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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 2, 2021 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines: the home secretary says police must raise the bar, by taking the harassment of women more seriously. her thoughts are echoed by health secretary, sajid javid. what the metropolitan police have said about the reforms that they will be looking at i think is absolutely right. we need to also be looking at what more a government can do to help build that confidence. the army will begin delivering fuel to petrol stations across the uk from monday, after days of queuing at the pumps. and this is the scene alive at holyrood where the queen is arriving to open the sixth session of the scottish parliament. the ceremony would normally take place injuly, but was postponed because of a pandemic for so she is accompanied
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by her son, prince charles, and by camilla who, in scotland, are known as the duke and duchess of rothesay. provisional clinical trial results suggest an experimental drug for severe covid cuts the risk of hospitalisation or death by about half. and two new streams of lava pose a further threat of destruction as the la palma volcano forces thousands more to flee. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk's home secretary has said police must raise the bar by taking the harassment of women more seriously. priti patel said crimes such as flashing and verbal abuse should not be taken lightly. she said women should feel confident
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to call out such offences. ministers have promised reform to the criminaljustice system, following the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer. simonjones reports. the death of sarah everard prompted an outpouring of public grief. now the government says it is determined her murder will bring about permanent change in how society deals with violence against women and girls. the prime minister says there are too few prosecutions and convictions for sexual violence. the time from report to referral, from referral to court proceedings, from court proceedings to the conclusion — all three of those segments — is far too long. and what you are seeing is the whole system snarled up with evidential problems, data issues, mobile phones disclosure, all that kind of stuff, and it's a nightmare for the women concerned. wayne couzens kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard,
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he then dumped her body in woodland in kent. cars registered to him had previously been linked to two allegations of indecent exposure, but he wasn't identified as a potential sex offender. it's claimed couzens also used a whatsapp group to swap misogynistic messages with officers from the metropolitan police, the civil nuclear constabulary, and the norfolk constabulary. we also have to address the issues going on in the police force, and you will have seen this stuff about the officers on a whatsapp group. we have got to come down very hard on them. the home secretary says the police must raise the bar by taking harassment and flashing more seriously. priti patel told the telegraph, they should not be considered low level crimes. the met says it is putting more officers in places where people feel unsafe. we're absolutely committed to tackling violence against women and girls. it is one of our priorities. so you will see us out on patrol in hot spots.
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but there are calls for more scrutiny of the police themselves. this has been going on for many, many years, and i'm rather tired of police forces saying "we are going to learn lessons from some tragedy." the lessons don't seem to be learned. women's suffering of this sort of stuff has to stop. you have to listen, and police forces are not doing that. and so it has to be listened at a lower level, and i'm sorry that means resourcing and more police available and more money put into policing and the court system. but we also have to have much better processes of training police and those in the justice system. opposition politicians accused the government of starving the police and courts of resources, but there is a growing consensus that the death of sarah everard must act as a watershed moment. simon jones, bbc news.
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the deputy chief constable of hampshire police maggie blyth is the incoming national police lead for violence against women and girls in england and wales. she says that part of her new role will be to look at how standards can be raised, and how officers can report discrimination amongst their own ranks. as i come into the role, i'm reviewing a new national strategy from all police forces across the country about violence against women and girls, and a component of that is to look internally as to how our culture, our behaviours and our standards have to be extremely high. the public expect of us that we are people they can trust, and we know that within society there are behaviours and conduct and traits linked to misogyny that we need to address as a society. policing will reflect that, too. it's really important that our standards are higher and as high as they can be at all times. part of the strategy, part of what i will be looking at,
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is reviewing how we set those standards, and looking very closely at work already under way in many forces at establishing networks so that officers and staff can call out bad behaviour, can call out anything that links to misogyny, links to discriminatory behaviour. that is already very much under way. our political correspondent, ione wells told me ministers are increasing pressure on the police on how they deal with violence against women and young girls. there is certainly huge public and political pressure that is now growing on the metropolitan police in particular, particularly around this question of whether they could have done more to prevent a serving police officer from murdering sarah everard, not least because it has now emerged that he has been linked to two previous cases of, or allegations of indecent exposure but also allegations of exchanging misogynistic whatsapp messages with other police officers as well, so those questions now
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very much kind of facing the metropolitan police and earlier, as you say, the health secretary, the former home secretary sajid javid did say that both the government and the police needed to look at reforms about what could be done to try and stop something like this happening again. what the metropolitan police have said about the reforms that they will be looking at. i think it's absolutely right. we need to be looking at what more the government can do to help build that confidence, building on the violence against women and girls strategy that was published in the summer. this is obviously an appalling, shocking case and we must make sure that at least something that comes out of this is that we can give more confidence to more women about their own safety. we've heard there, obviously, the health secretary calling for some kind of reform into what has happened, but there are some on the opposition particularly calling for something a bit more specific. we have had people like the labour mp and chair of the home affairs committee yvette cooper, for example, saying that the metropolitan police issuing apologies just isn't enough and they have been calling
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for a specific enquiry notjust into what happened in the specific case but also into the wider culture within the police force as well. we obviously 25 years ago or more now had the enquiry into the killing of stephen lawrence and that led to a finding of institutional racism. is there a concern politically that we may be looking at a question of institutional misogyny that has become built into the dna of some parts of the police service? that is certainly an allegation that has been put forward by people across the political spectrum really. it's interesting to note that even people like the policing minister kitt malthouse himself has said that the police will have to work a lot harder to restore confidence and trust now in the police force and this is trust, i think, quite a number of levels here. this is trust not only in the fact that if a police officer stops an individual, like they did with sarah everard, that police officer will not do somebody harm. it is trust that the police will root out any misconduct within its own force. as you mention, given what we've seen and what has now emerged
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about these alleged whatsapp messages between other police officers exchanging misogynistic comments as well, but also trust that they will make sure that nothing like this happens again and that any kind of vetting that is done out any problematic behaviour, as we have seen was the case with this individual. the conservative party conference begins tomorrow. i guess this is one subject they might want to address, but it's a big topic area for political reform if you start to go down the route of legislation. that's right. we have had certain seniorfigures as well like the conservative mp bob niels who is chair of thejustice committee saying that one action that could be taken by the government would be to make hate crime, to try to find another way that people who show some signs of misogynistic behaviour, sexism, are held to account for those... so treat it in the same way that we treat a racist comment or a homophobic comment? that's right, and i think people like him, that is something that has been echoed by the mayor of london, sadiq khan, as well, saying that if misogyny was a hate crime,
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some of these incidents would be better recorded, potentially help to identify further offenders in future as well, so that is certainly something that may come up again at party conference, but as i say, i think as you say, it is certainly something will come up particularly after sajid javid himself has said that there is a need to build on the government's own violence against women and girls strategy that was just launched earlier this summer. let's cross the queen is due to address msps at holyrood in the next hour to mark the opening of the sixth session of the scottish parliament. the ceremony would normally take place injuly, but was postponed because of coronavirus. thatis that is the presiding officer of the scottish parliament, the equivalent of the speaker in the house of commons. the queen, of course, doing
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so in her capacity as monarch of scotland after the merger of the two grants by the active union. scotland's parliament is the biggest example, the strongest in terms of powers of the various devolved administrations in the uk, very much the driving force for devolution in the driving force for devolution in the uk, the kind of frustration that dated back from the referendum at the end of the 1970s when a majority of scots voted for devolution but, in the process, they did not meet the threshold which the uk parliament had imposed about the number of people turning out to vote in favour, so it was defeated. eventually, that led to a scottish convention of all the political parties who are willing to take part and then the process which led to a referendum on devolution in scotland under the tony blair led government and eventually the opening, or reopening, as many scots would argue, of the scottish parliament. let's hear what the providing
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officer is saying.— let's hear what the providing officer is saying. let's hear what the providing officer is sa inc. , , ., officer is saying. they deserve our raise officer is saying. they deserve our praise and — officer is saying. they deserve our praise and gratitude. _ officer is saying. they deserve our praise and gratitude. we - officer is saying. they deserve our praise and gratitude. we also - officer is saying. they deserve our praise and gratitude. we also say| officer is saying. they deserve our| praise and gratitude. we also say a heartfelt _ praise and gratitude. we also say a heartfelt thank you to the workforce in hospitals, in care homes, in our health_ in hospitals, in care homes, in our health service and in all our front line services. covid has brought about_ line services. covid has brought about changes that might otherwise have taken decades. rethinking of work patterns, for example, and the balance _ work patterns, for example, and the balance between our working and our caring _ balance between our working and our caring lives, — balance between our working and our caring lives, measures to protect public— caring lives, measures to protect public health make that parliament could _ public health make that parliament could not_ public health make that parliament could not meet in the same way as before _ could not meet in the same way as before but— could not meet in the same way as before but we adapted. the parliament came together to pass emergency laws. technology and dedicated staff enables us to work online _ dedicated staff enables us to work online and in hybrid forms. our 43 new msps — online and in hybrid forms. our 43 new msps have never voted other than in hybrid _ new msps have never voted other than in hybrid form. i have not presided over a _ in hybrid form. i have not presided over a vote — in hybrid form. i have not presided over a vote that has not taken place both online — over a vote that has not taken place both online and in this chamber. a
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conversation about what changes we may wish _ conversation about what changes we may wish to keep is ongoing, continuing in this place, as well as in many— continuing in this place, as well as in many other walks of national life _ in many other walks of national life and. — in many other walks of national life. and, of course, every parliamentary session brings changes. my predecessors presided over minority, majority and coalition— over minority, majority and coalition government. this session, too, coalition government. this session, loo, sees _ coalition government. this session, too, sees another type of formal agreement between two parties. i am heartened _ agreement between two parties. i am heartened that this parliament is the most — heartened that this parliament is the most diverse that we have ever returned _ the most diverse that we have ever returned. this is the first opening ceremony— returned. this is the first opening ceremony where we celebrate the election— ceremony where we celebrate the election of women of colour. i wish it hadn't— election of women of colour. i wish it hadn't taken so long. i know, though. — it hadn't taken so long. i know, though, that such progress is not linear~ _ though, that such progress is not linear~ it — though, that such progress is not linear. it cannot be taken for granted _ linear. it cannot be taken for granted. it takes continuous effort, but we _ granted. it takes continuous effort, but we all— granted. it takes continuous effort, but we all have a part to play. let us not _ but we all have a part to play. let us not stop — but we all have a part to play. let us not stop until we look across this chamber and see scotland reflected back in all its diversity.
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the increased electoral turnout in may shows how embedded the parliament is in the life of the nation — parliament is in the life of the nation 0f— parliament is in the life of the nation. of course, democratic engagement mustn't stop at the ballot — engagement mustn't stop at the ballot box as the benefits of working _ ballot box as the benefits of working in partnership with our people — working in partnership with our people are profound. we see it in our work— people are profound. we see it in our work with the citizens assembly and the _ our work with the citizens assembly and the climate assembly. we learn from the _ and the climate assembly. we learn from the children'sparliament and the youth — from the children'sparliament and the youth parliament. we see it in the youth parliament. we see it in the parliament's own ground—breaking participation and communities work. tens of— participation and communities work. tens of thousands of people come to this parliament every year, passionately expressing their views, an essential part of our democracy. in an essential part of our democracy. in this _ an essential part of our democracy. in this chamber, decisions affecting the lives _ in this chamber, decisions affecting the lives of— in this chamber, decisions affecting the lives of people across scotland will be _ the lives of people across scotland will be closely scrutinised and debated. this parliament can set the tone for— debated. this parliament can set the tone for that debate, so let's get that tone — tone for that debate, so let's get that tone right, show that it is possible — that tone right, show that it is possible for people with opposing
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views _ possible for people with opposing views to — possible for people with opposing views to have a constructive conversation and demonstrate that disagreements does not have to be divisive _ disagreements does not have to be divisive. we will not be afraid to address— divisive. we will not be afraid to address the local and global challenges of the pandemic and recovery— challenges of the pandemic and recovery from its effects, nor will we shirk— recovery from its effects, nor will we shirk the collected crises of biodiversity loss and climate change _ biodiversity loss and climate change. our interaction with the change. 0ur interaction with the natural— change. our interaction with the natural world and other species has far—reaching consequences. our makar is speaking _ far—reaching consequences. our makar is speaking later. she is one who believes— is speaking later. she is one who believes in— is speaking later. she is one who believes in paying attention to nature — believes in paying attention to nature in— believes in paying attention to nature. in herview, perhaps a radical— nature. in herview, perhaps a radical noticing could be part of the solution. if you are stopping to notice _ the solution. if you are stopping to notice you — the solution. if you are stopping to notice, you are not actually trashing _ notice, you are not actually trashing the planet. as cop26 approaches, scotland will become the global— approaches, scotland will become the global focus for action to provide that solution and as we begin this sixth— that solution and as we begin this sixth session, we must challenge ourselves— sixth session, we must challenge ourselves to make the best use of the time _ ourselves to make the best use of the time we have. when we agree and when _ the time we have. when we agree and when we _ the time we have. when we agree and when we agree to disagree, in the
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chamber. — when we agree to disagree, in the chamber. in— when we agree to disagree, in the chamber, in committee, in conversation over coffee, we must be parliamentarians as well as politicians. we must maximise scrutiny— politicians. we must maximise scrutinv to _ politicians. we must maximise scrutiny to best enable this parliament to hold the government to account _ parliament to hold the government to account. and we must deliver the best outcomes we can in representing all who— best outcomes we can in representing all who scotland home. because regardless of our differences, that, surely, _ regardless of our differences, that, surely, is _ regardless of our differences, that, surely, is our common purpose. your majesty, _ surely, is our common purpose. your majesty, i_ surely, is our common purpose. your majesty, i now and may due to address— majesty, i now and may due to address the scottish parliament. —— i address the scottish parliament. —— i now— address the scottish parliament. —— i now invite — address the scottish parliament. —— i now invite you. presiding officer, first minister, members of the scottish parliament,
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it is a pleasure to be invited to address you on this special occasion. i would like to begin by thanking you, presiding officer, for your kind words of welcome. i would also like to congratulate you and the scottish parliament as a whole for being able to mark the new session at parliament in a safe and welcoming manner during what has been a very trying period. presiding officer, you carry the weighty responsibility of being a strong advocate for the parliament and i know you will strive to use your judgment to lead this parliament by demonstrating fairness, respect and impartiality. members of the scottish parliament, as we all stepped out from adverse and uncertain times, occasion such as
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this today provide an opportunity for hope and optimism. marking this new session does, indeed, bring a sense of beginning and renewal. the scottish parliament has been at the heart of scotland's response to the pandemic with people across this country looking to you for leadership and stewardship and i hope you will remain at the forefront as we move towards a phase of recovery. while some of you will have differences of opinion, i trust you will continue to work together. your service here is carried out in the presence of the mace and i encourage you to draw inspiration from the founding principles of wisdom, justice, compassion and integrity. these words are a reminder of your responsibilities to
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the people of scotland and, in the years ahead, i hope you can reaffirm their importance to everything you do as a member of this parliament. todayis do as a member of this parliament. today is also a day when we can celebrate those who have made an extraordinary contribution to the lives of other people in scotland, locally or nationally, during the covid—i9 pandemic. i have spoken before of my deep and abiding affection for this wonderful country and of the many happy memories prince philip and i always held of our time here. prince philip and i always held of ourtime here. it prince philip and i always held of our time here. it is often said that it is the people that make a place and there are few places where this is truer than in scotland, as we have seen in recent times. we all know of the difficult circumstances that many people have encountered
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during the last 18 months, however, alongside this, there have been countless examples of resilience and goodwill. following my grandson's time as lord high commissioner, prince william has told me very heartening stories that he heard 1st—hand of people and communities across scotland uniting to protect and care for those who are isolated or vulnerable. and care for those who are isolated orvulnerable. it and care for those who are isolated or vulnerable. it is only fitting that we use this occasion to acknowledge and thank these remarkable people who have made such a positive difference to so many. members of the scottish parliament, as i said earlier, the beginning of as i said earlier, the beginning of a new session is the time for renewal and fresh thinking, providing an opportunity to look to the future and our future generations. next month, i will be
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attending cop26 events in glasgow. the eyes of the world will be on the united kingdom and scotland in particular as leaders come together to address the challenges of climate change. there is a key role for the scottish parliament, as with all parliaments, to help create a better, healthier future for us all and to engage with the people they represent, especially our young people. presiding officer, first minister, members of the scottish parliament, the duke and duchess of rothesay and i will continue to follow your progress with the closest of interest and we extend to you all are warmest good wishes as you all are warmest good wishes as you embark on this sixth session of parliament.
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applause thank you, your majesty. i would now like to— thank you, your majesty. i would now like to invite — thank you, your majesty. i would now like to invite you all to enjoy a performance from the national centre of excellence in traditional music. they— of excellence in traditional music. they will— of excellence in traditional music. they will perform in up—tempo... studio: — they will perform in up—tempo... studio: presiding officer of the scottish parliament, msp for the lothians, first began starting segment working there in 1999 when the parliament opens as an adviser this is now a parliament with the snp and the scottish greens because the snp did not get a majority at the snp did not get a majority at the elections earlier this year. there will be a number of
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performances and a reading by the makar, scotland's national poem, who will be performing a new home. you cannot see it here but the crown of scotland is also there, one of the oldest crown jewels in the uk first worn by mary of guise in 1540 as a reminder of the age of the scottish parliament. there is coverage of this ceremony continuing for viewers in scotland on bbc1 scotland and, of course, anyone in the uk can follow the coverage on bbc iplayer. the army will begin delivering fuel to forecourts from monday, to try to ease the pressure at petrol stations. ministers are also allowing up to 300 of the 5,000 hgv drivers being recruited from abroad to come to the uk immediately. the government says the rest will arrive later this month, as our political correspondent peter saull reports.
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we started to see scenes like this in parts of the uk last weekend. frustrated drivers desperately trying to fill up. and now the government is calling in the military. some service personnel will be out providing support today, and from monday soldiers will be driving petrol tankers themselves. so why has it taken so long? first of all, you're asking military personnel who are trained to drive tankers cross—country to take tankers full of highly flammable liquids into built—up areas, onto forecourts where you and ifill up our cars. and it has to be the case that we make sure they get the appropriate training to do so. i think we would all expect that to be the right thing. and at the same time, we have to work with industry so that we know where we're sending them. we can'tjust send them to random garages. it has to be properly deployed. as well as support from the armed forces, more drivers will be allowed into the uk from overseas. a new scheme will enable up to 300
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tanker drivers to come and work here immediately. haulage firms will find potential recruits and apply to the government for licences. up to 4,700 lorry drivers specialising in food delivery will start to arrive from the end of this month. this temporary visa scheme has been extended until the end of february. and 5,500 poultry workers will be granted the right to work here, too — until the end of the year. ministers hope these measures, along with efforts to recruit more british staff, will address some of the problems in the supply chain — but there could still be a tough winter ahead. peter saull, bbc news. the president of the philippines, rodrigo duterte, has said he's retiring from politics. he'd been offered the chance to run as vice president in the election next may, because the constitution bars him from a second term in office. he won the presidency in 2016 on a platform of crushing crime and fixing the country's drugs crisis but critics say that
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he has encouraged police to engage in extrajudicial killings. the decision potentially clears the way for his daughter, sara duterte carpio, to contest the presidency instead. the volcano that's been erupting for the past 11 days on the spanish island of la palma is spewing out two new streams of lava, threatening further destruction. many homes and crops have been destroyed and thousands of people have been forced to evacuate since the eruption first began last month. dan johnson reports. this volcano is still really active, and there is fresh lava flowing from new vents. that means other homes and villages are under risk. more than 6,000 people now have been evacuated and are staying with friends and family or in emergency shelters. we saw people today making the decision that it's time for them to leave, to get to somewhere safe because they have lived with this for over 11 days
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now, and some people arejust fed up. they have had enough and they want to get to a safe place. more than 1000 properties have been destroyed, and this is having a really big impact, notjust on daily life here but people's livelihoods. i was talking to a fisherman in the harbour who cannot go out to sea because there is such a big exclusion zone around the area where the lover is pouring off the land, into the water and setting hard. the lava is pouring off the land, into the water and setting hard. it is actually creating new land. la palma is growing. it is such a destructive process and refreshment process and he thought that he may not have a future here in that industry. he may leave and potentially never return. even before it has ended, the impact of this eruption are wide ranging and long lasting. what nobody knows is just how long it is going to go on. for now, the volcano keeps erupting, the lover keeps flowing, the lava keeps flowing, but it's unpredictable. where is it going to go and how much more damage will it do? danjohnson, bbc news, la palma.
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time for a weather. at the map is matt taylor. one or two of you will get out in the sunshine this afternoon before many it is a case of hunkering away from the rain which becomes pretty extensive across england, wales, central and southern scotland rather less of today for some parts of south—east scotland and may stay dry, brightening in northern ireland after the rain and it may brighten up after the rain and it may brighten up across some other western areas, driest in northern scotland but a breezy, gusty day with strong winds in the south—east, 40, 50, maybe 60 mob hour gust which will cause a rather of 11 to 15 degrees. rain, strong winds remaining in the north—east of scotland through tonight, most other areas being partially clear skies, some showers in the west and a cool start with debit as widely as ingle figures tomorrow, a briar stick make brighter day, especially eastern areas, scattering of showers in the way straight from the start of the day, some of them is no way eastwards but more persistent rain in the north and west of scotland
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and shetland because he wins gust into 60 only be 70mph making for another cool day. by finau. —— goodbye for now. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the home secretary says police must "raise the bar", by taking the harassment of women more seriously. her thoughts are echoed by health secretary, sajid javid.
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the metropolitan police have said about reforms that they will be looking at, that is absolutely right. we also need to look at what government can do to build that confidence. the army will begin delivering fuel to petrol stations across the uk from monday, after days of queuing at the pumps. the queen at holyrood, addressing msps to mark the opening of the sixth session of the scottish parliament. provisional clinical trial results suggest an experimental drug for severe covid cuts the risk of hospitalisation or death by about half. and two new streams of lava pose a further threat of destruction as the la palma volcano forces thousands more to flee. now on bbc news, it's time for dateline london with geeta guru murthy.

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