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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 1, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: following the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer scotland yard tries to regain public confidence. as it seeks to reassure the public the met says it will increase patrols and advises people stop by a lone plainclothes police officer to challenge them.— lone plainclothes police officer to challenuethem. ' l , , a, l, challenge them. officers up-and-down the land recognised _ challenge them. officers up-and-down the land recognised the _ challenge them. officers up-and-down the land recognised the devastating - the land recognised the devastating impacts of this event and there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police especially in london. are you reassured by the measures being proposed by the met police or what else would you like to see happen? please get in touch using questions
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hashtag. higher energy bills for 15 million higher price cap comes into force. scotland's vaccine passport scheme begins affecting anyone wanting to go to a nightclub or a big event like a football match. australia says it will reopen its borders to fully vaccinated visitors in november after 18 months of tight restrictions. a0 new diagnostic sites offering nhs tests and scans are being opened around england in local communities aiming to ease pressure on hospitals and waiting lists. a new law requiring food retailers to display their full ingredients comes into effect today named after a teenager who died from a severe allergic reaction. and also coming up this hour... we hear more about europe's first mission to mercury which we hear more about europe's first mission to mercury.
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hello and welcome to bbc news. the metropolitan police has explained how it intends to better protect women and girls following the murder of sarah everard. yesterday, wayne couzens a serving officer with the met was given a whole life prison term for kidnapping, raping and killing the marketing executive in march. the head of the force, dame cressida dick, has faced repeated calls to resign — but she says lessons will be learnt. let's look at how the met is trying to reassure the public. anyone stopped by a lone plain clothes police officer can challenge their legitimacy. the met says those detained by one can ask "where are your colleagues" and "where have you come from?" and can request to speak to an operator on a police radio to check if the officer is genuine. an extra 650 new officers will patrol busy public areas in london where women have concerns about their safety.
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and plain—clothes officers will not be deployed on their own, and will be in pairs. but serious questions are being asked about whether opportunities were missed to prevent sarah everard's murder. the met has admitted a vetting check on couzens was not done correctly when he joined the force. it meant an incident of indecent exposure in kent in 2015, involving a vehicle linked to couzens, was missed. and around 72 hours before ms everard's abduction, met police officers received a separate allegation of indecent exposure which also identified the vehicle involved, registered to couzens. simonjones reports. sarah everard, described in court as intelligent, talented, much loved. but the question now facing the met is, could and should her a killer wayne couzens have been stopped earlier? i recognise that for some people a precious bond of trust has been damaged.
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there are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. so resign, then! she didn't respond to questions about whether she should resign. this was the moment couzens falsely arrested sarah everard in south london in march. his arm outstretched, holding his warrant card. he'd go on to rape and murder her, her body dumped in woodland in kent. but back in 2015 a car owned by couzens was linked to an allegation of indecent exposure. this wasn't picked up by police vetting. and 72 hours before the kidnap, there was another allegation of indecent exposure. we'll be pushing ministers and the home secretary to have a look at exactly what is going wrong in the vetting processes,
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in the reporting processes, in the scrutiny of police officers, and how that gets done. the met says it will shortly publish a new strategy for tackling violence against women and girls. it will be deploying 650 new officers into busy public places where people often feel unsafe. it insists it's focused on improving detections for indecent exposure. the home secretary actually, in response to this case, started off a whole piece of work around a new strategy on violence against women and girls — so looking at making our streets safer, looking at, you know, designing out some of the risks, getting more cctv, supporting more helplines. sarah everard's death prompted an outpouring of public grief. in new safety guidance the met says people should ask questions if they're concerned an officer is a threat — advice backed by a police watchdog. call the control, and call 999 and say, "look, i'm being asked to cooperate with someone who says he's a police officer — i want to know, is this person
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a police officer?" and if there are any real concerns that the person in question is going to be assaulted or abducted, then that 999 call will be treated as priority. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't, no. the metropolitan police is now investigating whether he may have committed more crimes. sarah everard's family say the world is a safer place now he'll never be let out of prison. simon jones, bbc news. i will be to up to date with some information about a whatsapp group that was circulating amongst police officers. the independent 0ffice that was circulating amongst police officers. the independent office for police conduct, the iopc, says it's investigating a group of police officers who allegedly shared discriminatory messages on a whatsapp group. the messages were
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discovered during the investigation into the murder of sarah everard. it is now believed that the group included wayne couzens who was yesterday given that whole life sentence. five serving officers, that's five serving officers, are under investigation for distributing the messages which were sent between march and october 2019, in addition to a former officerfrom march and october 2019, in addition to a former officer from the met. three of the serving officers are from the met, one is from the civil nuclear constabulary and one from the norfolk constabulary, who are being investigated for gross misconduct. two of the met officers and another former met officer have been notified by the iopc that they are under criminal investigation for offences under the communications act. that's the latest we have on this whatsapp group which some information has come to light about. let's now cross to simonjones who
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is outside scotland yard in london for us. some more detail on this whatsapp group, and taking into account what the police are saying, the measures they are trying to take to rebuild public confidence, do they really think this is the right way to go about it? should the onus be on the person who is being stopped to have to ask an apparent police officer, are you who you claim to be?— police officer, are you who you claim to be? ~ . ,. , claim to be? the met have described the killin: claim to be? the met have described the killing of — claim to be? the met have described the killing of sarah _ claim to be? the met have described the killing of sarah everard _ claim to be? the met have described the killing of sarah everard as - claim to be? the met have described the killing of sarah everard as one i the killing of sarah everard as one of the most dreadful incidents in their 190 year history. and now they are facing another very difficult time about confidence in the police. we have had that new safety guidance you referred to. we are told by the met that it is very unusual for someone to be stopped on the street by a lone plainclothes officer. but if that happens to you and you are concerned about the officer's conduct then the advice from the police is you should perhaps ask to
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use the officer's radio to contract the control room to check what the officer doing is legitimate and then the advices if you still feel in danger you might want to run to a nearby house and ask for help —— contact the control room. you might want to shout out to a passer—by to show you are in distress, you might want to flag down a bus, or even dial 999. but as you say, this is very much putting the onus on the person who is stopped. and in the case of sarah everard, when wayne couzens showed his arrest warrant, he then quickly handcuffed her. so it is unclear whether that advice would have worked in this case, whether it would have been practical. but this is new advice. the met recognising that they have a job to do to rebuild confidence. and that's part of the safety advice. they also say they are going to put hundreds of extra officers on the streets of london, 650 new officers, they are going to send those
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officers into hotspots where violence is perpetrated against women and girls in particular. but as well as the issue of confidence over the way they handled wayne couzens and the vetting procedure, you have now got this further investigation by the independent 0ffice investigation by the independent office for police conduct. and i think while that is ongoing, that is still going to undermine confidence people have for the metropolitan police. ,, ., ., ~ people have for the metropolitan police, ,, ., ., ~' , ., people have for the metropolitan police. ,, ., . ~' , ., , police. ok, simon, thank you very much. police. ok, simon, thank you very much- simon _ police. ok, simon, thank you very much. simon jones _ police. ok, simon, thank you very much. simon jones reporting. - earlier, the crime and policing minister, kit malthouse told the bbc that trust needs to be rebuilt by the police. he says an individual stopped by a lone police officer has a right to make reasonable lines of inquiry and that there is a job to be done to rebuild trust. that there is a “0b to be done to rebuild trust.— that there is a “0b to be done to rebuild trust. normally when an arrest would _ rebuild trust. normally when an arrest would be _ rebuild trust. normally when an arrest would be made _ rebuild trust. normally when an arrest would be made like - rebuild trust. normally when an arrest would be made like that, | rebuild trust. normally when an l arrest would be made like that, a police officer would be calling for back—up, orwould police officer would be calling for back—up, or would be radioing police officer would be calling for back—up, orwould be radioing in what has happened. and obviously that itself produces an element of third—party verification. officers
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up—and—down the land recognise the devastating consequences of this. there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police, particularly, i have to say, in london. if those circumstances arise then it is perfectly reasonable for an individual to make those lines of inquiry about what the police officer is doing and satisfy themselves about that. that won't be appropriate in every circumstance and obviously there are thousands of thousands of police officers out there apprehending criminals and seeking to keep us all safe everyday and they need to be able to go about their business. but i do recognise their business. but i do recognise the implications of this particular incident and the below it has struck towards trust, particularly in the metropolitan police. that towards trust, particularly in the metropolitan police.— towards trust, particularly in the metropolitan police. that was the crime and policing _ metropolitan police. that was the crime and policing minister- metropolitan police. that was the i crime and policing minister speaking a little earlier. let's talk to political correspondent nick eardley at westminster. good morning to you, nick. i want to begin with questions about the future of cressida dick, the commander of the metropolitan police. is her position seriously in
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question? or do ministers think that would be a distraction from the work that actually needs to be done right now? , . ., , , , , that actually needs to be done right now? ,. ., i, ,, ., now? there is certainly pressure on her, we now? there is certainly pressure on her. we have _ now? there is certainly pressure on her, we have heard _ now? there is certainly pressure on her, we have heard some _ now? there is certainly pressure on her, we have heard some pretty - her, we have heard some pretty prominent mps like harriet harman, labour mp, formerjustice minister, saying they don't think dame cressida dick can be the person who leads the reform that is needed within the met. that said, i don't think it's likely she will resign because she does appear to have the backing of the home office. she has the backing of the mayor of london said khan, itappears, as the backing of the mayor of london said khan, it appears, as well. the backing of the mayor of london said khan, itappears, as well. so although there is some pressure, we have seen that pressure before and it doesn't look likely that dame cressida dick is going anywhere at the moment —— saddiq khan. d0 cressida dick is going anywhere at the moment -- saddiq khan. do you think the police _ the moment -- saddiq khan. do you think the police will— the moment -- saddiq khan. do you think the police will now _ the moment -- saddiq khan. do you think the police will now be - the moment -- saddiq khan. do you think the police will now be saying i think the police will now be saying to the government you need to think about our budgets, if we are going to really seriously look at the safety of women and girls, we need more money to put more police officers on the beat, for example? i
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imagine that will be part of the conversation. we know the met was talking overnight about 650 new police in london to monitor some of those areas where women and girls have reported feeling unsafe. i think the bigger pressure politically is going to come on the government to take some firm action, frankly. we heard kit malthouse saying that this had been a devastating blow for the police and fought trust in the police services. but the pressure that's coming from the labour party is for and concrete action, for the government to get on the front foot and maybe introduce some new legislation. we have heard from tory mps on that as well, caroline nokes, the chair of the women and equalities committee, saying the government must get on the front foot and do something. i'm not sure that any sort of particular action in terms of legislation is
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imminent from the government. we did have a strategy on violence against women and girls published earlier in the summer, and there is talk of a victim bill coming out at some point, although it isn't completely clear to me when we are going to see that brought forward, but i think you are going to see more and more pressure for concrete action because some politicians are arguing this morning it is all fine and well telling women that you can do this or that when you are approached by a plainclothes police officer but it is worth remembering that in this case the man who committed that terrible crime was a police officer. he had all the necessary power he needed to stop somebody and a lot of the focus at westminster is about coming up with more concrete actions and more priority when it comes to that issue of violence against women and girls. that issue of violence against women and uirls. . ~ that issue of violence against women and uirls. w ., , that issue of violence against women and uirls. . , ., ~ and girls. nick eardley, thank you very much- _ very much. let me read out a few of the comments you have sent in about what
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you think of the met�*s proposals to rebuild public trust and what would make you feel safer. briony says if loan officers had to inform people they stop that they had a right to a second officer or to call the control room that might help. this from bernadette sanders who says more police on the streets in uniforms and pairs, especially at night, and at all times in quieter places in urban environments. ed lynn says what can help to rebuild women's trust in the police? i would say it is well beyond that for many people, unfortunately. tony asks, could it be that police were not openly declare cases like indecent exposure by police officers because it would discredit police and dent the image of law enforcement? viv kirk says it is a sad state of affairs when the public cannot trust affairs when the public cannot trust a lone police officer. i taught my kids when in trouble to look for a woman or a police officer. thank you
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for those comments. keep them coming in. you can do that by getting in touch with me on twitter using the hashtag bbc your questions. the australian prime minister scott morrison says fully vaccinated australians will be able to enter and leave the country freely from november. it's the first time they will be able to do so without permission since australia closed its international borders in march 2020 in response to the coronavirus pandemic. it means millions of citizens can travel out of the country and some 115,000 australians currently abroad will be able to return home. it will be time very soon that we will be able to open those international borders again and that will enable australians who are fully vaccinated and australians and residents of australia who are overseas who are fully vaccinated to be able to travel again and to be able to lift those caps will stop this will happen next month. that's when it will start happening, from
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next month. when it will start happening, from next month-— next month. australian prime minister scott _ next month. australian prime minister scott morrison. - next month. australian prime minister scott morrison. let's next month. australian prime - minister scott morrison. let's talk to our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil who is in australia. tell us about the reaction to this news, and is it literally vaccinated australian citizens? will their families be able to travel with them if they are not citizens?— if they are not citizens? that's really the _ if they are not citizens? that's really the detail _ if they are not citizens? that's really the detail that - if they are not citizens? that's really the detail that we - if they are not citizens? that's really the detail that we have l if they are not citizens? that's - really the detail that we have been trying to get clarity on, and yes, the office of the prime minister has said that as it stands this announcement will include australian citizens or australian permanent residents. non—australians are not included in those plansjust residents. non—australians are not included in those plans just yet. but to say it is highly anticipated is really an understatement. this has been a very, very emotional moment for thousands and thousands of australians here, and of course abroad, because essentially what it means is if you are a fully vaccinated citizen or permanent resident you no longer have to worry about hotel quarantine. you can travel abroad and be guaranteed to come back, or if you have been
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stranded abroad you can come back for a seven day home quarantine, so the caps on arrivals, all of these limitations, are now gone for australian citizens. the other big detail, of course, is vaccination. they have to be fully vaccinated, these vaccinations have to be approved by the health authorities here, and that the states who reach 80% vaccination rates and above are the ones that are able to open for international travel. as it stands, new south wales where i am is set to be the first one to open internationally. there are still so many details to iron out especially about proof of vaccination, whether it is going to be certificates, vaccination passports, qr codes, how that will work in different states, especially that the different states have handled their outbreaks differently. for example, new south wales, the delta outbreak here is stabilising, it is getting ready to open up domestically and internationally, whereas queensland
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and western australia, for example, they are still going for elimination, still going for zero covid, they have been the strictest with their borders, the first to close, very reluctant to reopen with the rest of the country, so we don't know where they stand on international travel. know where they stand on internationaltravel. i know where they stand on international travel. i think as early as next month you can get a very interesting scenario where someone in sydney, for example, could travel to london or new york but wouldn't be able to travel to brisbane or perth because these two states would still be closed. but i think generally, huge sense of relief amongst so many that international travel is now back as an option after nearly two years of being isolated from the rest of the world. is being isolated from the rest of the world. , ., , _, ., world. is there any conversation about opening _ world. is there any conversation about opening up _ world. is there any conversation about opening up australia - world. is there any conversation about opening up australia to i about opening up australia to others, to non—australians? or is that some way off yet? i others, to non-australians? or is that some way off yet?— others, to non-australians? or is that some way off yet? i think it is definitely going — that some way off yet? i think it is definitely going to _ that some way off yet? i think it is definitely going to be _ that some way off yet? i think it is definitely going to be part - that some way off yet? i think it is definitely going to be part of- that some way off yet? i think it is definitely going to be part of the l definitely going to be part of the conversation but i think, if you will, the most urgent need for now, and these have been the cause for months and months and months now, for australians in the country to be
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reunited with their families and be able to travel and come back, but also for the thousands of australian stranded abroad to be able to come back home and do not have to wait for a space in hotel quarantine. i cannot tell you the number of stories i have heard of people that have missed weddings and funerals and, you know, the birth of grandsons and granddaughters. i remember recently sitting with a woman who missed her mother's funeral. she showed me pictures of her mother and she said because i couldn't get an exemption to leave australia and travel i had to watch that funeral on a screen and i missed that moment to say goodbye to my mother. so multiply that by how many thousands of stories, similar stories. and remember a huge portion of people living in australia have connections abroad. so being able to travel freely is an integral part of their living here. and that being taken away from them for nearly two years has dramatically changed their lives. some people who love living here have said they have to leave
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because that was the only option that was all available to them. shaimaa khalil, in sydney, thank you very much. more than 15 million households across england, scotland and wales are to face higher energy bills as the increased price cap comes into effect from today. a typical bill for those on a default tariff will rise by around £140 a year, with those on prepayment meters expected to pay even more. our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey reports. as the temperature dips, so our energy bills rise. the cost of heating and lighting our homes is limited by the price cap, but this is the biggest ever increase at a time when many household budgets are being squeezed. it affects people on standard tariffs in england, wales and scotland and generally those who haven't switched for a long time, or whose time—limited tariffs have expired. the new cap means they will now pay £1,277 a year if they use an average
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amount of gas and electricity — that's £139 a year more on their bill than under the previous cap. prepayment—meter customers face a higher typical bill of £1,309 a year — that's an increase of £153 on the previous time. those who use more than the average amount of energy in their homes will face bigger bills because the policy caps price, not the total bill. those affected are normally encouraged to switch suppliers for a cheaper deal. this time of the massive rise in the cost of wholesale gas in recent weeks has stripped the market of better offers. it's also led to the collapse of nine suppliers. their customers will now pay a more expensive tariff in line with the price cap. surviving firms say they are having to buy wholesale energy at a much higher price than the retail cap allows them to sell it for it. we are really worried about making sure customers get through this
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period so i don't think anyone is asking for the price cap to be increased again, and so it is what it is, we're doing our best to get customers through it, we're trying to support well—run businesses through this period, and otherwise, if we need to do anything else, we are talking to government. analysts say companies' extra costs will be reflected when the cap is revised in the spring, at a level likely to be significantly more expensive for bill payers. kevin peachey, bbc news. ellen fraser is an energy analyst and partner at the management consultancy firm baringa. thank you forjoining us. as consumers, what are we to do in this situation? prices are going up. is there anything we can do about it? the main advice i would give to consumers is be very mindful of the amount of energy you use in your home, the best way to manage your spend currently, if that is a real concern for you, is to make sure you
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manage the time carefully on heating, make sure you are switching things off overnight, for example, and thinking about things like insulation in your home to make sure that you use less energy to heat your home. it is more thinking about your home. it is more thinking about your energy consumption because, exactly as that introduction said, there really aren't that many tariffs available on the market that will give you a better deal than is available under the price cap at the moment. ., ., ,, moment. some of those are tips we can all do immediately _ moment. some of those are tips we can all do immediately and - moment. some of those are tips we can all do immediately and some i moment. some of those are tips we can all do immediately and some of| can all do immediately and some of those are perhaps slightly longer term or medium term projects like looking at insulation in our homes. to pick up on the comment you made about tariffs, what we have is a situation where we have the price cap at one end of this which clearly affects the amount that energy firms can charge consumers. the other end of this, the wholesale price of gas is going up, so more costs for energy suppliers. is that going to lead to less choice in the market? in other words, will be seen more
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energy firms going out of business, and even less choice for us as consumers? figs and even less choice for us as consumers?— and even less choice for us as consumers? ~ , ., ., consumers? as we move into the winter period _ consumers? as we move into the winter period we _ consumers? as we move into the winter period we always - consumers? as we move into the winter period we always see i consumers? as we move into the winter period we always see a i consumers? as we move into the | winter period we always see a few surprise exit the market, and the same thing happened around about this time last year and the year before, the spike we have seen in the wholesale price this year has made the problem much, much more acute, so we are seeing much larger numbers of suppliers, in fact, 12 in the last year and nine just in the last month alone exit the market, so certainly the work we have done within baringa suggests there will be a number more that exit the market. that sounds really quite stark, but in reality the ones that remain are the ones that have the biggest market share and tend to be the ones that are more stable, better capitalised, they have hedged themselves, they have bought ahead their energy needs when energy prices were not quite as high so they tend to be more stable. much as we will see a number of supplies exit the market, the number of consumers, yes it is painful if you
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go through it, but it will not impact the whole market. if not ri . ht impact the whole market. if not right now. _ impact the whole market. if not right now. are _ impact the whole market. if not right now, are we _ impact the whole market. if not right now, are we going - impact the whole market. if not right now, are we going to i impact the whole market. if not right now, are we going to get i impact the whole market. if not right now, are we going to get to a point again when we are going to see more competition between those firms which survive this period with better offers who don't like to try and bring new customers in? will they be better deals around? in the short term it _ they be better deals around? in the short term it will— they be better deals around? in the short term it will be _ they be better deals around? in the short term it will be challenging i short term it will be challenging because the price cap, as mentioned in the introduction, isn't cost reflective at the moment, in fact it is below the energy wholesale price and a number of suppliers, even the big ones that are well capitalised, are making a loss on a number of customers, especially the ones that they acquire when other suppliers go bust, so they are having to hold a significant amount of cost on their balance sheets at the moment. that cost will have to flush through industry at some point. we expect the price cap, unfortunately, to go up the price cap, unfortunately, to go up again when it is revised in april as some of those costs start to catch up with us. suppliers unfortunately will find it difficult
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to drop prices much below that. they will be trying to recoup some of the costs that effectively they are protecting us from in the short term. white 0k, ellen, good to get your thoughts, term. white 0k, ellen, good to get yourthoughts, ellen term. white 0k, ellen, good to get your thoughts, ellen fraser, term. white 0k, ellen, good to get yourthoughts, ellen fraser, energy analyst with baringa. thank you. people reported issues trying to register for scotland's new covid passport at just a few hours after it was launched. from today, anyone entering nightclubs and most large scale events will need to prove they've had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. officials say overwhelming demand could be to blame for the problems. alexandra mackenzie is in glasgow. are there still teething issues? there definitely seems to be and this went live about five o'clock last night, people were able to register for this and there have been reports of problems since then. if you're looking for the app, it is called the nhs covid status app. i
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downloaded it quite easily, it was quite a quick process for me, but there have been reports from many people looking for the app, finding it difficult to find, and also difficult to register and also people in the newsroom have been talking about that trying to register and not being able to. the scottish government has said this is because of the volume of people doing it and advise people to possibly step away from it for a couple of hours and come back and try and do it again. tell couple of hours and come back and try and do it again.— try and do it again. tell us a bit more about _ try and do it again. tell us a bit more about how _ try and do it again. tell us a bit more about how this _ try and do it again. tell us a bit more about how this process i try and do it again. tell us a bitj more about how this process of registering for the app works? {lime registering for the app works? once ou registering for the app works? once you download _ registering for the app works? once you download the _ registering for the app works? once you download the app _ re(”staring for the app works? icez you download the app and registering for the app works? icez you download the app and it re(”staring for the app works? once: you download the app and it is re(”staring for the app works?
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passport or your driver's licence. you take a photograph of that and then you also take a photograph of yourself and that cross—references and proves who you are. one of the other things it does ask for is your nhs number. i didn't have mine to hand soi nhs number. i didn't have mine to hand so i didn't put it in but you don't necessarily need it even though it asks for it. some people have said that the stage that has been tricky when they have tried to put their nhs number in, it has then pushed you out. so if you get to the final stage, then what you see is you don't need to provide the dates or anything of when you have been vaccinated but you have all the other details, the dates pop up of your vaccine and the particular vaccine that you had. and behind thatis vaccine that you had. and behind that is the qr code you are going to need and that will cross—reference at the venues and the clubs, at the larger venues, and possible larger
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football matches tomorrow. that will cross—reference with the app that these businesses have. even though it has come into play now, this will not be enforced until the 18th of october. : :, :, :, ~' not be enforced until the 18th of october. : :, :, :, ,, :, october. alexandra, thank you for that. alexandra _ october. alexandra, thank you for that. alexandra mackenzie - october. alexandra, thank you for that. alexandra mackenzie in i that. alexandra mackenzie in glasgow. i'mjoined by that. alexandra mackenzie in glasgow. i'm joined by leon thompson, scotland executive director of uk hospitality which represents more than 730 companies operating about 85,000 venues. thank you forjoining us. 18th of october, a little bit of a grace period for everyone to get used to the scheme. broadly speaking, do you think it is going to work well or not? we are already seeing challenges with the app, we are expecting it to be challenging for businesses and many businesses are reporting they will struggle to have enough door stewards to check apps and people are coming in. obviously, people may well be appearing without any kind
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of certification because of the problems which they have been experiencing with the app. hopefully those are teething _ experiencing with the app. hopefully those are teething issues, _ experiencing with the app. hopefully those are teething issues, beyond i those are teething issues, beyond that, you are hearing their new owners are concerned they will not have enough staff to monitor this, to administer this.— to administer this. yes, that's ri . ht, to administer this. yes, that's right. there — to administer this. yes, that's right, there are _ to administer this. yes, that's right, there are staff - to administer this. yes, that's| right, there are staff shortages hospitality and one of the critical areas is around door stewards who areas is around door stewards who are also responsible for scanning apps and letting people in. other challenges around venues that are perhaps open earlier in the evening, it is not clear when businesses should be beginning the process of checking people's fascination status. the guidance is putting it on the owners of businesses, but businesses will need to find a way through and make it work. the companies _ through and make it work. the companies you _ through and make it work. the
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companies you represent and their venues, how many will be affected by this because we are talking about a unseated indoor events of more than 500 people, unseated outdoor events of more than 4,000, some very specific figures are horrendous. the bi specific figures are horrendous. i“i2 big challenge specific figures are horrendous. t“i2 big challenge and the debate we had scotland when this was announced was it was going to be introduced for nightclubs, but there is no working definition of a nightclub, so, in the end, the definition which the scottish government arrived at was late night venues. that is a large swathe of bars with live music and recorded music and a designated dancing area, as well as what we might consider to be traditional nightclubs. there are a lot of businesses that are captured by this which may have considered to be out of the scope at the start. you which may have considered to be out of the scope at the start.— of the scope at the start. you do not seem _ of the scope at the start. you do not seem to _ of the scope at the start. you do not seem to be _ of the scope at the start. you do not seem to be seeing _ of the scope at the start. you do not seem to be seeing any i of the scope at the start. you do i not seem to be seeing any positives in the so far. are there any? the
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scottish in the so far. are there any? t“i2 scottish government has not made a compelling case for introducing the vaccination certification checks. we keep hearing about vaccination rates being high in scotland. we are seeing cases dropping dot—mac bun? isn't this to protect that? that is what the scottish government says. they are also saying they are very pleased with the process of the vaccination programme and the number of cases as well. vaccination programme and the number of cases as well-— of cases as well. thank you very much for _ of cases as well. thank you very much for your— of cases as well. thank you very much for your thoughts. - let's have a look at the weather. very good morning. it is autumnal this morning and will be that way over the next few days, blustery winds and heavy rain. heavy rain with this batch of a rumble of
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thunder across the south—east. in between, some sunshine, pushing their way eastwards. a few showers to the south and east this afternoon. more dry weather, fewer showers and western parts. heavy hail and thunder in places where the strongest of the showers will be making it rather cool. this evening, showers across the north and west, clearer skies in central and eastern areas. if we get up early on saturday morning, the temperatures will be a mid— single figures. make the most of the morning sunshine because in england and wales will be a wet saturday, strong winds in east anglia and the south—east, blustery elsewhere but brighter in the afternoon in the west, not too much rain for northern ireland, temperatures 11 to 16.
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11 to 16 . let's find out the latest in sport. this very troubling story about rangers. the manager has said tougher punishments have to come into tackle racism after one of the players was jeered by young fans last night. rangers lost one — nell, the game was initially supposed to be played behind closed doors after some supporters had racially abused monaco player. but it was later decided to allow 10,000 school to attend and the jeering started in the second half. rangers are bottom of the group as our celtic who lost four — nell, they have conceded eight goals in their opening two
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games. former player chris sutton said the manager needs patient and time and will stick by their style. in contrast, west ham united art loving their european return, they are top of their group after a two — nell to vietnam. they opened the scoring in the first half hour. it triggered some ugly scenes in the crowd with away fans jumping over barriers to gold the home supporters. at the end, wrapped up with west ham, lovely finish there. leicester were beaten by warsaw to continue their poor start to the season, the only goal of the game in the first half. huge relief as harry kane came on as a substitute for tottenham and scored a hat—trick in europe at conference league. goals have been hard to come by for the
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england captain this season but he scored three goals in 20 minutes. a morale boosting win for the site after a humbling defeat by neighbours arsenal last weekend. england manager relieved and pleased to see that his captain was scoring again with world cup qualifiers against andorra and hungary coming up. midfielder back in the squad after missing last month a triple header through injury. and the same goes for ollie watkins. ac milan defender is included. southgate says his move to italy from chelsea has put him back in contention internationally. iie put him back in contention internationally.— put him back in contention internationally. put him back in contention internationall. , ., ., internationally. he is playing at a club where _ internationally. he is playing at a club where there _ internationally. he is playing at a club where there is _ internationally. he is playing at a club where there is an _ club where there is an expectation to win every week, he is performing under pressure, he did very well at liverpool in the champions league game, his next game isjuventus, big matches as well as the general league games. obviously they are
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delighted with him, they have bought him, and it has been a really good experience for him.— experience for him. australia's cricket captain _ experience for him. australia's cricket captain said _ experience for him. australia's cricket captain said the - experience for him. australia's cricket captain said the ashes i experience for him. australia's i cricket captain said the ashes will go ahead this winter even if some england players decide not to travel because of covid—19 concerns. other members have expressed doubt over the tour because of restrictions and pressure being in a bubble all the time. it applies to australian citizens but could apply to foreigners. the first test is on december the eighth. andy murray has been knocked out of the third round of the open. he lost to the norwegian player who described him as a legend and said his fight back from serious injury had been an he has been given another into next week. another opportunity to enjoy andy murray next weekend.
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in 2016, teenager natasha ednan laperouse died from a severe allergic reaction after she ate a baguette that, unknowingly to her, contained sesame seeds. since then her family have campaigned for businesses to include a full list of ingredients on the packaging of food they sell and today "natasha's law" comes into effect across the uk. john maguire has the story. her death may well save many, many lives. natasha ednan—laperouse was flying from heathrow with herfather and best friend when she bought some food — a baguette. natasha knew she had a food allergy, and always checked labels. but the bread had been baked with sesame seeds — not included in the list of ingredients, and which triggered a severe reaction. natasha suffered several cardiac arrests on the plane, and died later in a french hospital. she was only 15. this new legislation, called natasha's law,
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comes into force today and closes a loophole so that, now, all pre—wrapped food — including sandwiches, fast—food and cheese or meat from deli counters — must be clearly labelled with a full list of ingredients. also 14 major allergens — including eggs, peanuts and sesame seeds — must be highlighted in the list. the food standards agency calls it a huge step in helping the 2 million people who live with food allergies in the uk. natasha's parents describe it as a bittersweet moment for them but, five years on from their daughter's death, say they they know in their hearts she would be very proud of the new rules in her name — natasha's law. john maguire, bbc news.
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iamjoined by i am joined by dan kelly who has a severe nut allergy. thank you for joining us today to talk about the new law. perhaps you could begin by telling us about your allergy and how it affects your life. i found out when _ how it affects your life. i found out when i _ how it affects your life. i found out when i was _ how it affects your life. i found out when i was five _ how it affects your life. i found out when i was five years i how it affects your life. i found out when i was five years old, | out when i was five years old, eating out in restaurants, there is always a risk of having an allergic reaction, it is like a russian roulette. reaction, it is like a russian roulette-— reaction, it is like a russian roulette. ~ ~ :, roulette. when you think back to when ou roulette. when you think back to when you heard _ roulette. when you think back to when you heard the _ roulette. when you think back to when you heard the news - roulette. when you think back to when you heard the news aboutl roulette. when you think back to i when you heard the news about what had happened to natasha, that must have really shaken you.— have really shaken you. absolutely. it shocked have really shaken you. absolutely. it shocked me _ have really shaken you. absolutely. it shocked me to _ have really shaken you. absolutely. it shocked me to the _ have really shaken you. absolutely. it shocked me to the court - have really shaken you. absolutely. it shocked me to the court because | it shocked me to the court because you don't think it is going to happen to you and you when i heard the story about what happened to her, there was nothing on the packaging, and you couldn't see it,
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it was cooked into the bread, she couldn't see it by looking at the food itself. i did a podcast and i was so upset and so emotional after it. :, . , . :, , :, was so upset and so emotional after it. how much difference do you think this new law— it. how much difference do you think this new law will— it. how much difference do you think this new law will make? _ it. how much difference do you think this new law will make? it _ it. how much difference do you think this new law will make? it is - it. how much difference do you think this new law will make? it is going i this new law will make? it is going to make a massive _ this new law will make? it is going to make a massive difference. i this new law will make? it is going i to make a massive difference. people will feel more confident when they are eating out and grabbing food on the go, and with the top 40 allergens, people can make a more informed decision as it doesn't contain any of their allergens and start the dialogue with staff members to make sure they can see the packaging, i think it is going to make such a difference. fewer allergy dates, there has been a threefold in the last 20 years. hour threefold in the last 20 years. how much awareness _
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threefold in the last 20 years. how much awareness do _ threefold in the last 20 years. how much awareness do you think there is about this new law? there has been a servery, i understand suggesting eight out of ten companies are not aware of it, are you concerned about that and compliance with it? i was shocked when _ that and compliance with it? i was shocked when i _ that and compliance with it? i was shocked when i read _ that and compliance with it? i was shocked when i read that - that and compliance with it? i —" shocked when i read that online, that eight out of ten businesses were not aware, they have had two years to get on board and the food standards agency website have all the information, it is very straightforward for businesses to get onboard with this new law and by doing an interview like this we can get more awareness as possible. i hope that people can take on more responsibility or accountability, that they will take allergy is a lot more seriously. i that they will take allergy is a lot more seriously.— more seriously. i guess in the meantime. — more seriously. i guess in the meantime, people _ more seriously. i guess in the meantime, people with i more seriously. i guess in the i meantime, people with allergies more seriously. i guess in the - meantime, people with allergies have to be very vigilant. what else would you like to see to allow people with allergies to be more confident if
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they go to a restaurant are buying prepacked food in a sandwich shop? i feel it is very varied from small establishments to bake establishments. just starting the dialogue with the customer is so important, you would be surprised at the amount of restaurants who do not have this dialogue. it is important but the allergy trading, some establishments, over 39% from this recent study said that they have had no allergy training at all. it was really shocking and i think they should be allergy training across the board for small and big businesses. my best experiences when you have the personal connection, a family member with an allergy, or a friend with an allergy, they take allergy more seriously. fight! friend with an allergy, they take allergy more seriously. and then you feel more confident. _ allergy more seriously. and then you feel more confident. thank— allergy more seriously. and then you feel more confident. thank you i allergy more seriously. and then you feel more confident. thank you very | feel more confident. thank you very much for talking to us and i wish you well with your campaign to bring this to even wider attention. i want
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to talk about our lead story today. the met police offering advice if they are stopped by a lone police officer, trying to regain public trust after the murder of sarah everard. you have sent in your thoughts. this message says why did his nickname not set alarms ringing in any workplace? the name was not chosen randomly. another message says we need to put more funding into raising awareness from the beginning, schools having a violence against women education to dismantle this culture where misogynist crimes are the norm. we are treating the symptoms, not the norm. another message, are the telling us we should run away if the police man tries to arrest us? why is it up to us? why are they not making tougher
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procedures for the police to follow? another message, we must be open—minded and respect the majority of police force, perhaps a loan constable should be restricted to calling for support if they are required to take a person to the police station. keep your comments coming in and i will read out as many as possible on trust in the police force, what is going to make you feel safe? the headlines, following the murder of sarah everard, scotland yard tries to regain public confidence. it seeks to reassure the public and says it will increase patrols and advise people to challenge the legitimacy stopped by a lone police officer. a higher price cap comes into force.
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forty diagnostic sites offering nhs tests and scans are being opened around england in local communities, including shopping centres. it's hoped they will help reduce waiting times for routine operations and ease pressures on hospitals. our health editor hugh pym reports. a report for nhs england last year recommended that diagnostic hubs or one—stop shops should be set up away from major hospitals so patients could get check—ups close to their homes. pilot schemes were launched and now the initiative is being extended with 40 centres open seven days a week, due to be set up in england by march next year. the £350 million plan is being funded from nhs england's existing budget. the idea is to get earlier diagnoses for patients and in different locations to allow hospitals to focus on more urgent work. gps will refer people to the most appropriate local centre for tests and scans to be carried out.
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the hope is that waiting times and the backlog of operations can be reduced. there will be a one—stop shop, let's call it, where people can get the scans they need — the mri scans, the ct scans and others — and the tests all in one place in a convenient location like a shopping centre or a localfootball club. they'll be open seven days a week and we believe that the 40 of them in their first year of operation can get through another 2.8 million scans and checks and it's going to make a huge difference. locations will be in town centres, retail developments and even a sporting site — brighton's amex football stadium. some doctors, though, are asking whether the priorities are right. it's a new version of an old idea and those of us who have been around for a little while remember when we used to have community hospitals and you could send your patients up there to have their x—rays and their ultrasound scans done and their blood taken. so there's a sense of deja vu and we've got lots of empty community hospitals around the country. seems a bit strange that we are not using those for this to get them going immediately,
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and instead we are building shiny new buildings or repurposing space. macmillan cancer support welcomed the new investment but said the government must commit to providing long—term funding to grow the specialist workforce so the nhs was equipped to recover from the impact of covid—19. hugh pym, bbc news. the climate activist has joined as the meat ahead of glasgow is cop 26 meeting. the swedish activist criticised the attitude of politicians to tackle climate change as 30 years of blah, blah. ministers said progresses being made on a range of issues. borisjohnson says young people have a right to be angry and were paying the price for the reckless actions of their elders. detectors have been
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arresting two men. they have been taken to belfast for questioning. she was 29 years old and was shot deadin she was 29 years old and was shot dead in derry in april when she observed writing in the city. facebook�*s global head of safety has defended the social media giant against accusations that its photo sharing app instagram can negatively affect the mental health of young people. antigone davis was appearing before a us senate committee hearing on child protection. it comes two weeks after a leak exposed how instagram's own research had found the platform could have a damaging impact on teenagers' body image and self esteem. senators highlighted how facebook had earlier denied it was aware of the research. ms davis argued that instagram �*affirmatively helped' young people on serious issues. our los angeles correspondent david willis has more. she said this could actually end some cases help to give young people
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more control over their lives and be helpful to them. that wasn't met with much sympathy, i might add, by the senators who formed this committee. one described the facebook research as a bombshell, and accused the company of a cover—up. it was likened as well, this research, to the cover—up conducted by the tobacco industry for the harmful effects of cigarettes several decades ago. there have been calls as well by this committee for facebook to release the full findings, the full research, on the links between instagram and youth suicide. this is not an issue that is going away any time soon because next week the same committee is due to hearfrom a facebook whistle—blower who left the company with tens of thousands of
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documents relating to internal research on these and other matters. that person is going to give evidence on tuesday. police in ecuador say they have regained control of a high security prison following a major operation involving nine hundred police officers and army soldiers. clashes broke out on tuesday between rival gangs, who are thought to have links with mexican drug gangs. at least 118 inmates were killed in the disturbances north korean state media says the country has fired a newly developed anti aircraft missile. it said the test was conducted on thursday to evaluate the missile's launcher, radar and combat performance. it's the fourth new weapons system tested by pyongyang in the last month. europe's first mission to mercury is expected to reach its destination this weekend. the bepi colombo spacecraft will carry out six fly bys around the planet and if successful, the probe will start sending images back to earth. it's moving too fast to go into orbit but will begin more detailed observations
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in four years' time. not quite at its destination, but it is getting there. the colosseum, the pantheon, piazza navona?rome is the picture postcard city beloved by those who visit it. but peel back the facade and you find it's plagued by problems. this weekend, romans will decide who should govern as mayoral elections take place across italy. our rome correspondent mark lowen reports now on a city that its increasingly disgruntled residents feel is falling apart. it should be fixed, because it looks like a dirty town. it doesn't look clean at all. for me, it is heartbreaking, to see my city is a bit left behind. the eternal city, �*caput mundi', rome, bewitches the world and those of us lucky enough live here but,
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beneath the beauty, lies decay, dirty, broken and, say many romans, the worst in living memory, a huge challenge for whoever is to be elected mayor. translation: rome's biggest problems, transport, waste management, public spaces, are down to a complete lack of skills, the city and regional authorities blame each other for what to do with the rubbish and mismanagement of the waste company ama. this is a city for tourists, not for its residents. europe's largest landfill, malagrotta, outside of rome, was closed in 2013 for failing to meet eu standards and, since then, the city has become an open air dump. now, waste is sent out across the country and in the nearby town of albano, the capital's failure to deal with its own rubbish is meeting fierce resistance.
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rome is not doing anything to manage their waste because elections are coming, they do not want to treat their waste in rome, so that is why they're coming here. but here there is countryside. there used to be vineyards. we are not against some solutions to manage treat our waste but we want plans that are proportionate with our needs. when virginia raggi was elected as mayor of rome five years ago, she came in with a lot of support and a lot of optimism but now many romans are blaming her for the state of the city. mayor, after you running the city for five years, there is rubbish everywhere, potholes, buses are catching fire, why? we laid the foundations for five years and now we have to rebuild completely our city. translation: regarding the rubbish, we inherited a company, ama, with more than 13 years of false balance sheet.
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we relaunched it and have new plans with new tracks, cleaners and plans and putting things in order. other institutions too, like the national government and the region, have to do theirjob. rome's timeless beauty makes it a bit stuck in time, development often hampered by ancient remains, a city resting on its laurels, lacking dynamism. it will always enchant but this election is about who will be trusted to clean up its modern ruins. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. some very lucky residents in parts of northern scotland were treated to a spectacular sight last night. the aurora borealis lit up the skies over the highlands and islands. these gorgeous pictures were sent in by bbc weather watchers, who managed to capture the display before the rain arrived.
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let's have a look at the weather. amazing images. you get to show the joy, amazing images. you get to show the joy, the rain has arrived. it is not only rain, at times it is going to be strong winds. some areas to keep a close eye on, tomorrow across the south and south—east of england, on sunday, northern scotland for the worst of the winds, potentially damaging gust of wind, and it tuesday could be another day to watch across the southern half of england and south wales. the winds are blustery today but not as strong as tomorrow. the main story is the rain, nasty downpours across east anglia, south—east, edging out of the way, more showers working eastwards, fragmenting, most places will get to see some sunshine at
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times through the rest of the day. some are still some showers around, less frequent england and wales, but western scotland and northern ireland will have rain and strong winds. it will feel cold. 11 to 14 c. if you are out in the sunshine further south, 14 c. if you are out in the sunshine furthersouth, nice 14 c. if you are out in the sunshine further south, nice enough, 17 c, fresher air and it will feel cooler if you get caught out by an isolated shower. this evening and overnight, showers in the west, central and eastern areas, winds lighter sky is clearer, fresh air. a cool start to saturday, single figures in the temperatures, but it will change because another low pressure system is a developing area on the southern edge of this low pressure. strengthening winds towards the south and east of the country, early brightness taken away, if you have
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plans outdoors, do it early, the rain is pitching in for a way saturday. dry and bright out towards west ireland but it is going to be heavy rain at times, could be torrential, strong winds, south—east and east anglia, 50mph winds. temperatures on saturday 11 to 16 . down for this time of year. developing low pressure runs its way northwards through the north sea into northern parts of scotland, saturday night to sunday, early rain in the south—east will clear, it looks 0k in the south—east will clear, it looks ok for the london marathon, it will be a blustery day but the strongest winds are in northern scotland, 70mph.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. following the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer, and is by increasing patrols and issuing advice on dealing with plainclothes police officers. officers up—and—down the land recognise the devastating consequences of this event. there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police, particularly i have to say in london. abs, the police, particularly i have to say in london.— the police, particularly i have to say in london. a group of officers believed to _ say in london. a group of officers believed to have _ say in london. a group of officers believed to have included - say in london. a group of officers believed to have included wayne | believed to have included wayne couzens are being investigated for allegedly sharing discriminatory messages on a whatsapp group. are you reassured by the measures being proposed by the met police? what would make you feel safer? do
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get in touch, you can do that

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