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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 1, 2021 1:30pm-2:00pm BST

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there are people who put their lives at risk in order to work with us. and there is a category of people that it is our privilege to work with who, if they were found out to be working with us, could be in grave danger. they could lose their lives. and that is where fact meets fiction. the operations planned from this building are real. so are the risks. and so are the threats they are trying to stop. frank gardner, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. mike miller is with me. it may be one of the brighter days out there today but icy is going to change again, we expect low pressure to come back and further spells of wind and rain. there could be some very
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heavy rain around, some disruptive went out there, some met office weather warnings for the weekend so please look at those, online, especially if you are travelling. this area of low pressure will form, moving across us and deepen as icy does so with a swathes of heavy rain tomorrow from wales across england, reaching eastern scotland, the wind is picking up, windiest on sunday in northern scotland but by then icy is sunshine and showers. pretty much what we have at the moment, one of the brighter days out there, some showers to be had, but many places are dry and sunny this afternoon. sprinkling of showers working across east anglia and the south—east, some of them coming into north—west england, more especially for northern ireland and western scotland, some heavy downpours and gusty winds, as high as 60mph in north—west scotland. cooler day here, feeling warmer in the sunshine in eastern england. overnight night tonight the blustery winds continue pushing the showers towards north—western parts of the uk. clear
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spells as well and a much cooler night to come especially across wales and england. temperatures into single figures, 5 in norwich as we start tomorrow. tomorrow, if you have the stomach for icy, icy may start to dry and bright, but icy will not last, in northern ireland early rain clearing through to brighter skies. early rain clearing through to brighterskies. in scotland, rain moving northwards but this swathes of soaking rain from else moving across england, 30— a0 millimetres in places, the wind is picking up. temperatures throughout the weekend on the cool side, mid to low teens. tomorrow for many the winds on a par with what we had the last few days, blustery, but stronger winds with rain in the south—east and eastern england, inland, a0— 50mph, around the coast, disruptive gusts as much as 65mph. heavy rain pushing through eastern scotland and into sunday, wettest and windiest in the northern isles on sunday. a brighter day on sunday, bands of heavy showers
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moving west to east, some of these may reach the london marathon later in the day depending on how long the runners take. temperatures again mid to low teens. sunshine and showers on monday, more wind and rain on tuesday. the forecast for where you are and where you are going is online and through the app. jane, you did ask. you were not wrong. thank you. a reminder of our top story. the metropolitan police is trying to regain public trust in the wake of the milder of sarah everard. by one of its officers. —— murder. that's all from the bbc news at one so it's goodbye from me,
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rangers have contacted uefa about the booing and jeering that glen kamara was subjected to end the proud last nightjust months after the finland material that was racially abused by a slab via prague player. he was targeted directly at 1-0 player. he was targeted directly at 1—0 defeat by sparta prague. the game was initially supposed to be played behind closed doors after sparta prague players had racially abused monaco players in a match, but it was later decided school children could attend to stop manager steven gerrard said these things reared their head too much and not enough is being done. sparta have said it is absolutely unbelievable that after a match we have to watch innocent children being attacked and faced unfounded accusations of racism. the former rangers and england captain has called for heading to be phased out of football, saying you can't recover from of football, saying you can't recoverfrom broken of football, saying you can't recover from broken lights of football, saying you can't recoverfrom broken lights but of football, saying you can't recover from broken lights but not from a heavy brain intact. —— terry
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butcher. the standout moment of his career was arguably hidden with a bloodied bandage after a clash of heads in a match against sweden. he told the bbc sport podcast that football authorities should consider banning heading front the game altogether to protect players from suffering from brain diseases later in life. studies show players are more likely to die from degenerative brain diseases.— brain diseases. there is something in our sport — brain diseases. there is something in our sport in _ brain diseases. there is something in our sport in football— brain diseases. there is something in our sport in football that - brain diseases. there is something in our sport in football that can - brain diseases. there is something in our sport in football that can be | in our sport in football that can be catastrophic for players in the future. injuries, bridging top two broken legs, you can recover very well from them generally. you never recoverfrom well from them generally. you never recover from a real huge and heavy brain trauma, huge and heavy brain intact, and that's something we really to consider. it is a sobering and horrible thought, but these
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happen every day in the games, not so much now. but there is the potential in the game. you only have to look at rauljiminez of wolves, a fractured skull, that something that should be consigned to history and never happen again. australia's cricket captain tim paine says the ashes will go ahead this winter, even if some england players decide not to travel because of covid concerns. skipperjoe root and other members of the england team have expressed doubts over the tour because of the restrictions — and the relaxation only applies to australian citizens at the moment, but it could be extended to foreign travellers in time, which may allay england players' fears, with the first test on december 8.
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warwickshire north the new champions of the bob willis through fee, they beat lancashire in some style. tom bailey was the last man to fall. that completes a domestic double for warwickshire who also won the county championship. the british boxerjoe joyce says he trusts he will be awarded an olympic gold medal after an independent mitigation found officials were elated the outcomes officials were elated the outcomes of matches at rio 2016. joyce lost the superheavyweight final to france's tony yoka, and that was one of 11 suspicious bouts. the head of the investigation said a system volume in the position of fights was in place. the sports world governing body, the aiba, said it needed the report with concern. joyce had four has released a statement saying he is sad to see corruption in the
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sport he loves and he will be considering findings with his legal team. he added colour. more on that story and the rest of the stories that we featured on the bbc sport website. thank you, jane. with an interview, you are watching bbc news. i'mjane hill, i will take you over the next half hour of our news coverage. still very much dominated by the murder of sarah everard south london. chief constables across the country have been told their forces will have to work much harder to regain public trust, after a serving officer
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at scotland yard was handed a whole —— after a serving officer at the met was handed a whole life term for the murder of sarah everard. the policing minister, kit malthouse, said wayne couzens' crimes had struck a "devastating blow" to public confidence. the mayor of london sadiq khan has been speaking about this as well. he said he does retain confidence in the commission of the metropolitan police, cressida dick. you the commission of the metropolitan police, cressida dick.— police, cressida dick. you can run away from — police, cressida dick. you can run away from the — police, cressida dick. you can run away from the fact _ police, cressida dick. you can run away from the fact that _ police, cressida dick. you can run away from the fact that this - police, cressida dick. you can run| away from the fact that this sexual predator, this man who adopted, right, killed sarah, and then set her body a serving police officer. you cannot run away from that. this was somebody who transferred from police services and served at least two years. this is why it is important we get to the bottom whether other people were aware of
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inappropriate comments, his behaviour. we have to look into any allegations made previously. across society, we have to address this culture of misogyny. cressida dick is the right person to bring about the transformation needed. the issue will not be addressed by one officer. we have to make sure the education our buoys receive and in schools receive is right, how is it right that girls in school have to change their behaviour because of the behaviour of buoys. misogyny should be a hate crime, the harassment of women in a public place should be a criminal offence. how is it right that only 3% of those accused of rape are found guilty. it has to be transformed across society. i support the inspector when she says there is an epidemic in our society would come to violence against women and girls,
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that's what we need a whole societywide response. scotland yard has said people with concerns about an officer's legitimacy to challenge them. we asked women in manchester if they would feel comfortable doing that. when people are in charge you just, you know, respect that they're doing theirjob properly and that they're trying to keep you safe. i don't think you'd ever challenge that. i think you'd just, you know, feel like they're trying to keep you safe and you'd be comfortable. i wouldn't challenge them, definitely not. i think we kind of need to take it in our own hands now to feel safe, so i think i would, kind of, feel tjat i'd have to ask the question, that i'd have to ask the question, "can you radio in and see?" just for that proof, i think, because i've lost a bit of trust now, unfortunately. i don't feel like i'd i go to the police now. i feel like, you know, we have to, kind of, i stand together rather than go to the police. _ we have to, kind of, _ have back—up from other means. it wouldn't matter to me whether it was an officer or whether it was anybody — anybody saying that they
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could be an officer. i think if an officer of the law was that way inclined to do something in the way he did to sarah, i don't think challenging him would make a difference. we are going to be talking a lot more about that and what more the met police can and should be doing after two o'clock year. right now, we will talk more about one of the other major stories here today, the news that noise of households across the country are facing higher energy bills from today because a new price cut has come into effect. my colleague ben brown has been taking your questions on this. he was joined by lynn beattie, personal finance adviser and founder of the mrs mummypenny website; and faith archer, who's a personal finance journalist and founder of the much more with less website to answer your
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questions on this subject. let's kick off with lynn, a question from a mum of two young children who lives in a flat in south london who wants to know how much more should she be budgeting per month for her bills? i did a little survey of the people in my facebook group to find out what people are paying, what their bills have gone to. i actually have some people in the situation. this is quite scary, but it looks like bills have been doubling. it depends what company she is with, what tariff she is on, a variable or fixed rate. but i would be prudently assuming they might be doubling. but to get around that, she needs to make sure she is on the best fixed deal, switch deals, and lots of tips on energy saving will help her bring the cost down. this one wants to know more
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about home energy efficiency grants. how can she find out more about them? the best option is to get on the internet and google. find out if you can get the support. you are liable to get larger grants if you are on some benefits, such as the state pension or universal credit. this one is from natasha, who lives in a three—bedroom house with her family of four, she wants to know if there is any way to subsidise the cost of insulation or solar power in her home. she and her husband both work full—time, not receiving any benefits. is there any help is available on that? interesting about the solar panels, i'm just about to move to a house with solar panels so i've done a lot of research on this. there is so much stuff i don't know! there are lots of considerations with solar panels because do you lease them from a company, do you own them?
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there are lots of subsidisations available from these companies. but be careful what companies you talk to, work with a reputable firm because there are a few cowboys out there. what i have been told about my new house is that my energy bills will be about £200 a year, when at the moment i'm paying about £800 a year in my current house, so the savings can be really big with solar panels. the same with insulation, there will be subsidies available, but do a google, that kind of thing. that is an incredible saving. we will see if that actually happens. we will get back to you. this one from hannah who uses a prepaid meter. she is worried about the increase to her bills, usually pays around 50 quid a month, how much more might she have to pay?
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is there anything she can do to cut costs? i think she is likely to pay more. what has happened today is that the energy price cap went up, that is the maximum that can be charged on the default tariff. that went up for prepayment customers, the average user, up by £153 to £1309 a year. i think all the tips on energy savings, going for the insulation, using your appliances less, making sure they're not on standby. i've been putting on the extra jumpers, turning the thermostat down recently as things have got chillier. it's going to be tough this winter. extra jumper, that's always a very good tip. here is one from rachel, who is on a fixed tariff until march next year. what will happen to her bills when that fixed tariff runs out? is there anything she can do
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to avoid a hike in prices? this is an interesting one because we really don't know what is going to happen to the wholesale price of energy the next six months. i would hope that if we have a windy winter we can generate lots of wind power. if the far east isn't using all the energy again, we can conserve some more energy over here. it is all dependent on that wholesale price. the energy suppliers do pass on increases and reductions in that wholesale price to customers pretty quickly. i used work with the buyers of energy with tesco, and it is passed on quickly. more likely to go up than down i would hazard a guess? i would assume they are more likely to go up. but you would hope by then we have sort of worked out that supply issue and we have got some more energy back again and it will not
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be so much of a hike. again, maybe prudently assume doubling your bills with that first question, i would maybe assume the same. it is quite scary but at least you are prepared for it. this one from seb in south london, two bedroom flat, working from home, worried that as the weather gets worse over the winter, his bills will get worse. how can he save money elsewhere with bills? what can he do generally to save money? in terms of heating, taking a thermostat down a bit, checking if your radiator valves can be switched on or off. if you are working from home, maybe you can hole up in a single room and keep that one warmer than the rest of the flat. investigating if there are other
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places that you might be able to work so you might be able to benefit from them spending on the energy. i'm thinking of things like internet cafes, libraries, places you can go that can maybe give you a bit of a change of perspective as well while you are working. otherwise, food bills for households are going to be housing, food, transport. if you are working from home, transport might not be so big. but certainly food bills, cooking from scratch, swapping to discount supermarkets, those are going to be the best savings you can get. if you are cooking a lot of soups and stews, that might keep you warm too. this one is someone who was with avro energy, they have gone bust, she has been e—mailed by octopus energy. will they give her a more competitive tariff? so many of these companies have gone bust in the last few weeks.
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i was reading threads of tweets yesterday from avro energy customers asking octopus what is happening. obviously octopus have a lot of new customers, they are trying to get them connected up. they are trying to put them on the best deal at the moment, but all those people switching over, they are not tied to octopus. because i'm one of their customers, they are not a tiny company that are likely to go bust, in fact their ceo has been doing a lot of pr about how successful the company is and how much cash they have got. the fact that a lot of avro energy customers have moved over to octopus, that almosts puts them in the realm of bigger ones i think sit and wait for a few weeks but you are in pretty good hands with the company at octopus. thank you both for answering those.
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i turned on the central heating yesterday for the first time yesterday, but my director has told me i should have just put on a sweater. that is maybe the advice. that is your questions answered for today. let's take a look now at some of the stories making the news across the uk. campaigners are warning that more help is needed to address the impacts of cold homes. it comes as figures show the east london borough of barking and dagenham is the worst place in england for fuel poverty, with one in five households unable to heat their homes. marc ashdown reports. it is getting chillier and this is
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about the time of year when most people reach to the thermostat to turn on the heating to stop the bad news is from today energy bills are going up. a couple of years ago the governor introduced a cap energy suppliers can only charge people a certain amount. but i see that they can adjust the up and up and down and because of the flying wholesale gas prices, from today prices are going to go up by an average of 12%. that means for the average bill pay out they will see their bill get up by about £139 a year. one fuel poverty charity has done a map on the areas most affected and found here in barking and dagenham, more people than anywhere in the country people than anywhere in the country people will struggle to pay the bills and may fall into fuel poverty. we have been asking people around you how they are feeling. business is quiet, income is less, and you have to pay more. it is a very bad for us.— and you have to pay more. it is a very bad for us. gas and electricity is a big problem —
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very bad for us. gas and electricity is a big problem for— very bad for us. gas and electricity is a big problem for people - very bad for us. gas and electricity is a big problem for people living | is a big problem for people living i’ilht is a big problem for people living right now — is a big problem for people living riaht now. , , ., , right now. everything is going up, everything. _ right now. everything is going up, everything. so — right now. everything is going up, everything, so what _ right now. everything is going up, everything, so what do _ right now. everything is going up, everything, so what do you - right now. everything is going up, everything, so what do you do? . right now. everything is going up, l everything, so what do you do? just -et everything, so what do you do? just get on _ everything, so what do you do? just get on with— everything, so what do you do? just get on with it — everything, so what do you do? just get on with it— get on with it. hopefully it won't be too bad- _ get on with it. hopefully it won't be too bad- i— get on with it. hopefully it won't be too bad. i know _ get on with it. hopefully it won't be too bad. i know some - get on with it. hopefully it won't be too bad. i know some peoplej get on with it. hopefully it won't - be too bad. i know some people who will really suffer. this be too bad. i know some people who will really suffer.— will really suffer. this couldn't come at a _ will really suffer. this couldn't come at a worse _ will really suffer. this couldn't come at a worse time - will really suffer. this couldn't come at a worse time of - will really suffer. this couldn't come at a worse time of the i come at a worse time of the government's furlough scheme in it yesterday and this changes to universal credit putting even more of a squeeze on household finances. the government says it will do all it can to help people but campaigners fear we are entering a difficult winter with lots of family struggling to pay bills. a new car braking system that could save thousands of lives each year has been developed by researchers at coventry university. it helps eliminate every driver's worst nightmare, aqua—planing, when a car loses all grip on a road in wet conditions with potential catastrophic consequences. kevin reide reports. the moment a car aqua planes like this is one we all dread. the driver is helpless as a light of what a great chat between the tire and the
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road, making the car uncontrollable. but now as part of his masters degree, ravi has developed a prototype device to the phenomenon. it works by blasting outjust in front of the tire to displace the water so that gripped can be maintained, and the test results have been impressive. at the moment, i work best results come at 50 and 65 mph, and we have been able to decrease the deceleration by 60%. our stopping distances have improved between the 3—5 metres at 60—70 mph. that is about life and death. the system developed here in coventry has already been patented in united states and japan and apply for in the china. interest is being shown by some of the major car manufacturers across the globe. but before that it needs to be proved
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effective in the real world. one potential scenario is that we will see this offer on a high value car. it's a value and worth will be proved much as we saw in the 70s with anti—lock braking systems. they eventually become mandated. if this can get through at a price points thatis can get through at a price points that is acceptable on a high value car, it proves its worth, it is mandated, then it will be rolled up through as a legislative requirement.— through as a legislative requirement. through as a legislative reauirement. . . ,. ,, ., , requirement. we have had discussions with car manufacturers _ requirement. we have had discussions with car manufacturers in _ requirement. we have had discussions with car manufacturers in the - requirement. we have had discussions with car manufacturers in the uk - requirement. we have had discussions with car manufacturers in the uk and l with car manufacturers in the uk and they are very excited about the prospect of this solution and they are watching is very closely. rather it is now seeking _ are watching is very closely. rather it is now seeking further _ are watching is very closely. rather it is now seeking further funding i are watching is very closely. rather it is now seeking further funding to | it is now seeking further funding to develop the idea, and if successful this could help bring an end to something all mounted a sphere during wet weather. —— all mountainous fear. as the oyster season begins, there's continuing problems for south—west producers trying to export. the rules have changed since brexit meaning most exports have to undergo purification before they go to the eu.
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spotlight�*s david dixon reports. it has been a difficult year for the shellfish industry, almost all of our waters are classified as a bride to be, which didn't matter when we were in europe, but since brexit it has become impossible to export to the eu without intimacy purification process. martin runs a wholesale business in flushing.— business in flushing. every of roduct business in flushing. every of product that _ business in flushing. every of product that comes _ business in flushing. every of product that comes from - business in flushing. every of- product that comes from category b and cornwall must be purified, so we have got a hell of a lot more work now in order to export the same quantities of shellfish, as well as of the other problems of brexit paperwork. i5 of the other problems of brexit paperwork-— of the other problems of brexit “aerwork. , ., , .,, paperwork. is it economically viable for them to — paperwork. is it economically viable for them to purify _ paperwork. is it economically viable for them to purify their _ paperwork. is it economically viable for them to purify their stuff - paperwork. is it economically viable for them to purify their stuff and - for them to purify their stuff and get it over to europe? he. for them to purify their stuff and get it over to europe?— get it over to europe? no, not reall . get it over to europe? no, not really- they — get it over to europe? no, not really. they are _ get it over to europe? no, not really. they are smaller- get it over to europe? no, not - really. they are smaller producers, smothered growers, and a lot of those now right throughout the uk have turned their back on europe as a market, which they never thought they would do. they are just not
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geared up, they don't have the company infrastructure to cope with the vast amounts of paperwork. and of the extra costs, they are being priced out of the market. the south-west — priced out of the market. the south-west saw _ priced out of the market. the south-west saw a _ priced out of the market. the south—west saw a bumper summer for tourism, mechanically domestic market take up the slack. irate tourism, mechanically domestic market take up the slack. we have never seen — market take up the slack. we have never seen a _ market take up the slack. we have never seen a sales _ market take up the slack. we have never seen a sales like _ market take up the slack. we have never seen a sales like it - market take up the slack. we have never seen a sales like it in - market take up the slack. we have never seen a sales like it in the - market take up the slack. we have never seen a sales like it in the uk locally ever before, and we are very grateful for that. locally ever before, and we are very gratefulforthat. but locally ever before, and we are very gratefulfor that. but it locally ever before, and we are very grateful for that. but it is very small in comparison to what we were selling to europe. i suppose 10% of our capacity, production capacity, was capacity, was sold locally. so what does the future hold for the south—west�*s bivalve industry? irate south-west's bivalve industry? we have not south—west's bivalve industry? - have got a paradigms shift on the way and i think it will be a very rough wide. we have been transitioning into the uk market, but we have had huge failures with distribution in the uk as well. there is a lot of challenges in the seafood sector at the moment, a hell
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of a lot. much more coming up from two o'clock with martine croxall. right now let's take a look at the weather prospects with nick miller. i blustery day out there but a much brighter day across much of the uk, some showers around, but through the rest of the afternoon and many places will stay dry, most of the shower is running into north wales, north—west england, but especially northern ireland and western scotland, some heavy with rail —— hail and thunder. when is picking up as well. temperatures mainly in the mid to low teens. into tonight, shall was continuing, especially towards the north—west, clear spells elsewhere, temperatures dipping lower than last night. you will
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notice a change most in wales and england, were last night was very mild. early rain in northern ireland tomorrow, then brighter skies, some rain vision across scotland, the bulk of the really heavy rain moving in tomorrow. it will be all wales and england, some very difficult travel conditions.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... following the murder of sarah everard, the metropolitan police give new guidance about plainclothes officers and what people can do if stopped by one of them. critics say it isn't women who need to change their actions. it puts the onus on women. it is not about the women, it's about the men that are killing us. especially if those men are the people that are paid and appointed to keep us safe. within 50 million households face higher energy bills as the biggest increase on the price cap so far comes into effect. covid vaccination passports are introduced for large—scale events in scotland. but the app is hit with technical problems. travel in and out of australia will resume in november but only for people

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