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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 2, 2021 10:00am-10:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the home secretary says police must raise the bar, by taking the harassment of women more seriously. her thoughts are echoed by health secretary sajid javid. what the metropolitan police have said about the reforms that they will be looking at i think is absolutely right. we need to also be looking at what bore a government can do to help build that confidence. the army will begin delivering fuel to petrol stations across the uk from monday, after days of queuing at the pumps. provisional clinical trial results suggest an experimental drug for severe covid cuts the risk of hospitalisation or death by about half. and two new streams of lava, pose a further threat of destruction as the la palma volcano forces
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thousands more to flee. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the home secretary has said police must raise the bar by taking the harassment of women more seriously. priti patel said crimes such as flashing and verbal abuse should not be taken lightly. she said women should feel confident to call out such offences. ministers have promised reform to the criminaljustice system, following the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer. simonjones reports.
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the death of sarah everard prompted an outpouring of public grief. now the government says it is determined her murder will bring about permanent change in how society deals with violence against women and girls. the prime minister says there are too few prosecutions and convictions for sexual violence. the time from report to referral, from referral to court proceedings, from court proceedings to the conclusion — all three of those segments — is far too long. and what you are seeing is the whole system snarled up with evidential problems, data issues, mobile phones disclosure, all that kind of stuff, and it's a nightmare for the women concerned. wayne couzens kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard, he then dumped her body in woodland in kent. cars registered to him had previously been linked to two allegations of indecent exposure, but he wasn't identified as a potential sex offender.
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it's claimed couzens also used a whatsapp group to swap misogynistic messages with officers from the metropolitan police, the civil nuclear constabulary, and the norfolk constabulary. we also have to address the issues going on in the police force, and you will have seen this stuff about the officers on a whatsapp group. we have got to come down very hard on them. the home secretary says the police must raise the bar by taking harassment and flashing more seriously. priti patel told the telegraph, they should not be considered low level crimes. the met says it is putting more officers in places where people feel unsafe. we're absolutely committed to tackling violence against women and girls. it is one of our priorities. so you will see us out on patrol in hot spots. but there are calls for more scrutiny of the police themselves. this has been going on for many, many years, and i'm rather tired of police forces saying "we are going to learn letters from tragedy." the lessons don't
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seem to be learned. women's suffering of this sort of stuff has to stop. you have to listen, and police forces are not doing that. and so it has to be listened at a lower level, and i'm sorry that means resourcing and more police available and more money put into policing and the court system. but we also have to have much better processes of training police and those in the justice system. opposition politicians accused the government of starving the police and courts of resources, but there is a growing consensus that the death of sarah everard must act as a watershed moment. simon jones, bbc news. deputy chief constable maggie blyth is the incoming national police lead for violence against women and girls in england and wales. she says that part of her new role will be to look at how standards can be raised and how officers can report discrimination amongst
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their own ranks. asl as i come into the role, i'm reviewing _ as i come into the role, i'm reviewing a new national strategy from _ reviewing a new national strategy from all _ reviewing a new national strategy from all police forces across the country — from all police forces across the country about violence against women and girls. _ country about violence against women and girls, and a component of that is to look— and girls, and a component of that is to look internally as to how our culture, _ is to look internally as to how our culture, our— is to look internally as to how our culture, our behaviours and our standards — culture, our behaviours and our standards have to be extremely high. the public— standards have to be extremely high. the public expect of us that we are people _ the public expect of us that we are people they can trust, and we know that within — people they can trust, and we know that within society there are behaviours and conduct and traits linked _ behaviours and conduct and traits linked to— behaviours and conduct and traits linked to misogyny that we need to address— linked to misogyny that we need to address as — linked to misogyny that we need to address as a society. policing will reflect _ address as a society. policing will reflect that, too. it's really important that our standards are higher— important that our standards are higher and as important that our standards are higherand as high important that our standards are higher and as high as they can be at all times _ higher and as high as they can be at alltimes. part higher and as high as they can be at all times. part of the strategy, part of— all times. part of the strategy, part of what i will be looking at, is reviewing how we set those standards, and looking very closely at work _ standards, and looking very closely at work already under way in many forces _ at work already under way in many forces at _ at work already under way in many forces at establishing networks so that officers and staff can call out bad behaviour, can call out anything
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that links _ bad behaviour, can call out anything that links to — bad behaviour, can call out anything that links to misogyny, links to discriminatory behaviour. that is already— discriminatory behaviour. that is already very much under way. with me is our political correspondent, ione wells. this is clearly a very difficult area. the government has talked about reform, and the health secretary has been talked about what my need to be done.— my need to be done. that's right, there is certainly _ my need to be done. that's right, there is certainly huge _ my need to be done. that's right, there is certainly huge public- my need to be done. that's right, there is certainly huge public and| there is certainly huge public and political— there is certainly huge public and political pressure growing on the metropolitan police in particular, particularly around this question about— particularly around this question about whether they could do more to prevent _ about whether they could do more to prevent a _ about whether they could do more to prevent a serving police officer from _ prevent a serving police officer from murdering sarah everard, not least _ from murdering sarah everard, not least because it has now emerged that he _ least because it has now emerged that he has been linked to two previous— that he has been linked to two previous cases or allegations of indecent — previous cases or allegations of indecent exposure, but also allegations of exchanging misogynistic whatsapp messages with police officers as well. those questions very much facing the metropolitan police. earlier, the former— metropolitan police. earlier, the former home secretary did say that the government and the police to look
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the government and the police to took at _ the government and the police to look at reforms about what could be done to _ look at reforms about what could be done to stop something like this happening again. the metropolitan police have said about the reforms they will be looking at is absolutely right, we also need to look at what more government can do to build confidence. this is obviously an appalling, shocking case, and we must make sure that at least something that comes out of this is that we can give more confidence to more women about their own safety. we've heard they are, obviously the health _ we've heard they are, obviously the health secretary calling for some kind of— health secretary calling for some kind of reform into what has happened. but there are some on the opposition— happened. but there are some on the opposition in particular calling for something a bit more specific. we've had people _ something a bit more specific. we've had people like labour mp and chair of the _ had people like labour mp and chair of the home affairs committee yvette cooper _ of the home affairs committee yvette cooper saying that metropolitan potice _ cooper saying that metropolitan police issuing apologies is not enough. — police issuing apologies is not enough, and they have been calling for a specific enquiry, notjust into— for a specific enquiry, notjust into what— for a specific enquiry, notjust into what happened in this particular case, but into the wider culture _ particular case, but into the wider culture within the police force as wett~ _
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culture within the police force as well. ~ ., , ., , ., culture within the police force as well. ~ ., , ., ., culture within the police force as well. ., , ., ., ., ., well. we had 25 years or more ago the enquiry — well. we had 25 years or more ago the enquiry into — well. we had 25 years or more ago the enquiry into the _ well. we had 25 years or more ago the enquiry into the killing - well. we had 25 years or more ago the enquiry into the killing of- the enquiry into the killing of stephen lawrence, and that led to a finding of institutional racism. is there a concern politically that we could be looking at a case of institutional misogyny that has become built into the dna of parts of the police service? that become built into the dna of parts of the police service?— of the police service? that is an allegation _ of the police service? that is an allegation that _ of the police service? that is an allegation that has _ of the police service? that is an allegation that has been - of the police service? that is an allegation that has been put - of the police service? that is an - allegation that has been put forward try people _ allegation that has been put forward by people across the political spectrum. even the police minister has said _ spectrum. even the police minister has said that the police will have to work— has said that the police will have to work harder to regain trust in the police force. this is trust _ trust in the police force. this is trust not — trust in the police force. this is trust not only in the fact that if a police _ trust not only in the fact that if a police officer stops an individual, like they— police officer stops an individual, like they did with sarah everard, that that — like they did with sarah everard, that that police officer will not do somebody harm. it's trust that police — somebody harm. it's trust that police will— somebody harm. it's trust that police will root out any misconduct within _ police will root out any misconduct
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within its _ police will root out any misconduct within its own voice, as you mention _ within its own voice, as you mention. given what we have seen and what has _ mention. given what we have seen and what has emerged about his alleged whatsapp messages as well. it also trust that— whatsapp messages as well. it also trust that nothing like this will happen— trust that nothing like this will happen again, and that any vetting that is— happen again, and that any vetting that is done bits out any problematic behaviour as was the case with— problematic behaviour as was the case with this individual. conservative party conference begins tomorrow. it's a big topic area for if you start to go down the route of legislation. if you start to go down the route of leaislation. ., �* , if you start to go down the route of legislation-— legislation. that's right, and we have had certain _ legislation. that's right, and we have had certain senior- legislation. that's right, and we have had certain senior figures, | have had certain senior figures, like boh— have had certain senior figures, like bob neill, chair of the justice committee, saying that one action that could — committee, saying that one action that could be taken by the government is to make misogyny a hate crime — government is to make misogyny a hate crime to try to find another way that — hate crime to try to find another way that people who show some signs of misogynistic behaviour, sexism, are held _ of misogynistic behaviour, sexism, are held to— of misogynistic behaviour, sexism, are held to account.— are held to account. treated the same way _ are held to account. treated the same way you — are held to account. treated the same way you would _ are held to account. treated the same way you would treat - are held to account. treated the same way you would treat a - are held to account. treated the i same way you would treat a racist comment or homophobic comment. that is somethin: comment or homophobic comment. that is something that has been echoed by the mayor— is something that has been echoed by the mayor of london, saying that if ntisolgyny— the mayor of london, saying that if misogyny was a hate crime some of these _ misogyny was a hate crime some of these incidents would be better recorded, potentially help to identify— recorded, potentially help to identify offenders in the future as well _ identify offenders in the future as well that — identify offenders in the future as well. that is something that may come _ well. that is something that may come up —
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well. that is something that may come up again at party conference. it come up again at party conference. it certainly — come up again at party conference. it certainly that's going to be something that comes up, particularly after sajid javid said, to build — particularly after sajid javid said, to build on the strategy that was launched — to build on the strategy that was launched earlier this summer. thank ou ve launched earlier this summer. thank you very much- _ the army will begin delivering fuel to forecourts from monday, to try to ease the pressure at petrol stations. ministers are also allowing up to 300 of the 5,000 hgv drivers being recruited from abroad to come to the uk immediately. the government says the rest will arrive later this month, as our political correspondent peter saull reports. we started to see scenes like this in parts of the uk last weekend. frustrated drivers desperately trying to fill up. and now the government is calling in the military. some service personnel will be out providing support today, and from monday soldiers will be driving petrol tankers themselves. so why has it taken so long? first of all, you're asking drivers
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to take tank is full of highly flammable liquid into built—up areas onto forecourts where you and i fill up onto forecourts where you and i fill up our cars. it has to be the case that they get the appropriate training to do so. i think we would all expect that to be the right thing. at the same time, we have to work with industry so that we know where we are sending them. we cannot just send them to random garages. it has to be properly deployed. as well as support from the armed forces, more drivers will be allowed into the uk from overseas. a new scheme will enable up to 300 tanker drivers to come and work here immediately. haulage firms will find potential recruits and apply to the government for licences. up to 4,700 lorry drivers specialising in food delivery. to arrive from the end of this month. this temporary visa scheme has been extended until the end of february. and 5,500 poultry workers will be granted the right to work here, too, until the end of the year.
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ministers hope these measures, along with efforts to recruit more british staff, will address some of the problems in the supply chain — but there could still be a tough winter ahead. peter saull, bbc news. brian madderson is chairman of the petrol retailers association. brian, good morning to you. thank you for being with us. let me start with the impact you hope that the use of these military drivers will make. what difference and how quickly? make. what difference and how cuickl ? ~ . , make. what difference and how cuickl ? ~ ., , . quickly? well, we are seeing much the same as _ quickly? well, we are seeing much the same as yesterday. _ quickly? well, we are seeing much the same as yesterday. an - quickly? well, we are seeing much i the same as yesterday. an improving situation from the midlands through the north and into scotland. but in fact a worsening situation in london, the south—east and parts of east england. so what we have been asking government, and i've had a long conversation with grant shapps this morning, it's very good the government are talking to industry about the problems. what i've asked him is that the prioritisation for
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deliveries must now go to london and the south—east and to the independent forecourts that make up 65% of all forecourts across the uk. if your local filling station doesn't have a fuel and then you travel further and find yet more filling stations without fuel, then consumer confidence is going to remain at a low ebb. go local first? absolutely, to the local filling stations, the transient filling stations, the transient filling stations, that people pass and see. and they can tell whether it is dry or not. if they are starting to get fuel in, starting to work normally, then consumer confidence will return quite quickly. share then consumer confidence will return quite quickly-— quite quickly. are you clear by the government _ quite quickly. are you clear by the government didn't _ quite quickly. are you clear by the government didn't begin - quite quickly. are you clear by the government didn't begin this - government didn't begin this training of military drivers earlier, because there was a long period where they were saying, then they acknowledge that they might put them on standby, then they did put
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them on standby, then they did put them on standby, then they did put them on standby. meanwhile, days have been going past. presumably, had they done that, the deliveries could have started sooner. 0r had they done that, the deliveries could have started sooner. or if they found they were necessary, they could havejust they found they were necessary, they could have just stood them down? the could have 'ust stood them down? the driver could have just stood them down? tie: driver training has could have just stood them down? tie driver training has been could have just stood them down? ti9 driver training has been taking place over some years previously, and it's reallyjust making sure that the vehicles are roadworthy for busy motorways, city centres, that the drivers are absolutely prepared for this. so, the drivers are absolutely prepared forthis. so, really, short contingency work needed to make sure, as the secretary of state has said, you are driving 42,000 litres of highly inflammable fuel in some of highly inflammable fuel in some of the most crowded road conditions possible, particularly in london and the south—east, so they've got to be absolutely up to the game, and i'm sure when they come out this weekend they will be fit for purpose. the other bad news _ they will be fit for purpose. the other bad news that drivers may be about to face is an increase in the
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cost of fuel at the pumps.- about to face is an increase in the cost of fuel at the pumps. yes, that is i'm cost of fuel at the pumps. yes, that is m afraid — cost of fuel at the pumps. yes, that is i'm afraid the _ cost of fuel at the pumps. yes, that is i'm afraid the next _ cost of fuel at the pumps. yes, that is i'm afraid the next shock. - cost of fuel at the pumps. yes, that is i'm afraid the next shock. this . is i'm afraid the next shock. this week, we have seen wholesale prices go week, we have seen wholesale prices 9° up week, we have seen wholesale prices go up by as much 3p a litre. next week, when the new stock does start arriving at the fuel stations, the retailers have got no alternative but to put the prices up. we can see pump price creep by up to 3p a litre next week. this is definitely not profiteering. this is purely the result of global factors. this year, the price of crude oil has gone up by over 50%. recently, we have seen a weakening of the pound against sterling. those two global factors are affecting wholesale prices, which are going to be a bit of a shock, particularly when you think thatjust i2 shock, particularly when you think thatjust 12 months ago you could buy unleaded fuel for 115, diesel
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416, 25 p per litre cheaper. this is a nasty shock. the 416, 25 p per litre cheaper. this is a nasty shock-— a nasty shock. the cheaper pound means that _ a nasty shock. the cheaper pound means that you _ a nasty shock. the cheaper pound means that you cannot _ a nasty shock. the cheaper pound means that you cannot get - a nasty shock. the cheaper pound means that you cannot get so - a nasty shock. the cheaper pound i means that you cannot get so much for it abroad when you are buying that crude. thank you very much. there could be a breakthrough in the way we treat covid—19. interim trials suggest a new experimental drug could cut the risk of hospitalisation, or death, by about half. if authorised by regulators, the treatment will be the first oral, antiviral medication for covid—19. mark lobel reports. trial suggest it could cut hospitalisations or deaths by half. 0bviously hospitalisations or deaths by half. obviously very good news. the company, when they briefed us last night, had mentioned that they would
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be submitting their data to the fda imminently. the be submitting their data to the fda imminentl . ., ., be submitting their data to the fda imminentl . :, ., ., be submitting their data to the fda imminentl . :, :, ., , , , imminently. the data are impressive. pills were given _ imminently. the data are impressive. pills were given to _ imminently. the data are impressive. pills were given to 775 _ pills were given to 775 unvaccinated, medically at risk volunteers within five days of them showing coronaviruses symptoms. the data from a phase three trial showed 7.3% of patients on the drug were hospitalised compared to 14.1% of those who didn't take the tablets. eight patients who were given a placebo or dummy pill later died of covid—19, but there were no deaths in the group taking the pill. the trial was stopped early because the pill was so successful. but data still needs to be peer reviewed. so how does it work? as corona virus replicates itself inside your body, these antiviral pills trick get into using the drug, which then inserts errors into the virus's genetic code, blocking the virus from replicating. it code, blocking the virus from
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replicating-— code, blocking the virus from re-ulicatin. , , ., replicating. it corrupts the genome ofthe replicating. it corrupts the genome of the virus — replicating. it corrupts the genome of the virus so _ replicating. it corrupts the genome of the virus so it _ replicating. it corrupts the genome of the virus so it can't _ replicating. it corrupts the genome of the virus so it can't replicate, i of the virus so it can't replicate, and that— of the virus so it can't replicate, and that is— of the virus so it can't replicate, and that is the beauty. and then, even _ and that is the beauty. and then, even if— and that is the beauty. and then, even if the — and that is the beauty. and then, even if the virus mutates, it could be still— even if the virus mutates, it could be still useful. people are now talking — be still useful. people are now talking about this, that if we have another— talking about this, that if we have another coronavirus pandemic in the future, _ another coronavirus pandemic in the future, this— another coronavirus pandemic in the future, this drug will still work for that— future, this drug will still work for that coronavirus. because it is agnostic— for that coronavirus. because it is agnostic to — for that coronavirus. because it is agnostic to variance.— agnostic to variance. there are existin: agnostic to variance. there are existing clinic _ agnostic to variance. there are existing clinic -based - agnostic to variance. there are i existing clinic -based intravenous existing clinic —based intravenous treatments which are even more effective, but this appears to be the first pill to treat covid—19, and as long as it is taken early on could offer an alternative at roughly a third of the price, at $700 per treatment. accessibility is ei . ht $700 per treatment. accessibility is eight problem- _ $700 per treatment. accessibility is eight problem. for _ $700 per treatment. accessibility is eight problem. for this _ $700 per treatment. accessibility is eight problem. for this one, - $700 per treatment. accessibility is eight problem. for this one, it - $700 per treatment. accessibility is eight problem. for this one, it is . $700 per treatment. accessibility is eight problem. for this one, it is a i eight problem. for this one, it is a simple pill, so obviously a lot easier to administer and a lot easier to administer and a lot easier to administer as an outpatient as well.- outpatient as well. the company ho es 10 outpatient as well. the company hopes 10 million _ outpatient as well. the company hopes 10 million courses - outpatient as well. the company hopes 10 million courses of- outpatient as well. the company hopes 10 million courses of the i hopes 10 million courses of the treatment will be available by the end of the year. close to 2 million,
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and to license the club to various india —based generic drug makers. for countries that don't have the vaccine available, this could be another stopgap. the vaccine available, this could be another stopgap.— vaccine available, this could be another stopgap. the us authorities sa the another stopgap. the us authorities say the drug — another stopgap. the us authorities say the drug is _ another stopgap. the us authorities say the drug is no _ another stopgap. the us authorities say the drug is no substitute - another stopgap. the us authorities say the drug is no substitute for - say the drug is no substitute for preventative vaccines, but this is an exciting development, as the us drug company seeks emergency approval within weeks. as others companies also work on similar treatments. the number of deaths caused by covid—19 in the united states has now exceeded 700,000, according tojohns hopkins university in maryland. it's the highest number for any country in the world, outstripping other badly affected nations. the us is facing a further resurgence in cases due to the prominence of the delta variant.
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the role that has gone badly wrong, according to two charities. kidney care uk and blood cancer uk say many people are still struggling to access their third jab a month after it was recommended by the the vaccine experts, thejcvi. nhs england say eligible patients should be offered the injection by the end of next week. steve harrison is among those still waiting. ijust think it has been pretty terrible, the communication right from the very beginning. it's made a lot of patients quite anxious and angry, because without this we are kind of almost shielding again. vaccine passports came into effect for the first time in scotland last night. people need proof of vaccination to gain entry to nightclubs or large events. the scheme will be mandatory on the 18th of october. ajudge rejected a challenge to the roll—out by
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the nightclub industry. the launch of the app has been hit by technical problems. we've ultimately made a decision as a society to respect people who don't want to get vaccinated. i think that's why it's a little bit disappointing, even though i myself am double vaccinated, that there isn't an option for people who don't want to get vaccinated. we're not sort of respecting their opinions by being able to submit a negative lateral flow and then still be able to go into a nightclub. we're saying, effectively, "don't come". the queen is due to address msps at holyrood in the next hour to mark the opening of the sixth session of the scottish parliament. the ceremony would normally take place injuly, but was postponed because of coronavirus. this will be the snp's fourth consecutive term in government, following their victory in may. georgians are heading to the polls in local elections, where the atmosphere has been described as "highly polarised" with reports of violence and intimidation of oppostion candidates. the vote has been overshadowed by friday's arrest of the country's
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former leader, mikheil saakashvili, just a few hours after he returned from years in exile. he posted this video on social media, calling on voters to oppose the governing party. he was tried and convicted in absentia of abusing his office during his two terms as president, and faces six years injail in georgia. it's an important day in the lead up to the environmental summit cop26, where so many hopes for a proper solution to combatting climate change rest. climate ministers from across the globe are meeting in milan to hold talks before the crucial meeting in november. it is the meeting to clear the decks before the world leaders, some are hundred of them have said they will come to glasgow in the first two weeks of november. before they get there, their environment ministers and their chief negotiators have a lot of work to do to essentially tie up lot of work to do to essentially tie up a lot of loose ends that were carried over from up a lot of loose ends that were carried overfrom previous meetings. they don't want their bosses coming to glasgow and having to deal with
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the nitty—gritty of some very technical issues, such as carbon markets, the article six process. they don't want their bosses to go near those things. they want them to deal with the bigger picture of how do we take the bigger steps to address climate change. part of this meeting is to type those loose ends. there are some optimistic noises being made. nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. but the mood generally here is positive. 50 ministers or so here, and while there are some big divisions on some key issues, they seem to be making some progress on at least some small ones. the islands prime minister said china had damaged regional peace. taiwan says it scrambled planes to one of chinese military airport that entered the zone into waves on friday. china's national day. it has
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been stepping up pressure on the island to accept china's sovereignty. the volcano that's been erupting for the past 11 days on the spanish island of la palma is spewing out two new streams of lava, threatening further destruction. many homes and crops have been destroyed and thousands of people have been forced to evacuate since the eruption first began last month. dan johnson reports. this volcano is still really active, and there is fresh lava flowing from new vents. that means other homes and villages are under risk. we saw people today making the decision that it's time for them to leave, to get to somewhere safe. because they have lived with this for over 11 days now, and some people arejust lived with this for over 11 days now, and some people are just fed up. they have had enough and they want to get to a safe place. more than 1000 properties have been destroyed, and this is having a really big impact, notjust on daily
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life here but people's livelihoods. i was talking to a fisherman in the harbour who cannot go out to sea because there is such a big exclusion zone around the area where the lover is pouring off the land, into the water and setting hard. it is actually creating new land. la palma is growing. it is such a destructive process and refreshment that he may not have a future here in that industry. he may leave and potentially never return. even before it has ended, the impact of this disruption is wide ranging and long lasting. what nobody knows is just how long it is going to go on. for now, the volcano keeps erupting, the lover keeps flowing, but it's unpredictable. where is it going to go and how much more damage will it do? danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. europe's first mission to mercury is completing its first fly by. the bepi colombo will fly by the planet at high speeds taking
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pictures and sending them back to earth. it's moving too fast to go into orbit but will begin more detailed observations in four years' time. but there are some spectacular images there to end. you are watching bbc news. a woman from selby, north yorkshire is getting ready to run the 26.2 mile london marathon tomorrow on her 70th birthday. anne lewis, who is a member of the selby swans triathlon club, is taking on the challenge with her sons owen and matthew and raising money for a cause close to their hearts. she joins us now from her train to london. are you having a good journey? it is a very crowded train. i think everyone is going to london this weekend. i’m everyone is going to london this weekend. �* :, everyone is going to london this weekend. �* ., , :, :, everyone is going to london this weekend. �* ., :, ., , ., weekend. i'm glad you got a seat, because tomorrow _ weekend. i'm glad you got a seat, because tomorrow it's _ weekend. i'm glad you got a seat, because tomorrow it's going - weekend. i'm glad you got a seat, because tomorrow it's going to . weekend. i'm glad you got a seat, because tomorrow it's going to be j because tomorrow it's going to be pounding away on the streets. how do you feel about the prospect? i just you feel about the prospect? i 'ust wanted to come. i you feel about the prospect? i 'ust wanted to come. i i you feel about the prospect? i 'ust wanted to come. i am i you feel about the prospect? i 'ust wanted to come. i am so i
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you feel about the prospect? limit wanted to come. i am so excited. i have been thinking about it since january and training since january. bring it on, tomorrow, please. it’s bring it on, tomorrow, please. it's not how many people would imagine celebrating their 70th birthday? it's the perfect way to celebrate your birthday. it has been a great focus during lockdown and ijust really excited. i've got my t—shirt with my birthday badges on and my name, so i've got lots of birthday wishes. what can be better? anyone who is watching _ wishes. what can be better? anyone who is watching who _ wishes. what can be better? anyone who is watching who sees _ wishes. what can be better? anyone who is watching who sees and - wishes. what can be better? anyone who is watching who sees and as - wishes. what can be better? anyone who is watching who sees and as he | who is watching who sees and as he she pounce by, we got a picture of you there with your sons, 0wen she pounce by, we got a picture of you there with your sons, owen and matthew. and again, you've been doing quite a lot of runs, but i saw you did a marathon back in the mid—90s? you did a marathon back in the mid-90s?— you did a marathon back in the mid-90s? :, �*, . �*, ~ mid-90s? that's correct. it's 26 ears mid-90s? that's correct. it's 26 years ago _ mid-90s? that's correct. it's 26 years ago since _ mid-90s? that's correct. it's 26 years ago since my _ mid-90s? that's correct. it's 26 years ago since my last - mid-90s? that's correct. it's 26 l years ago since my last marathon.
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0nly years ago since my last marathon. only 24 miles, but 4000 metre climb. i kind of think the views were probably quite spectacular on that at least. :, , :, , , ., at least. fabulous, yet. i did that twice. at least. fabulous, yet. i did that twice- since _ at least. fabulous, yet. i did that twice. since then, _ at least. fabulous, yet. i did that twice. since then, i've _ at least. fabulous, yet. i did that. twice. since then, i've concentrated on the of marathons and ten case. this is an opportunity for me. is this is an opportunity for me. is the plan for you to run with your sons as your wingman, as it were? no, no, no. they will leave me way behind. but that's fine. it is no, no, no. they will leave me way behind. but that's fine.— behind. but that's fine. it is your birthda . behind. but that's fine. it is your birthday. what — behind. but that's fine. it is your birthday. what is _ behind. but that's fine. it is your birthday. what is your— behind. but that's fine. it is your birthday. what is your birthday i behind. but that's fine. it is your i birthday. what is your birthday wish for tomorrow? birthday. what is your birthday wish fortomorrow? i birthday. what is your birthday wish for tomorrow?— for tomorrow? i would really like to finish it, which — for tomorrow? i would really like to finish it, which i'm _ for tomorrow? i would really like to finish it, which i'm optimistic - finish it, which i'm optimistic about. numbertwo, to finish it, which i'm optimistic about. number two, to come in about 5.5 hours. :. . :. about. number two, to come in about 5.5 hours. :, , ., , , about. number two, to come in about 5.5 hours. :, , :, , , 5.5 hours. that is a pretty good time. 5.5 hours. that is a pretty good time- have _ 5.5 hours. that is a pretty good time. have you _ 5.5 hours. that is a pretty good time. have you arranged - 5.5 hours. that is a pretty good time. have you arranged for . time. have you arranged for something fizzy to be waiting for you at the end? i
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something fizzy to be waiting for you at the end?— something fizzy to be waiting for you at the end? i hope so. i hadn't specifically — you at the end? i hope so. i hadn't specifically requested _ you at the end? i hope so. i hadn't specifically requested it. _ you at the end? i hope so. i hadn't specifically requested it. but - specifically requested it. but perhaps if they are watching they will get the hint. i perhaps if they are watching they will get the hint.— perhaps if they are watching they will get the hint. i hope the family are listening- _ will get the hint. i hope the family are listening. that _ will get the hint. i hope the family are listening. that is _ will get the hint. i hope the family are listening. that is a _ will get the hint. i hope the family are listening. that is a hint - will get the hint. i hope the family are listening. that is a hint from i are listening. that is a hint from us. we expect something fizzy at the end for an. she deserves it. what a great way to celebrate your birthday, and from all of us, many happy returns. i hope the rest of the journey goes without incident. have a nice, restful night tonight and we will be looking out for you tomorrow. . . and we will be looking out for you tomorrow. , , :, . ,, and we will be looking out for you tomorrow. , , :, ., ,, tomorrow. the best of luck. thank ou so tomorrow. the best of luck. thank you so much- _ tomorrow. the best of luck. thank you so much. aboard _ tomorrow. the best of luck. thank you so much. aboard the - tomorrow. the best of luck. thank you so much. aboard the train - tomorrow. the best of luck. thankl you so much. aboard the train from yorkshire to — you so much. aboard the train from yorkshire to london. _ you so much. aboard the train from yorkshire to london. let's - you so much. aboard the train from yorkshire to london. let's see - you so much. aboard the train from j yorkshire to london. let's see what the weather is going to be holding for her when she gets here. this morning on the coast of north—east england, icy should stay dry until later this afternoon. but
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icy is a different story elsewhere. a soggy walk on the beach in devon. heavy rain across many parts of the country through the day. here is where the bulk of the rain is. the worst is clear in northern ireland but spreading into southern scotland, pushing across a good part of england and wales, too. heaviest across southern counties, and icy is here where we see the strongest of the winds. around there, gusts of wind, up to 60 mph. finishing the day with some brightness in the west. a dry and bright day in northern scotland. wherever you are, icy will feel cool compare to what you are used to. 10—15 c. this evening and overnight, rain spreads northwards. the strongest of the winds in northern scotland. sunday, a fresh start. sunday itself will be a fresh start. sunday itself will be a day of sunshine and showers. showers most frequent in the west. potentially damaging winds in shetland. goodbye for now.

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