the government has announced that 100 military drivers will start delivering fuel to petrol stations from monday. our business correspondent katy austin reports. there were queues to feel again this morning in parts of southern england. morning in parts of southern encland. , , , ., england. this is the first time i am here because _ england. this is the first time i am here because my _ england. this is the first time i am here because my boy _ england. this is the first time i am here because my boy normally - england. this is the first time i am | here because my boy normally gets england. this is the first time i am i here because my boy normally gets it for me. ., ., ., .,
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for me. the organisation that represents — for me. the organisation that represents independent - for me. the organisation that - represents independent forecourts said the supply issue has improved in the midlands, the north and scotland. ida in the midlands, the north and scotland. ., , , , , scotland. no problems, i 'ust put £100 in. a— scotland. no problems, i 'ust put £100 in. a fewfi scotland. no problems, i 'ust put £100 in. a few days h scotland. no problems, i 'ust put £100 in. a few days ago _ scotland. no problems, ijust put £100 in. a few days ago it - scotland. no problems, ijust put £100 in. a few days ago it was i scotland. no problems, ijust put. £100 in. a few days ago it was hard but i think it's — £100 in. a few days ago it was hard but i think it's picking _ £100 in. a few days ago it was hard but i think it's picking up. _ £100 in. a few days ago it was hard but i think it's picking up. there - but i think it's picking up. there is a warning _ but i think it's picking up. there is a warning the _ but i think it's picking up. there is a warning the situation - but i think it's picking up- is a warning the situation appears to be worsening in london and the south—east. to be worsening in london and the south-east— south-east. we've been asking government — south-east. we've been asking government and _ south-east. we've been asking government and i _ south-east. we've been asking government and i had - south-east. we've been asking government and i had a - south-east. we've been asking government and i had a long i government and i had a long conversation with grant shapps this morning. it's very good. the government are talking closely to industry about the problems and i've asked him that the privatisation now go to london and the south—east and to the independent forecourts which make up 65% of all forecourts across the uk. make up 6596 of all forecourts across the uk. :: :: ., , , make up 6596 of all forecourts across the uk, :: i: ., , , ., the uk. 200 military personnel have been called to _ the uk. 200 military personnel have been called to help _ the uk. 200 military personnel have been called to help with _ the uk. 200 military personnel have been called to help with deliveries, l been called to help with deliveries, 100 of them are drivers. they are currently training before the first cohort to start on monday. the first big amount — cohort to start on monday. the first big amount will _ cohort to start on monday. the first big amount will be _ cohort to start on monday. the first big amount will be working - cohort to start on monday. the first big amount will be working through |
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big amount will be working through this weekend, deploying on monday, probably— this weekend, deploying on monday, probably on their own and then by the end _ probably on their own and then by the end of— probably on their own and then by the end of the weekend another 60 or 70 will_ the end of the weekend another 60 or 70 will come online. this the end of the weekend another 60 or 70 will come online.— 70 will come online. this comes amid a chronic shortage _ 70 will come online. this comes amid a chronic shortage of _ 70 will come online. this comes amid a chronic shortage of hgv _ 70 will come online. this comes amid a chronic shortage of hgv drivers - a chronic shortage of hgv drivers across the economy. last weekend theseis across the economy. last weekend these is were announced for 5000 to come in from a disease lasting until christmas eve. that includes 300 fuel tanker drivers. we know they will be able to start immediately and the length of time they can stay in the uk has been extended to the end of march. a700 of the visas are forfood end of march. a700 of the visas are for food lorry drivers. end of march. a700 of the visas are forfood lorry drivers. they for food lorry drivers. they won't be able to start until later this month but the length of their stay has also been extended until the end of february. the government still says these are only a short—term fix and businesses must invest in building the domestic workforce. ministers insist the fuel situation will continue to improve if people buy only what they need. even when supply levels return to normal,
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motorists are being told they should expect to pay more as wholesale prices rise. katy austin, bbc news. our political correspondent nick eardley is in manchester now — where the conservative party conference is due to begin tomorrow. has the government got this under control, nick? that's the hope, that the situation is continuing to stabilise, that there's better fuel supply and is continuing to stabilise, that there's betterfuel supply and maybe not immediately but over the medium term this will start to get better. it's interesting because we've also heard those warnings about what's going on in the south of england and warnings like that have forced the government to make some decisions it didn't really want to make, like sending in the army to help from next week, like adding those extra 300 emergency visas to its plan over the next few weeks. boris johnson has been repeating this morning in the newspapers that he wants to make
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the newspapers that he wants to make the hgv driver situation a lot better by getting more people from the uk into better paid jobs. that's going to be one of the themes at the conservative conference. there is an interesting backdrop of the fuel supply issues, other issues in the supply issues, other issues in the supply chain, energy, lots of things for the conservatives to think about. some of them making tory mps quite nervous. about. some of them making tory mps quite nervous-— vaccine passports came into effect for the first time in scotland last night. people need proof of vaccination to gain entry to nightclubs or large events. the scheme will be mandatory from the 18th of october. it is being trialled at some football stadiums at scottish premiership matches this afternoon. megan paterson reports. a night out in glasgow. as well as showing id, vaccine passports too. some people will definitely be driven to get vaccinated in order to
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participate in this kind of event. it's definitely an incentive but my main _ it's definitely an incentive but my main reason is to be protected. | main reason is to be protected. i don't main reason is to be protected. don't agree main reason is to be protected. i don't agree with the concept of having — don't agree with the concept of having to — don't agree with the concept of having to show _ don't agree with the concept of having to show something - don't agree with the concept of having to show something to l don't agree with the concept of i having to show something to get don't agree with the concept of - having to show something to get into a duh _ having to show something to get into a duh i_ having to show something to get into a duh idon't— having to show something to get into a club. i don't agree in _ having to show something to get into a club. i don't agree in terms - a club. i don't agree in terms of freedom — a club. i don't agree in terms of freedom-— freedom. proof of to vaccines will be shown for _ freedom. proof of to vaccines will be shown for nightclubs - freedom. proof of to vaccines will be shown for nightclubs and - freedom. proof of to vaccines will be shown for nightclubs and any i be shown for nightclubs and any event with more than 10,000 people in attendance. for some club owners there is concern about what it means for customers. it is there is concern about what it means for customers— for customers. it is disappointing there isn't an _ for customers. it is disappointing there isn't an option _ for customers. it is disappointing there isn't an option for- for customers. it is disappointing there isn't an option for people l for customers. it is disappointing i there isn't an option for people who don't want to get vaccinated. we are not respecting their opinions by being able to submit a negative lateral flow. that being able to submit a negative lateral flow.— being able to submit a negative lateral flow. at football grounds includinu lateral flow. at football grounds including ibrox, _ lateral flow. at football grounds including ibrox, today _ lateral flow. at football grounds including ibrox, today will - lateral flow. at football grounds including ibrox, today will be i lateral flow. at football grounds | including ibrox, today will be the first test of the scheme at matches. the app has been plagued with technical problems and although it went live yesterday it won't be enforceable until the 18th, causing confusion for clubs. aberdeen have postponed the trailing of proof of vaccine for entry and sunday's
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premiership meeting and hearts and rangers say no one will be refused entry at their test events against motherwell and hibs. with access to the terraces, dance floors and elsewhere seem to be reliant on the passport, the scottish government has reissued reassurances about the capacity saying systems have been improved to cope with demand. the queen has been addressing msps at holyrood, to mark the opening of the sixth session of the scottish parliament. this will be the snp's fourth consecutive term in government, following their election victory in may. the ceremony would normally take place injuly, but was postponed because of coronavirus. alexandra mackenzie reports. the queen and the duke and duchess of rotc made the shortjourney from the palace of holyrood house to the scottish parliament. they were greeted by the party leaders including the first minister nicola sturgeon. msps gathered as the crown
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of scotland were placed in the chamber, symbolising this new session of parliament.— chamber, symbolising this new session of parliament. marking this new session — session of parliament. marking this new session does _ session of parliament. marking this new session does indeed _ session of parliament. marking this new session does indeed bring i session of parliament. marking this new session does indeed bring a i new session does indeed bring a sense of beginning and renewal. the scottish parliament has been at the heart of scotland's response to the pandemic, with people across this country looking to you for leadership and stewardship and i hope he will remain at the forefront as we move towards a phase of recovery. as we move towards a phase of recove . , ., as we move towards a phase of recovery-— as we move towards a phase of recove . , ., . . recovery. due to the pandemic, much ofthe recovery. due to the pandemic, much of the music— recovery. due to the pandemic, much of the music was _ recovery. due to the pandemic, much of the music was recorded _ recovery. due to the pandemic, much of the music was recorded around i recovery. due to the pandemic, much of the music was recorded around the country. this group of asylum seeking and refugee musicians in glasgow. seeking and refugee musicians in glasuow. .,, seeking and refugee musicians in glasuow. ., , ., seeking and refugee musicians in glasuow. ., , glasgow. those of us who sit in the chamber will— glasgow. those of us who sit in the chamber will disagree, _
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glasgow. those of us who sit in the chamber will disagree, often i glasgow. those of us who sit in the chamber will disagree, often and i chamber will disagree, often and often _ chamberwill disagree, often and often vigorously. but in the years ahead _ often vigorously. but in the years ahead we — often vigorously. but in the years ahead we will also, i hope, find the resolve _ ahead we will also, i hope, find the resolve and — ahead we will also, i hope, find the resolve and the courage to reach beyond _ resolve and the courage to reach beyond our disagreements and find consensus — beyond our disagreements and find consensus and common purpose where consensus and common purpose where we consensus and common purpose where we can _ consensus and common purpose where we can. the _ consensus and common purpose where we can. ~ consensus and common purpose where we can. ., ., , ., consensus and common purpose where we can. ~ ., , we can. the queen also used her seech we can. the queen also used her speech to — we can. the queen also used her speech to reflect _ we can. the queen also used her speech to reflect on _ we can. the queen also used her speech to reflect on happy i we can. the queen also used her- speech to reflect on happy memories of the many times she spent in scotland with her late husband, the duke of edinburgh. she said this was a time to look to the feature and a new generation. with all the sport now, here's gavin ramjaun at the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. the winners of the early kick—off in the premier league will go to the top of the table. it's manchester united against everton and it is still goalless. united had the best chance so far. cristiano ronaldo is starting a premier league match at old trafford from the bench for the first time since 2007. britain's cameron norrie has enjoyed another impressive win he's
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into the semi finals of the san diego open after dropping just four games in a straight sets win, over fourth seed denis shapovalov. norrie's brilliant form of 2021, has stalled in recent weeks but this victory took him into his sixth atp semi—final of the year, where he'll face the top seed, andrey rublev. the london marathon returns tomorrow, with thousands of runners on the streets of the capital. last year's event was limited to just elite athletes because of the pandemic and many were forced to take part vitually. mike bushell has been speaking to some of those who've been preparing for the race. it's finally back. the world—famous marathon sees a0,000 people running together, all with individual stories and reasons why they're pounding the streets of london. among the most emotional, claire nash and wayne flanagan, running in memory of their daughter jade, who died injanuary this year just ten days after she was born. both claire and wayne had tested positive for covid—19 just days before jade suffered unforeseen
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complications during her birth. immediately afterjade died, i started running as a way of trying to understand my grief and loss of jade and the emotions. i felt so overwhelmed. as i started running more and more i realised the benefits for me, my mental health, my wellbeing. we are running to raise awareness and funds for the people who cared for us and jade, nhs and care workers.— people who cared for us and jade, nhs and care workers. there will be lots tears and _ nhs and care workers. there will be lots tears and smiles. _ nhs and care workers. there will be lots tears and smiles. we _ nhs and care workers. there will be lots tears and smiles. we know i nhs and care workers. there will be| lots tears and smiles. we know we'll have a _ lots tears and smiles. we know we'll have a lot _ lots tears and smiles. we know we'll have a lot of — lots tears and smiles. we know we'll have a lot of friends cheering us on so it will_ have a lot of friends cheering us on so it will be — have a lot of friends cheering us on so it will be special to see them. i think— so it will be special to see them. i think the — so it will be special to see them. i think the thing that will help is knowing — think the thing that will help is knowing that jade is there but hearing — knowing that jade is there but hearing everyone shout her name. that's _ hearing everyone shout her name. that's going to be really, really speciat —
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last year over 37,000 people did run the marathon virtually on their own, wherever they could, joining in in spirit, via their screens, and even though a similar number are signed up to do it again virtually this year, there's nothing like the real thing. i truly believe this is going to be one of the most emotional and memorable london marathons in the history of the event, that's had some pretty special moments. the crowds will be helping them all the way to the finish line. that's all the sport for now. the next news on bbc one is at 5:10. bye for now.
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hello. you're watching the bbc news channel. more on the fuel supply crisis. the fuel retailers association says has been an improvement in scotland, northern england and parts of the middlesbrough supply issues remain a big problem in london, the southeast and eastern england. retailers are now asking the transport secretary to prioritise deliveries in those areas. 300 foreign fuel tanker drivers will not be allowed work in the uk into the end of march help ease the situation. brian madderson from the petrol retailers association described the situation out on the roads this morning. we're seeing from our poll this morning much the same as yesterday. an improving situation from the midlands through the north and into scotland but, in fact, worsening situation in london, the southeast and parts of east england, so what we've been asking the government, and i have had a long conversation with grant shapps this
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morning, it's very good. the government are talking closely to industry about the problems and what i've asked him is that the prioritisation, all deliveries must now go to london and the south—east and to the independent forecourts which make up 65% of all forecourts across the uk. if your local filling station doesn't have fuel and then you travel further and find yet more filling stations without fuel, then consumer confidence is going to remain at a low ebb. so go localfirst? so go local first? absolutely, so go localfirst? absolutely, do our so go localfirst? absolutely, do your neighbourhood _ so go localfirst? absolutely, do your neighbourhood filling i so go local first? absolutely, do i your neighbourhood filling stations, the transient filling stations that people pass and cm cannot tell whether it is dry or not, and if they are starting to get fuel in and work normally, consumer confidence will return quite quickly. shore work normally, consumer confidence will return quite quickly.—
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will return quite quickly. are you clear why the — will return quite quickly. are you clear why the government i will return quite quickly. are you clear why the government didn't| clear why the government didn't begin this training of military drivers earlier? because there was a long period where they were saying initially there was a crisis, then they said they might put them on standby, then put them on standby, and meanwhile days have been going past because presumably, had they done that, the deliveries could have started sooner or, if they had found they were not necessary, they could have stood them down. the they were not necessary, they could have stood them down.— have stood them down. the driver trainin: have stood them down. the driver training has _ have stood them down. the driver training has been _ have stood them down. the driver training has been taking _ have stood them down. the driver training has been taking place i have stood them down. the driver| training has been taking place over some years previously and it really is just getting sure that the vehicles are roadworthy for busy motorways, city centres, that the drivers are absolutely prepared for this, so really, short—term contingency work was needed to make sure, as the secretary of state has said, you are driving a2,000 litres of highly inflammable fuel in some of highly inflammable fuel in some of the most crowded road conditions possible, particularly in london and
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the south—east, so they have to be absolutely up to the game and i am sure when they come out this weekend, they will be fully fit for purpose. weekend, they will be fully fit for --urose. ., ,., weekend, they will be fully fit for --urose. ., ,. , weekend, they will be fully fit for --urose. ., , ., purpose. the other bad news that drivers may _ purpose. the other bad news that drivers may be — purpose. the other bad news that drivers may be about _ purpose. the other bad news that drivers may be about to _ purpose. the other bad news that drivers may be about to face i purpose. the other bad news that drivers may be about to face is i purpose. the other bad news that drivers may be about to face is an increase in the crossed it fuel at the pumps. cyanide yes, that is the next shock. this week, we have seen wholesale prices go up by as much as 3p per litre. next week, when the new stock does start arriving at the fuel stations, the retailers have got no alternative but to put the prices up. we can see pump prices creep by up to 3p a litre next week. this is definitely not profiteering or gouging, this is purely as a result of global factors. this year, the price of crude oil, brent crude, has gone up by over 50% and recently we have seen a weakening of the pound. those two global factors are
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affecting wholesale prices which are going to be a bit of a shock for motorists, particularly when you think thatjust 12 months ago, you could buy unleaded fuel for 115, diesel for 116, 20 5p per litre cheaper. this is a nasty shock to the consumer pocket and to inflation going forward. the uk's home secretary has said police must raise the bar by taking the harassment of women more seriously. priti patel said crimes such as flashing and verbal abuse should not be taken lightly. she said women should feel confident to call out such offences. ministers have promised reform to the criminaljustice system, following the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer. simonjones reports. the death of sarah everard prompted an outpouring of public grief. now the government says it is determined her murder will bring about permanent change in how society deals with violence against women and girls. the prime minister says there are too few prosecutions
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and convictions for sexual violence. the time from report to referral, from referral to court proceedings, from court proceedings to the conclusion — all three of those segments — is far too long. and what you are seeing is the whole system snarled up with evidential problems, data issues, mobile phones disclosure, all that kind of stuff, and it's a nightmare for the women concerned. wayne couzens kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard, he then dumped her body in woodland in kent. cars registered to him had previously been linked to two allegations of indecent exposure, but he wasn't identified as a potential sex offender. it's claimed couzens also used a whatsapp group to swap misogynistic messages with officers from the metropolitan police, the civil nuclear constabulary, and the norfolk constabulary. we also have to address the issues going on in the police force,
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and you will have seen this stuff about the officers on a whatsapp group. we have got to come down very hard on them. the home secretary says the police must raise the bar by taking harassment and flashing more seriously. priti patel told the telegraph, they should not be considered low level crimes. the met says it is putting more officers in places where people feel unsafe. we're absolutely committed to tackling violence against women and girls. it is one of our priorities. so you will see us out on patrol in hot spots. but there are calls for more scrutiny of the police themselves. this has been going on for many, many years, and i'm rather tired of police forces saying "we are going to learn lessons from some tragedy." the lessons don't seem to be learned. women's suffering of this sort of stuff has to stop. and women up and down the country are saying that. you have to listen, and police forces are not doing that. and so it has to be listened at a lower level, and i'm sorry
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that means resourcing and more police available and more money put into policing and the court system. but we also have to have much better processes of training police and those in the justice system. opposition politicians accused the government of starving the police and courts of resources, but there is a growing consensus that the death of sarah everard must act as a watershed moment. simon jones, bbc news. the deputy chief constable of hampshire police maggie blyth is the incoming national police lead for violence against women and girls in england and wales. she says that part of her new role will be to look at how standards can be raised, and how officers can report discrimination amongst their own ranks. as i come into the role, i'm reviewing a new national strategy from all police forces across the country about violence against women and girls, and a component of that is to look internally as to how our culture, our behaviours and our standards have to be extremely high.
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the public expect of us that we are people they can trust, and we know that within society there are behaviours and conduct and traits linked to misogyny that we need to address as a society. policing will reflect that, too. it's really important that our standards are higher and as high as they can be at all times. part of the strategy, part of what i will be looking at, is reviewing how we set those standards, and looking very closely at work already under way in many forces at establishing networks so that officers and staff can call out bad behaviour, can call out anything that links to misogyny, links to discriminatory behaviour. that is already very much under way. maggie blythe there. an american private investment company has won a
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bidding warfor private investment company has won a bidding war for morrisons, uk's fourth biggest market. clayton, dubilier & rice offered almost £7,000,000,000 for the group. it has been advised by the former tesco boss, sirterry been advised by the former tesco boss, sir terry leavey. there could be a breakthrough in the way we treat covid—19. interim trials suggest a new, experimental drug could cut the risk of hospitalisation, or death, by about half. if authorised by regulators, the treatment will be the first oral antiviral medication for covid—19. mark lobel reports. this is the first covid pill. trial results suggest it can cut hospitalisations or deaths by half. the news of the efficacy of this particular antiviral is obviously very good news. the company, when they briefed us last night, had mentioned that they will be submitting their data to the fda imminently. the data are impressive. pills were given to 775 unvaccinated, elderly or medically at risk volunteers within five days of them showing coronaviruses symptoms.
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the data from a phase three trial showed 7.3% of patients on the drug were hospitalised, compared to 1a.1% of those who didn't take the tablets. eight patients who were given a placebo or dummy pill later died of covid, but there were no deaths in the group taking the pill. the trial was stopped early because the pill was so successful. but data still needs to be peer reviewed. so how does it work? as coronavirus replicates itself inside your body, these antiviral pills trick it into using the drug, which then inserts errors into the virus�*s genetic code, blocking the virus from replicating. it completely corrupts the genome of the virus so it can't replicate, and that's the beauty. and then, even if the virus mutates, it could be still useful. people are now talking about this, that if we have another coronavirus pandemic in the future,
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this drug will still work for that coronavirus. because it is agnostic to variants. there are existing clinic—based intravenous treatments which are even more effective, but this appears to be the first pill to treat covid, and as long as it's taken early on could offer an alternative at roughly a third of the price — at $700 per treatment. accessibility is a problem with a monoclonal antibody. for this one, it's a simple pill so obviously a lot easier to administer and a lot easier to administer as an outpatient as well. merck hopes 10 million courses of the treatment will be available by the end of the year. it has agreed to supply the us with close to 2 million, and to license the drug to several india—based generic drug makers, which could supply it to low and middle—income countries. for countries that don't have the vaccine available, this could be another stopgap. the us authorities say the drug is no substitute
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for preventative vaccines, but this is an exciting development — as the us drug company seeks emergency approval within weeks as the first company to report trial results of an effective and relatively cheap pill to treat covid as others companies also work on similar treatments. mark lobel, bbc news. from gunge and slime to phone ins with pop stars, saturday morning kids tv has been entertaining children for decades. it all began a5 years ago today, when noel edmonds first presented the multi coloured swap shop and though presenters and programmes have changed through the years, it's continually kept young ones amused. earlier i spoke to the former cbbc presenter kirsten o'brien who explained the appeal of saturday
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morning kids television. weill. explained the appeal of saturday morning kids television.- morning kids television. well, i think they _ morning kids television. well, i think they are _ morning kids television. well, i think they are booting - morning kids television. well, i think they are booting about, i morning kids television. well, i. think they are booting about, and having my own now, the uprooting about, they do not have to go to school, they are looking for something to do and that was the joy back then of all your favourite band is used to be on saturday morning telly, so you could see your absolute key favourites people were on, whether it be that they would interview pop stars, film stars, everything was happening there and then and as a kid, you could just sit down and go all, my gosh, and as a presenter, i got to see everybody. it was incredible.— it was incredible. swap shop as it became known, _ it was incredible. swap shop as it became known, the _ it was incredible. swap shop as it| became known, the multicoloured it was incredible. swap shop as it i became known, the multicoloured bit dropped off the title after a few years, 1976 it started, it had its own purple dinosaur figure years, 1976 it started, it had its own purple dinosaurfigure but years, 1976 it started, it had its own purple dinosaur figure but he was not really interactive with the presenter. by the time we get to the saturday aardvark, the, dare i admit it, puppet, is getting equal billing. i'mjust wondering it, puppet, is getting equal billing. i'm just wondering what that was like. hat billing. i'm just wondering what that was like.— that was like. not even equal billin: , that was like. not even equal billing. it _
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that was like. not even equal billing, it was _ that was like. not even equal billing, it was his _ that was like. not even equal billing, it was his own - that was like. not even equal billing, it was his own show. | that was like. not even equal| billing, it was his own show. i that was like. not even equal- billing, it was his own show. i am the sidekick! i was the sidekick by then. otis was an absolute legend of a puppet and i have so many laughs. but we would quite often do is we would rehearse in the studio, the cameras, the director and they would say to ourselves, it will not be like that when we go live and then because it is live, it was just mayhem and as long as you are not swearing or being too rude, it was a real playground and that is what you get so many presenters like philip schofield, who go on to do great things because you learn so much in that environment of how to be a presenter. pact that environment of how to be a presenter-— presenter. act interesting what ou're presenter. act interesting what you're saying — presenter. act interesting what you're saying because - presenter. act interesting what you're saying because what i presenter. act interesting what you're saying because what we| presenter. act interesting what i you're saying because what we do in use is generally quite controlled, he says, famous last words, that's a guarantee that something will go wrong now, isn't it? but from life children'stv, apart from working with children and quite often animals, things that actors are told never to do, you are dealing with a very unpredictable environment where a lot of the scribble just a ad lib., adler, adler. i
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a lot of the scribble 'ust a ad lib., adler, adler.i a lot of the scribble 'ust a ad lib., adler, adler. i always always used to have _ lib., adler, adler. i always always used to have a _ lib., adler, adler. i always always used to have a pile _ lib., adler, adler. i always always used to have a pile of— lib., adler, adler. i always always used to have a pile of kids - lib., adler, adler. i always always| used to have a pile of kids pictures just out of shot in case a programme went down or some kind of technical problem, particularly back in the days when it was very manual, a person pressing a button and then saying, the tape is not even here! i have 50 kids pictures to show. i have 50 kids pictures to show. i have travelled on with that, never now do i do live radio without thinking, what is my backup if something goes wrong? that is the training in action. did something goes wrong? that is the training in action.— training in action. did you find there was _ training in action. did you find there was a — training in action. did you find there was a different - training in action. did you find i there was a different atmosphere in there was a different atmosphere in the studio on a saturday morning? did everyone feel a bit more relaxed? because my memory of tv back and certainly the �*70s and �*80s was that a lot of people in studios still wore ties and it was very formal. you were doing it in the �*905 formal. you were doing it in the �*90s with saturday aardvark, but it felt a bit more relaxed. brute '90s with saturday aardvark, but it felt a bit more relaxed.— felt a bit more relaxed. we use to net a felt a bit more relaxed. we use to get a delivery _ felt a bit more relaxed. we use to get a delivery of _ felt a bit more relaxed. we use to get a delivery of bacon _ felt a bit more relaxed. we use to get a delivery of bacon butties i felt a bit more relaxed. we use to | get a delivery of bacon butties and 999 get a delivery of bacon butties and egg sandwiches to get us going. talking of things going wrong, they came back to early off a programme
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once and the guy that puppeteers otis, the brilliant dave chapman, had a mouthful of sandwich at the time and otis to mimic that because dave couldn't get his words out, so people were just happy to be there. it was a joyous environment, really, really lucky to work on saturday mornings on such a big show like that. , �* �* the volcano that's been erupting for the past 11 days on the spanish island of la palma is spewing out two new streams of lava, threatening further destruction. many homes and crops have been destroyed and thousands of people have been forced to evacuate since the eruption first began last month. certainly not a wash—out of the weekend, but a fairly soggy weekend on the way for the majority rain at times heaviest across southern areas, but we will see the strongest
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of the wind is confined to parts of the south and east, gail is expected here for tomorrow looks much brighter, sunshine and showers, the strongest of the winds in the very far north of scotland. today, strong winds on the eastern edge of this developing low pressure system which will scoot its way up to northern scotland by tomorrow, but underneath it, as we have seen, various weather fronts combining, plenty of rain around to take us to the afternoon. dry start across parts of eastern england and the good part of scotland and drying up across parts of northern ireland after this morning cosmic rain, a scattering of showers to the afternoon. turning central and southern scotland, some of north—east england into late in the afternoon, driest of all in the far north of scotland. 11 to 15. lively showers but sunshine in between in wales in the south—west, the winds later here than this morning but the strongest are on the southern coastal counties of england right the way through the east anglia, a0 to 60 mail per hour gusts are complete by heavy rain, unpleasant travelling conditions. through this evening and overnight,
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heavy rain across eastern areas to begin with,

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