Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 1, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm BST

10:00 am
this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. following the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer, and is by increasing patrols and issuing advice on dealing with plainclothes police officers. officers up—and—down the land recognise the devastating consequences of this event. there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police, particularly i have to say in london. fix, the police, particularly i have to say in london.— the police, particularly i have to say in london. a group of officers believed to _ say in london. a group of officers believed to have _ say in london. a group of officers believed to have included - say in london. a group of officers believed to have included wayne | believed to have included wayne couzens are being investigated for allegedly sharing discriminatory messages on a whatsapp group. are you reassured by the measures being proposed by the met police? what would make you feel safer? do
10:01 am
get in touch, you can do that on twitter and use the hashtag bbc your questions. australia says it will reopen its borders to fully vaccinated citizens in november after 18 months of tight restrictions. higher energy bills for 15 million uk households as a new higher price cap comes into effect. scotland's vaccine passport scheme begins, affecting anyone wanting to go to a nightclub or a big event like a football match. facebook�*s global head of safety refutes accusations that its photo sharing app instagram negatively affects young people's mental health. as black history month starts around the uk, we will be live in coventry, the uk, we will be live in coventry, the uk's city of culture, to see what's happening there. and coming up this hour... we also hear more about the progress of europe's first mission to mercury.
10:02 am
hello and welcome if you are watching here in the uk, or around the world. london's police force, the metropolitan police, has explained how it intends to better protect women and girls following the murder of sarah everard. yesterday, wayne couzens, a serving officer with the met, was given a whole life prison term for kidnapping, raping and killing sarah in march. the head of the force, dame cressida dick, has faced repeated calls to resign — but she says lessons will be learnt. let's look at how the met is trying to reassure the public. anyone stopped by a lone plain clothes police officer can challenge their legitimacy, and request to speak to an operator on a police radio to check if the stop is genuine. plain clothes officers will not be deployed on their own, and will be in pairs. an extra 650 new officers will patrol busy public areas in london where women have concerns about their safety. and the independent office
10:03 am
for police conduct is investigating a group of officers who allegedly shared "discriminatory" messages on a whatsapp group — which were discovered during the investigation into the sarah everard's murder. serious questions are now being asked about whether opportunities were missed before sarah everard's murder. the met has admitted a vetting check on couzens was not done correctly when he joined the force. it meant an incident of indecent exposure in kent in 2015, involving a vehicle linked to couzens, was missed. and around 72 hours before sarah everard's abduction, met police officers received a separate allegation of indecent exposure which also identified the vehicle involved as registered to couzens. simonjones reports. sarah everard, described in court as intelligent, talented, much loved. but the question now facing the met
10:04 am
is, could and should her killer wayne couzens have been stopped earlier? i recognise that for some people a precious bond of trust has been damaged. there are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. so resign, then! she didn't respond to questions about whether she should resign. this was the moment couzens falsely arrested sarah everard in south london in march. his arm outstretched, holding his warrant card. he'd go on to rape and murder her, her body dumped in woodland in kent. but back in 2015 a car owned by couzens was linked to an allegation of indecent exposure. this wasn't picked up by police vetting. and 72 hours before the kidnap,
10:05 am
there was another allegation of indecent exposure. we'll be pushing ministers and the home secretary to have a look at exactly what is going wrong in the vetting processes, in the reporting processes, in the scrutiny of police officers, and how that gets done. the met says it will shortly publish a new strategy for tackling violence against women and girls. it will be deploying 650 new officers into busy public places where people often feel unsafe. it insists it's focused on improving detections for indecent exposure. the fact that this awful man used the cover of being a police officer to commit his crime does have devastating implications for trust. and i know that has caused distress throughout the ranks in british policing, in the thousands of british police officers up—and—down the land. we hope that over time police can rebuild the trust of the british people. sarah everard's death prompted
10:06 am
an outpouring of public grief. in new safety guidance the met says people should ask questions if they're concerned an officer is a threat. advice backed by a police watchdog. call the control room, call 909, and say i'm being asked to co—operate with someone who says he is a police officer, i want to know if this person is a police officer and if there are any real concerns that the person in question is going to be assaulted or abducted, then that 999 call will be treated as urgent. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't, no. the metropolitan police is now investigating whether he may have committed more crimes. sarah everard's family say the world is a safer place now he'll never be let out of prison. simon jones, bbc news. simon has been at the metropolitan police's headquarters and earlier he told me more about the response. the
10:07 am
met told me more about the response. tue: met described told me more about the response. tte: met described the told me more about the response. t'te: met described the killing told me more about the response. tte: met described the killing of sarah everard is one of the most dreadful incidents in their 190 year history, and now they are facing another very difficult time about confidence in the police. we have had that new safety guidance you referred to. we are told by the met it is very unusualfor are told by the met it is very unusual for someone to be stopped on the street by a loan plainclothes officer, but if that happens to you and you are concerned about the office of�*s conduct, then the advice from the police is you should ask to use the officer �*s radio contact the control room to check what the officer is doing is legitimate. and then the advice is if you still feel in danger you might perhaps want to run to a nearby house and ask for help. you might want to shout out to a passer—by to show you are in distress, you might want to flag down a bus or even dialled 999. but as you say, this is very much
10:08 am
putting the onus on the person who is stopped. in the case of sarah everard when wayne couzens showed his arrest warrant, he then quickly handcuffed her. so it is unclear whether that advice would have worked in this case, whether it would have been practical. but this is new advice. the met recognising that they have a job to do to rebuild confidence. that is part of the safety advice. they also say they are going to put hundreds of extra officers on the streets of london, 650 new officers. they are going to send those officers into hotspots where violence is perpetrated against women and girls in particular. but as well as the issue of confidence over the way they handled wayne couzens and the vetting procedure, you have this further investigation by the independent office for police conduct. and i think while that is ongoing, that is still going to undermine confidence people have in the metropolitan police.—
10:09 am
the metropolitan police. simon jones. a couple _ the metropolitan police. simon jones. a couple more - the metropolitan police. simon jones. a couple more of - the metropolitan police. simon jones. a couple more of your. jones. a couple more of your comments on this story and about what would make you feel safe and what would make you feel safe and what you think of the metropolitan police's plan to regain trust. michael o'shea says would couzens have let sarah phone someone, check his id, run? of course not, given his id, run? of course not, given his plan, so how will new advice keep anyone safe? what can you do if handcuffed? this from bobby, who says come on the police issue, simply go back to two bobbies on the beat. one morejust coming in from abu nadeem ansari, who says if one or two police officers with uniform should not be allowed to question people unless they give a pin number or a police officer number, so public can confirm they are legitimate police officers by calling a dedicated number. thank you for getting in touch with those comments and keep them coming in to me on the twitter @annita—mcveigh
10:10 am
and use the hashtag bbc your questions. what would make you feel safe? the australian prime minister, scott morrison, says fully vaccinated australians will be able to enter and leave the country freely from november. it's the first time they will be able to do so without permission since australia closed its international borders in march 2020 in response to the coronavirus pandemic. it means millions of citizens can travel out of the country and some 115,000 australians currently abroad will be able to return home. it will be time very soon that we will be able to open those international borders again, and that will enable australians who are fully vaccinated and australians and residents of australia who are overseas, who are fully vaccinated, to be able to travel again and to be able to lift those caps. this will happen next month. that's when it will start happening, from next month. ~ , ., ., month. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil— month. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil is _ month. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil is in _ month. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil is in sydney - month. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil is in sydney and - month. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil is in sydney and has| shaimaa khalil is in sydney and has more detail about who is covered by this relaxation of travel
10:11 am
restrictions.— this relaxation of travel restrictions. ., ' . ., restrictions. the office of the prime minister _ restrictions. the office of the prime minister has _ restrictions. the office of the prime minister has said - restrictions. the office of the prime minister has said that l restrictions. the office of the l prime minister has said that as restrictions. the office of the - prime minister has said that as it stands this announcement will include australian citizens or australian permanent residents, non—australians not included in those plans just yet. non—australians not included in those plansjust yet. but non—australians not included in those plans just yet. but to say it is highly anticipated is really an understatement. this has been a very, very emotional moment for thousands and thousands of australians here and of course abroad. essentially what it means. you can travel abroad and be guaranteed to come back, or if you have been stranded abroad you can come back for a seven day home quarantine, so the caps on arrivals, all of these limitations are gone for australian citizens. the other big detail, of course, is vaccination, they need to be fully vaccinated, these vaccinations have to be approved by the health authorities here and the states who reach 80% vaccination rates and
10:12 am
above are the ones that are able to open for international travel. as it stands, new south wales where i am is set to be the first one to open internationally. there is still so many details to iron out, especially about proof of vaccination, whether it will be certificates, vaccination passports, qr codes, how that's going to work in different states, especially that the different states have handled their outbreaks differently. for example, new south wales, the delta outbreak here is stabilising, getting ready to open up stabilising, getting ready to open up domestically and internationally, whereas queensland and western australia, for example, they're still going for elimination, still going for zero covid and they have been the strictest with their borders, the first to close, very reluctant to reopen for the rest of the country. so we don't know where they stand on international travel. as early as next month you can get a very interesting scenario where someone in sydney, for example, could travel to london or new york but would not be able to travel to
10:13 am
brisbane or perth because these two states would still be closed. i think generally, a huge sense of relief amongst so many that international travel is now back as an option after nearly two years of being isolated from the rest of the world. being isolated from the rest of the world, ,, ., ., ., being isolated from the rest of the world. ,, ., ., ., ., being isolated from the rest of the world. ,, ., .,., ., , portugal is due to lift almost all of its restrictions that were imposed to limit the spread of coronavirus. with more than 85% of its residents now fully vaccinated, the government will no longer recommend remote working and masks will not be required in the street. more than 15 million households across england, scotland and wales are to face higher energy bills, as the increased price cap comes into effect from today. a typical bill for those on a default tariff will rise by around £140 a year, with those on prepayment meters expected to pay even more. our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey reports. as the temperature dips, so our energy bills rise. the cost of heating and lighting our homes is limited by the price cap, but this is the biggest ever increase at a time when
10:14 am
many household budgets are being squeezed. it affects people on standard tariffs in england, wales and scotland and generally those who haven't switched for a long time, or whose time—limited tariffs have expired. the new cap means they will now pay £1,277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity — that's £139 a year more on their bill than under the previous cap. prepayment—meter customers face a higher typical bill of £1,309 a year — that's an increase of £153 on the previous time. those who use more than the average amount of energy in their homes will face bigger bills because the policy caps price, not the total bill. those affected are normally encouraged to switch suppliers for a cheaper deal.
10:15 am
this time of the massive rise in the cost of wholesale gas in recent weeks has stripped the market of better offers. it's also led to the collapse of nine suppliers. their customers will now pay a more expensive tariff in line with the price cap. surviving firms say they are having to buy wholesale energy at a much higher price than the retail cap allows them to sell it for it. it is what it is, we're doing our best to get we are worried about our customers through this period so nobody is asking for the price cap to be increased again. it is what it is and we are doing our best to get customers through it and support well—run businesses through it and otherwise if we need to do anything else we are talking to government. analysts say companies' extra costs will be reflected when the cap is revised in the spring, at a level likely to be significantly more expensive for bill payers. kevin peachey, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. following the murder by sarah everard by a
10:16 am
serving police officer london's metropolitan police tries to regain public confidence by increasing patrols and issuing advice on dealing with plainclothes police officers. a group of officers believed to include couzens are being investigated for allegedly sharing discriminatory messages on a whatsapp group. australia says it will reopen its borders to fully vaccinated citizens in november after 18 months of tight restrictions. a planned vote on us presidentjoe biden's trillion dollar infrastructure bill has been delayed after democrats in congress failed to reach agreement on its scope. a statement said work on the bill would now be completed on friday. however, president biden has signed into law a short term spending bill, aimed at avoiding a federal government shutdown. this is what nancy pelosi the leader of the democrats in the house of representatives had to say. with this continuing resolution we not only keep government open, keep cheques flowing to our veterans
10:17 am
and social security recipients and the rest, but it's about again, whether it's about science at the national institutes of health, the education of our children, the protection of our environment, it's just a remarkable thing to think of all the things that we can do working together for the people. nancy pelosi. people reported issues trying to register for scotland's new covid passport atjust trying to register for scotland's new covid passport at just a few hours after it was launched. from today, anyone entering nightclubs and most large scale events will need to prove they've had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. officials say overwhelming demand could be to blame for the problems. james shaw reports. scotland's vaccine passport scheme will have an impact across a range of live events. n ig htclu bs face particular challenges. everyone going in will have to be checked. they'll have to show a qr code
10:18 am
on a smartphone or have a printout of their certificate. all my friends are so angry because they are waiting on this letter form of a vaccine passport, it's just ridiculous. i think they are a good idea. i think. there's nothing, like, wrong with it. so i mean if people are getting vaccinated then there is nothing wrong with showing you are vaccinated, do you know what i mean? seems like an imposition, i seems unreasonable, seems like another nail in the coffin for the hospitality sector. . it's not yet clear what the impact will be for the big football clubs, but they will be relieved that enforcement is being delayed. rangers will play hibernian here at ibrox on saturday, and the club has told fans they must turn up with proof of vaccination. but how many will be checked, and will any fans be turned away from these gates? the scottish government insists the scheme is essential to manage the pandemic, and they say the delay will make it easier for businesses. there will be a period ofjust over
10:19 am
two weeks when businesses get the opportunity to make sure the arrangements they have in place to do this are tested, can be adapted if necessary, and businesses get the confidence in those arrangements. no other part of the uk is bringing in a scheme quite like scotland's. as before, during the pandemic, the scottish approach is different and more cautious than elsewhere. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. earlier i spoke to our scotland correspondent alexandra mackenzie and asked her if there were still issues with the app.— issues with the app. there definitely _ issues with the app. there definitely seems - issues with the app. there definitely seems to - issues with the app. there definitely seems to be. i issues with the app. there l definitely seems to be. this issues with the app. there - definitely seems to be. this went to live about five o'clock last night. people were able to register for this. there have been reports of problems since then. if you are looking for the app it is called the nhs covid status at. i did manage to download it quite easy, it was quite a quick process for me, but they
10:20 am
have been reports from many people who have been looking for the app and finding it difficult to find, and finding it difficult to find, and then also difficult to register. lots of people here in the newsroom have been talking about trying to register and not being able to. the scottish government has said this is because of the volume of people doing it and have advised people to possibly step away from it for a couple of hours and then go back and try again. 50 couple of hours and then go back and t aaain. , ., couple of hours and then go back and t aaain. ,., , ., try again. so tell us a bit more, then, alexandra, _ try again. so tell us a bit more, then, alexandra, but— try again. so tell us a bit more, then, alexandra, but how - try again. so tell us a bit more, then, alexandra, but how this | then, alexandra, but how this process for registering for the app works? . , ., ., process for registering for the app works? . ., ., process for registering for the app works? . i. ., ., ., , , works? once you do download the app, as i said, it works? once you do download the app, as i said. it is— works? once you do download the app, as i said, it is the _ works? once you do download the app, as i said, it is the nhs _ works? once you do download the app, as i said, it is the nhs covid _ as i said, it is the nhs covid status at the that you need, and you download the app and put in some basic details, you have your name and date of birth. cash status app. you also need some photographic id available as well, either your passport or your driver's license. you take a photograph of that and then you also take a photograph of
10:21 am
yourself, and that cross references and proves who you are. one of the other things it does ask for is your nhs number. i didn't have mine to hand soi nhs number. i didn't have mine to hand so i didn't put that in. you don't necessarily need it even though it does ask for it and some people have said that's the stage that has been tricky when they have tried to put their nhs number in, it has then pushed you out. so if you do get to the final stage, what you see is, you don't need to provide the dates of when you have been vaccinated, if you have all the other details, the dates pop up of your vaccine, and the particular vaccine that you had, and behind thatis vaccine that you had, and behind that is the qr code which you are going to need and that will cross—reference at the venues, at the clubs, at the larger venues, possible larger football matches tomorrow. that will cross reference with the app that these businesses
10:22 am
have. even though it has come into play now, this will not be enforced until the 18th of october. alexandra mackenzie. facebook�*s global head of safety has defended the social media giant against accusations that its photo sharing app instagram can negatively affect the mental health of young people. antigone davis was appearing before a us senate committee hearing on child protection. it comes two weeks after a leak exposed how instagram's own research had found the platform could have a damaging impact on teenagers' body image and self esteem. senators highlighted how facebook had earlier denied it was aware of the research. ms davis argued that instagram �*affirmatively helped' young people on serious issues. our los angeles correspondent david willis has more. she said that this could actually, in some cases, help to give young people more control over their lives and to actually be helpful to them. that wasn't met with much sympathy, i might add,
10:23 am
by senators who formed this committee. one described the facebook research as a bombshell and accused the company of a cover up. it was likened as well, this research, to the cover—up conducted by the tobacco industry over the harmful effects of cigarettes several decades ago. there have been calls as well by this committee for facebook to release the full findings, its full research, on the links between instagram and youth suicide. this is not an issue going away anytime soon because next week the same committee is due to hearfrom a facebook whistleblower, who left the company with apparently tens of thousands of documents related to internal research on these and other matters. that person is due to give evidence on tuesday.
10:24 am
david will summit. the swedish activist criticised the efforts of politicians to tackle climate change as 30 years of blah blah blah. but ministers say some progress is being made on a range of issues. boris johnson has said young people have every right to be angry about the state of climate change and were paying the price for the reckless actions of their elders. detectives in northern ireland investigating the murder of the journalist lear and mickey have arrested two men. the men aged 44 and 53 were arrested in the londonderry area this morning under the terrorism act —— lyra mckee. they have been taken to belfast for questioning. lyra mckee who was 29 were shot dead in april 2019 as she observed writing in the craigen area of the city.
10:25 am
police in ecuador say they have regained control of a high security prison following a major operation involving 900 police officers and army soldiers. clashes broke out on tuesday between rival gangs, who are thought to have links with mexican drug gangs. at least 118 inmates were killed in the disturbances. north korean state media says the country has fired a newly developed anti—aircraft missile. it said the test was conducted on thursday to evaluate the missile's launcher, radar and combat performance. it's the fourth new weapons system tested by pyongyang in the last month. after the actress and tv star dame barbara windsor was diagnosed with dementia she used her profile to raise awareness and help others living with the disease. nine months after her death, her husband scott mitchell is continuing that campaign. on sunday, he'lljoin thousands of runners taking part in the london marathon and he's raising money for alzheimer's research uk. david sillito went to meet him.
10:26 am
# ain't it a shame # ain't it a shame # sparrows can't sing... # barbara windsor, from carry on to eastenders, she was a part of british life for over 50 years and 27 of them she shared with her husband scott and he was there by her side on one of her last public appearances, trip to downing street to raise awareness about alzheimer's. and now, nine months after her death, that commitment they had to be open, to campaign, to raise awareness continues. you they had to be open, to campaign, to raise awareness continues.— raise awareness continues. you lived here a long — raise awareness continues. you lived here a longtime _ raise awareness continues. you lived here a long time together. _ raise awareness continues. you lived here a long time together. it's - raise awareness continues. you lived here a long time together. it's a - here a long time together. it's a place full of memories, isn't it? yeah, we're talking nine months since _ yeah, we're talking nine months since barbara past and me more than anyone _ since barbara past and me more than anyone is_ since barbara past and me more than anyone is aware that that's very early— anyone is aware that that's very early in — anyone is aware that that's very early in the _ anyone is aware that that's very early in the stages of grieving. you know, _ early in the stages of grieving. you know. we _ early in the stages of grieving. you know, we spent 27 years of our life together— know, we spent 27 years of our life together and we really were together a lot as _
10:27 am
together and we really were together a lot as a _ together and we really were together a lot as a couple. i think it's no secret that caring for someone with alzheimer's is a very challenging thing — i'd certainly say the most challenging thing i've ever been through in my life. the barbara the public met was funny and sharp and always open and gregarious. um... it must have been very difficult when you began to see changes in her. yeah. it seemed that barbara — once we got the diagnosis, it seemed that there in the room at the time she... i'v e. i've always recalled this story. she looked at me and she put her hand out and said "i'm sorry" to me. that was her initial reaction. and i said, "don't worry, bar," i said, "it'll be ok. it'll be ok." then she went into a completely different mode, which was, "ok, let's get on with life,
10:28 am
let's, you know, i've got my work to get on with," and that's what she did and, you know, the advice given to me at the time was...let her continue as long as she can. the decision to go public — 2018, wasn't it? mm. what sort of impact did that have? what i didn't want was i didn't want barbara — and it's the same with people living with alzheimer's and dementia and theirfamilies — you don't want to have to hide that person away. you know, you don't want to have to feel that there's a shame to it, and i think for many years there has been a great shame attached to dementia, and how people feel they can talk about it and be open about it. and, of course, barbara being a public figure made it even more difficult because people
10:29 am
constantly would be drawn to her the minute they saw her. and we spoke to her about it and explained to her what was happening — which she understood — and the other big thing that meant a lot to her was, isaid, "you know, barbara, by talking about this, you're going to be helping so many other people." you're about to do the marathon on sunday. you're going to have many thoughts nine months on, i'm guessing. when i go around this time it's going to be a completely different run for me. of course...i was supposed to do it last year, barbara was still here with us. i'm going to be reflecting on a lot. i'm going to be reflecting on that lady i spent 27 of my life with. she will be with me the whole way, like she's been on every training run. you know, i talk to her so much in my head when i'm running. the thing that will be missing for me is, when i finished in 2019, i got to the finish line and i phoned barbara — she was here with her carer and i phoned her and i wasjust,
10:30 am
like, elated and euphoric and i said, "barbara, i'v e ju st r u n a mara th o n p. and she said, "oh, very good, dear, what time will you be home?" he laughs totally not grasping the enormity of what i felt i'd done on my 56th birthday. and i went, "well, i'll be home soon, love, there'sjust a little celebration that i'm just going to stop off at." she said, "but you've been out all day!" which is wonderful and, oh, goodness, barbara, how i wish i could make that call again. but, you know... not to be this year. . the headlines. following the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer met tries to regain public confidence by issuing advice on plainclothes police officers. officers up—and—down the land recognise the devastating
10:31 am
consequences of this event. there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police, particularly i have to say in london. aha, the police, particularly i have to say in london.— the police, particularly i have to say in london. a group of officers believed to _ say in london. a group of officers believed to include _ say in london. a group of officers believed to include couzens - say in london. a group of officers believed to include couzens are i believed to include couzens are being investigated for allegedly sharing disco military messages on a whatsapp group. australia says it will reopen its borders to fully vaccinated citizens in november after 18 months of tight restrictions. higher energy bills for 15 million uk households as a new higher price cap comes into effect. scotland's vaccine passport scheme begins, affecting anyone wanting to go to a nightclub or a big event like a football match. facebook�*s global head of safety refutes accusations that its photo sharing app instagram negatively affects young people's mental health. as black history month starts around the uk we will be live in coventry, the uk we will be live in coventry, the uk's city of culture, to see what is happening there. and also coming up this hour, we hear more about the progress of
10:32 am
europe's first mission to mercury. in belgium, homes are being demolished as part of a one point four billion dollar reconstruction plan after devastating floods earlier this year. forty one people died in the rural ardennes region as streets turned to rivers and houses collapsed. tanya dendrinos reports. a town reduced to rubble. this isn't the result of an explosion, this is the sheer force of mother nature. pepinster in eastern belgium was torn to pieces by flooding injuly. on thursday, the excavators moved in. residents took a final look at the remnants of their homes. buildings once brimming with life and housing years of treasured memories about to be demolished. translation: the situation is a difficult one for me,
10:33 am
from a sentimental and emotional point of view, because i was born in this house in 19116. the floods were the most destructive in living memory, claiming dozens of lives. this drone footage gives you an indication of the scale of the catastrophe in the region. the torrent inescapable. now begins a 1.2 billion euro reconstruction plan. translation: we have a lot of infrastructure around us that has been damaged, as you can see, whether it is the banks, the bridges or the vehicles or the sewers, we still have a lot of work to do, it will take years. but winter is on its way and, for many, the situation remains dire. translation: nothing is happening, we don't even know where we will sleep this winter. we have no accommodation, it is not normal to leave people like that. at the end of the month, world leaders will converge on glasgow for the cop26 summit.
10:34 am
images like these will be front of mind, with climate change fuelling an increase in extreme weather events. leaders will need to discuss how to cope, while addressing the pressing need to cut emissions. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. ethiopia says it is expelling seven senior un officials, for what it calls meddling in the country's internal affairs. the expulsion comes amid repeated calls by the un for the government to allow more humanitarian help into the northern region in and around tigray. mark lobel reports displaced and desperate, reliant on handouts, victims of an 11—month war. now ethiopia's government has told of those there to help get the aid out to get out. the seven senior figures are from the offices of humanitarian affairs, human rights, and children's fund.
10:35 am
ethiopia's ministry of foreign affairs declared the officials persona non grata for meddling in the internal affairs of the country — instructing them to leave the country within the next 72 hours. the un says it's shocked. all un humanitarian operations are guided by the core principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality, and independence. the ethiopian state often accuses aid organisations of supporting its rivals in the north, the tigray people's liberation front. the tplf regained control tigray and the neighbouring area injune after months of bloody battles. they pushed back federal forces, who retain control of the region's checkpoints. which the un says amounts to a blockade of medical supplies and fuel in the war—torn region. what we need is 100 trucks
10:36 am
to enter tigray every day. so we are way below that target. ethiopia's un mission in new york claims of a blockade baseless, yet the un says 5.2 million people still require food aid, with 400,000 people living in famine—like conditions. the only thing that is clear is how far apart both sides remain. there is no hunger in tigray. there is a problem in tigray and the government is capable of fixing that. if not the us is threatening to act. president biden signed an executive order earlier this month enabling the us government to impose financial sanctions on those prolonging the conflict in northern ethiopia. we will not hesitate to use this. as this humanitarian disaster deepens, the us says it is engaging with ethiopia's government to allow its staff to remain working there in what is now a diplomatic disaster. mark lobel, bbc news.
10:37 am
a new law comes into force across england today which bans under 18s from getting botox style injections or dermal lip fillers for cosmetic reasons. it follows years of campaigning to regulate the non surgical beauty industry but there are warnings the changes don't go far enough. our health correspondent anna collinson reports. i just saw this look on herface of panic, and my heart started racing, and i could feel blood just trickling down the side of my face. laura was offered a cheap filler treatment to plump up her lips, but the practitioner accidentally punctured an artery. my lip was massive, it was black, particularly underneath it, but inside of my lip had just filled with blood. i almost passed out with the shock of seeing the state of my face. complications like this need to be dealt with quickly to prevent more serious possible problems like blindness, but laura says her practitioner panicked and didn't know what to do. many practitioners, including ones at this clinic,
10:38 am
adhere to strict safety guidelines. but due to a lack of regulation in the nonsurgical beauty industry, effectively anyone can carry out potentially dangerous treatments. from today there will be more protection but only for some. it's now illegal for under—18s to receive botox style injections or dermalfillers in england for non—medical reasons. though the ban doesn't cover other invasive procedures like thread lifts. this clinic only treats patients over 21. it was absolutely long overdue, but purely cosmetic treatments, really, you don't need anything when you are so young, so it will be unnecessary, it would be a waste of time, a waste of money. going 0k? 0k, brilliant. latest figures estimate around 70,000 of these treatments are carried out in under—18s per year. now anyone caught administering to this age group could go to prison.
10:39 am
update on possible legislation in wales and scotland are expected in the near future. while northern ireland has no current plans. one of the helpful things about this bill is it fits into an existing licensing provision for, for example, sunbeds or tattoo parlours. so the enforcement will be the same through local authorities and for the police, so there is an established provisions, which will mean that it is quite easy to go and enforce. young women believe demand for these treatments are down to constant pressure to look a certain way. i see it so much with my friends, that they have these expectations of themselves and they are so critical of themselves, which i think has 100% come from social media. it's definitely hard to tell which photos are edited and which ones are not, and then you get a really unrealistic body image. so, i'm 20, i have friends who've | had filler and botox in the past, | and they have become addicted to getting it done, that never. really satisfied with the outcomes, and they are always _ looking for more. the law change is a huge achievement for those who have been calling
10:40 am
for regulation for seven years. this feels like a really important first step, but the industry has still got such a long way to go. the fact that these treatments can be done by anyone with no training or experience, they can purchase their products over the internet, and insurance is a huge thing for us, we really want to make it a legal requirement. but anyone over 18 remains as vulnerable as ever. like laura, who is too scared to get the bump in her lip fixed, but is also grateful it didn't turn out worse. it's time to have our monthly catch up with what's happening in coventry�*s city of culture the year long festival of events . and as we come out of lockdown, there's been an unlocking of talent across the city. today is the launch of this is africa's �*the living culture exhibition' to concide with the start of black history month. let's go to coventry now, where our corrrespondent trish adudu has been keeping across what the city has to offer.
10:41 am
like you say, today marks the start of black history month and here in coventry they are really embracing it. there are over 20,000 africans in coventry and being half nigerian myself it is wonderful to find out about my culture. there is a huge exhibition, two miles outside of coventry city centre. the creator and organiser, you are not very stressed, you look very relaxed. it is wonderful. a lot of people here. tell us about this exhibition. this is the living _ tell us about this exhibition. this is the living culture exhibition it is the living culture exhibition it is the _ is the living culture exhibition it is the beginning of black history month — is the beginning of black history month. we are celebrating the future and honouring the past. we want to tell a _ and honouring the past. we want to tell a story, — and honouring the past. we want to tell a story, a story that people have _ tell a story, a story that people have not— tell a story, a story that people have not already said where we think about— have not already said where we think about when_ have not already said where we think about when we talk about black
10:42 am
history — about when we talk about black history month is where we look at the slavery— history month is where we look at the slavery and the messy parts, we want to— the slavery and the messy parts, we want to tell— the slavery and the messy parts, we want to tell the story way before that, _ want to tell the story way before that, how — want to tell the story way before that, how africans lived, looking at governance, military. that is interesting because black history starts _ interesting because black history starts with slavery. we wanted to depict _ starts with slavery. we wanted to depict what africa was. the wealth before _ depict what africa was. the wealth before the — depict what africa was. the wealth before the invasion. the exhibition takes _ before the invasion. the exhibition takes you — before the invasion. the exhibition takes you through the storyline to the messy— takes you through the storyline to the messy medal and into the present where _ the messy medal and into the present where we _ the messy medal and into the present where we have the george floyd madhur— where we have the george floyd madhur and people started asking about— madhur and people started asking about what is happening, what is the history. _ about what is happening, what is the history. and — about what is happening, what is the history, and the empire, so we are portraying — history, and the empire, so we are portraying all that to the present and then— portraying all that to the present and then the present will lead into the future — and then the present will lead into the future where guests and visitors of the _ the future where guests and visitors of the exhibition will carve the future — of the exhibition will carve the future for— of the exhibition will carve the future for young people from the black— future for young people from the black community. the future for young people from the black community.— future for young people from the black community. the city of culture
10:43 am
su orted black community. the city of culture sunported this. _ black community. the city of culture sunported this. it — black community. the city of culture supported this, it is _ black community. the city of culture supported this, it is very _ black community. the city of culture supported this, it is very exciting, i supported this, it is very exciting, is it important in this city of culture year to showcase this? culture is very important, it helps communities to develop, in this year this is— communities to develop, in this year this is africa — communities to develop, in this year this is africa taking part in the city of— this is africa taking part in the city of culture where we can showcase these events and we're really _ showcase these events and we're really excited and privileged to be a of it _ really excited and privileged to be a of it. , ,., ., , really excited and privileged to be aofit. , ., ,., , a of it. one person who is a very larae a of it. one person who is a very large part _ a of it. one person who is a very large part of— a of it. one person who is a very large part of it. _ a of it. one person who is a very large part of it, colourful- large part of it, colourful character, you look amazing. what is your role today? t character, you look amazing. what is your role today?— your role today? i am the writer, the storyteller— your role today? i am the writer, the storyteller for _ your role today? i am the writer, the storyteller for the _ your role today? i am the writer, the storyteller for the exhibition | the storyteller for the exhibition here _ the storyteller for the exhibition here i— the storyteller for the exhibition here i am — the storyteller for the exhibition here. i am the storyteller, the historian. _ here. i am the storyteller, the historian, before i start anything, i historian, before i start anything, i have _ historian, before i start anything, i have to — historian, before i start anything, i have to hear my drummer. to
10:44 am
announce — i have to hear my drummer. to announce the storyteller, you need to have _ announce the storyteller, you need to have a _ announce the storyteller, you need to have a grandma. they carry messages _ to have a grandma. they carry messages— to have a grandma. they carry messares. . ., ., , , to have a grandma. they carry messares. . ., ., , messages. what are the messages you are auoin to messages. what are the messages you are going to relate _ messages. what are the messages you are going to relate today? _ messages. what are the messages you are going to relate today? the - are going to relate today? the createst are going to relate today? the greatest scene _ are going to relate today? the greatest scene is _ are going to relate today? the greatest scene is the scene of self ignorance — greatest scene is the scene of self ignorance. africans had suffered this for— ignorance. africans had suffered this for centuries through historical omissions or colonial dot-mac— historical omissions or colonial dot—mac messes a great injustice to and we _ dot—mac messes a great injustice to and we must correct it because african — and we must correct it because african history is world history. do ou african history is world history. you think african history is world history. drr you think young people are interested in this nowadays? thea;r interested in this nowadays? they are ruickl interested in this nowadays? they are quickly finding _ interested in this nowadays? they are quickly finding out. are - interested in this nowadays? they are quickly finding out. are you i are quickly finding out. are you interested? _ all: yeah!
10:45 am
young people are finding out to be grafted _ young people are finding out to be grafted to — young people are finding out to be grafted to another culture is not enough — grafted to another culture is not enough. you have to be rooted to yourself — enough. you have to be rooted to yourself i— enough. you have to be rooted to ourself. , ., , , ., ,, enough. you have to be rooted to ourself. ,, , , ., ,, ., yourself. i will let you speak to our yourself. i will let you speak to your audience. _ yourself. i will let you speak to your audience. like _ yourself. i will let you speak to your audience. like i— yourself. i will let you speak to your audience. like i say, - yourself. i will let you speak to your audience. like i say, it. yourself. i will let you speak to your audience. like i say, it is| your audience. like i say, it is going to be a very exciting month here in coventry.— here in coventry. thank you very much. the green party has new leaders who have just been elected as the co—leaders of the green party. the counsellor for the bristol ward since 2016 and a former deputy leader of the party who designed the election strategy in the most region — recent council elections. we have more messages about the top story today following the life tariff
10:46 am
given to the murderer of sarah everard. what do you think of the metropolitan police plan to regain public trust and what would make you feel safe? joanne says if you are in london it is unlikely to be stopped by one officer, if it happens, i would ask to call a uniformed colleague, female if possible, and make sure they use the police radio to do that. another message, if i am stopped by one police officer i would like to call it a dedicated verification phone line to confirm their badge numbers. another person suggest an easy number to call would be really useful in those circumstances. something easy to remember. another message, challenging officers sounds dangerous. if an officer has malicious intent i do not think they would let you verify they are legitimate. this does not add confidence for me. the focus should
10:47 am
be on vetting officers. thank you so much for sending all your comments in. i was not able to read all of them, but i read all the messages that you soon. thank you very much. europe's first mission to mercury is expected to reach its destination this weekend. the bepi colombo spacecraft will carry out six fly bys around the planet and if successful, the probe will start sending images back to earth. it's moving too fast to go into orbit but will begin more detailed observations in four years' time. i'm joined now by elsa montagnon, spacecraft operations managerfor the mission at the european space agency: thank you forjoining us on what is a very exciting day. we should begin by re— emphasising that this is part of a much longer project. just remind our viewers where we are in this mission. the remind our viewers where we are in this mission-— this mission. the colombo was
10:48 am
launched in _ this mission. the colombo was launched in 2018 _ this mission. the colombo was launched in 2018 and _ this mission. the colombo was launched in 2018 and is - this mission. the colombo wasj launched in 2018 and is headed this mission. the colombo was i launched in 2018 and is headed to its destination, mercury, a rival due in december 2025. we have been supporting the mission for 1h years. it is a long—term project. a prime scientific mission. one earth year with a possible extension in 2026, a decade long project. itruihat with a possible extension in 2026, a decade long project.— decade long pro'ect. what is the scientific decade long project. what is the scientific mission, _ decade long project. what is the scientific mission, the _ decade long project. what is the scientific mission, the purpose l decade long project. what is the | scientific mission, the purpose of all of this? to scientific mission, the purpose of all of this?— all of this? to explore planet mercury. _ all of this? to explore planet mercury. a — all of this? to explore planet mercury, a forgotten - all of this? to explore planet mercury, a forgotten object i all of this? to explore planet| mercury, a forgotten object in all of this? to explore planet - mercury, a forgotten object in our solar system. mercury, a forgotten object in our solarsystem. it mercury, a forgotten object in our solar system. it has been visited before about to nasa missions in the �*705 before about to nasa missions in the �*70s and the last decade, but for europe and the japanese space agency, it is a first. we have never been there before. the agency, it is a first. we have never been there before.— been there before. the space craft is called colombo, _ been there before. the space craft is called colombo, can _ been there before. the space craft is called colombo, can you - been there before. the space craft is called colombo, can you explain the name? who is it cold up there and what does it tell us about the
10:49 am
way it is actually by the planet? the mission is named after an italian scientist called colombo, we have decided to honour him with our mission, give his name to our mission, give his name to our mission because he has been a person who inspired nasa on the trajectory, the way to bring spacecraft to mercury. it is very difficult to get into orbit around mercury because it is surrounded by energy, to adjust the visibility of the crab so it can enter orbit, and he had the idea of combining planetary flybys like the one we are doing now to get there. he has played a very important role in the exploration of mercury by spacecraft and tomorrow it is dot—mac it would have been his 101st birthday. it is a great way to honour him. it is a big day
10:50 am
tomorrow. th honour him. it is a big day tomorrow.— honour him. it is a big day tomorrow. , ., , , , , tomorrow. in terms of the six flybys that are planned, _ tomorrow. in terms of the six flybys that are planned, what _ tomorrow. in terms of the six flybys that are planned, what sort - tomorrow. in terms of the six flybys that are planned, what sort of- tomorrow. in terms of the six flybys that are planned, what sort of data | that are planned, what sort of data will you be getting from that? will we be seeing images as well? yes. we be seeing images as well? yes, we will see images. _ we be seeing images as well? yes, we will see images, it _ we be seeing images as well? yes, we will see images, it is _ we be seeing images as well? yes, we will see images, it is blocked - we be seeing images as well? yes, we will see images, it is blocked by - will see images, it is blocked by the spacecraft that we have, but we have other cameras and we are furtunate have other cameras and we are furtu nate fortunate that we have other cameras and we are furtunate fortunate that we will be able to take images of mercury as we pass by. we are hopeful we can raise a first image tomorrow morning and some more images later. from a scientific point of view, seven out of the 11 instruments of the mercury planet, will be operated during this flyby. several instruments from our spacecraft from the japanese space agency. forthe spacecraft from the japanese space agency. for the scientific community it is a very exciting moment because we have waited decades for this moment to get first data from our
10:51 am
target mercury. moment to get first data from our target mercury-— target mercury. very best of luck. thank ou target mercury. very best of luck. thank you for— target mercury. very best of luck. thank you for talking _ target mercury. very best of luck. thank you for talking to _ target mercury. very best of luck. thank you for talking to us. - target mercury. very best of luck. thank you for talking to us. she i target mercury. very best of luck. j thank you for talking to us. she is the operations manager for the spacecraft. in 2016, teenager natasha ednan laperouse died from a severe allergic reaction after she ate a baguette that, unknowingly to her, contained sesame seeds. since then her family have campaigned for businesses to include a full list of ingredients on the packaging of food they sell and today "natasha's law" comes into effect across the uk. john maguire has the story. her death may well save many, many lives. natasha ednan—laperouse was flying from heathrow with herfather and best friend when she bought some food — a baguette. natasha knew she had a food allergy, and always checked labels. but the bread had been baked with sesame seeds — not included in the list of ingredients, and which triggered a severe reaction. natasha suffered several cardiac
10:52 am
arrests on the plane, and died later in a french hospital. she was only 15. this new legislation, called natasha's law, comes into force today and closes a loophole so that, now, all pre—wrapped food — including sandwiches, fast—food and cheese or meat from deli counters — must be clearly labelled with a full list of ingredients. also 1a major allergens — including eggs, peanuts and sesame seeds — must be highlighted in the list. the food standards agency calls it a huge step in helping the 2 million people who live with food allergies in the uk. natasha's parents describe it as a bittersweet moment for them but, five years on from their daughter's death, say they they know in their hearts she would be very proud of the new rules in her name — natasha's law. john maguire, bbc news.
10:53 am
people in rome go to the polls this weekend to vote for a mayor who will run the city for the next five years. the main talking point is rubbish or more accurately, rome's chronic problem with managing its waste. mark lowen has more. it should be fixed, because it looks like a dirty town. it doesn't look clean at all. for me, it is heartbreaking, to see my city is a bit left behind. the eternal city, �*caput mundi', rome, bewitches the world and those of us lucky enough live here but, beneath the beauty, lies decay, dirty, broken and, say many romans, the worst in living memory, a huge challenge for whoever is to be elected mayor.
10:54 am
translation: rome's biggest problems, transport, waste management, public spaces, are down to a complete lack of skills, the city and regional authorities blame each other for what to do with the rubbish and mismanagement of the waste company ama. this is a city for tourists, not for its residents. europe's largest landfill, malagrotta, outside of rome, was closed in 2013 for failing to meet eu standards and, since then, the city has become an open air dump. now, waste is sent out across the country and in the nearby town of albano, the capital's failure to deal with its own rubbish is meeting fierce resistance. rome is not doing anything to manage their waste because elections are coming, they do not want to treat their waste in rome, so that is why they're coming here. but here there is countryside. there used to be vineyards.
10:55 am
we are not against some solutions to manage treat our waste but we want plans that are proportionate with our needs. when virginia raggi was elected as mayor of rome five years ago, she came in with a lot of support and a lot of optimism but now many romans are blaming her for the state of the city. mayor, after you running the city for five years, there is rubbish everywhere, potholes, buses are catching fire, why? we laid the foundations for five years and now we have to rebuild completely our city. translation: regarding the rubbish, we inherited a company, ama, with more than 13 years of false balance sheets. we relaunched it and have new plans with new tracks, cleaners and plans and putting things in order. other institutions too, like the national government and the region, have to do theirjob. rome's timeless beauty makes it
10:56 am
a bit stuck in time, development often hampered by ancient remains, a city resting on its laurels, lacking dynamism. it will always enchant but this election is about who will be trusted to clean up its modern ruins. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. bain will be here with you next to take you through to one o'clock. let's have a look at the weather. hello there. autumn has certainly set in and more in the way of autumnal weather over the next few days which could have an impact if you are on the move. stay closely tuned to the forecast if you are because as well as heavy rain at times there is a potential for some damaging disruptive gusts of wind here and there, right the way
10:57 am
through into the start of next week. it is blustery out there today but the main focus has been so far the rain. worse the rain late morning in parts of east anglia and the south—east which clears away, one or two isolated showers. a lot of the time it will be dry across southern and eastern parts. showers frequent in the north and west, particularly west of scotland and northern ireland, where the strongest of the breeze will be but a bigger gap between the showers compared with the morning across western england and wales, more staying dry. across the board, humidity levels drop compared to what they wear this morning so out of the suncheon, a fresh feel but nice enough in the south, cool in the wind further north, 11—14 c. where the wind continues to pile in, the showers through tonight, still some heavy, thundery potentially around, more in the way of persistent rain starting to push into the south—west. bear that in mind for saturday. but with clear skies across central and eastern areas, in much fresher start tomorrow morning, temperatures in single figures. there will be sunshine but here is this developing area of low pressure just along these weather fronts which are going to dominate the charts right the way through the weekend. it is starting to approach, sunny start, and outbreaks of rain quite widely. strong gust of the wind as the rain pushes in, particularly across
10:58 am
southern and eastern parts of england, east anglia and the south—east could see the worst of the wind but a soggy day for many across england and wales after what was a promising start. brighten up across western areas, still blustery here, but it is towards east anglia and the south—east where we could see wind gusts 40—50 mph and add the fact you have the wind and rain it will not feel anything particularly pleasant out there, temperatures down on what we have been used to of late. now let's follow this, the area of low pressure develops further as it runs its way up the north sea and into the north of scotland. exact positioning open to question, that will dictate who sees the wettest and windiest weather. certainly worse there. a brighter further south for the rest of the country with a mixture of sunshine and showers. still some blustery winds but the strongest of the winds potentially hitting 60—70 mph across the far north of scotland, more especially shetland. it will make for another fairly cool day across the country and even though winds will ease a bit into monday, more strong winds in the south on tuesday. we will keep you updated.
10:59 am
11:00 am
this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... after the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer, london's metropolitan police tries to regain public confidence by increasing patrols and issuing advice on dealing with plain clothes police officers. officers up and down the land recognise the devastating consequences of this event. there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police, particularly, i have to say, in london. but a group of officers — believed to include couzens — are being investigated for allegedly sharing "discriminatory" messages on a whatsapp group. higher energy bills for 15—million households as a new, higher price cap comes into effect. australia says it will re—open it's borders to fully vaccinated citizens in november — after 18 months of
11:01 am
tight restrictions. scotland's vaccine passport scheme begins — affecting anyone wanting to go to a nightclub or a big event like a football match. natasha's law — new legislation requiring food retailers to display their full ingredients comes into effect today — named after a teenager who died from a severe allergic reaction. and coming up this hour....we hear more about the progress of europe's first mission to mercury. hello. the metropolitan police — has explained how it intends to better protect women and girls — after the murder of sarah everard. yesterday, wayne couzens —
11:02 am
a serving officer with the met — was given a whole—life prison term for kidnapping, raping and killing sarah in march. the head of the force, dame cressida dick, has faced repeated calls to resign — but she says lessons will be learnt. let's look at how the met is trying to reassure the public. anyone stopped by a lone plain—clothes police officer can challenge their legitimacy, and request to speak to an operator on a police radio to check if the stop is genuine. plain—clothes officers will not be deployed on their own, and will be in pairs. an extra 650 new officers will patrol busy public areas in london where women have concerns about their safety. and the independent office for police conduct is investigating a group of officers who allegedly shared "discriminatory" messages on a whatsapp group — which were discovered during the wayne couzens investigation. serious questions are now being asked about whether opportunities were missed before sarah everard's murder. the met has admitted a vetting check on couzens was not done correctly
11:03 am
when he joined the force. it meant an incident of indecent exposure in kent in 2015, involving a vehicle linked to couzens, was missed. and around 72 hours before sarah everard's abduction, met police officers received a separate allegation of indecent exposure which also identified the vehicle involved as registered to couzens. simonjones reports. sarah everard. described in court as intelligent, talented, much loved. but the question now facing the met is, could and should her killer wayne couzens have been stopped earlier? i recognise that for some people a precious bond of trust has been damaged. there are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all
11:04 am
feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. so resign, then! she didn't respond to questions about whether she should resign. this was the moment couzens falsely arrested sarah everard in south london in march. his arm outstretched, holding his warrant card. he'd go on to rape and murder her, her body dumped in woodland in kent. but, back in 2015, a car owned by couzens was linked to an allegation of indecent exposure. this wasn't picked up by police vetting. and, 72 hours before the kidnap, there was another allegation of indecent exposure. we'll be pushing ministers and the home secretary to have a look at exactly what is going wrong in the vetting processes, in the reporting processes, in the scrutiny of police officers, and how that gets done. the met says it will shortly publish a new strategy for tackling violence against women and girls. it will be deploying 650
11:05 am
new officers into busy public places where people often feel unsafe. it insists it's focused on improving detections for indecent exposure. the fact that this awful man used the cover of being a police officer to commit his crime does have devastating implications for trust. and i know that has caused distress throughout the ranks in british policing, in the thousands of british police officers up—and—down the land. but what we hope is that over time the police can rebuild the trust of the british people. sarah everard's death prompted an outpouring of public grief. in new safety guidance the met says people should ask questions if they're concerned an officer is a threat. advice backed by a police watchdog. call the control room, call 909, and say i'm being asked
11:06 am
to co—operate with someone who says he is a police officer, i want to know if this person is a police officer and if there are any real concerns that the person in question is going to be assaulted or abducted, then that 999 call will be treated as urgent. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't, no. the metropolitan police is now investigating whether he may have committed more crimes. sarah everard's family say the world is a safer place now he'll never be let out of prison. simon jones, bbc news. simon has been at the metropolitan police's headquarters and earlier he told me more about the response. well, the met have described the killing of sarah everard as one of the most dreadful incidents in their 100—year history, and now they are facing another very difficult time about confidence in the police. we have had that new safety guidance you referred to.
11:07 am
now, we are told by the met it is very unusual for someone to be stopped on the street by a loan plain clothes officer, but if that happens to you and you are concerned about the office of�*s conduct, then the advice from the police is you should ask to use the officer �*s radio contact the control room to check what the officer is doing is legitimate. and then the advice is if you still feel in danger you might perhaps want to run to a nearby house and ask for help. you might want to shout out to a passer—by to show you're in distress, you might want to flag down a bus or even dial 999. but, as you say, this is very much putting the onus on the person who is stopped. and, in the case of sarah everard, when wayne couzens showed his arrest warrant, he then quickly handcuffed her. so it's unclear whether that advice would have worked in this case, whether it would have been practical. but this is new advice. the met recognising that they have a job to do to rebuild confidence.
11:08 am
and that's part of the safety advice. they also say they're going to put hundreds of extra officers on the streets of london — 650 new officers. they're going to send those officers into hotspots where violence is perpetrated against women and girls in particular. but, as well as the issue of confidence over the way they handled wayne couzens and the vetting procedure, you've now got this further investigation by the independent office for police conduct. and i think while that is ongoing, that is still going to undermine confidence people have in the metropolitan police. i'm joined now byjess phillips, labour mp for birmingham yardley and shadow minister for domestic violence and safeguarding. let's pick up on the lap points from simonjones. do you have confidence
11:09 am
in the metropolitan police? tt is in the metropolitan police? it is not about in the metropolitan police? tit 3 not about whether in the metropolitan police? tt 3 not about whether i have confidence, it is whether the women in london have confidence in them and the women could you have confidence in any other police forces and it isn't just an issue that starts with the killing of sarah everard and the fact that her killer was a police officer. there is a long and deep—seated problem with trust that when women come forward about issues such as indecent exposure, such as rape, such as domestic abuse, i'm afraid to say that in the case of rape for example 99% of them walk away with no further action and so i don't think that this is just a met police is zero, i think this is a police is zero, i think this is a police issue and so did the police inspectorate and that is why they have called for police over the whole of the systems we is frequently to protect women —— i don't think this is just a met issue. ts don't think this is 'ust a met issue. , ., , ., ~' don't think this is 'ust a met issue. , ., i. ,, ., don't think this is 'ust a met issue. , ., i., ~ ., , issue. is what you think about this latest advice _ issue. is what you think about this latest advice women _ issue. is what you think about this latest advice women are _ issue. is what you think about this latest advice women are being - issue. is what you think about this l latest advice women are being given well anyone being stopped by a lone plainclothes police of the can challenge the legitimacy and asked
11:10 am
to speak to an operator on a police radio. is that putting the onus on women too much, do you think? —— being stopped by a lone police officer can. t being stopped by a lone police officer can-— being stopped by a lone police officer can. ~ , ., ., officer can. i think it is tone deaf but i sympathise _ officer can. i think it is tone deaf but i sympathise with _ officer can. i think it is tone deaf but i sympathise with the - officer can. i think it is tone deaf but i sympathise with the met i officer can. i think it is tone deafi but i sympathise with the met and what else can i say today? i have beenin what else can i say today? i have been in the violence against women and girls sect of the nearly two decades now and actually it was horrifying to see the footage observe everard being handcuffed and the police status being used to coerce her so they have been sort of left with a very, in the short term, nowhere to go. whether, i could scream if i'm honest about the amount of things that women are told to do. sarah everard was keeping herself completely safe. she was doing exactly what any woman would doing exactly what any woman would do and still this happened to her. the onus is on the metropolitan police do better. do the onus is on the metropolitan police do better.— the onus is on the metropolitan police do better. do better how, exactl ? police do better. do better how, exactly? just — police do better. do better how,
11:11 am
exactly? just list _ police do better. do better how, exactly? just list some - police do better. do better how, exactly? just list some of- police do better. do better how, exactly? just list some of the i exactly? just list some of the things you would like to see not just the met was of the police forces do in this area. for just the met was of the police forces do in this area.- just the met was of the police forces do in this area. for a start off they should _ forces do in this area. for a start off they should make _ forces do in this area. for a start off they should make violence i off they should make violence against women and girls a key priority for every single force. the money that is not the case. the inspectorate reported just two weeks ago and the book came out on the day that sabina nasser was killed it is simply not a priority and the government had taken to the airwaves today to say it is up to local areas if they want to use the duty and serious violence of violence against women and girls and we are not going to make the witch and a bit like the government saying terrorism, do it if you want. —— which is a bit like the government saying... that is the first place we need to start, it to be a government privacy and we need every single police force to have, it is quite unbelievable this doesn't exist, but a common set of standards and a strategy for dealing with these offenders. there is no current national strategy and there is no agreed set of principles of
11:12 am
how we devote the offending of violence against women and girls. there have been a lot of calls, as you know, for cressida dick to resign over this. would you join those calls so mike calls. because of because they are and if you have got a woman in charge of the metropolitan police in charge of metropolitan police and you've also got a woman home secretary. guess, and i think both _ got a woman home secretary. guess, and i think both of _ got a woman home secretary. guess, and i think both of those _ got a woman home secretary. guess, and i think both of those women - and i think both of those women should be using the power they have to act more swiftly and decisively and neither of them have shown much in the way of that in the last 2a hours. i understand their salvo and they are upset and even regret on they are upset and even regret on the part of cressida dick and actually their salvo isn't going to stop and the fact that by the end of the day another woman will likely have been murdered by the hands of a man. getting rid of cressida dick is not going to improve the police force in greater manchester, it is not going to help in the west midlands, it is not going to help the fundamental and systematic problem that we have in this country that we just simply don't care as
11:13 am
much is about the safety and security of women in our country as we care about other things. i want to hear within a week from cressida dick more than we will work together, we learn lessons. honestly, a five—year—old could come up honestly, a five—year—old could come up with it. just honestly, a five-year-old could come u- with it. , , honestly, a five-year-old could come uwithit. , v honestly, a five-year-old could come uwithit. , �*, ., up with it. just feel it's good to talk to you- _ up with it. just feel it's good to talk to you. labour _ up with it. just feel it's good to talk to you. labour mp - up with it. just feel it's good to talk to you. labour mp for - talk to you. labour mp for birmingham yardley and shadow ministerfor birmingham yardley and shadow minister for domestic violence and safeguarding. now, more than 15 million households across england, scotland and wales are to face higher energy bills, as the increased price cap comes into effect from today. a typical bill for those on a default tariff will rise by around £140 pounds a year, with those on prepayment meters expected to pay even more. our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey reports as the temperature dips,
11:14 am
so our energy bills rise. the cost of heating and lighting our homes is limited by the price cap, but this is the biggest ever increase at a time when many household budgets are being squeezed. it affects people on standard tariffs in england, wales and scotland and generally those who haven't switched for a long time, or whose time—limited tariffs have expired. the new cap means they will now pay £1,277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity — that's £139 a year more on their bill than under the previous cap. prepayment—meter customers face a higher typical bill of £1,309 a year — that's an increase of £153 on the previous time. those who use more than the average amount of energy in their homes will face bigger bills because the policy caps price, not the total bill. those affected are normally encouraged to switch suppliers for a cheaper deal. this time of the massive rise in the cost of wholesale gas in recent weeks has stripped the market of better offers. it's also led to the collapse
11:15 am
of nine suppliers. their customers will now pay a more expensive tariff in line with the price cap. surviving firms say they are having to buy wholesale energy at a much higher price than the retail cap allows them to sell it for it. we're we' re really we're really worried about making sure customers get through this period so i don't think anyone is asking for the price cap to be increased again. it is what it is, we are doing our best to get customers through it, we are trying to support well—run business to see this period and otherwise if we need to do anything else we are talking to do anything else we are talking to government. analysts say companies' extra costs will be reflected when the cap is revised in the spring, at a level likely to be significantly more expensive for bill—payers. kevin peachey, bbc news. dale vince is the owner of the green energy company ecotricity
11:16 am
thank you very much for being with us. what would you say this whole crisis on gas imports shows about our reliance on traditional forms of energy? t our reliance on traditional forms of ener: ? ~ , ., , ., , energy? i think it shows how utterly de endent energy? i think it shows how utterly dependent we _ energy? i think it shows how utterly dependent we are _ energy? i think it shows how utterly dependent we are on _ energy? i think it shows how utterly dependent we are on fossil - energy? i think it shows how utterly dependent we are on fossil fuels - energy? i think it shows how utterly| dependent we are on fossil fuels and honest global markets notjust for the supply of those fuels but for the supply of those fuels but for the pricing of them because 50% of britain's gas at the moment comes in the north sea which is ours and we own that the price of the north sea gas has grown fivefold only because the global price has gone up by the same amount in the north sea operators are raping it in while bills reach record levels —— are raking it in. there is no point having a retail price cap are not a wholesale price cap. t0 having a retail price cap are not a wholesale price cap.— having a retail price cap are not a wholesale price cap. to what extent would move — wholesale price cap. to what extent would move into _ wholesale price cap. to what extent would move into green _ wholesale price cap. to what extent would move into green energy - wholesale price cap. to what extent would move into green energy and. would move into green energy and what exactly do we mean by that but how would that help the consumer? that is a good question because we can actually make all of the electricity we need in our country from the wind and sun a little bit of c. we can make all of the gas we need from grass but unless we change
11:17 am
the market we will still follow global prices for energy and we have the dealing hassles from government intervention and regulation that actually sets the price of energy based on what it cost to make it here in britain, not what it gets sold for investable water costs to make. that is not happening right now. th make. that is not happening right now. , ., ., ., , now. in the short term, what does today mean _ now. in the short term, what does today mean for— now. in the short term, what does today mean for consumers? - now. in the short term, what does i today mean for consumers? because they have obviously got to put out of business in the last few weeks. the price cap is misconceived, a very blunt instrument, 17 competitors in the energy market but we don't have a price cap anywhere else. there is a lot of focus and danced on the cost of energy because we have these incremental changes twice a year from the regulator but we don't have the example a price cap on food and we'll spend five times as much on food as we do an energy. food poverty is a bigger
11:18 am
issue than energy poverty. you why does the government isn't like that because is inconsistency and ad hoc nature to the way the country is being run. nature to the way the country is being run-— being run. what is the advice to --eole being run. what is the advice to people who _ being run. what is the advice to people who are _ being run. what is the advice to people who are going _ being run. what is the advice to people who are going to - being run. what is the advice to people who are going to see i being run. what is the advice to i people who are going to see their bills shooting up because in the old days the advice was to switch what it is much harder to switch now. because the id you can simply switch and get a better deal and avoid realities of global pricing all of thatis realities of global pricing all of that is a bit of smoke and mirrors for consumers, you know, and it is no wonder people feel bamboozled and confused in the energy market. these prices are the real prices of energy at the moment. we are subjecting them and trying to resist in with a price cap is happening now is not just driving energy companies out of business, it is a kinky new types can dance. you we have to accept the realities and everything. —— king canute—type stance. at the moment, the government take 7% of everyone's
11:19 am
energy bills attacks and if they really care about the price of energy and fuel poverty as you take that away. —— as a tax. that energy and fuel poverty as you take that away. -- as a tax.— energy and fuel poverty as you take that away. -- as a tax. that was the founder of — that away. -- as a tax. that was the founder of an _ that away. -- as a tax. that was the founder of an electricity _ that away. -- as a tax. that was the founder of an electricity company. i we will have more on the price cap rises what that means fewer hapless 11. and the journalist in the finance expert who runs the mrs moneypenny website will be had to give you their tips. to e—mail your question the bbc.co.uk. government winners this is one that shows it is a petrol filling stations will continue for a week or so and there is still strong demand for fuel so and there is still strong demand forfuel in so and there is still strong demand for fuel in parts so and there is still strong demand forfuel in parts of so and there is still strong demand for fuel in parts of the country in borisjohnson would review for fuel in parts of the country in boris johnson would review the situation if it deteriorated further. so what is the latest? let's talk to our transport
11:20 am
corresponding carolyn davies who is with us and has been monitoring the situation around the country and it is fair to say it is different in different parts of the country, isn't it? , , , different parts of the country, isn'tit? , , , , isn't it? yes, it is very patchy situation _ isn't it? yes, it is very patchy situation and _ isn't it? yes, it is very patchy situation and we _ isn't it? yes, it is very patchy situation and we know- isn't it? yes, it is very patchy situation and we know that i situation and we know that scotland's situation seems to be improving along to the petrol retailers association, wales seems to be improving as well but london and the south—east are potentially subbed dyke struggling at the moment. we are yet to get figures to see how the situation is developing. we did see how the situation had sold and it was the same percentage of their members had one vie as had on the day before many will be hoping this is a blip and things will be improving —— had run dry. of course, if they do continue to stall and potentially get worse that does raise the question of what can be done to potentially reassure customers further so they can go back to purchase the same petrol as they did before.— they did before. because the government _ they did before. because the government had _ they did before. because the government had said i they did before. because the government had said they i they did before. because the i government had said they hope that it would start to ease as people filled up, once they had a full tank of fuel than the whole panic buying situation would start to down? qt
11:21 am
situation would start to down? of course situation would start to down? qt course we situation would start to down? (ztt course we are not situation would start to down? ttt course we are not actually having a shortage of fuel but the issues of course that you cannot get the fuel to the pump which was the initial situation and we are in a situation where the demand has increased so rapidly that many of the operators are struggling to fill up and i was speaking to one petrol operator earlier today and he was saying that normally they would be sort of selling about 35,000 gallons and today they are up to 65,000 gallons of it is a huge amount more that they are selling on a regular basis and that is what they are trying to keep up with so it is not necessarily always about these deliveries been delayed or later art not having enough of them, it is just the fact that the demand has gone up so rapidly and they are trying to keep up with them. find trying to keep up with them. and what is the _ trying to keep up with them. and what is the latest on the driver situation in terms of both the ministry and also the visas that were issued, 5000 visas? —— in terms of the military? do we know if and when those 5000 lorry drivers are going to come? {in when those 5000 lorry drivers are going to come?— when those 5000 lorry drivers are going to come? on the army to start with we have — going to come? on the army to start with we have not _ going to come? on the army to start with we have not yet _ going to come? on the army to start with we have not yet at _ going to come? on the army to start with we have not yet at confirmation | with we have not yet at confirmation the out on the road and we knew they
11:22 am
were going to get additional training the next few days that we not certain if they have yet appeared on the road to helping out. we know that the reserve tank is, they came out from wednesday that they came out from wednesday that the government set out so that is being driven by civilian drivers. in terms of the visa situation, these temporary visas are expected to be, the school is meant to be starting to roll to get together later this month in october. there was concern yesterday speaking to the haulage industry that the government might reduce the length of these visas from three months down to two months in the haulage industry originally said they wanted six months because it takes a long time to be to trainable uk drivers to fill the spaces they wanted to have a longer period of time. the government has said it was a three—month period and now they are worried that could get squeezed and squeezed and reduced down and they say that is not long enough. the government, of course, has overseen quite emphatic that it is doing lots of other things, lots of other measures to try to make sure that drivers can beat trained, that tests have been streamlined, that tests have been streamlined, that they are able to move people
11:23 am
through the process and train have visas uk jobs not through the process and train have visas ukjobs not from independence jobs but the moment you play the visa scheme has not started and people can apply for these visas. taste people can apply for these visas. we have heard already from some european lorry driver saying what is the point of they came here in october and have got to get out by christmas eve and is it worth them while? that is the exact situation. people are very concerned that three months was not going to be appealing enough for people to want to leave theirjobs, move and come to the ukraine and put everything particularly at the moment given that we are not the only place that has got a lovely driver shortage and so there are other options for people in the eu. the suggestion that it was going to be two months is obviously left the haulage industry feeling even more concerned that people are not going to necessarily want to take that up. again, the government has been determined that the competitive salaries that are going to be offered will be enough to try and entice people to come to the uk. caroline, thank you very much indeed for pinging is the latest on the petrol situation. the australian prime minister scott
11:24 am
morrison says fully vaccinated australians will be able to enter and leave the country freely from november. it's the first time they will be able to do so without permission since australia closed its international borders in march 2020 in response to the coronavirus pandemic. it means millions of citizens can travel out of the country and some a5,000 australians currently abroad will be able to return home. it will be time very soon that will be able to open those international borders again and that will enable australians who are fully vaccinated and australians and residents of australia who are overseas who are fully vaccinated to be able to travel again and to be able to lift those caps. this will happen next month. that's when it will start happening, from next month. well, our australia correspondent simon khalil is in sydney and has got more details about who that is covered by this relaxation of australia's travel restrictions.
11:25 am
fully vaccinated as the key in 80% vaccinated is also the key for this highly and hugely anticipated and very, very emotional moment for many australians here in the country but also abroad as well. the prime minister in his announcement said that states who have reached 80% vaccination will be able to open international travel and those who are travelling and coming back all those who are coming back from overseas will go into a seven day quarantine, home quarantine. essentially, this is the end of hotel quarantine, which means that those thousands and thousands of stranded australians are going to be able to come back home much more easily and it will be a much more straightforward process because there will be no caps on arrival. as it stands, new south wales, where i am, will be the first state to open its borders internationally. there are still a lot of details to iron out, especially the proof of vaccination, whether it is
11:26 am
certificates or passports or qr codes. a loss of details about that but also the fact that different states have approached their covid—19 outbreaks differently so new south wales has decided it is going to live with the virus, it is going to live with the virus, it is going to live with the virus, it is going to reach 80% and it will open up. when and western australia have a very different picture there and they are still going for elimination and zero covid and have always been the strictest, always the first close, always reluctant to open a bodice and we still don't know where they stand on international borders because it will mean a spike in covid—19 cases so you can have a scenario in the nearfuture covid—19 cases so you can have a scenario in the near future where someone in sydney, where i am, for example, will be able to travel to london or paris or new york but they won't be able to travel to perth or brisbane because the states will still be closed so it will be an interesting, if confusing, scenario, but i think generally a huge sigh of relief for many australians with overseas travel now an option for so
11:27 am
many people after nearly two years of being isolated.— of being isolated. khalil reporting from sydney- _ people are reporting issues trying to register for scotland's new covid—19 reporting app right if it was launched. officials say overwhelming demand could be to blame for the problems as james shaw now reports. scotland's vaccine passport scheme will have an impact across a range of live events. n ig htclu bs face particular challenges. everyone going in will have to be checked. they'll have to show a qr code on a smartphone or have a printout of their certificate. all my friends are so angry because they are waiting on this letter form of a vaccine passport — it's just ridiculous. i think they're a good idea. i think. there nothing, like, wrong with it.
11:28 am
i mean, if people are getting vaccinated then there's nothing wrong with showing you are vaccinated, do you know what i mean? seems like an imposition, i seems unreasonable, seems like another nail in the coffin for the hospitality sector. i it's not yet clear what the impact will be for the big football clubs, but they will be relieved that enforcement is being delayed. rangers will play hibernian here at ibrox on saturday, and the club has told fans they must turn up with proof of vaccination. but how many will be checked? and will any fans be turned away from these gates? the scottish government insists the scheme is essential to manage the pandemic, and they say the delay will make it easier for businesses. there will be a period ofjust over two weeks when businesses get the opportunity to make sure the arrangements they have in place to do this are tested, can be adapted if necessary, and businesses get the confidence in those arrangements. no other part of the uk is bringing in a scheme quite like scotland's. as before, during the pandemic, the scottish approach is different
11:29 am
and more cautious than elsewhere. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. in 2016, teenager died from severe allergic reaction after she ate a baguette which to lead to lead to hurt contain sesame seeds. her family have campaigned for manufacturers to include a full list of ingredients on the packaging of phonics they sell and now natasha is has come into force across the united kingdom. we can talk to the chief executive at the food standards agency who joins us now. thank you very much for being with us. just talk as though how things will change things. obviously, natasha's k so tragic. will this prevent something like that happening again?
11:30 am
from today you need to put phil labelling on food if it is prepack before the customer orders it. that also needs to highlight the allergens if there are any, milk, gluten, and so on. we think this is really important, we think it will make a big difference to 2 million orso make a big difference to 2 million or so allergen sufferers in uk. there are more with coeliac disease, third intolerances was up that means if they are go into a shop and are grabbing a sandwich, they can quickly check the label and find if there ingredient is on the pack. == there ingredient is on the pack. -- food there ingredient is on the pack. —— food intolerances. why wasn't it done before?— food intolerances. why wasn't it done before? ., ., done before? before, food law was divided into — done before? before, food law was divided into prepacked _ done before? before, food law was divided into prepacked and - done before? before, food law was divided into prepacked and food i divided into prepacked and food prepared on the premises. now if it is prepared or not the princess before the customer orders it needs this ordering meaning it can be
11:31 am
trusted. t this ordering meaning it can be trusted. , , ., , trusted. i suppose for the bigger businesses. _ trusted. i suppose for the bigger businesses, it _ trusted. i suppose for the bigger businesses, it is _ trusted. i suppose for the bigger businesses, it is relatively i trusted. i suppose for the bigger. businesses, it is relatively simple. but for smaller operators, what are the challenges that this will present? the challenges that this will resent? ., , , , ,, , present? even for big businesses, it is not completely _ present? even for big businesses, it is not completely simple, _ present? even for big businesses, it is not completely simple, they i present? even for big businesses, it is not completely simple, they have| is not completely simple, they have had to make some big changes. they have had to get the full ingredients on the label, that doesn't need to be high—tech, they canjust on the label, that doesn't need to be high—tech, they can just do that with a normal printer. we know from research we did last year into business readiness, that already four out of five businesses who sold a sort of labelling it with the allergen information and a three and five were doing full ingredient labelling. so businesses are already doing this. tt labelling. so businesses are already doin: this. , , . doing this. it sounds basic in principle. — doing this. it sounds basic in principle. but _ doing this. it sounds basic in principle, but how— doing this. it sounds basic in principle, but how do i doing this. it sounds basic in principle, but how do you i doing this. it sounds basic in i principle, but how do you police it? how do you make sure, especially smaller operators, are doing this? local authorities already go into offered businesses around the country to make sure it is done
11:32 am
safely. there little green and black sticker is on at the door at the hygiene ratings. offices will be checking when they do the inspections will if businesses haven't done it yet, the opposite were government support and guidance. if they insist on doing, they get an improvement notice. if they get an improvement notice. if they really don't do, they get an unlimited fine.— unlimited fine. what is the situation — unlimited fine. what is the situation with _ unlimited fine. what is the situation with restaurants | unlimited fine. what is the i situation with restaurants and cafe is? tt situation with restaurants and cafe is? ., ., , , situation with restaurants and cafe is? , , ., is? if the food is prepared after the customer _ is? if the food is prepared after the customer orders, _ is? if the food is prepared after the customer orders, then i is? if the food is prepared after the customer orders, then it i is? if the food is prepared after i the customer orders, then it doesn't need ingredient labelling. we would say to the consumer is that if you have got a or allergy, make sure you ask and talk to the chef about what is in that thread. it is the responsibility of the business to make sure they have the information available for the consumer and they have to provide it aurally if it hasn't got ingredient labelling on the menu. ,., ., hasn't got ingredient labelling on the menu. ., ., ., ,, ., the menu. good to good to talk to ou, the menu. good to good to talk to you. thank— the menu. good to good to talk to you. thank you — the menu. good to good to talk to you, thank you for _ the menu. good to good to talk to you, thank you for all _ the menu. good to good to talk to you, thank you for all that. i the menu. good to good to talk to you, thank you for all that. let's l you, thank you for all that. let's
11:33 am
catch up on the latest weather forecast and what is going to be happening over the weekend. matt taylor has all the latest details. early heavy rain clearing of the east anglia by lunchtime. isolated showers, most will be dry. if you are showers compared to the morning. showers remain frequent in that they not find the west. a cold blustery day, nice enough in the east, but it's likely fisher feel. showers keep going across many northern and western areas, becoming more frequent in the night. temperatures will down into single figures quite widely. it will be closed at the weekend, promising start with some sunshine for some, weekend, promising start with some sunshine forsome, quickly weekend, promising start with some sunshine for some, quickly will turn into a soggy saturday for england and whales. same for scotland, the western areas will brighten up. blustery here, the strongest of winds east anglia and the south—east. it will feel cooler for
11:34 am
many. more heavy rains and strong —— heavy rain and strong winds to take us into this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines at 11: after the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer, london's metropolitan police tries to regain public confidence by increasing patrols and issuing advice on dealing with plain clothes police officers. officers up and down the land recognise the devastating consequences of this event. there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police, particularly, i have to say, in london. but a group of officers — believed to include couzens — are being investigated for allegedly sharing "discriminatory" messages on a whatsapp group. higher energy bills for 15 million households as a new, higher price cap comes into effect. australia says it will re—open it's
11:35 am
borders to fully vaccinated citizens in november — after 18 months of tight restrictions. scotland's vaccine passport scheme begins — affecting anyone wanting to go to a nightclub or a big event like a football match. natasha's law, new legislation requiring food retailers to display their full ingredients comes into effect today — named after a teenager who died from a severe allergic reaction. and, coming up this hour — we hear more about the progress of europe's first mission to mercury. sport — and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. here is jane. good morning. the powers that be are not taking racism seriously enough, that is according to rangers manager stephen kamara —— steven gerrard.
11:36 am
glen kamara, who was racially abused by a slavia prague player last season, was booed and jeered, by young fans in their europa league defeat at sparta prague last night. rangers lost 1—0 — this headerjust about crossing the line in the first half. the game was initially supposed to be played behind closed doors, after sparta supporters had racially abused a monaco player in a champions league qualifier — but it was later decided to allow 10,000 schoolchildren to attend. the jeering at kamara reached a peak in the second half, when he was sent off. rangers are bottom of their group, as are celtic, who were thumped 4—0 at home, by bayer leverkusen. they've now conceded eight goals in their opening two games. but former celtic striker chris sutton, has tweeted that the manager needs patience and time, and will stick with his style of play. in contrast, west ham are loving their european return. they're top of their group after a 2—0 win at home to rapid vienna.
11:37 am
they opened the scoring on the half hour mark michail antonio crossing for declan rice to tap in. that triggered some ugly scenes in the crowd, with a number of away fans jumping over barriers to goad the home supporters, and both sides throwing objects. right at the end, sayid benrama wrapped up the points for west ham. and there was huge relief, as harry kane, came on as a substitute for tottenham and scored a hat—trick in a win 5—1 win, over ns mura in the europa conference league. goals have been harder to come by for the england captain this season, but he scored three in 20 minutes —
11:38 am
that was a morale—boosting win for the side after their humbling defeat by neighbours arsenal last weekend. i think it was a good performance, i think we started the gain a very strong. the energy of the buoys was important. it is always important to start the way we needed, we scored, we score again, we dominate. the only period i think is at the beginning of the second half that they lost a little bit of control, but the reaction was good to their call. overall, ithink but the reaction was good to their call. overall, i think a very good performance. australia's cricket captain tim paine says the ashes will go ahead this winter, even if some england players decide not to travel because of covid concerns. skipperjoe root and other members of the england team have expressed doubts over the tour because of the restrictions — and the relaxation only applies to australian citizens at the moment, but it could be extended to foreign travellers in time, which may allay england players' fears, with the first test on december 8. andy murray has been knocked out in the second round of the san diego open.
11:39 am
he lost in straight sets to the world number 10, casper ruud of norway, who described murray as a "legend" and said his fight back from serious injury had been an inspiration. murray was in the event as a wild card — and he's been given another into next week's indian wells masters. they were partying in perpignan last night, as catalan dragons, the rugby league club from that southern french city, reached their first ever grand final, after beating hull kr in the play—off semi—final. the dragons were always in control, and when fouad yaha went over in the second half the game was beyond doubt. they'll now face the winners of tonight's semi between leeds rhinos and st helens in the grand final a week tomorrow. that's all the sport for now. the green party of england and wales have elected new leaders. carla denyer and adrian ramsay
11:40 am
will take over the helm afterjonathan bartley announced injuly that he would stand down. our political correspondent, ione wells, is in central london. we are here in central london where they nearly dig of the green party have just been announced. this election was triggered whenjonathan bartley announced he would no longer be standing for leader and also sian berry also said she would not be seeking the election as co—leader of the green party. we do have the results in today. we can speak to the leaders as well now, we have carla denyer here, a bristol city councillor, as well as adrian ramsay, who is the former deputy leader but also somebody who has co—written the party's strategy going into those elections. as part of your campaign, both of you had an
11:41 am
emphasis on building this party to be a really serious electoral force. how do you plan on doing that? the green how do you plan on doing that? tte: green party is consistently polling third in the opinion polls, we have a fantastic opportunity to take the party to the next level. i think what people are seen across the country as more and more greens getting elected, pipping forward practical policies that make a difference to people's lives. making sure people have high quality local housing and services. if green councils are making a difference on the ground and waiting more and more greens elected at different levels of government, i think that will take the party forward to new heights. taste take the party forward to new heiahts. ~ . , take the party forward to new heiahts. ~ ., , , take the party forward to new heihts_ . ., , , ., heights. we are seeing parties go into their conferences _ heights. we are seeing parties go into their conferences really i into their conferences really gearing up for the next election. you currently have one mp. carla, you yourself have been touted as the possible next mp for the green party. possible next mp for the green .a _ . ., possible next mp for the green party. we are already doing really well in bristol. _ party. we are already doing really well in bristol. i— party. we are already doing really well in bristol. i am _ party. we are already doing really well in bristol. i am one - party. we are already doing really well in bristol. i am one of- party. we are already doing really
11:42 am
well in bristol. i am one of 24 i well in bristol. i am one of 24 green — well in bristol. i am one of 24 green party councillor is now on bristol— green party councillor is now on bristol city _ green party councillor is now on bristol city council, we are the same — bristol city council, we are the same size _ bristol city council, we are the same size as the labour group there. we have _ same size as the labour group there. we have got— same size as the labour group there. we have got voters coming to us from across _ we have got voters coming to us from across the _ we have got voters coming to us from across the spectrum, writing green for the _ across the spectrum, writing green for the first — across the spectrum, writing green for the first time, getting a green elected _ for the first time, getting a green elected and liking what they see. we have hard—working passionate have ha rd—working passionate counsellors have hard—working passionate counsellors working locally and i think— counsellors working locally and i think people realise we are a serious — think people realise we are a serious force and will deliver what we promise, and so people are more likely— we promise, and so people are more likely to _ we promise, and so people are more likely to vote for is then in the general— likely to vote for is then in the general election. notjust mps, we want to— general election. notjust mps, we want to get more councillors, council — want to get more councillors, council leaders and members of the senate _ council leaders and members of the senate also. in council leaders and members of the senate also-— senate also. in the news today, we have the incidents _ senate also. in the news today, we have the incidents blocking - senate also. in the news today, we have the incidents blocking the i senate also. in the news today, we have the incidents blocking the m4| have the incidents blocking the m4 after successive protests. do you agree with their tactics and they think they could be putting off potential green voters, people interested in green politics by disrupting commuters on their way to work and things like that? those
11:43 am
urou -s work and things like that? those 9"°ups are _ work and things like that? those groups are different _ work and things like that? ii—tt"* groups are different organisations from the green party and we don't always support their tactics. what campaigners are doing is putting klein met at the top of the agenda and highlighting that we need to take action urgently to raise juice of society present on fossil fuel stop —— climate at the top of the agenda. we assume that with rising bills and energy, the crisis at the fuel pumps. we need to help people to move beyond that addiction on fossil fuels. to move beyond that addiction on fossilfuels. there are policies that we can deliver that will improve people's everyday lives. both of you, thank you very much. let's get more on the news that millions of uk households are facing
11:44 am
higher energy bills as a new price cap comes into effect. unvented gueye getting answers to your questions on that in a moment or two. first, though, colette smith has been looking at how people can save money on their energy bills. global gas prices, companies going bust, rising bills. it's all a bit much right now. but there are a few things you could do that will save you more than the amount your bills are going up by. i've come round tojenny�*s house to have a look around. hi, jenny. hi. and just see how much money we can save. this is culprit number one. yeah, my thermostat. ok, and do you like it nice and warm in the house? i do, i always have the heating on a lot. well, turning your heating down by one degree — so most of us have it about 22, 21 — if you turn it down to 20, do you reckon anyone would notice? no. well, it could save you as much as 55 quid through the year. do you ever put the telly on standby? no, ijust use the remote, it's easier to press the button
11:45 am
and throw the remote and up you go. well, turning off the telly either at the button or at the wall could save you 35 quid a year. the dishwasher and the washing machine. yeah. if... i guess they're always on, right? they are always on. if you do one less wash a week — whether that's on the washing machine or dishwasher — that's going to clock up some savings through the year. 0k. behind you here, we've got an led light. this is pretty expensive to get in the first place so it's a bit of an outlay to begin with, but once you've bought them, led lights to save a good lot of money each year. i've got you a draft excluder — cost me all of £2.50. i didn't splash out much but the point is this would save you ten times that in a year if you're sticking that at the bottom of your doors, and save a load of money through the year. were you trying to hide this one from me? my favourite appliance! my tumble dryer. ok, is this on a lot? it's on an awful lot. it uses a load of energy. if you were to use it a little bit less you could save a lot on your
11:46 am
energy bill through the year. jenny, i think we're there, i think we've done it. yeah. i think between us... i think you have! ..we have maybe beaten the price—cap rise. easy things that maybe we could all do, do you think, jenny? yeah, little changes make up big savings. those were some top tips. we are going to attempt to answer some of your questions about rising energy prices and bills. with me is lynn beattie, personal finance adviser and founder of the mrs mummypenny website, and faith archer, who's a personal finance journalist and founder of the much more with less website. let's kick off with lynn, a question
11:47 am
from a mum of two young children who lives in a flat in south london who wants to know how much more should she be budgeting per month for her bills? t she be budgeting per month for her bills? ., , , ., bills? i did a little survey of the --eole in bills? i did a little survey of the people in my — bills? i did a little survey of the people in my facebook - bills? i did a little survey of the people in my facebook group i bills? i did a little survey of the| people in my facebook group to bills? i did a little survey of the i people in my facebook group to find out what people are paying, what their bills have gone too. i actually have some people in the situation. this is quite scary, but it looks like bills have been dabbling. it depends what company she is worth, what tariff she is on, a variable or fixed rate. but i would be prudently assuming they might be doubling. but to get around that, she needs to make sure she is on the best fixed deal, sites out switch deals, and lots of tips on energy saving will help her bring the cost down. this energy saving will help her bring the cost down.— energy saving will help her bring the cost down. this one wants to know more _ the cost down. this one wants to know more about _ the cost down. this one wants to know more about home - the cost down. this one wants to know more about home energy i know more about home energy efficiency grants. how can she find out more about them? the
11:48 am
efficiency grants. how can she find out more about them?— efficiency grants. how can she find out more about them? the best option is to net on out more about them? the best option is to get on the — out more about them? the best option is to get on the internet _ out more about them? the best option is to get on the internet and _ is to get on the internet and google _ is to get on the internet and google. find out if you can get the support _ google. find out if you can get the support. you are liable to get larger— support. you are liable to get larger grants if you are on benefits, such as the state pension or universal — benefits, such as the state pension or universal credit. this benefits, such as the state pension or universal credit.— or universal credit. this one is from natasha, _ or universal credit. this one is from natasha, who _ or universal credit. this one is from natasha, who lives i or universal credit. this one is from natasha, who lives in i or universal credit. this one is from natasha, who lives in a i from natasha, who lives in a three—bedroom house with herfamily of four, she wants to know if there is any way to subsidise the cost of insulation or solar power in her home. she and her husband both work full—time, not receiving any benefits. is there any help is available on that? , ., ,., available on that? interesting about the solar panels. — available on that? interesting about the solar panels, and _ available on that? interesting about the solar panels, and just _ available on that? interesting about the solar panels, and just about i available on that? interesting about the solar panels, and just about to l the solar panels, and just about to move to a house with solar panels so i've done a lot of research on this. there is so much stuff i don't know! there is so much stuff i don't know! there are lots of considerations with solar panels because do you release them from a company, do you own them? there are lots of subsidisation is available from
11:49 am
these companies. to be careful what company she talk to because you to work with a reputable firm because there are if you cowboys out there. what i have been told about my new houseis what i have been told about my new house is that my energy bills will be about £200 a year, when at the moment aren't paying about £800 a yearin moment aren't paying about £800 a year in my current house, so the savings can be really big with solar panels. the same with insulation,
11:50 am
there will be subsidies available, but do a google, that kind of thing. that is an incredible saving. taste that is an incredible saving. we will see if that actually happens. we will aet back if that actually happens. we will get back to _ if that actually happens. we will get back to you. _ if that actually happens. we will get back to you. this _ if that actually happens. we will get back to you. this one i if that actually happens. we will get back to you. this one from i get back to you. this one from hannah who uses a prepaid metering. she is worried about the increase to her bills, which usually pays around 50 quid a month, how much more might she have to pay? is there anything she have to pay? is there anything she can do to cut costs? t she have to pay? is there anything she can do to cut costs?— she have to pay? is there anything she can do to cut costs? i think she is likely to — she can do to cut costs? i think she is likely to pay _ she can do to cut costs? i think she is likely to pay more. _ she can do to cut costs? i think she is likely to pay more. what - she can do to cut costs? i think she is likely to pay more. what has i is likely to pay more. what has happened _ is likely to pay more. what has happened today is that the energy price cap — happened today is that the energy price cap went up, that is the maximum _ price cap went up, that is the maximum that can be charged on the default _ maximum that can be charged on the default target. that went out for prepayment customers, the average user, _ prepayment customers, the average user, up— prepayment customers, the average user, up by— prepayment customers, the average user, up by £153 to £1309. i think all you _ user, up by £153 to £1309. i think all you tips — user, up by £153 to £1309. i think all you tips on energy savings,
11:51 am
going — all you tips on energy savings, going for— all you tips on energy savings, going for the insulation, all you tips on energy savings, going forthe insulation, using all you tips on energy savings, going for the insulation, using your appliances — going for the insulation, using your appliances less, making sure they are not— appliances less, making sure they are not on— appliances less, making sure they are not on standby. i've been putting — are not on standby. i've been putting on— are not on standby. i've been putting on the extra jumpers, turning — putting on the extra jumpers, turning the thermostat down recently as things _ turning the thermostat down recently as things have got chillier. it's going — as things have got chillier. it's going to — as things have got chillier. it's going to be tough this winter. extra “um er, going to be tough this winter. extra jumper. that's _ going to be tough this winter. extra jumper, that's always _ going to be tough this winter. extra jumper, that's always a _ going to be tough this winter. esta. jumper, that's always a very going to be tough this winter. eat? jumper, that's always a very good tip. here is one from rachel, who is on a fixed tariff until march next year. what will happen to her bills were not fixed had a runs out? is it that anything she can do to avoid a hike in prices. this that anything she can do to avoid a hike in prices-— hike in prices. this is an interesting _ hike in prices. this is an interesting one - hike in prices. this is an interesting one because j hike in prices. this is an i interesting one because we hike in prices. this is an - interesting one because we really don't know what is going to happen to the wholesale price of energy the next six months. i would hope that if we have a windy winter we can generate lots of wind power. if the far east isn't using all the energy again, we can conserve some more energy over here. it is all dependent on that wholesale price. the energy suppliers do pass on increases and reductions in that hotel price josh —— wholesale price to customers quickly first up i used to customers quickly first up i used to buy energy with tesco, and it is passed on quickly.— to buy energy with tesco, and it is passed on quickly. more likely to go u . passed on quickly. more likely to go u- than passed on quickly. more likely to go op than down _ passed on quickly. more likely to go op than down i _ passed on quickly. more likely to go up than down i would _ passed on quickly. more likely to go up than down i would hazard i passed on quickly. more likely to go up than down i would hazard a i passed on quickly. more likely to go i up than down i would hazard a guess? i would assume they are more likely to go up. but you would hope by then we have sort of worked out that supply issue and we have got some more energy back again and it will not be so much of a hike. again, may
11:52 am
be prudently assume doubling your bills with that first question, i would maybe assume the same. it is quite scary but at least you are prepared for it.— quite scary but at least you are reared for it. , ., ., ,., prepared for it. this one from south london, prepared for it. this one from south london. two — prepared for it. this one from south london, two bedroom _ prepared for it. this one from south london, two bedroom flat, - prepared for it. this one from south london, two bedroom flat, working| london, two bedroom flat, working from home, worried that as the weather gets worse over the winter, his bills will get worse. how can he save money elsewhere with bills? what can he do generally to save money? th what can he do generally to save mone ? , ., ., ., ,, what can he do generally to save mone ? , ., ., ., ~' ., money? in terms of heating, taking a thermostat down _ money? in terms of heating, taking a thermostat down a _ money? in terms of heating, taking a thermostat down a bit, _ money? in terms of heating, taking a thermostat down a bit, checking i money? in terms of heating, taking a thermostat down a bit, checking if. thermostat down a bit, checking if vou're _ thermostat down a bit, checking if you're radiator valves can be switched _ you're radiator valves can be switched on or off. if you are working _ switched on or off. if you are working from home, maybe you can hole up _ working from home, maybe you can hole up in_ working from home, maybe you can hole up in a — working from home, maybe you can hole up in a single room and keep that one _ hole up in a single room and keep that one warmer than the rest of the flat. investigating if there are other— flat. investigating if there are other places that you might be able to work_ other places that you might be able to work so— other places that you might be able to work so you might be able to benefit — to work so you might be able to benefit from them spending on the energy~ _ benefit from them spending on the energy. i'm thinking of things like
11:53 am
internet— energy. i'm thinking of things like internet catheters, libraries, places — internet catheters, libraries, places you can go at that can maybe .ive places you can go at that can maybe give you _ places you can go at that can maybe give you a _ places you can go at that can maybe give you a bit of a change of perspective as well while you are working — perspective as well while you are working to stop otherwise, nice bills for— working to stop otherwise, nice bills for households are going to be housing, _ bills for households are going to be housing, food, transport. if you are working _ housing, food, transport. if you are working from home, transport might not be _ working from home, transport might not be so _ working from home, transport might not be so big. but certainly fit bills, — not be so big. but certainly fit bills, cooking from scratch, swapping to discount supermarkets, those _ swapping to discount supermarkets, those are _ swapping to discount supermarkets, those are going to be the best savings — those are going to be the best savings you can get. if you are getting — savings you can get. if you are getting a — savings you can get. if you are getting a lot of soups and stews, that might keep you warm too. -- cookin: that might keep you warm too. cooking a lot. that might keep you warm too. » cooking a lot. this one is someone from avro energy, they have gone bust, she has been e—mailed by catlike octopus energy. will they give her a more competitive tariff? so many of these companies have gone bust and the last few weeks. i was reading the threads of tweets yesterday from avro energy customers asking catlike octopus what is happening. obviously catlike octopus
11:54 am
have a lot of new customers, they are trying to get them connected up. they are trying to put them on the best deal at the moment, all those people switching over, they are not tied to octopus. because i'm one of their customers, they are not a tiny company at that are likely to go bust, in fact their ceo has been doing a lot of pr about how successful the company is and how much cash they have got. the fact that a lot of avro energy customers have moved over to octopus. i think sit and wait for a few weeks but you are in pretty good hands with the company at octopus.— are in pretty good hands with the company at octopus. thank you brown for answering — company at octopus. thank you brown for answering those. _ company at octopus. thank you brown for answering those. i _ company at octopus. thank you brown for answering those. i turned - company at octopus. thank you brown for answering those. i turned on - company at octopus. thank you brown for answering those. i turned on at - for answering those. i turned on at the central heating yesterday for the central heating yesterday for the first time yesterday, but my director has told me i should have just put on a sweater. that is may
11:55 am
at the advice. that is your questions answered for today. the founder of the uk's first black children's magazines, cocoa girl and cocoa boy, is today launching a new book to coincide with the start of black history month. serlina boyd was inspired to write cocoa girl awesome hair after after damaging her own hair with relaxers and harmful products during childhood. as well as being passionate about giving black children a voice by educating them about black culture and role models, as a parent, she has also been keen to ensure children celebrate their hair and have confidence to be themselves. i'm pleased to say serlina joins us now. first of all, tell us a bit more about what inspired the magazines and the book. your daughter was
11:56 am
having a hard time at school with some of the other kids? mr; having a hard time at school with some of the other kids? my daughter basically inspired _ some of the other kids? my daughter basically inspired me _ some of the other kids? my daughter basically inspired me to _ some of the other kids? my daughter basically inspired me to do _ some of the other kids? my daughter basically inspired me to do the - basically inspired me to do the magazines. ijust wanted to celebrate her, she has got beautiful skin, beautiful here, sol celebrate her, she has got beautiful skin, beautiful here, so i wanted to do some magazines that celebrated her and other children like her, but also a magazine that speaks about our culture as well. it has had a huge effect, skills subscribing up and down the country. our readership has grown. my daughter was firstly the inspiration, but all the children from different cultural backgrounds have been another inspiration of why i wanted to do this amazing book. tellll inspiration of why i wanted to do this amazing book.— this amazing book. tell us more about the book _ this amazing book. tell us more about the book and _ this amazing book. tell us more about the book and how - this amazing book. tell us more i about the book and how important this amazing book. tell us more - about the book and how important it is. in terms of the feedback you have had so far from the people if
11:57 am
you have read the magazine and the book as well. i you have read the magazine and the book as well-— book as well. i have had incredible feedback from _ book as well. i have had incredible feedback from children _ book as well. i have had incredible feedback from children whose - book as well. i have had incredible | feedback from children whose lives have been changed, who really embrace shoot they are. i'm actually envious of this time because children are seen representation on the screens and they are embracing who they are. there are incredible days like world after a day. i feel that children now are able to see themselves and you see that attitude towards their hair and their beautiful skin tones, and this book religious celebrates that. in the back of the book, we have lots of children having their hair out i'm just saying i love me. when you love yourself, you are going to have incredible future is, when you are confident in who you are. this is the movement at the moment. the book really does just celebrate them and
11:58 am
just they are affirming themselves as well. they do see a lot of positivity around them, and the future is bright when they are surrounded by positivity this is all part of black history month, how important the thing that is to make us think more about black history and black culture? i think it is really important for others to find out about our culture and what we find out about other people's cultures. project lead for this month it is about finding out our history. we talk about than two knots and the tribe in africa where they come from. it is incredible that when you know your history, you will go for. that is what we're doing, telling people about our
11:59 am
history, educating children about the history. it is not uses me, there are so many other organisations doing the same thing. the beauty is that our magazines are in schools and its are subscribing up in schools and its are subscribing up and down the country, they want to get their hands on this book cocoa girl awesome hair, which is just awesome. cocoa girl awesome hair, which is just awesome-— cocoa girl awesome hair, which is just awesome. thank you for being with us. europe's first mission to mercury is expected to reach its destination this weekend. the spacecraft will carry out six flybys around the planet and if successful the probe. sending images back to. it will gain more detailed observations in four years' time. you are watching
12:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at 12... after the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer, london's metropolitan police tries to regain public confidence by increasing patrols and issuing advice on dealing with plain clothes police officers. officers up and down the land recognise the devastating consequences of this event. there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police, particularly, i have to say, in london. but a group of officers — believed to include couzens — are being investigated for allegedly sharing "discriminatory" messages on a whatsapp group. higher energy bills for 15 million households as a new, higher price cap comes into effect. australia says it will re—open it's
12:01 pm
borders to fully vaccinated citizens in november — after 18 months of tight restrictions. scotland's vaccine passport scheme begins — affecting anyone wanting to go to a nightclub or a big event like a football match. natasha's law — new legislation requiring food retailers and coming up this hour....we hear more about the progress of europe's first mission to mercury. hello. the metropolitan police — has explained how it intends to better protect women and girls — after the murder of sarah everard. yesterday, wayne couzens — a serving officer with the met — was given a whole—life prison term for kidnapping, raping and killing sarah in march. the head of the force, dame cressida dick, has faced repeated calls to resign — but she says lessons will be learnt.
12:02 pm
let's look at how the met is trying to reassure the public. anyone stopped by a lone plain—clothes police officer can challenge their legitimacy, and request to speak to an operator on a police radio to check if the stop is genuine. plain—clothes officers will not be deployed on their own, and will be in pairs. an extra 650 new officers will patrol busy public areas in london where women have concerns about their safety. and the independent office for police conduct is investigating a group of officers who allegedly shared "discriminatory" messages on a whatsapp group — which were discovered during the wayne couzens investigation. serious questions are now being asked about whether opportunities were missed before sarah everard's murder. the met has admitted a vetting check on couzens was not done correctly when he joined the force. it meant an incident of indecent exposure in kent in 2015, involving a vehicle linked
12:03 pm
to couzens, was missed. and around 72 hours before sarah everard's abduction, met police officers received a separate allegation of indecent exposure which also identified the vehicle involved as registered to couzens. simonjones reports. sarah everard. described in court as intelligent, talented, much loved. but the question now facing the met is, could and should her killer wayne couzens have been stopped earlier? i recognise that for some people a precious bond of trust has been damaged. there are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. so resign, then!
12:04 pm
she didn't respond to questions about whether she should resign. this was the moment couzens falsely arrested sarah everard in south london in march. his arm outstretched, holding his warrant card. he'd go on to rape and murder her, her body dumped in woodland in kent. but, back in 2015, a car owned by couzens was linked to an allegation of indecent exposure. this wasn't picked up by police vetting. and, 72 hours before the kidnap, there was another allegation of indecent exposure. we'll be pushing ministers and the home secretary to have a look at exactly what is going wrong in the vetting processes, in the reporting processes, in the scrutiny of police officers, and how that gets done. the met says it will shortly publish a new strategy for tackling violence against women and girls. it will be deploying 650 new officers into busy public places where people often feel unsafe. it insists it's focused on improving detections for indecent exposure.
12:05 pm
the fact that this awful man used the cover of being a police officer to commit his crime does have devastating implications for trust. and i know that has caused distress throughout the ranks in british policing, in the thousands of british police officers up and down the land. but what we hope is that over time the police can rebuild the trust of the british people. sarah everard's death prompted an outpouring of public grief. in new safety guidance the met says people should ask questions if they're concerned an officer is a threat. advice backed by a police watchdog. call the control room, call 999, and say i'm being asked to co—operate with someone who says he is a police officer, i want to know if this person is a police officer and if there are any real concerns that the person in question is going to be assaulted or abducted, then that 999 call will be treated as priority. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. do you know sarah?
12:06 pm
i don't, no. we can talk now to the chair of the home affairs select committee yvette cooper. cressida dick says she's sorry. is cooper. cressida dick says she's sor . , . ., cooper. cressida dick says she's sor ., . ., , sorry. is that enough? of course it is not enough- _ sorry. is that enough? of course it is not enough. we _ sorry. is that enough? of course it is not enough. we have _ sorry. is that enough? of course it is not enough. we have got - sorry. is that enough? of course it is not enough. we have got to - sorry. is that enough? of course it| is not enough. we have got to have some answers about what happened and how it is that somebody who is so dangerous can serve as a police officer for so long and that is how we need an independent enquiry into this awful awful case that should look both at what went wrong, why allegations went investigated but also into some of the wider issues about the systems in the culture in policing that meant that this wasn't
12:07 pm
stopped. policing that meant that this wasn't sto ed. ~ ., policing that meant that this wasn't sto ed. a, , , policing that meant that this wasn't stoned. , , . , ., stopped. more broadly, what is wrong with the police — stopped. more broadly, what is wrong with the police in _ stopped. more broadly, what is wrong with the police in this _ stopped. more broadly, what is wrong with the police in this country, - stopped. more broadly, what is wrong with the police in this country, not - with the police in this country, not just in london. he was talking to one of your colleagues just ability were saying theyjust don't investigate or take seriously and of crimes against women and girls, not just on the streets but in the homes, domestic violence. what more do you want to see the police in this country do? irate do you want to see the police in this country do?— do you want to see the police in this country do? do you want to see the police in this count do? ~ . ., . , this country do? we have got, as the inspectorate — this country do? we have got, as the inspectorate said, _ this country do? we have got, as the inspectorate said, an _ this country do? we have got, as the inspectorate said, an epidemic- this country do? we have got, as the inspectorate said, an epidemic of- inspectorate said, an epidemic of violence against women and girls that hasn't been addressed by the whole criminaljustice system. i think this needs to come from the top and home office and home secretary need to make clear to forces across the country that violence against women and girls should be part of the strategic police requirement. that means it should be their top priority alongside tackling terrorism and more serious crimes. —— terrorism and considered amongst the most serious crimes. it is important we
12:08 pm
keep women safe. tables go back to this and say they will be able to rebuild trust unless they are open about the things that have gone wrong and that means we need an independent enquiry into this case, into why allegations weren't followed up, into how such a dangerous man could be a police for such a long time and into the wider country. we need that independent enquiry and we have had it after previous of the events that have damaged trust. we need one now. in damaged trust. we need one now. in the short term, the met have responded by saying they're putting on 650 extra officers into areas where women are concerned. they have also issued advice as to what happens if you are approached by a lone police officer in plain clothes, how how women should deal with that. what is your response to that? j with that. what is your response to that? 4' , ., , , that? i think the problem is if it is alwa s that? i think the problem is if it is always about _ that? i think the problem is if it is always about and _ that? i think the problem is if it is always about and advice - that? i think the problem is if it is always about and advice to i that? i think the problem is if it - is always about and advice to women are not changing the system again you don't rebuild trust. it is why we need a different approach with
12:09 pm
much stronger action taken to address the wider problems around women and girls —— around violence against women and girls but also much more open assessment and some of the issues around the culture and procedure and systems within policing thatjust procedure and systems within policing that just acting procedure and systems within policing thatjust acting fast enough and effectively enough to address those problems. irate enough and effectively enough to address those problems. we have heard it is often _ address those problems. we have heard it is often claimed - address those problems. we have heard it is often claimed the - address those problems. we have| heard it is often claimed the police is institutionally racist. do you think it is may be institutionally misogynist as well? that think it is may be institutionally misogynist as well?— think it is may be institutionally misogynist as well? that is why you need a proper _ misogynist as well? that is why you need a proper independent - misogynist as well? that is why you need a proper independent enquiry| misogynist as well? that is why you i need a proper independent enquiry to actually be also asked these questions?— actually be also asked these ruestions? ~ . . . actually be also asked these cuestions? ~ . . . ., questions? what you think? what do ou think? questions? what you think? what do you think? we _ questions? what you think? what do you think? we know— questions? what you think? what do you think? we know for— questions? what you think? what do you think? we know for example - questions? what you think? what do | you think? we know for example that there are cases _ you think? we know for example that there are cases where _ you think? we know for example that there are cases where a _ you think? we know for example that there are cases where a police - there are cases where a police officer may be a of domestic abuse but they are not suspended while those allegations are actually investigated. that is not taking it seriously enough. we know that there are cases where there have been we've heard in our select committee we've heard in our select committee we have heard from rape victims who weren't taken seriously enough.
12:10 pm
there is an immense amount of excellent work being done by dedicated police officers right across the country but as long as we have these problems in the system as long as we don't have broad enough action taking seriously the good work is undermined. i action taking seriously the good work is undermined.— action taking seriously the good work is undermined. i started off by askin: ou work is undermined. i started off by asking you about — work is undermined. i started off by asking you about cressida _ work is undermined. i started off by asking you about cressida dick- work is undermined. i started off by asking you about cressida dick in i work is undermined. i started off by asking you about cressida dick in a| asking you about cressida dick in a savvy enough. are you one of those who think she should resign over this? —— if she is sorry enough. yvette cooper, i'm not sure you can hear me? de think cressida dick should resign? sorry, last question if you can hear me, do you think cressida dick should resign? no, i think we have lost yvette cooper. but we got the gist of what yvette cooper was saying. chair of the home affairs committee and labour mp.
12:11 pm
now, more than 15 million households across england, scotland and wales are to face higher energy bills, as the increased price cap comes into effect from today. a typical bill for those on a default tariff will rise by around £140 pounds a year, with those on prepayment meters expected to pay even more. our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey reports as the temperature dips, so our energy bills rise. the cost of heating and lighting our homes is limited by the price cap, but this is the biggest ever increase at a time when many household budgets are being squeezed. it affects people on standard tariffs in england, wales and scotland — generally those who haven't switched for a long time, or whose time—limited tariffs have expired. the new cap means they will now pay £1,277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity — that's £139 a year more on their bill than under the previous cap. prepayment—meter customers face a higher typical bill of £1,309 a year — that's an increase of £153 on the previous time.
12:12 pm
those who use more than the average amount of energy in their homes will face bigger bills because the policy caps price, not the total bill. those affected are normally encouraged to switch suppliers for a cheaper deal. this time, the massive rise in the cost of wholesale gas in recent weeks has stripped the market of better offers. it's also led to the collapse of nine suppliers. their customers will now pay a more expensive tariff in line with the price cap. surviving firms say they are having to buy wholesale energy at a much higher price than the retail cap allows them to sell it for. we're really worried about making sure customers get through this period and so i don't think anyone is asking for the price cap to be increased again.
12:13 pm
it is what it is, we are doing our best to get customers through it, we're trying to support well—run business through this period, and otherwise, if we need to do anything else, we're talking to government. analysts say companies' extra costs will be reflected when the cap is revised in the spring, at a level likely to be significantly more expensive for bill—payers. kevin peachey, bbc news. greta thunberg has joined another claimant to strike and criticise the efforts of politicians to tackle climate change is that he is a blah blah blah. said young people has every right to be angry about the state of climate change. detectives investigating the murder of the genus leva mckee have a two men aged 44 and 53 who were arrested in the londonderry earlier this morning under the terrorism act and have been taken to belfast for questioning. leva mckee who was 29
12:14 pm
years of age were shot dead in derry in 2019 as she observed rioting in an area of the city. —— lyra mckee. you're watching bbc news. we ta ke we take you back to our top stories today and the metropolitan police's reaction to sarah everard's murder and we can talk now to a professor of criminology and expert on violence against women at the university of roehampton. thank you very much a being with us today and we have been talking to lots of people in today about what they think and how they think the police in this country needs to change in terms of doing more to address the wider issue of violence against women and girls, notjust in london but around the uk. what is your view? ~ , ., , , . view? my view, nothing less than transformative _ view? my view, nothing less than transformative change. _ view? my view, nothing less than transformative change. top - view? my view, nothing less than l transformative change. top down, right down to the hobby on the beat.
12:15 pm
right down to the hobby on the heat. this includes actually dismantling cop culture that fuels gender—based misogyny, sexism, racism, lgbtq y discrimination. the purpose of the police is to serve and pursue justice. justice, my essay, for all victims and i do think we need to ensure that police officers serve and pursue the perpetrators and that means also pursuing perpetrators who denigrate the uniform, denigrate in the line of duty, and to pursue them within the police force as well. because you see, you know, we can, it is important to deploy extra police on our streets but we need a... we need a dismantling of the culture which allows complicity, which allows police officers to turn a blind eye. now, this officer, this
12:16 pm
criminal who murdered sarah everard, can police —— kent police have questions to answer from 2015. no onejoined the dots in relation questions to answer from 2015. no one joined the dots in relation to what happened in kent police and subsequently allowing this criminal to actually go on to work in uniform, serve our streets, shame the police force in the way that he did. ~ , ., . ~ the police force in the way that he did. ~ i. . ~ . the police force in the way that he did. . the police force in the way that he did. when you talk about cop culture and the need — did. when you talk about cop culture and the need to _ did. when you talk about cop culture and the need to dismantle _ did. when you talk about cop culture and the need to dismantle it, - did. when you talk about cop culture and the need to dismantle it, how i did. when you talk about cop culture | and the need to dismantle it, how do you do that? what does that mean? does not mean getting rid of certain officers? does it mean changes in the way officers are trained? offices are educated? irate the way officers are trained? offices are educated? we need to be lookin: at offices are educated? we need to be looking at all— offices are educated? we need to be looking at all those _ offices are educated? we need to be looking at all those things _ offices are educated? we need to be looking at all those things and - looking at all those things and more. they make a plea for greater accountability but i also want to say this. heads should roll in relation to those who failed, who continue to fail, victims of gender—based violence and ijust
12:17 pm
want to remind us that, you know, the feminine side censuses stated that at least 16 serving police officers have killed women. why is this not being taken seriously? why does it take another murder for us to collectively sit up and pay attention?— to collectively sit up and pay attention? , . . , ., ., attention? use a head should roll, deemina attention? use a head should roll, deeming cressida _ attention? use a head should roll, deeming cressida dick— attention? use a head should roll, deeming cressida dick is _ attention? use a head should roll, deeming cressida dick is well- attention? use a head should roll, l deeming cressida dick is well ahead of metropolitan police because of course you have got a woman in charge of the metropolitan police. i charge of the metropolitan police. i think we need a public enquiry to ensure that police officers who failed to protect and serve citizens from all communities, you only have to look at the way in which the treatment of... henry and nicholas... there are so many woman from black and racialised minority communities who are subject to a hostile environment.
12:18 pm
communities who are sub'ect to a hostile environment._ communities who are sub'ect to a hostile environment. thank you very much indeed- _ hostile environment. thank you very much indeed. again, _ hostile environment. thank you very much indeed. again, we _ hostile environment. thank you very much indeed. again, we have - hostile environment. thank you very much indeed. again, we have lost i hostile environment. thank you very l much indeed. again, we have lost the line there but that was a professor from the university of roehampton. we are going to get a full sports round—up thief from the bbc sports centre. hi, then. breaking news regarding last night's match regarding last night's match regarding rangers and rangers have contacted uefa about the building in jeering —— booing and jeering their play was subjective. that was just months after the fenland midfield it was racially abused by a slavia prague player. the game was initially supposed to be postponed after slavia prague players said a reason monaco player in a separate incident was it was later decided to allow 10,000 school children to attend. the manager said these things keep raising the head far too
12:19 pm
often and unfortunately the punishments are not enough. click it in australia's captain tim paine says the ashes will go ahead this winter even if some england players decide not to travel because of covid—i9 concerns. captainjoe root and the other members of the england team have expressed doubts over the term because of the restrictions and the relaxation in the advice of australian citizens of the moment but it could be extended to foreign travellers in time which may allow england players fears with the first test due to start in september the 8th. warwickshire are the new champions at the bob willis trophy. they beat lancashire at lord's champions at the bob willis trophy. they beat lancashire at lords and in some style too. tom bailey was the last months as follows warwickshire secured the victory by an innings and 299 runs with the day and i have to spare. that completes and i have to spare. that completes a domestic double for warwickshire who also won the county championship. the british boxerjoe
12:20 pm
joyce says he trusts he will be awarded an olympic gold medal after an independent investigation found officials manipulated the outcome of matches in 2016 in rio. he lost one of his matches injust matches in 2016 in rio. he lost one of his matches in just one of ii suspicious bouts. the head of the investigation professor richard mclaren said a system in the manipulation of fight was in place. the spot�*s world covering body —— governing body said it noted the report with concern. he said he was sad to see disruption in the sport he loved and will be considering the findings with his legal team. he added to that statement... there is more on that developing story on the bbc sport website the
12:21 pm
latter that for now. then. jane dougal with later spot. latest figures coming in through the office for national statistics of the prevalence of covid—i9 in england increased to around one in 85 people in the week ending the 24th of september so the prevalence of covid—i9 cases then remaining lower than it was two weeks ago when it was estimated at one in 80. those are the latest figures for you. now, tens of thousands of pigs may have to be cold if the government does not take urgent action to ease labour shortage which is creating backlogs and fans across the country. that is the warming today from farmers and farming unions are calling for more visas to beissued unions are calling for more visas to be issued to allow skilled workers from mainland workers to come into the united kingdom. i ruralaffairs correspondent claire marshall has this report.
12:22 pm
they found a saviour desperate and in despair. there could be serious animal welfare and hygiene issues. once pigs get to big retailers don't want to buy them. a friend of the van he was foster his piglets on his farm said he had been by that. —— the farmer who was. to slaughter his piglets. i was the staff in two of the uk's biggest meat processing centres were in europe. the government recently created temporary visas for lorries and paltry divers to try and limit disruption in the run—up to christmas. national pig association wants a similar scheme for its industry. the government said it was working closely with the sector to explore options. claire marshall, bbc news.
12:23 pm
we can now talk to the chief executive of the british meat producers association. talk is about the problem you're facing.— the problem you're facing. started in on the brexit _ the problem you're facing. started in on the brexit time _ the problem you're facing. started in on the brexit time when - the problem you're facing. started in on the brexit time when we - the problem you're facing. started in on the brexit time when we hadj in on the brexit time when we had been part of europe and very reliant on uk workers, —— non—uk workers, mainly from europe and this has gradually been building as we got further away from that point and of course covid—i9 has caused us some more problems as well, really, so this time last year i was talking about a 10% shortage of labour in ourfarms and now about a 10% shortage of labour in our farms and now we are looking at 15, 15.5, 15% our farms and now we are looking at 15, 15 .5, 15% short and some of them are higher than that, up to 25% short on staff so this is a growing problem and has been growing for some time, really, and we have tried all the things that governments asked us to do in terms of
12:24 pm
increasing wages and things like that but there are a lot of people and a loss ofjob vacancies out there at the moment and it is really hard to agree and particularly what we need a skilled butjust to do this. it is not something we can look for people of the street. echoes in a way of the shortage of lorry drivers we have been saying and the government have been telling industry in general to pay british workers more. as she said, you have offered higher wages will maybe haven't offered enough? mac well, this is the trouble. some of our plants reported they have increased wages by sort of 11% across the board. i know some starting wages have gone up by nearly sort of 20%. that doesn't seem to be pulling the men. and, of course, the end of the day, someone has to pay for this. this is an industry which works in quite tight margin so somewhere along the line these wages have to be funded from somewhere and that is
12:25 pm
the missing piece of the jigsaw and it is all very well saying to everyone to pay more but where does the money come from to pay more. so, in the short term what would you like? with the lorry drivers we have seen is temporary visas for european lorry drivers claim? in similar? would that work?— lorry drivers claim? in similar? would that work? along with a lot of other associations _ would that work? along with a lot of other associations in _ would that work? along with a lot of other associations in the _ would that work? along with a lot of other associations in the country - would that work? along with a lot of other associations in the country we | other associations in the country we joined and we which to the prime minister asking for a covid—19 recovery package issuing short—term visas to help the industry out. you know, i think this is slightly longer term thanjust the know, i think this is slightly longer term than just the run—up to christmas and just fixing the christmas and just fixing the christmas problem. this needs to be looked at on a wider basis and i think it's frustrating from our point of view that only gave year or so, actually, the other government commission, the migrate of the advisory committee said to look at this and have an independent view it
12:26 pm
and actually do have a plan for the country where the poms were likely to arise and said the easing of immigration policy that would help resolve these issues and that migrator the advisory committee report was actually just discarded, really, and has not been implemented. in that report a loss of the answers and a lot of the solutions to the problems... hagar solutions to the problems... how much of this _ solutions to the problems... how much of this sheathing is because, for example, by brexit, how much by covid—19 and about longer term factors? covid-19 and about longer term factors? ., ' ' covid-19 and about longer term factors? ., " , . covid-19 and about longer term factors? ., " factors? covid-19 has been a big factors? covid-19 has been a big factor because _ factors? covid-19 has been a big factor because we _ factors? covid-19 has been a big factor because we haven't - factors? covid-19 has been a big factor because we haven't been l factors? covid-19 has been a big - factor because we haven't been able to train people and we haven't had the mobility of people around the country. you know, our plants are mainly cited in places where we need to get animals to and also training has been really difficult with social distancing and plants and things like that so recruitment and training during covid—19 has been a
12:27 pm
source of factor. i don't actually blame brexit. it is about the immigration policy introduced since both are causing the problems. ihlick both are causing the problems. nick alan, thank — both are causing the problems. nick alan. thank you- — both are causing the problems. nick alan, thank you. chief executive of the british meat processors association. thank you. the australian prime minister scott morrison says fully vaccinated australians will be able to enter and leave the country freely from november. it's the first time they will be able to do so without permission since australia closed its international borders in march 2020 in response to the coronavirus pandemic. it means millions of citizens can travel out of the country and some 16,000 australians currently abroad will be able to return home. it will be time very soon that we'll be able to open those international borders again and that will enable australians who are fully vaccinated and australians and residents of australia who are overseas who are fully vaccinated to be able to travel again and to be able to lift those caps. this will happen next month.
12:28 pm
that's when it will start happening, from next month. scott morrison. we can talk to the independent�*s travel editor. i guess there will be a surge in flight bookings?— there will be a surge in flight bookinus? , ,, . bookings? just to put a perspective on this, it bookings? just to put a perspective on this. it was _ bookings? just to put a perspective on this, it was march _ bookings? just to put a perspective on this, it was march 2020 - bookings? just to put a perspective on this, it was march 2020 when i bookings? just to put a perspective | on this, it was march 2020 when the australian close their borders completely. they are allowed in the australian citizens and permanent residents who were brought to coming —— they allowed only australian citizens. that continues. i know australians in the uk who are still having to queue up to get back to their own country and when they get there they are going to go into two weeks of quarantine either in a hotel of innate mining camp in the northern territory but that is all going to change as you heard scott morrison say. the first flights on qantas i think going in on the 19th of november, which will be a great
12:29 pm
advantage for people who are in the uk. there is going to be a flight three times a week from london. i havejust three times a week from london. i have just checked the prices, not too bad considering it is a monopoly situation. £1048 it will cost you of other not you unless you happen to have an australian passport or you are a permanent resident there which i don't believe you are. trio. are a permanent resident there which i don't believe you are.— i don't believe you are. no, i'm not, i don't believe you are. no, i'm not. actually- — i don't believe you are. no, i'm not, actually. simon, _ i don't believe you are. no, i'm not, actually. simon, let - i don't believe you are. no, i'm not, actually. simon, let me i i don't believe you are. no, i'm. not, actually. simon, let mejust also ask you, in terms of australia's policy on all of this they were criticised for being incredibly draconian on this but at the same time they were relatively slow in getting the people vaccinated?— slow in getting the people vaccinated? , . , vaccinated? oh, sure, and there is an absolute _ vaccinated? oh, sure, and there is an absolute punch-up _ vaccinated? oh, sure, and there is an absolute punch-up going - vaccinated? oh, sure, and there is an absolute punch-up going on - vaccinated? oh, sure, and there is| an absolute punch-up going on and vaccinated? oh, sure, and there is. an absolute punch-up going on and i an absolute punch—up going on and i listen so you didn't have to do to the whole a0 minute press conference and loads of it was all about well, new south wales are doing this in victoria probably going to sign up. they are the two states with the highest vaccination levels and the key number there is 80% of the adult population but they are also the two
12:30 pm
states with the highest infection rate and if you are queensland, if you are western australia, if you are tasmania, you are absolutely not signed up for this so there is an awful lot to be sorted out now and he actually said, scott morrison, you might be in sydney and be able to fiji or bali but you won't be able to go to queensland and he said he didn't know what the queensland tourist industry would think about that. having said that, though, he said almost exactly nothing about people who were desperate to see family in australia, people who just want to go on holiday there, for goodness' sake. he simply the 13 migrant workers and two students who he said he might have some good news for next year. —— he simply referred to migrant workers and to students but there is absolutely no haste in australia opening up to all the bits you want to go there. it is australia opening up to all the bits you want to go there.— you want to go there. it is nice to see ou you want to go there. it is nice to see you in _ you want to go there. it is nice to see you in an _ you want to go there. it is nice to see you in an airport. _ you want to go there. it is nice to see you in an airport. you - you want to go there. it is nice to see you in an airport. you off - you want to go there. it is nice to see you in an airport. you off to l see you in an airport. you off to some lovely?— some lovely? i'm certainly not
12:31 pm
australia but _ some lovely? i'm certainly not australia but i'm _ some lovely? i'm certainly not australia but i'm going - some lovely? i'm certainly not australia but i'm going to - some lovely? i'm certainly not - australia but i'm going to eindhoven in the netherlands and netherlands and there are an awful lot of people travelling today and i hope they have all paid as little as i have because the airlines still desperate to get us back on board and i am coming back by boat on monday morning which is of course when the rules changed and i will be among the first consignment of people who don't have to have a test before they come back into the uk. ok. good luck for you- — they come back into the uk. ok. good luck for you. had _ they come back into the uk. ok. good luck for you. had a _ they come back into the uk. ok. good luck for you. had a great _ they come back into the uk. ok. good luck for you. had a great time - they come back into the uk. ok. good luck for you. had a great time and - luck for you. had a great time and have a lovely cup of coffee. simon calder there at stansted airport. lets see what the weather is doing this weekend with nick miller. it is one of the brighter days out there today but there is a lot of weather on the way going into the weekend. we have had some showers and rent me through today. another band of shelves across east anglia and the east of england over the next couple of hours, but a lot of sunshine following that across the uk. showers for north whales, northern
12:32 pm
ireland and western scotland, some heavy with hail and thunder. it is a blustery out there. it is towards the north—west where the showers will continue as we go on through the night, a night which is going to be much cooler, especially wales and england. let's take a look out tomorrow. we start dry, but the rain is going to move in, clues that northern ireland quickly, knows into scotland, but it is really heavy in wales and england. the wind is really heavy in wales and england. the winds also picking up. there could be some gusts up to 65 mph. this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines: after the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer, london's metropolitan police tries to regain public confidence by increasing patrols and issuing advice on dealing with plain clothes police officers.
12:33 pm
officers up and down the land recognise the devastating consequences of this event. there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police, particularly, i have to say, in london. but a group of officers — believed to include couzens — are being investigated for allegedly sharing "discriminatory" messages on a whatsapp group. higher energy bills for 15 million households as a new, higher price cap comes into effect. australia says it will re—open it's borders to fully vaccinated scotland's vaccine passport scheme begins — affecting anyone wanting to go to a nightclub or a big event like a football match. it's time to have our monthly catch—up with what's happening in coventry — this year's uk city of culture. as we come out of lockdown, there's been an unlocking of talent across the city. the coveted turner prize is headed to the midlands for the first time. our corrrespondent, trish adudu, is keeping across everything there. so what can we expect?
12:34 pm
we are so excited in coventry, the turner prize, the first time it has beenin turner prize, the first time it has been in the midlands and it is here because of the city of culture. it is one of those things are easier on the news out at all highbrow and intellectual, but it is on our doorstep, which is absolutely incredible. we are so looking forward to the end of the year when the turner prize will be announced at the beginning of december. frankly, you are creative director here at this gallery hosting the turner prize exhibition. you can't stop smiling! i’m turner prize exhibition. you can't stop smiling!— stop smiling! i'm so excited, it's amazin: stop smiling! i'm so excited, it's amazing to _ stop smiling! i'm so excited, it's amazing to be — stop smiling! i'm so excited, it's amazing to be able _ stop smiling! i'm so excited, it's amazing to be able to _ stop smiling! i'm so excited, it's amazing to be able to bring - stop smiling! i'm so excited, it's amazing to be able to bring the| amazing to be able to bring the turner— amazing to be able to bring the turner prize to coventry, especially at this— turner prize to coventry, especially at this historic moment, the first time _ at this historic moment, the first time in _ at this historic moment, the first time in the — at this historic moment, the first time in the midlands, but also the first time — time in the midlands, but also the first time that has been five collectives, which has been absolutely amazing. they are all
12:35 pm
socially — absolutely amazing. they are all socially engaged, so it's brilliant. what _ socially engaged, so it's brilliant. what they— socially engaged, so it's brilliant. what they mean by collectives? we mean they are a group shows. for instance. — mean they are a group shows. for instance. we — mean they are a group shows. for instance, we are currently in the project _ instance, we are currently in the project artworks room, i think there are about _ project artworks room, i think there are about ga artists, so a huge amount— are about ga artists, so a huge amount of— are about ga artists, so a huge amount of artist. instead of working with four— amount of artist. instead of working with four individuals, we have worked — with four individuals, we have worked with five collectives, you can imagine it's been an absolute right— can imagine it's been an absolute right and — can imagine it's been an absolute right and been amazing. the outcome is stunning- — right and been amazing. the outcome is stunning- it — right and been amazing. the outcome is stunning. it is _ right and been amazing. the outcome is stunning. it is like _ right and been amazing. the outcome is stunning. it is like alice in - is stunning. it is like alice in wonderland. taste is stunning. it is like alice in wonderland.— is stunning. it is like alice in wonderland. we are in pro'ect artworks, fl wonderland. we are in pro'ect artworks. they i wonderland. we are in pro'ect artworks, they were i wonderland. we are in pro'ect artworks, they were with h wonderland. we are in project artworks, they were with so i wonderland. we are in project - artworks, they were with so many artists _ artworks, they were with so many artists that — artworks, they were with so many artists that the only way to show off all— artists that the only way to show off all the — artists that the only way to show off all the work was to create a snapshot — off all the work was to create a snapshot of their archives. this structure — snapshot of their archives. this structure is _ snapshot of their archives. this structure is a snapshot of all the work— structure is a snapshot of all the work they— structure is a snapshot of all the work they have created with their members — work they have created with their members. as you can see, they are absolutely— members. as you can see, they are absolutely prolific!— absolutely prolific! what are the other collectives? _ absolutely prolific! what are the other collectives? we _ absolutely prolific! what are the other collectives? we have - absolutely prolific! what are the other collectives? we have got| other collectives? we have got cookin: other collectives? we have got cooking sections, _ other collectives? we have got cooking sections, if—
12:36 pm
other collectives? we have got cooking sections, if you - other collectives? we have got cooking sections, if you look i other collectives? we have gotj cooking sections, if you look at other collectives? we have got - cooking sections, if you look at the environment, we have won the from wales, _ environment, we have won the from wales, and — environment, we have won the from wales, and we have one from northern lreland _ wales, and we have one from northern lreland and _ wales, and we have one from northern ireland and one based in london. we are in ireland and one based in london. we. are in a ireland and one based in london. - are in a museum, let's walk around like they do. what is this? this are in a museum, let's walk around like they do. what is this?- like they do. what is this? this is a charcoal — like they do. what is this? this is a charcoal drawing, _ like they do. what is this? this is a charcoal drawing, it _ like they do. what is this? this is a charcoal drawing, it is - like they do. what is this? this is a charcoal drawing, it is one - like they do. what is this? this is a charcoal drawing, it is one of. like they do. what is this? this is l a charcoal drawing, it is one of the collective's — a charcoal drawing, it is one of the collective's work. there is a whole series _ collective's work. there is a whole series as — collective's work. there is a whole series. as you can see, is absolutely stunning how much would that set _ absolutely stunning how much would that set you back? i don't know, we don't _ that set you back? i don't know, we don't talk— that set you back? i don't know, we don't talk about money. we that set you back? i don't know, we don't talk about money.— don't talk about money. we don't talk about money! _ don't talk about money. we don't talk about money! i'm _ don't talk about money. we don't talk about money! i'm learning i talk about money! i'm learning everything. talk about money! i'm learning everything-— talk about money! i'm learning everything. talk about money! i'm learning eve hina. ,, ., , everything. this is gorgeous. it is absolutely beautiful. _ everything. this is gorgeous. it is absolutely beautiful. if _ everything. this is gorgeous. it is absolutely beautiful. if you - everything. this is gorgeous. it is absolutely beautiful. if you come| absolutely beautiful. if you come down, _ absolutely beautiful. if you come down, we — absolutely beautiful. if you come down, we will be having artists in residence — down, we will be having artists in residence so you will be able to see artists— residence so you will be able to see artists working throughout the season — artists working throughout the season. we also have an animation where _ season. we also have an animation where you — season. we also have an animation where you can see the artist and video— where you can see the artist and video work— where you can see the artist and video work of them working. yes, you will be _ video work of them working. yes, you will be able _ video work of them working. yes, you will be able to get into the practice _
12:37 pm
will be able to get into the practice for the first time. how important _ practice for the first time. how important is — practice for the first time. how important is this _ practice for the first time. how important is this for _ practice for the first time. finch important is this for coventry, to have the turner prize here in the city? have the turner prize here in the ci ? , ., , , �* have the turner prize here in the ci ? , ., .y �* ., have the turner prize here in the ci? �* ., city? obviously, i'm a creative director so _ city? obviously, i'm a creative director so i — city? obviously, i'm a creative director so i think— city? obviously, i'm a creative director so i think it's - city? obviously, i'm a creative director so i think it's really i director so i think it's really important, but i also think it's an amazing — important, but i also think it's an amazing opportunity to inspire the next generation of artists. it is such— next generation of artists. it is such a — next generation of artists. it is such a fabulous experience, everything is so engaging and immersive. everything is about looking — immersive. everything is about looking at— immersive. everything is about looking at the world differently. i think— looking at the world differently. i think where we find ourselves at the moment, _ think where we find ourselves at the moment, being kind to each other and kind to _ moment, being kind to each other and kind to society and coming together, so an— kind to society and coming together, so an absolutely amazing experience. are you _ so an absolutely amazing experience. are you seeing the footfall as things kind of return to normal? taste things kind of return to normal? we are. i think we're quite lucky being one. _ are. i think we're quite lucky being one. so— are. i think we're quite lucky being one, so people are interested in our programme — one, so people are interested in our programme. we have natural histories. _ programme. we have natural histories, which was massively successful. now the turner prize will have — successful. now the turner prize will have national visitors coming to us— will have national visitors coming to us as — will have national visitors coming to us as well as local visitors, retweet — to us as well as local visitors, retweet we really want to encourage the people of coventry to engage.
12:38 pm
how do _ the people of coventry to engage. how do they look tickets to come to this exhibition? you how do they look tickets to come to this exhibition?— this exhibition? you can book oane, this exhibition? you can book online. and — this exhibition? you can book online, and then _ this exhibition? you can book online, and then we - this exhibition? you can book online, and then we have i this exhibition? you can book online, and then we have a i this exhibition? you can book- online, and then we have a certain number— online, and then we have a certain numberof— online, and then we have a certain number of tickets available for walk ups but— number of tickets available for walk ups but we — number of tickets available for walk ups but we do recommend you book online _ ups but we do recommend you book online to _ ups but we do recommend you book online to avoid disappointment. as a lovely seeing — online to avoid disappointment. £3 —. lovely seeing schoolchildren online to avoid disappointment. is —. lovely seeing schoolchildren here getting involved in the community art. i getting involved in the community art. ., ~' getting involved in the community art. ., ,, , ., getting involved in the community art. ., ,, , art. i do think young people come away feeling _ art. i do think young people come away feeling like _ art. i do think young people come away feeling like they _ art. i do think young people come away feeling like they can - art. i do think young people come away feeling like they can change | away feeling like they can change the world — away feeling like they can change the world with their artwork because that is— the world with their artwork because that is exactly what the collectives are dealing here. it that is exactly what the collectives are dealing here.— are dealing here. it has been fascinating. _ are dealing here. it has been fascinating. i— are dealing here. it has been fascinating. i may _ are dealing here. it has been fascinating. i may have i are dealing here. it has been fascinating. i may have to i fascinating. i may have to remortgage the house to pay for some of these paintings, but i for one i'm so proud of coventry, it's amazing, the turner prize in coventry. they when it will be announced in december, in the meantime you can come and look at the exhibition. i meantime you can come and look at the exhibition.— the exhibition. i wouldn't remortgage _ the exhibition. i wouldn't remortgage the - the exhibition. i wouldn't remortgage the house, l the exhibition. i wouldn't i remortgage the house, not the exhibition. i wouldn't - remortgage the house, notjust the exhibition. i wouldn't _ remortgage the house, notjust yet. that's my advice. people have reported issues trying to register for scotland's new covid passport app, just a few hours after it was launched.
12:39 pm
from today, anyone entering nightclubs and most large—scale events will need to prove they've had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. officials say overwhelming demand could be to blame for the problems. james shaw reports. scotland's vaccine passport scheme will have an impact across a range of live events. n ig htclu bs face particular challenges. everyone going in will have to be checked. they'll have to show a qr code on a smartphone or have a printout of their certificate. all my friends are so angry because they are waiting on this letter form of a vaccine passport, it's just ridiculous. i think they are a good idea. there's nothing, like, wrong with it. so i mean if people are getting vaccinated then there is nothing wrong with showing you are vaccinated, do you know what i mean? seems like an imposition, i seems unreasonable, seems like another nail in the coffin for the hospitality sector. i it's not yet clear what the impact will be for the big football clubs, but they will be relieved that
12:40 pm
enforcement is being delayed. rangers will play hibernian here at ibrox on saturday, and the club has told fans they must turn up with proof of vaccination. but how many will be checked, and will any fans be turned away from these gates? the scottish government insists the scheme is essential to manage the pandemic, and they say the delay will make it easier for businesses. there will be a period ofjust over two weeks when businesses get the opportunity to make sure the arrangements they have in place to do this are tested, can be adapted if necessary, and businesses get the confidence in those arrangements. no other part of the uk is bringing in a scheme quite like scotland's. as before, during the pandemic, the scottish approach is different and more cautious than elsewhere. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. a government minister has warned shortages at petrol filling stations
12:41 pm
may continue for another "week or so." the policing minister, kit malthouse, said there is still strong demand for fuel in some parts of the country, and borisjohnson would review the situation if it deteriorated further. our transport correspondent, caroline davies, says the fuel shortage problem is more acute in some parts of the uk than in others. the scotland situation seems to improving, according to the petrol retailers association, wales seems to be improving as well, but london and the south—east are still potentially struggling at the moment. we had figures yesterday, we are yet to get figures today from the pra to see how the situation is developing. they did tell us yesterday that it seems to have stalled, it was the same percentage of their members that had run dry that day as had done the day before. many will be hoping that this is a blip and things will be improving, but of course we are waiting to see those figures. if they do continue to stall
12:42 pm
or potential get worse that does raise the question of what can be done to try and reassure customers further so they can go back to purchasing petrol as they did before. the government had said that they hoped it would start to ease as people filled up, once they had a full tank of fuel, then the whole panic buying situation will start to calm down. we are not actually having a shortage of fuel, the main issue is of course that you can't get the fuel to the pumps. at least that was the initial situation. now we are also in a situation where the demand has increased so rapidly that many operators are struggling to fill up. i was speaking to one petrol retailer earlier today, who was saying that normally they would be selling about 35,000 gallons, now they're up to around 60,000 gallons. it is a huge amount more that they are selling on a regular basis, and that is what they're trying to keep up with. so it is not necessarily always about these deliveries being delayed or late or not having enough of them, it's just the fact that the demand has gone up so rapidly. they are trying to keep up with them. what is the latest on the driver situation in terms of both
12:43 pm
the military and also the visas that were issued, 5000 visas? do we know if and when any of those foreign lorry drivers are going to come? on the army to start with, we haven't yet been given confirmation that they are out on the roads, we knew that they were getting additional training and that was going to happen in the next few days. we are not certain if they have yet appeared on the roads helping out. we know that the reserve tankers came out from wednesday, that is being driven by civilian drivers. in terms of the visa situation, these temporary visas are expected, the scheme is meant to be starting to roll together later this month in october. there was concern yesterday speaking to the haulage industry that the government might reduce the length of these visas from three months down to two months. the haulage industry originally said they wanted six months because it takes a really long time to be able to train up uk drivers to fill those spaces and they wanted to have that longer period of time. the government have said
12:44 pm
three month period. now they are worried that could get squeezed and squeezed and reduced down. they say that is not long enough. the government of course has always been quite emphatic that it is doing lots of other things, lots of other measures to try and make sure that drivers can be trained, that tests have been streamlined, that they are able to move people through the process and try and have these as ukjobs, not as foreign dependent jobs. but at the moment the visa scheme has not yet started, people can't yet apply for these visas. in 2016, teenager natasha ednan—laperouse died from a severe allergic reaction after she ate a baguette that, unknowingly to her, contained sesame seeds. since then, her family have campaigned for businesses to include a full list of ingredients on the packaging of food they sell — and today natasha's law comes into effect across the uk. john maguire has the story. her death may well save many, many lives. natasha ednan—laperouse was flying from heathrow with herfather and best friend when she bought
12:45 pm
some food, a baguette. natasha knew she had a food allergy, and always checked labels. but the bread had been baked with sesame seeds — not included in the list of ingredients, and which triggered a severe reaction. natasha suffered several cardiac arrests on the plane, and died later in a french hospital. she was only 15. this new legislation, called natasha's law, comes into force today and closes a loophole so that now all pre—wrapped food — including sandwiches, fast—food and cheese or meat from deli counters — must be clearly labelled with a full list of ingredients. also 1a major allergens — including eggs, peanuts and sesame seeds — must be highlighted in the list. the food standards agency calls it a huge step in helping the two million people who live with food allergies in the uk.
12:46 pm
natasha's parents describe it as a bittersweet moment for them but, five years on from their daughter's death, say they they know in their hearts she would be very proud of the new rules in her name — natasha's law. john maguire, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: the metropolitan police's response to the sentencing of former officer wayne couzens — i have bills for 15 million
12:47 pm
households is a new higher energy cap comes effect. —— higher bills. more now the metropolitan police's response to the sentencing of former officer wayne couzens — who kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard earlier this year while he was a serving policeman. i'm joined now by wendy chamberlain, liberal democrat mp for north east asa as a former police officer, what are your thoughts after this horrific case? my initial thoughts are with sarah everard's family in the first instance to have heard the shocking details. as a former police officers, ifeel very details. as a former police officers, i feel very saddened, details. as a former police officers, ifeel very saddened, all is most a sense of shame. but officers, ifeelvery saddened, all is most a sense of shame.- officers, ifeelvery saddened, all is most a sense of shame. but i also think about — is most a sense of shame. but i also think about the _ is most a sense of shame. but i also think about the thousands _ is most a sense of shame. but i also think about the thousands of - is most a sense of shame. but i also think about the thousands of police l think about the thousands of police officers across the uk who go out everyday to protect and serve the public and that trust in what they do has been significantly eroded by
12:48 pm
this case. is do has been significantly eroded by this case. . do has been significantly eroded by this case. , ,., this case. is there something systematically _ this case. is there something systematically wrong - this case. is there something systematically wrong with i this case. is there something| systematically wrong with the this case. is there something - systematically wrong with the police force, do you think? we are talking with a professor in criminology who said that as a sort of matching corporate culture. does the police force need to change? i corporate culture. does the police force need to change?— corporate culture. does the police force need to change? i think there are two aspects _ force need to change? i think there are two aspects around _ force need to change? i think there are two aspects around that, - force need to change? i think there are two aspects around that, one i force need to change? i think there are two aspects around that, one is around trust, trust which has been clearly eroded in the police service by the action of sarah everard's killer. and trust that needs to be engendered in a policing team. i remember early in my server is being severely assaulted with a colleague and waiting for my college to come and waiting for my college to come and provide assistance, that trust needs to be there. i suppose what we previously described as canteen culture, yes, ithink previously described as canteen culture, yes, i think it could be described as misogynistic in nature. clearly if that hasn't changed in the ten years that i served, it
12:49 pm
remains a huge issue for the police service, power particularly when it comes to tackling violence against women and girls. that comes to tackling violence against women and girls.— women and girls. that is what we have heard _ women and girls. that is what we have heard time _ women and girls. that is what we have heard time and _ women and girls. that is what we have heard time and time - women and girls. that is what we have heard time and time again, | women and girls. that is what we i have heard time and time again, that the police forces are not doing enough to combat violence against women and girls, whether it is on the streets or at home with domestic violence. ed the streets or at home with domestic violence. , .., the streets or at home with domestic violence. , .. ., , violence. ed davey called last night for a ro al violence. ed davey called last night for a royal commission _ violence. ed davey called last night for a royal commission into - violence. ed davey called last night| for a royal commission into violence against women and girls. the conservatives from the commission in 2019 in relation to policing, that has not been one since she housing. i think that we demonstrate the government are taking this seriously. when i reflect on my own service, i carried out three days of diversity training in relation to the murder of stephen lawrence. i think we need to look very seriously what the police response is, there i said, putting extra officers on the beatin said, putting extra officers on the beat in public areas or are giving women advice how to deal with a lone
12:50 pm
police officer following them sound fairly knee jerk to me. police officer following them sound fairly kneejerk to me. the metropolitan police this year has been accused of being institutionally corrupt in relation to the daniel morgan inquiry. there were real concerns about the policing of the vigil in relation to sarah everard's nede. if the issue is how you get trusted back in at the police service, it seems cressida dick would not be the person taking that forward. iaghast cressida dick would not be the person taking that forward. what you have a women _ person taking that forward. what you have a women in _ person taking that forward. what you have a women in charge _ person taking that forward. what you have a women in charge of _ person taking that forward. what you have a women in charge of the - have a women in charge of the metropolitan police.— have a women in charge of the metropolitan police. whether it is a women or a — metropolitan police. whether it is a women or a man _ metropolitan police. whether it is a women or a man in _ metropolitan police. whether it is a women or a man in charge - metropolitan police. whether it is a women or a man in charge of- women or a man in charge of the police, it is about the right person to engender that trust. given the difficulties the metropolitan police has experienced this year, it seems to me that she is not the right person to take that work forward. 50 person to take that work forward. so you want her to resign? i think i person to take that work forward. so you want her to resign? i think she l you want her to resign? i think she should be considering _ you want her to resign? i think she
12:51 pm
should be considering her - you want her to resign? i think she| should be considering her position, yes. should be considering her position, es. . ~' should be considering her position, es. . ~ , ., y should be considering her position, es. . ~' , ., , . should be considering her position, es, ., ~' i., , . ., should be considering her position, es. . , . yes. thank you very much for your time. europe's first mission to mercury is expected to reach its destination this weekend. the bepicolombo spacecraft will carry out six fly—bys around the planet and if successful, the probe will start sending images back to earth. it's moving too fast to go into orbit, but will begin more detailed observations in four years' time. elsa montagnon is the spacecraft operations manager for the mission at the european space agency. bepicolombo was launched in october 2018 from peru, and is headed to its destination, mercury, with an arrival due in december 2025. me, personally, i have been supporting the mission for 1a years, so it's a very long term project. its prime scientific mission will start in 2026, due for one earth year, with possible extension by another year, so it's
12:52 pm
another decade—long project that we would like to have in space. our objective is the exploration of planet mercury, which is a bit of a forgotten object in the solar system. the planet has been visited before by two nasa missions, in the 70s and in the last decade. but for europe and our partner agencies, the japanese space agency, it's a first. we have never been there before. a new law comes into force across england today which bans under 18s from getting botox—style injections or dermal lip fillers for cosmetic reasons. it follows years of campaigning to regulate the non—surgical beauty industry, but there are warnings the changes don't go far enough. our health correspondent, anna collinson, reports. i just saw this look on herface of panic, and my heart started racing, and i could feel blood just trickling down the side of my face. laura was offered a cheap filler treatment to plump up her lips, but the practitioner accidentally punctured an artery.
12:53 pm
my lip was massive, it was black, particularly underneath it, but inside of my lip had just filled with blood. i almost passed out with the shock of seeing the state of my face. complications like this need to be dealt with quickly to prevent more serious possible problems like blindness, but laura says her practitioner panicked and didn't know what to do. many practitioners, including ones at this clinic, adhere to strict safety guidelines. but due to a lack of regulation in the nonsurgical beauty industry, effectively anyone can carry out potentially dangerous treatments. from today there will be more protection but only for some. it's now illegal for under—18s to receive botox style injections, or dermalfillers, in england for non—medical reasons. though the ban doesn't cover other invasive procedures, like thread lifts. this clinic only treats
12:54 pm
patients over 21. it was absolutely long overdue. for purely cosmetic treatments, really, you don't need anything when you are so young, so it will be unnecessary, it would be a waste of time, a waste of money. latest figures estimate around 70,000 of these treatments are carried out in under—18s per year. now anyone caught administering to this age group could go to prison. update on possible legislation in wales and scotland are expected in the near future, while northern ireland has no current plans. one of the helpful things about this bill is it fits into an existing licensing provision for, for example, sunbeds or tattoo parlours. so the enforcement will be the same through local authorities and for the police, so there is an established provisions, which will mean that it is quite easy to go and enforce. young women believe demand for these treatments are down to constant pressure to look a certain way. i see it so much with my friends, that they have these expectations of themselves
12:55 pm
and they are so critical of themselves, which i think has 100% come from social media. it's definitely hard to tell which photos are edited and which ones are not, and then you get a really unrealistic body image. so, i'm 20, i have friends who've i had filler and botox in the past, | and they have become addictedi to getting it done, they're never really satisfied with the outcomes, and they are always _ looking for more. the law change is a huge achievement for those who have been calling for regulation for seven years. this feels like a really important first step, but the industry has still got such a long way to go. the fact that these treatments can be done by anyone with no training or experience, they can purchase their products of the internet, and insurance is a huge thing for us, we really want to make it a legal requirement. but anyone over 18 remains as vulnerable as ever. like laura, who is too scared to get the bump in her lip fixed, but is also grateful it didn't turn out worse.
12:56 pm
this year's nature conservancy photo contest do more than 100,000 entrants from 158 countries. but of course that there is only one winner. here is that winning image. it is a western lowland gorilla walking through a cloud of butterflies in the central african republic. the winner wins a camera package worth nearly £3000 for the work. thankfully look at the weekend prospects with nick miller. spells of wind and rain will still be around over the next several days and into the weekend. we will all see some rain at some stage, the wind is also picking up. some travel disruption in some spots as well. the culprit for the weekend as an air of low pressure which on saturday will bring a swathe of really heavy rain in particular
12:57 pm
across wales and england. the winds are strengthening with this, gales in places. low pressure bringing strong winds across the far north of scotland on its they. today is one of the brighter days. gaps in the cloud here giving some spells of sunshine but also showers. they are particular across the north—west of the uk, north wales, north—west england, northern ireland, especially into western scotland. really gusty winds are developing here as well, could be up to 60 mph in the later stages of the day. hail and thunder are possible with the showers as well. they will continue into tonight, particularly north—western parts. much cooler night on the way tonight, especially in wales and england. widespread single figure temperatures. tomorrow, you may start the day dry,
12:58 pm
but it is just a case of waiting for that's wave of heavy rain to come from the area of low pressure. early wrinklies for northern ireland, dry with some sunny spells, rain pushing into scotland. but wales and england seeing some particularly heavy rain, with 30-a0 seeing some particularly heavy rain, with 30—a0 millimetres falling in places. very difficult to conditions, winds picking up as well and temperatures into the low teens. some of the strongest winds will be towards the south coast of england, then the north sea coast, particularly east anglia going into saturday afternoon and saturday evening. some gusts of up to 6 to five miles per hour on expose cows before easing on sunday. showers moving from west to east on a sunday. gusts and the northern isles may be between 60—70 mph for a time. temperatures towards the mid and low teens. sunshine and showers on monday, more blue pressure on tuesday.
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
the metropolitan police tries to regain public trust, in the wake of the murder of sarah everard by one of its officers. the force gives new guidance about plain clothes officers, and what people can do if stopped by one — but critics say it isn't women who need to change their actions. it puts the onus on women. it is not about the women, it's about the men that are killing us. especially if those men are the people that are paid and appointed to keep us safe. it's emerged wayne couzens, now jailed for life,
1:01 pm
was believed to be on a whatsapp group

55 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on