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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 1, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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you're watching bbc news. today at 5pm: following the murder of sarah everard, the met police gives new guidance about plain clothes officers, and what people can do if stopped by one. the prime minister says changes must be made. there is one area where i think the issue of trust needs to be addressed square on — and it's in the way we handle crimes against women and girls. more than 15 million households face higher energy bills from today, as the biggest increase in the price cap so far comes into effect. travel in and out of australia will resume in november — but only for people who are fully vaccinated. pig farmers are warning that a shortage of workers means
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they could have to carry out a mass cull of animals. you ever flown one of these things before? ., the new bond film made £5 million in uk and irish cinemas on its first day — but was it worth the wait? we'll get mark kermode's verdict in the film review. hello, good evening, welcome to bbc news, i'mjane hill. the metropolitan police has been laying out measures to try to reassure the public, in the wake of the murder of sarah everard by a serving officer. the force says it will no longer deploy plain clothes officers on their own,
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and has urged anyone stopped by one to ask to check their credentials. but critics say the onus should not be on women to change their actions. it's also emerged that wayne couzens, who was handed a whole—life term yesterday for kidnapping and murdering sarah everard, was believed to be in a whatsapp group with other officers, who are now being investigated after allegedly sharing discriminatory messages. this report from megan patterson. officers with a duty to serve and an expectation to protect. the actions of one man questioning those principles and the trust the public can place in met police. this man has brought shame on the met. speaking frankly, as an organisation, we have been rocked. wayne couzens, seen here showing his warrant card, then used his handcuffs in the grotesquely executed series of offences which led
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to sarah everard's murder. questions too about police culture and attitudes of officers. in a letter to mps, the met admits part of couzens�* vetting may not have been undertaken correctly. they won't be able to rebuild trust unless they are open about the things that have gone wrong. and that means we need an independent inquiry into this case, into why allegations were not followed up, into how such a dangerous man could be a police officer for such a long time. and into the wider culture. now, in new safety advice, the met is urging anyone who believes an officer represents a threat to them to shout out to passers—by, wave down a bus, or call the 999 control room. but the practicalities of that advice have caused concern. it puts the onus on women to keep themselves safe again. it's not about the women, it's about the men killing us, especially if those men are the people who are paid and appointed to keep us safe. this is on the met to find those men and get them out of the met,
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not for us to have to check and double—check if a police officer is an officer. every one of us would have got in the car, there is nothing sarah could have done, this is not on her, this is 100% on wayne couzens. what happened to sarah everard felt around the country. i've lost a bit of trust now. i think when people are in charge you expect they are doing the job properly and trying to keep you safe, i don't think you would ever challenge that. i would have to step it up and say, can you provide more _ thanjust your police id? the force says it will publish a strategy for tackling violence against women and girls, 650 new officers will be deployed in areas where people feel unsafe, indecent exposure allegations will be treated more seriously. the thousands and thousands of police officers who are out there apprehending criminals and seeking to keep us all safe everyday need to be able to go about their business but i do recognise the implications of this particular incident and the blow it has struck towards trust.
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at the heart of this debate about improvements to policing, a woman who simply was trying to walk home. the force has faced numerous challenges in the met�*s 200—year history. restoring confidence in its officers among the biggest yet. megan patterson, bbc news. the prime minister urges the public to trust the police, but he acknowledges the government needs to get to the bottom of how a serving officer could kidnapped, rape and murder sarah everard. in his first interview since the sentencing of wayne couzens, borisjohnson said change was needed. . i wayne couzens, boris johnson said change was needed. ._ change was needed. . i think there'll be — change was needed. . i think there'll be hundreds - change was needed. . i think there'll be hundreds of- change was needed. . i think there'll be hundreds of of. change was needed. . i think. there'll be hundreds of of police officers, let alone myself, up and down the country who will be absolutely heartsick by what has happened at the appalling murder of sarah everard by a police officer.
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and what i would really urge the public — i want to make it really clear that i do believe in the police. i do believe that we can trust the police, and i think the police do a wonderfuljob. but there is a problem, and there is a problem in the way we handle rape, domestic violence, sexual violence, and the way we handle the complaints of women and girls — and it's overwhelmingly women and girls. and although the incidence of some of these serious crimes is not actually going up in the way you might think, we are having success in getting many crime times done. the problem is we have too few prosecutions for rape and too few successful convictions. so yesterday, i got together the crime and justice task force again, and what we are trying to do is compress that timetable
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between a woman's complaint about what's happened and any action, whether it's a court proceeding or a conviction, or whatever. whether it's a court proceeding or a conviction, orwhatever. because the time from report to referral, to referral to the court proceedings, from the court proceedings to the conclusion — all three of those segments, it's far too long, and what you are seeing is the whole system snarled up with evidential problems, with data issues, mobile phones and dashed mobile phone disclosures, all that stuff. and it is a nightmare for the women concerned. we have to fix it. we must also address the issues going on within the police force, and you will have seen this stuff about the officers on a whatsapp group will stop we've got to come down very hard on them. but to answer your fundamental question, should we believe in the police, should we trust in the police? yes, i do, and that's what. ..
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trust in the police? yes, i do, and that's what... to trust in the police? yes, i do, and that's what. . .— that's what... to have trust in the metmpolitan _ that's what... to have trust in the metropolitan police _ that's what... to have trust in the metropolitan police given - that's what... to have trust in the metropolitan police given their. metropolitan police given their failings. ? metropolitan police given their failints. ? . metropolitan police given their failints. ? , ., �* metropolitan police given their failints. ? , ., ~ .. failings. ? yes, i do. and i think that needs— failings. ? yes, i do. and i think that needs to _ failings. ? yes, i do. and i think that needs to be _ failings. ? yes, i do. and i think that needs to be looked - failings. ? yes, i do. and i think that needs to be looked into, i failings. ? yes, i do. and i think. that needs to be looked into, and i think that priti patel is absolutely right that we must get to the bottom of what on earth happened. we make sure nothing like that happens again. but what we are doing is now notjust putting a lot more money into a safer streets and cctv, streetlights, but recruiting more female police officers. and i think that can make the most fundamental change of all. last year, i'm proud to say we had numbers of 20,000 more recruits, 37% were female and it's even higher this year, above 40% we hope. and that will make a lasting difference to the culture of the police force. so are there things we need to do? yes, there are. across a huge range of issues, from the way we handle these complaints to the
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way we speed up the whole criminal justice process. but should we be believing in policing? absolutely. that's the prime minister with his first interview since the sentencing of wayne couzens for the murder of sarah everard, and some of his thoughts on what needs to be done in terms of police and women. in a few minutes, i'll be speaking to a former superintendent from the met, we can ask his thoughts on what the prime minister is saying. the shadow home secretary, nick thomas simmons, says he wants a full government inquiry into the murder of sarah everard. we inquiry into the murder of sarah everard. ~ . inquiry into the murder of sarah everard. ~ , ., ., everard. we must have action. the government _ everard. we must have action. the government first _ everard. we must have action. the government first of _ everard. we must have action. the government first of all _ everard. we must have action. the government first of all needs - everard. we must have action. the government first of all needs to . government first of all needs to appoint a — government first of all needs to appoint a full independent inquiry to look_ appoint a full independent inquiry to look at— appoint a full independent inquiry to look at how on earth it was that the perpetrator, iwon't name him, the perpetrator, iwon't name him, the perpetrator, iwon't name him, the perpetrator of this heinous crime — the perpetrator of this heinous crime slipped the net it seems not 'ust crime slipped the net it seems not
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just once but on a number of occasions, _ just once but on a number of occasions, to look at the whole structure of vetting and misconduct hearings _ structure of vetting and misconduct hearings right across our police, and indeed _ hearings right across our police, and indeed to look at the wider culture — and indeed to look at the wider culture and to look at how violence against _ culture and to look at how violence against women and girls is treated. and secondly, the government needs to come _ and secondly, the government needs to come forward with legislation, and i've — to come forward with legislation, and i've been arguing that for months — and i've been arguing that for months to protect women and girls on our streets _ months to protect women and girls on our streets. if the government bring that forward on the next day the parliament sits, then they will sunport— parliament sits, then they will support it. . parliament sits, then they will sunport it- -_ support it. . that's the view of labour. damon _ support it. . that's the view of labour. damon graham, - support it. . that's the view of. labour. damon graham, atticus support it. . that's the view of - labour. damon graham, atticus joins labour. damon graham, atticusjoins us and has been listening to the prime minister has to say. what was your reading of the pressure that's been felt politically and in relation to this dreadful case? i relation to this dreadful case? i think it certainly is, and what we are seeing is a response to that, to the revelations that have come out in the sentencing about the sarah
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everard murder, about the police officer responsible, is a chorus from across the political spectrum about the fact that there needs to be a deep—seated response to this. so you heard the prime minister. there talking about the need to speed up cases, to have a higher proportion of convictions. the interesting thing there is that this is not something new, it's not something that has been identified just now, but sometime ago, something that has been called upon before. we saw earlier this year in june, robert buckland, apologising for the low levels of rate convictions. if you look back at figures from a year ago, but the number of rape cases recorded by police as well over 50,000, and the number of convictions atjust around 2,000. so he was apologising back
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then, some of the things the prime minister pointed to have been identified before as issues, the fact that it takes a while to go through the system, that cases are dropped through the system. the question is, what will they do about that? one of the arguments has always been that this is notjust about funding, but lawyers in the system say it's underfunded, and more broadly the question of the culture, and you heard the calls they are for coming from labour and from others for an inquiry, the liberal democrats looking into a investigation about bringing about a change in culture. all those things are adding to the pressure on both politicians and the police to do something more deep—seated. politicians and the police to do something more deep-seated. damien, thank ou. let's get more now from our correspondent helena wilkinson, who is here.
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in terms of the specifics, the prime minister reference to the whatsapp group as well. just your mind and explained to us because there is an investigation going on there? yes. investigation going on there? yes, the olice investigation going on there? yes, the police watchdog _ investigation going on there? use: the police watchdog are investigating a group of police officers. the allegation is they shared discriminatory messages on a whatsapp group, the messages were found during the investigation into the murder of sarah everard. it's believe the group included wayne couzens, but we don't believe he will be investigated. it doesn't feel, or it's understood that it would not further the interests of justice in the circumstances given he's serving a life service nap — life sentence now. but they are being investigatorfor life sentence now. but they are being investigator for gross misconduct, there are five serving officers under investigation for disturbing these messages, and one former metropolitan police officer that these messages — and i think
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it's clear what we've heard over the past 2a hours, they will add to the mistrust and could undermine the trust that the public have been the police. trust that the public have been the olice. . ., trust that the public have been the olice. , ., ., . ., ~ ., police. yes, and how much do we know about specifics — police. yes, and how much do we know about specifics of _ police. yes, and how much do we know about specifics of any _ police. yes, and how much do we know about specifics of any reforms - about specifics of any reforms that the mat is looking to bring? it's mentioned a couple things today, like plainclothes police officers patrolling streets in pairs — are we expecting more specifics like that? we haven't heard anything else, but as we heard from the metropolitan police. yesterday, they said they have an urgent police democratic duty to do more to protect women and girls. and we have heard over the past 2a hours the concerns from people about the trust in the metropolitan police, of course, and we heard from the judge yesterday in his sentencing remarks, he specifically said to wayne couzens when he was sentencing him, that he had "eroded public confidence in police nurses in england and wales,"
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and the commissioner yesterday saying that they have questions of the integrity of the officers. so there are two issues here, there's there are two issues here, there's theissue there are two issues here, there's the issue of trust in policing, but also the cultural issue, as damien touched on there, how are they going touched on there, how are they going to change what happens within the metropolitan police itself. ? just to remind you of a couple of the things that they are going to try and bring forward, they will try to publish a new strategy to target violence against women and girls, deploying 650 officers into areas where women feel particularly vulnerable, and also stepping up assurance patrols. we know that wayne couzens used his status and police equipment when he deceived sarah everard, and that will have an impact on public confidence. but that bit of advice that they gave at the end of this press release at the press release yesterday, it's astonishing that they said if you
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are approached by a plainclothes officer who or someone claiming to be a plainclothes officer, you have the right to ask very searching questions. if you don't trust them, you can ask them who they are, you can ask them to radio back into the office, you can flag down a bus if you really think you are concerned. and i think that bit has received quite a lot of criticism, of course, but let's not forget that wayne couzens was a serving metropolitan police officer. so even in that circumstance, he was a police officer. there are a lot of issues here, there's also, in terms of public confidence and trust in the police, a big job for the metropolitan police here in terms of tackling this. it's an urgent issue very clearly, but i think we're going to see this taking some time to solve. ., going to see this taking some time to solve. . ., ~ going to see this taking some time to solve. . ., ,, , ., leroy logan is a former superintendent in the metropolitan
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police, and was one of london's top officers until his retirement in 2013. hejoins me now. a very good evening to you. there is a lot of talk about culture, the need to change the culture. how great is the need, in your opinion? what do you see as the immediate changes that need to happen in the metropolitan police? you changes that need to happen in the metropolitan police?— metropolitan police? you cannot leave it to _ metropolitan police? you cannot leave it to the _ metropolitan police? you cannot leave it to the police _ metropolitan police? you cannot leave it to the police to - metropolitan police? you cannot leave it to the police to do - metropolitan police? you cannot leave it to the police to do it - leave it to the police to do it themselves. you need to have political will and independent oversight on how police conduct themselves. i'm not talking about complaints, but how they carry out their duties, and also how the leadership are holding officers to account. because my concern is that the officer concerned, wayne couzens, didn'tjust turn out the officer concerned, wayne couzens, didn't just turn out to the officer concerned, wayne couzens, didn'tjust turn out to be a rapist and a murderer. these
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things build up, and it's all these things build up, and it's all these things that were again kept in—house, there was no proper investigation stop and they seemed to close ranks — this is the play that the met has done for years. we saw that with the death of stephen lawrence and how that incompetent investigation and inquiry. i understand there is a need for inquiry, but there needs to be some drastic changes, and i really believe, and i don't say this lightly, but there needs to be a change from the top. because this has happened under the watch of cressida dick, and i don't think she's in a position to really make changes. the necessary changes in the here and now. qm. changes. the necessary changes in the here and now.— changes. the necessary changes in the here and now. 0k, cressida dick is one issue. — the here and now. 0k, cressida dick is one issue, and _ the here and now. 0k, cressida dick is one issue, and lots _ the here and now. 0k, cressida dick is one issue, and lots of _ the here and now. 0k, cressida dick is one issue, and lots of people - is one issue, and lots of people have called for her resignation, but you are talking about people closing ranks — that is something you are presumably saying you've witnessed
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and experienced during your years in the force,? i and experienced during your years in the force,? , , , ., the force,? i witnessed it before i even joined _ the force,? i witnessed it before i even joined the _ the force,? i witnessed it before i even joined the met _ the force,? i witnessed it before i even joined the met in _ the force,? i witnessed it before i even joined the met in 1983, - the force,? i witnessed it before i | even joined the met in 1983, when the force,? i witnessed it before i - even joined the met in 1983, when my evenjoined the met in 1983, when my father was badly beaten up by officers, and those officers tried to close ranks around him. in the end, he had to sue them for wrongful arrest and excessive force, and we saw that in the steve mcqueen film of my life. i've seen it beforehand and i've seen it throughout my 30 years. even other said yesterday that sarah had to have been very careful how she challenged because it had risk factors on an operational setting, especially if you are calling for help and you don't get any backup. and i had that situation. so we know the culture is very toxic, it actually prevents people from really speaking out because, especially this unwritten issue about if you can't take a joke, you shouldn't ofjoined — that
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means it's open game to be sexist, racist, homophobic because it's all in the name of a joke, we don't mean any harm. but now the culture has gone to an extreme, and you need to have that real constant supervision. that's what i'm concerned about, what were the supervisors doing to prevent this from going to the extreme that he did? what were the checks and balances within the culture? that's why come back to the fact that you need independent oversight. that can be done very quickly leading up into an inquiry, and getting the culture change by changing the top. and ensuring that people see officers for who they are, ie they are uniformed officers, they are not allowed to go around and play clothes. a lot of officers are plain closed when they don't need to be. get back in a uniform and start understand that people
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will hold you to account. and i've been doing that with my youth programme so that they know how to challenge officers. start programme so that they know how to challenge officers.— challenge officers. start and ralph, i'm interested _ challenge officers. start and ralph, i'm interested because _ challenge officers. start and ralph, i'm interested because you're - challenge officers. start and ralph, | i'm interested because you're giving examples of culture problems and people closing rank, as you say, you're giving examples that go back decades, long before cressida dick was in charge of the met, under other measures dashed sorry to interrupt. so as i understand it, you are suggesting a cultural situation that has existed for decades dashed so how do you change that, how do you eradicate that misogyny that we have talked about so much in the last few days is not cultural change it's very hard to achieve in any organisation, so you've mentioned getting rid of the current commissioner, but you say the prom goes back a long way. what a from that should be done to say, we don't want people operating like that within this organisation
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cancelo always said that you need independent oversight. you cancelo always said that you need independent oversight.— cancelo always said that you need independent oversight. you need an independent — independent oversight. you need an independent body _ independent oversight. you need an independent body to _ independent oversight. you need an independent body to hold _ independent oversight. you need an independent body to hold the - independent oversight. you need an independent body to hold the chiefsj independent body to hold the chiefs to account. we started to get that culture change and we started to see officers who are not fit for purpose leaving the organisation. now some officers said you've ruined the job — no, we were holding you to account because you can't leave it to the police to mark their own homework. because it's a culture that is success driven, and you need to have that independent oversight with the political will so that if the chief constables are not doing theirjob, they will be removed. and people start to lose theirjobs or they get put to the courts if they are being unprofessional or criminal. at the moment, there is a situation where officers think they are untouchable because of this hardened culture. and that's why you have bame
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officers not staying, they're leaving the force, they are four times more likely to leave if they are black than their white counterparts. that's the issue and we need to change it, especially as the met is at a crossroads of real change, and drastic times require drastic measures. ._ drastic measures. . leroy logan, thank you — drastic measures. . leroy logan, thank you very — drastic measures. . leroy logan, thank you very much _ drastic measures. . leroy logan, thank you very much for - drastic measures. . leroy logan, thank you very much for your - thank you very much for your assessment. leroy logan, former superintendent at the metropolitan police. more than 15,000,000 more than 15 million households across england, scotland and wales are to face higher energy bills, as the biggest—ever increase in the energy price cap comes into effect today. a typical bill for customers on a standard tariff will rise by about £140 a year, with those on pre—payment metres expected to pay even more. 0ur personal finance correspondent kevin peachey reports. as the temperature dips, so our energy bills rise. the cost of heating and lighting our homes is limited by the price cap,
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but this is the biggest ever increase at a time when many household budgets are being squeezed. a major shock. because we are on a static income, any form of major increase like this, you konw, our energy bill is probably our most significant cost every month in outgoings, and therefore when that happens it will have a tremendous effect. the new cap means they will now pay £1,277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity — that's £139 a year more on their bill than under the previous cap. prepayment—meter customers face a higher typical bill of £1,309 a year — that's an increase of £153 on the previous time. those who use more than the average amount of energy in their homes will face bigger bills. regulators say they understand the financial pressure. totally recognise going into winter
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this is a hard time for a lot of consumers. and you know, if they are struggling to pay their bills they should contact their supplier because there is a range of help out there and the supplier can sort of point them in the direction of what help they can get. those affected are normally encouraged to switch suppliers for a cheaper deal. this time, the massive rise in the cost of wholesale gas in recent weeks has stripped the market of better offers. it's also led to the collapse of nine suppliers. their customers will now pay a more expensive tariff in line with the price cap. surviving firms say they are having to buy wholesale energy at a much higher price than the retail cap allows them to sell it for. it is what it is, we are doing our best to get our customers through it, we're trying to support well—run business through this period, and otherwise, if we need to do anything else, we're talking to government. analysts say companies' extra costs will be reflected when the cap is revised in the spring, at a level likely to be significantly more
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expensive for bill—payers. kevin peachey, bbc news. tomlinson joins tomlinsonjoins us, he is also tomlinson joins us, he is also a labour counsellor. good evening. your thoughts about the energy price cap and whether really there is anything that any customer can do that's beyond tinkering at the edges. ? that's beyond tinkering at the edtes. ? , , . that's beyond tinkering at the edtes.? , , . that's beyond tinkering at the edtes.? i“ edges. ? the energy price cap, as a re orter edges. ? the energy price cap, as a reporter said. _ edges. ? the energy price cap, as a reporter said, is _ edges. ? the energy price cap, as a reporter said, is set _ edges. ? the energy price cap, as a reporter said, is set to _ edges. ? the energy price cap, as a reporter said, is set to go _ edges. ? the energy price cap, as a reporter said, is set to go up. - reporter said, is set to go up. one of the challenges that we will face this autumn in terms of the cost of living is that this is not happening on its own, and inflation is spiking at around 1t%, according to forecasts from the bank of england. at the same time, the furlough scheme has ended as of today, and also the government's decided to reduce universal credit by £20 per week, as
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well, so there is a coming together of a lot of different factors at the moment which mean it'll be quite a difficult time forfamilies moment which mean it'll be quite a difficult time for families around the country. difficult time for families around the country-— difficult time for families around the country. difficult time for families around the count . ., ._ the country. the government will say it has announced _ the country. the government will say it has announced a _ the country. the government will say it has announced a fund _ the country. the government will say it has announced a fund that - the country. the government will say it has announced a fund that is - it has announced a fund that is distributed via local councils, local authorities to try to deal with perhaps food poverty, fuel poverty. is that the sort of approach that will help those who are suffering the hardest, with everything you've just described? it certainly welcome that government is considering and has announced additional spending, considering and has announced additionalspending, £500,000,000 was announced today. but the cut to universal credit will affect 4,000,000 households, so £2000 a year — that's billions of pounds over the course of the year that's been taken out of family's pockets. 0ver been taken out of family's pockets. over the course of the pandemic, we think about the interventions the government has done, it was really
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welcome that the increased universal credit back at the start of the pandemic. in the furlough scheme, which is coming to an end today, has done a fantasticjob of protecting workers and their families from their living standards. we've had their living standards. we've had the biggest economic downturn in 300 years in the uk, yet the unemployment increase has been the lowest in recent decades. there's a good activity to support households during the pandemic, but as that policy unwinds and at the same time we deal with the supply shortages in the price rises, things could be a bit difficult for families next autumn. ., ,., ., ,, bit difficult for families next autumn. ., ., ,, i. bit difficult for families next autumn. ., . ~' ., autumn. dan tomlinson, thank you for our time. autumn. dan tomlinson, thank you for vourtime- in— autumn. dan tomlinson, thank you for your time. in the _ autumn. dan tomlinson, thank you for your time. in the last _ autumn. dan tomlinson, thank you for your time. in the last few— autumn. dan tomlinson, thank you for your time. in the last few minutes, - your time. in the last few minutes, the labour leader sir keir starmer has been talking about the fuel crisis. let'sjust hear a little has been talking about the fuel crisis. let's just hear a little of that interview. crisis. let'sjust hear a little of that interview.— crisis. let'sjust hear a little of that interview. we've got a fuel crisis going _ that interview. we've got a fuel crisis going at _ that interview. we've got a fuel crisis going at the _ that interview. we've got a fuel crisis going at the moment. - that interview. we've got a fuel- crisis going at the moment. there's this garage here, it says no fuel —
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this garage here, it says no fuel — this is typical across the country. we have an urgent situation with a lack of drivers, and there will be a lack of drivers, and there will be a lack of drivers in other sectors going forward into the run up to christmas. now the government has said it needs visas, but they haven't issued any, and we need urgent action from the prime minister — and if it's necessary to recall parliament to get the necessary measures through, then parliament should be recalled straight away, and we will vote for them. but we cannot delay any longer, we need to fix this crisis, we need urgent action, and we need it today. . we need urgent action, and we need it toda . . ,, ., we need urgent action, and we need ittoda .. ,, ., �* , we need urgent action, and we need ittoda.. ,, ., ~ i, ., it today. . should the army be doing it? the army — it today. . should the army be doing it? the army need _ it today. . should the army be doing it? the army need to _ it today. . should the army be doing it? the army need to be _ it today. . should the army be doing it? the army need to be on - it today. . should the army be doing it? the army need to be on standby| it? the army need to be on standby particularly — it? the army need to be on standby particularly in _ it? the army need to be on standby particularly in the _ it? the army need to be on standby particularly in the areas _ it? the army need to be on standby particularly in the areas most - particularly in the areas most affected. the government has said we need visas — it hasn't issued any visas, there's no sign of any visas, we should recall parliament for one day, maybe next week, as soon as
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possible and get them voted through. but we need the prime minister to get a grip and take a moment. at the moment he has his head buried in the sand. ., ., ., ,, sand. the labour leader talking about the fuel _ sand. the labour leader talking about the fuel crisis _ sand. the labour leader talking about the fuel crisis in - sand. the labour leader talking about the fuel crisis in the - about the fuel crisis in the shortage of hdv drivers. much more coming up in the next half an hour, but let's pause a moment and catch up but let's pause a moment and catch up with the weather prospects such as they are from thomas. it's looking dark and gloomy over the next few days, i must say, autumn has well and truly arrived, and we will have to deal with it. the forecast for tomorrow. for many of us is a wet and windy one, in fact we will see spells of wind over the next few days, even the possibility of disruption from this weather, and low pressure will pretty much the park itself over into the uk, seeing small ends of pressure developing over the uk. 0nce pressure developing over the uk. once this area of low pressure is heading towards the south east through the course of the night, even before that happens, it's been
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a day of showers, and they will continue through that night into many western areas. central and southern areas shouldn't be too bad. here's that wet weather that's reaching southwestern areas very quickly in the morning with strengthening winds, to developing low area of that area of low pressure, which means winds are increasing in strength and for some of us. it'lljust be a right afternoon. in some areas it looks like the weather will improve as this weather pulls away. even after that, it'll be a mixture again of sunshine, showers, and blustery weather. get ready. hello you're watching bbc news, the latest headlines. the prime minister is urging the public to trust the police but admits there are issues that need addressing following the death of sarah everard. there
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that need addressing following the death of sarah everard.— that need addressing following the death of sarah everard. there is one area where — death of sarah everard. there is one area where i— death of sarah everard. there is one area where i think _ death of sarah everard. there is one area where i think the _ death of sarah everard. there is one area where i think the issue - death of sarah everard. there is one area where i think the issue of - area where i think the issue of trust needs to be addressed square on. and it is in the way we handle crimes against women and girls. more than 15,000,000 — crimes against women and girls. more than 15,000,000 households are facing higher energy builds from today. the biggest increase in the price has come into effect. travel in and out of australia is to resume in november but only for people who are fully vaccinated. here pig farmers are warning that a shortage of workers means they might have to carry out a mass call of animals. ., ., ., ., ., animals. havi of a following of these before? _ animals. havi of a following of these before? nope. - animals. havi of a following of these before? nope. and - animals. havi of a following of these before? nope. and the| animals. havi of a following of- these before? nope. and the new bond film made £5,ooo,ooo _ these before? nope. and the new bond film made 5,000,000 in _ these before? nope. and the new bond film made 5,000,000 in uk— these before? nope. and the new bond film made 5,000,000 in uk and - these before? nope. and the new bond film made 5,000,000 in uk and irish| film made £5,000,000 in uk and irish cinemas over the weekend is it worth the wait? find out in 15 minutes' time when mark kermode joins me with his review. before all of that we
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are going to catch up with latest sports news from jane dougal. we start with breaking news because the czech far affairs minister says he will summon the british ambassador after allegations that the rangers player come out of it was subjected to booing last night. rangers have contacted you wave after being attacked by smarter props butjust months after he was racially abused by a slob you prod the player. the game was initially supposed to be played behind closed doors after sparta supporters had racially abused another player in an earlier match. but it was later decided to allow 10,000 schoolchildren to attend the one no game. sparta had tonight the allegation saying it's absolutely unbelievable that after a match we have to watch innocent children being attacked and face unfounded accusations of racism. as we mentioned the check far affairs minister waited into the argument by
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treating... — tweeting... however the livingston captain and the scottish fac quality adviser thinks these attitudes will not change until there is a deterrent. there are no consequences for peace peoples action and nothing will change. if people get to get away with doing these sorts of things wise to get a change? that has to be a deterrent for people out there at this moment in time it's slavic pride to but they did and camara it should've been an empty stadium. while a 10,000 people allowed in the air whether it was children or adults? edges shows that you wave care. forfartoo adults? edges shows that you wave care. forfar too long it's been going on, they don't care, they let fans into the stadiums. what kind of messages that sending out?
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premier league players will be able to travel on the international break on the red list and will be able to play when they on return. that's been announced by the uk government. showers was one of the argentine bass players who played in the match against brazil which was stopped against brazil which was stopped against brazilian hail officials say they had to quarantine. for this international break english players including manchester players and manchester cities players will be allowed to travel but will have to quarantine and be spokes facilities when they get back. liverpool milderjuergen clopp is not impressed. milderjuergen clopp is not impressed-— milderjuergen clopp is not imressed. ., ., ., ., impressed. that would mean for the -la ers impressed. that would mean for the players after — impressed. that would mean for the players after the _ impressed. that would mean for the players after the national _ impressed. that would mean for the players after the national break - players after the national break that they go for a ten to 12 days with the national teens and then they go another ten days away from their families they go another ten days away from theirfamilies into they go another ten days away from their families into quarantine. that's 22 days and two weeks later there is a next international break,
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there is a next international break, the next international tuesday. so it doesn't sound to me like a real solution. meanwhile thomas two — like a real solution. meanwhile thomas two goal _ like a real solution. meanwhile thomas two goal has - like a real solution. meanwhile i thomas two goal has announced like a real solution. meanwhile - thomas two goal has announced reese will not be starting matches because he still not back to full training yet. james was named sin the 23 man squad despite coming off injured in the defeat against manchester city last week. and not featuring in the trip to you princess in midweek. he is currently in training in the pool and will miss tomorrow's game was all he enters. to go thinks is been all he enters. to go thinks is been a misunderstanding and less james is playing for a different english team.— english team. when i saw it i thou:ht english team. when i saw it i thought that _ english team. when i saw it i thought that maybe - english team. when i saw it i thought that maybe reese i english team. when i saw it i i thought that maybe reese goes english team. when i saw it i - thought that maybe reese goes with the team for england because right now he trains in the pool. so i was a bit surprised but i understood that he was selected for the football team. this will not happen because reese is training in the pool right now. so my understanding, my last information is that he will
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not go. can only be a misunderstand, nothing else. the british boxer jo ce nothing else. the british boxer joyce says _ nothing else. the british boxer joyce says he _ nothing else. the british boxer joyce says he trusts _ nothing else. the british boxer joyce says he trusts he - nothing else. the british boxer joyce says he trusts he will. nothing else. the british boxer joyce says he trusts he will be| joyce says he trusts he will be awarded a medal after independent found there were. were. an olympic gold medal after an independent investigation found officials manipulated the outcome of matches at rio 2016. joyce lost his super heavyweight final to france's tony yoka and that was one of 11 "suspicious" bouts. the head of the investigation, professor richard mclaren, said a system for the manipulation of fights was in place. the sport's world giverning body the aiba said it noted the report with "concern". joyce has released a statement, saying he was sad to see corruption in the sport he loves and he'll be considering the finding with his legal team. more details on all those stories on the bbc website. back to jane. thank you. now five years after 15 —year—old
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natasha day from a severe allergic reaction after eating a baguette which she didn't know contain sesame seeds, a law in her name has come into effect across the uk. it means that all food packaging must contain a full list of ingredients and allergens. the tasha's parents who campaigned for the rule change have welcomed the law saying their daughter would be very proud. john maguire reports. her death may well save many, many lives. natasha was flying from heathrow with her file delete my father a best friend when she bought some food. a baguette. natasha knew she had a food allergy and always check labels but the bright had been baked with sesame seeds. not included in the list of ingredients which triggered a severe reaction. the suffered cardiac a risk and day later in the hospital.
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a very painful and poignant thing to happen to any family but happen to us. in many ways while we dedicate the tasha's law to natasha in fact it is for the people, almost 2,000,000 people that they may live a long and fruitful life. this 2,000,000 people that they may live a long and fruitful life.— a long and fruitful life. this new legislation _ a long and fruitful life. this new legislation comes _ a long and fruitful life. this new legislation comes into _ a long and fruitful life. this new legislation comes into force - a long and fruitful life. this new i legislation comes into force today and closes a loophole so that now all pre— wrap food including sandwiches, fast food and cheese or a meat on deli counters must be clearly labelled with the full list of ingredients. also, 14 major allergens including eggs, peanuts and sesame seeds must be highlighted in the list. we and sesame seeds must be highlighted in the list. ~ ~ . . in the list. we think this is really important. _ in the list. we think this is really important. to — in the list. we think this is really important, to make _ in the list. we think this is really important, to make a _ in the list. we think this is really important, to make a big - in the list. we think this is really i important, to make a big difference to the _ important, to make a big difference to the 2,000,000 or so allergen sufferers— to the 2,000,000 or so allergen sufferers in the uk. more 600,000 with food _ sufferers in the uk. more 600,000 with food intolerance that means if they're _ with food intolerance that means if they're going into a shop and going with a _ they're going into a shop and going with a sandwich they can quickly check _ with a sandwich they can quickly check the — with a sandwich they can quickly check the label and find out if their— check the label and find out if their ingredient is on there. the
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tasha's parents _ their ingredient is on there. tie: tasha's parents describe it as a bittersweet moment for them. but five years on from their daughter's death say they know in their parts she would be very proud of the new rolls in her name. the tasha's law. technical problems have been reported with scotland's covid vaccine passport at the day after its launch. with overwhelming demand being blamed from today anyone entering a nightclub or other large—scale event has to prove they have had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. james shaw reports scotland's vaccine passport scheme will have an impact across a range of live events. live events. n ig htclu bs face particular challenges. everyone going in will have to be checked. they'll have to show a qr code on a smartphone or have a printout of their certificate. all my friends are so angry because they are waiting on this letter form of a vaccine passport — it's just ridiculous.
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i think they're a good idea. ithink, there nothing, like, wrong with it. i mean, if people are getting vaccinated then there's nothing wrong with showing you're vaccinated, do you know what i mean? seems like an imposition, i seems unreasonable, seems like another nail in the coffin for the hospitality sector. . we are expecting this to be quite challenging for businesses. and many businesses are reporting that they are going to struggle to have enough door stewards to actually check apps when people are coming in. and obviously people may well be appearing without any kind of certification because of the problems they have been experiencing with the app. it's not yet clear what the impact will be for the big football clubs, but they will be relieved that enforcement is being delayed. rangers will play hibernian here at ibrox on saturday, and the club has told fans they must turn up with proof of vaccination. but how many will be checked? and will any fans be turned away from these gates?
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the scottish government insists the scheme is essential to manage the pandemic, and they say the delay will make it easier for businesses. there will be a period ofjust over two weeks when businesses get the opportunity to make sure the arrangements they have in place to do this are tested, can be adapted if necessary, and businesses get the confidence in those arrangements. no other part of the uk is bringing in a scheme quite like scotland's. as before during the pandemic, the scottish approach is different and more cautious than elsewhere. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. tens of thousands of pigs may have to be cold if the government doesn't take urgent action to ease a labour shortage which is causing back log on farms across the country. that's the word from farmers and unions who were calling for more visas to be issued to allow skilled workers from mainland europe to enter the uk. rural affairs correspondent claire
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marshall reports. pig farmers say they're desperate and in despair at the impact of the staffing crisis facing many abbatoirs. if mature pigs can't be taken away, it leads to overcrowding on farms, which could cause serious animal welfare and hygiene issues. 0nce pigs get too big, retailers don't want to buy them. a friend of the farmer who was forced to slaughter his piglets on his farm said he'd been destroyed by it. according to the british meat processors association, before brexit and the pandemic, around 80% of the staff in two of the uk's biggest meat processing centres were from eastern europe. this is a growing problem and has been growing for some time, really, and we've tried all the things that government's asked us to do in terms of increasing wages and things like that but there's a lot of people that are, sort of... a lot ofjob vacancies out there at the moment and it's really hard to recruit. and particularly what we need is skilled butchers to do this, it's not something we canjust pull
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people off the street to do. the government recently created temporary visas for lorry drivers and poultry workers to try to limit disruption in the run—up to christmas. the national pig association wants a similar scheme for its industry. the government said it was working closely with the sector to explore options. claire marshall, bbc news. 16 minutes to six these are the headlines. following the milder of sarah everard police gives new guidance of plainclothes officers of what people can do if they are stopped by one. the prime minister says changes must be made. more than 15,000,000 households face higher energy builds from today. the biggest increase in the price so far has come into effect. and travel in and out of australia will resume in november. not only for people who are fully vaccinated — but only for people who are fully vaccinated. an coming up on bbc news we will
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reflect on a painful night for rangers in prague. the row rambles on and on the booing of camara during the rangers appealing for uefa to act. the london marathon returns to the streets of london both shower about what we can expect from not likely to be the biggest marathon event ever held. and we will look back on the county championship season is once again endedin championship season is once again ended in october. that's on sports day at 630. now on bbc news it's time for the film review. hello and a very warm welcome to this week's film review on bbc news. guess it is with me and guess what were talking about? they are no prizes for guessing this week, are there? . prizes for guessing this week, are there? , ., , ~ prizes for guessing this week, are there? . ., . ~ ~ there? yes, quite a big week. we have no time _ there? yes, quite a big week. we
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have no time to _ there? yes, quite a big week. we have no time to die, _ there? yes, quite a big week. we have no time to die, james - there? yes, quite a big week. wej have no time to die, james bond is back finally.

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